Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

What Proteins Cause Cow ’ s Milk Protein Allergy?
Discussion Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) is one of the most common food allergies. It is estimated to have an incidence of 2-7.5% in infants and a prevalence of 0.5% in breastfeed infants. The prevalence decreases with age at 1% in children> or = 6 years. CMPA does not have a laboratory test and therefore is a clinical diagnosis. It is defined as a “hypersensitivity reaction brought on by specific immunologic mechanisms to cow’s milk.” Generally symptoms present within the first month of life and involve 2 of more systems with 2 or more symptoms. Systems are dermatologic (including atopic der...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 11, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The bees are already sealing their hives for the winter ahead
Ryall, Dorset The wax cells are studded with pollen gems in carnelian, citrine, garnet – an almanac of the seasonsThe bees think it ’s autumn. Since mid-July they have been reducing their numbers and sealing up the hives withpropolis. Dark brown, sticky when fresh, brittle as cinder toffee when dry, propolis is a glue bees make from tree sap. It ’s antimicrobial and despite its bitter taste some beekeepers chew it as a remedy for a sore throat.Bees use propolis to fill small gaps in the hive and to mummify any invaders that are too big for them to carry outside. Occasionally, you find a dead mouse inside ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sara Hudston Tags: Bees Summer Insects Animal behaviour Wild flowers Biology Environment Wildlife Autumn Source Type: news

How Will Animals React to the Solar Eclipse? Depends on How Smart They Are
Crickets will chirp, cows will march back to their barns and swarms of once-busy honeybees will fly hurriedly home to their hives when a total solar eclipse sweeps across the U.S. next week. The sudden darkness that comes when the moon momentarily blocks the entire sun on Aug. 21 will cause some animals to experience a range of reactions, including confusion, fright and excitement, experts say. While animals like insects and bats behave as if nighttime has simply come early, other more intelligent animals — chimpanzees, dolphins and llamas — appear to stop and stare at the sky, showing signs of understanding a ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized animals eclipse onetime space space 2017 Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Solar urticaria: Treatment, management, and symptoms
Solar urticaria is a type of rash that occurs after exposure to sunlight. Learn about the causes, symptoms, and how the condition is treated and prevented. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Omalizumab Benefits Patients With Chronic Inducible Urticaria Omalizumab Benefits Patients With Chronic Inducible Urticaria
The recombinant anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) monoclonal antibody omalizumab has'substantial benefits'in treating various forms of chronic inducible urticaria (CIndU), according to a new systematic review.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - August 11, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy & Clinical Immunology News Source Type: news

Technology tracks 'bee talk' to help improve honey bee health
(Simon Fraser University) A Simon Fraser University researcher has devised a new bee monitoring system to better understand what more than 20,000 honeybees housed in hives in a local field are 'saying' to each other -- looking for clues about their health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hives and Angioedema
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - August 3, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Woman credits SURPRISING new treatment for curing her chronic urticaria
TWO years ago Jen Ferguson was virtually housebound. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beekeepers Feel The Sting Of California's Great Hive Heist
This year authorities uncovered a "beehive chop shop:" nearly $1 million in stolen hives in a field in Fresno County. There's money to be made by renting out bees to orchards, and thefts are rising.(Image credit: Daniel Milchev/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ezra David Romero Source Type: news

Oh, Lovely: The Tick That Gives People Meat Allergies Is Spreading
By Megan Molteni for WIRED. First comes the unscratchable itching, and the angry blossoming of hives. Then stomach cramping, and — for the unluckiest few — difficulty breathing, passing out, and even death. In the last decade and a half, thousands of previously protein-loving Americans have developed a dangerous allergy to meat. And they all have one thing in common: the lone star tick. Red meat, you might be surprised to know, isn’t totally sugar-free. It contains a few protein-linked saccharides, including one called galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, or alpha-gal, for short. More and more people are lear...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oh, Lovely: The Tick That Gives People Meat Allergies Is Spreading
By Megan Molteni for WIRED. First comes the unscratchable itching, and the angry blossoming of hives. Then stomach cramping (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Desensitize Your Child To A Food Allergy
The news is suddenly full of new recommendations on how to keep your baby allergy free. But what if it is too late to prevent allergies in your household? What if you’ve already seen your little one break out in hives, swell into a bawling bruised tomato or some other scary reaction? Have the great advances in allergy understanding just come too late for you and your kid? No. Especially if your child is still relatively young.  The newest treatment, under study by experts at Northwestern University in Chicago, involves educating the immune system on the safety of, say, peanuts, by attaching peanut proteins to wh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Desensitize Your Child To A Food Allergy
The news is suddenly full of new recommendations on how to keep your baby allergy free. But what if it is too late to prevent allergies in your household? What if you’ve already seen your little one break out in hives, swell into a bawling bruised tomato or some other scary reaction? Have the great advances in allergy understanding just come too late for you and your kid? No. Especially if your child is still relatively young.  The newest treatment, under study by experts at Northwestern University in Chicago, involves educating the immune system on the safety of, say, peanuts, by attaching peanut proteins to wh...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Large Arachnoid Cyst / Steroids for Urticaria? / Chicago Hospitalist Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors Here's what we chose for you from NEJM Group today:NEJM Clinical Practice Center: Image in Clinical Medicine: A 27-year-old … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - June 13, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

When It's Not A Sunburn But A Sun Allergy
As it gets warmer and people start spending more time outside, I have more and more patients coming into my office and complaining of a “sun allergy.” A sun allergy is really a layman’s term, which refers to a number of conditions when a rash occurs on skin that has been exposed to the sun. These are also referred to as photosensitive disorders or photodermatoses, and can be broadly categorized into the following medical terms: idiopathic photodermatoses, exogenous photodermatoses, photoexacerbated dermatoses, genetic photodermatoses, and metabolic photodermatoses. Sounds complicated, right?  A...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Considerable Humanistic Impact for Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria
Two - thirds of patients with CSU report angioedema, which significantly affects health - related QoL (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - May 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dermatology, Family Medicine, Nursing, Psychiatry, Allergy, Emergency Medicine, Journal, Source Type: news

Honey, I love you: our 40,000-year relationship with the humble bee
Humans have always had a special relationship with bees. And while the archaeological evidence is sparse, what does exist shows the richness of ancient human activitiesEarlier this month I received my first package of bees. A package refers to a box containing 3 pounds of bees, or roughly 12 thousandApis Melliforia. And while introducing a new species of animal to your home seems like a hugely cathartic event, there was no ceremonious exchange of insect between myself and the store from which I ordered them, which was a bit of a let down. I accepted the humming box, placed it in the hatchback of the family car, and drove h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Holly Norton Tags: Science Archaeology Bees Environment Insects Source Type: news

How Much Peanut Butter Should He Take?
Discussion Peanut allergy is an increasing problem with ~2% prevalence in the United States. It is also the leading cause of food-related death. The LEAP trial (Learning Early about Peanut Allergy trial) was a randomized trial of early introduction of peanut foods to try to prevent peanut allergy. It found a significant decrease in peanut allergy at 60 months of age with early introduction of peanut foods to infants. This finding occurred in participants with baseline negative skin testing (13.7% in peanut avoidance group versus 1.9% in peanut consumption group) or those with measureable peanut skin testing at study entry ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

No Benefit From Corticosteroids for Acute, Simple Urticaria No Benefit From Corticosteroids for Acute, Simple Urticaria
Corticosteroids do not speed relief for patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute urticaria, according to a new randomized trial.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Dermatology News Source Type: news

American Airlines employees say uniforms are making them sick
More than 3,000 flight attendants and about 200 pilots from American Airlines have filed reports complaining that their new uniforms have caused rashes, hives and breathing problems. Kris Van Cleave reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Itchy Hives? A Steroid May Not Be Needed
Patients with mild itchy rashes did well with an antihistamine alone, a new study reports. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Antihistamines Itching Steroids Source Type: news

Steroids do not reduce itching in patients with urticaria
Study finds oral steroids provide no additional relief above treatment with antihistamines Related items fromOnMedica Evening primrose and borage oils no good for eczema Perioral dermatitis Antibiotics not effective for treating infected eczema in children Uncertainty remains over effectiveness of steroids for sore throat (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 4, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Got hives? Hold the steroids
(American College of Emergency Physicians) Despite standard use for the itching associated with urticaria (commonly known as hives), prednisone (a steroid) offered no additional relief to emergency patients suffering from hives than a placebo did, according to a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Levocetirizine and Prednisone Are Not Superior to Levocetirizine Alone for the Treatment of Acute Urticaria: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial'). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The end of plastic landfill? Researchers discover caterpillar that eats plastic; it's called a "wax worm"
(Natural News) Plastic-eating caterpillars known as “wax worms” may one day help reduce the global pollution crisis, a study revealed. Prior to the study, an amateur beekeeper was cleaning her hives and placed the parasitic wax worms in a plastic bag, only to find out that the caterpillars were able to make holes in the plastic. As... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could This Plastic-Eating Caterpillar Be The Answer To Our Waste?
A type of parasitic larvae often bred as fishing bait may hold a key to reducing the world’s plastic waste, researchers say. Waxworms, which grow into the Galleria mellonella moth, have been found capable of ingesting polyethylene plastic, suggesting a new way to break down the trillion plastic bags the world uses every year, according to a report published Monday in the journal Current Biology. The worms’ unusual appetite was discovered purely accidentally by Spanish biologist Federica Bertocchini as she tended to her beehives, according to a release from the University of Cambridge, whose researchers par...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Asthma drug effective against cold-induced hives in small study
Researchers in Germany found in a recent study that a drug used to treat asthma may be effective at treating the skin condition cold urticaria, or cold-induced hives. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bees Are Slowly Going Extinct. These Prisoners Are Trying To Stop That.
Just inside the barbed wire border of Airway Heights Corrections Center, four nondescript white boxes fat with honey and thousands of bees are being tended to by men society might misjudge as being anything but tender. Charles Roark is one of these men. He’s serving a 26-year sentence at the Spokane County facility in Washington state for first-degree assault and unlawful possession of a weapon — and honeybees are his new obsession. Hours before The Huffington Post spoke with him by phone on a Friday afternoon in late March, Roark had gathered with 16 other inmates to chat all things apiculture at the monthly ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fatal Mistakes Can't Be Undone
I was at a birthday party approximately 6 years ago for one of my son’s friends. While chatting with the some of the moms in his class, I must have had my back turned when little cups of snacks were passed out to each hungry 5-year-old. I broke out into a cold sweat and my heart started beating in my chest loudly. I was about to yank the cup from his hand when I saw from afar it was from a box of cereal he had eaten countless times before and I knew was safe for his egg, tree nut and peanut allergies. I don’t know what it was, call it “momsense,” but it kept gnawing at me that I did not actually rea...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

47 Tweets From Parents That Sum Up The Nightmare Of Lice Outbreaks
There is perhaps nothing more fear-inducing for parents than receiving the dreaded “LICE” note from their kid’s school. These notorious outbreaks have the power to make even the most level-headed parents want to burn all of their belongings and shave every family member’s head. Many moms and dads vent about their head lice anxieties on Twitter, and some manage to find humor in the bleakness. We’ve rounded up 47 tweets about the nightmare that is a lice outbreak. Try not to scratch your head while reading. Lice is the herpes of kindergarten.— Wonder Kitten (@Tw1tter_K1tten) December 31, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Common skin rashes: Pictures, causes, and treatments
In this article, we look at a variety of skin rashes including eczema, hives, and psoriasis. Learn about possible triggers and when to see a doctor. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Home Remedies: Having chronic hives
Hives, also known as urticaria (ur-tih-KAR-e-uh), are reddened, itchy welts that may be triggered by exposure to certain foods, medications or other substances.??The welts vary in size and appear and fade repeatedly as the reaction runs its course. Chronic hives are a condition in which the welts last more than six weeks or recur over [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 24, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

The 7 Most Common Causes Of Itchy Red Bumps
For SELF, by Amy Marturana. Regardless of your skin type, chances are you’ve had an itchy, red, bumpy rash at one time or another. It’s like the international sign of skin irritation. If it’s not affecting your daily life or covering whole body, and you’re not feeling sick otherwise, chances are it’s nothing to worry about and will clear up on its own, Rebecca Kazin, M.D., dermatologist and associate director at the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, tells SELF. Treating it with over-the-counter hydrocortisone itch relief cream until it goes away may be sufficient. “But...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study defines global burden of skin disease
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A study published today in JAMA Dermatology combines the prevalence of skin diseases around the world with their likelihood of creating disability across the lifespan to define the following 10 most challenging conditions (arranged in order of decreasing 'disability-adjusted life years'): dermatitis, acne, hives, psoriasis, viral skin diseases, fungal skin diseases, scabies, melanoma, pyoderma, cellulitis, non-melanoma skin cancer, decubitus ulcer, and alopecia areata. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
Although stingless bees do not have a sting to fend off enemies, they are nonetheless able to defend their hives against attacks. Only four years ago it was discovered that a Brazilian bee species, the Jatai bee, has a soldier caste. The slightly larger fighters guard the entrance to the nest and grip intruders with their powerful mandibles in the event of an attack. Now researchers have identified four further species which produce a special soldier caste to defend their nests. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 23, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Birmingham boy allergic to the cold moves to Australia
Finley Mitchell, 10, from Four Oaks, Birmingham, developed an angry, red rash all over his skin every time he stepped outdoors as a result of his cold urticaria. It left him in agony. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trump's Hiring Freeze Could Imperil Breakthrough Discovery On Bees
Julia Fine was all set for the next chapter. She’d packed her bags and moved out of her apartment, and was days away from making the drive from Pennsylvania to Utah, where she planned to start work as a postdoctoral scholar with the Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s research agency. “I had made all the plans,” said Fine, a bee researcher who recently completed her doctorate in entomology at Pennsylvania State University. “I was supposed to start as soon as possible.” But on Jan. 23, just three days after President Donald Trump’s inauguration,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Antihistamine Updosing in Chronic Urticaria Antihistamine Updosing in Chronic Urticaria
Is updosing of second-generation H1-antihistamines justified in all patients with chronic urticaria who don't respond sufficiently to standard dosages?The British Journal of Dermatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Journal Article Source Type: news

What is Black Spot Poison Ivy?
Discussion Poison ivy (PI, Toxicodendron radicans) is a common plant in North America that causes allergic contact dermatitis. Poison oak and sumac also cause similar problems. The rash usually appears as linear erythematous papules or vesicles occurring soon after exposure. Patients often do not identify the exposure specifically but will say they were walking/playing in gardens, fields or woods. PI can be a small plant, vine or even a shrub. The coloring changes over the growing season. Fires may also be a source as burning the plants and being in the smoke can cause extensive lesions on the body. The plant has 3 leaves...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 30, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Mother who had a deadly allergy to the cold is cured
Yvette Ramirez, from Houston, was 12 when she realised her rashes were being caused by the wind. Doctors diagnosed her with the potentially fatal cold urticaria. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Your Healers Become Your Killers
Since the introduction of penicillin in the middle of the 20th century, antimicrobial treatments have been used not only in human medicine but in veterinary care as well. But their excessive use in livestock (and aquaculture) contaminates the environment and contributes to a rise of resistant microorganisms, posing threats to human health, animal health, food security and people’s livelihoods. Photo: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Jan 11 2017 (IPS)There is a major though silent global threat to human and animal health, with implications for both food safety and food security and the economic well-being of millions of farming...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Projects TerraViva United Nations Improving the lives of rural populations: better nutrition & agriculture productivity Source Type: news

Experts Now Recommend Introducing Peanuts To Babies At High Risk Of Allergies
For millions of children who have peanut allergies, mealtimes can be deadly. And for years, doctors have advised parents to keep peanut products away from children thought to be at high risk.  But new guidelines issued Thursday state that infants should be introduced to peanut products as early as 4 months old if they appear to be at high risk of developing food allergies. A panel of experts convened by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases says that introducing peanuts early in life can actually help prevent the development of peanut allergies. The new recommendations encourage...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Egyptian Man Has One Honey Of A Bee Beard
Mohamed Hagras stands barechested as dozens of honeybees congregate around his face, eventually forming what he calls the “Beard of Bees.” To attract the insects he has a box housing their queen’s hormones strapped to his chin. The 31-year-old engineer-turned-beekeeper has been doing this for years both competitively ― he fondly recalls a Canadian model’s “Bikini of Bees” at a beekeeping event - and as an effort to educate Egyptians on the usefulness of bees. “The goal is to show that bees are not aggressive,” he told Reuters at his farm in Shibin El Kom, the capital of th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hives (Urticaria & Angioedema)
Title: Hives (Urticaria& Angioedema)Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/14/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)
Source: MedicineNet Skin General - November 14, 2016 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Dr Scurr explains why men have big bellies and stick-thin limbs
While Betty Russell consults Dr Martin Scurr about his son's " lemon-on-a-cocktail-stick " appearance, Nancy Joyce from Northants asks why she has bad bouts of hives with no apparent cause. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How is Swimmer ’ s Itch Diagnosed?
Discussion Cercarial Dermatitis (CD) is known by many names throughout the world, but is commonly known as swimmer’s itch. It is a water-borne, non-communicable infectious disease that is caused by the larval stage (cercariae) of parasitic schistosomatid flukes. The cercariae causes an allergic maculopapular skin rash in humans that is usually self-limited (usually 4-10 days) but can cause problems for up to 20 days. CD parasites are considered an emerging disease because of the increased distribution of the problem across the globe. Different parasite species cause the problem. In a normal life cycle that occurs ma...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 7, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Mother's allergy to WATER means she can't shower or even cry without causing a rash
Candice Dent, 35, from Kentucky, suffers from aquagenic urticaria - an allergy to water - and dermatographia - which means her skin becomes itchy and swollen when touched. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seek and you shall find: Bees remain excellent searchers even when ill
Honeybees are hardwired to efficiently search the landscape enabling them to continue working for the greater good of their hives even when they are sick, according to new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Could you be allergic to your husband?
Antonia Brindle, 45, can suffer hives, wheezing, and itchy skin, for which she takes four antihistamines a day, as a reaction to chemicals found in products like shampoo and aftershave. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Carolina sprays for Zika, further decimates honeybee population
(NaturalNews) Honeybee deaths have spread across Dorchester County, South Carolina, with millions of worker bees collapsing in little groups by their hives' entrances. However, this pattern of death does not suggest colony collapse disorder; most of the bees were trying to get to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Carolina Accidentally Kills Millions Of Honeybees With Zika Spraying
It was quieter than usual in parts of Dorchester County, South Carolina on Monday. Silence had replaced the familiar buzz as millions of the usual noisemakers lay silent on the ground — dead. It was an unanticipated massacre, collateral damage in the war against the Zika virus. County officials had been targeting mosquitos when they blanketed a 15-square mile area with pesticide on Sunday. But they ended up killing at least 2.5 million honeybees as well. “It was like visiting a cemetery, pure sadness,” wrote one woman who walked through an affected apiary on Monday.  More than 40 travel-related ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news