New Theory on How Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Disease Begin
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email:samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 4 p.m. (ET) on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Does eating too much sugar cause type 2 diabetes?The answer may not be simple, but a study published Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation adds to growing research linking excessive sugar consumption -- specifically the sugar fructose -- to a rise in metabolic disease worldwide.The study, conducted in mice and corroborated in human liver samples, unveils a metabolic process that could upend previous ideas about how the body becomes resist...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 28, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Clinical Research Institute to Coordinate National Study of Childhood Health
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- TheDuke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) has been named the coordinating center as part of a $157-million federal initiative involved in studying how environmental factors affect childhood health.The grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will fund the organizational framework of the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) initiative. The DCRI has been awarded $14.7 million in fiscal year 2016. This award is a seven-year grant with a to...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Team Identifies Blood Biomarkers in Drug-Resistant Cancer Tumor Cells
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016Duke Team Identifies Blood Biomarkers in Drug-Resistant Cancer Tumor Cells  DURHAM, N.C. -- While searching for  a non-invasive way to detect prostate cancer cells circulating in blood,Duke Cancer Instituteresearchers have identified some blood markers associated with tumor resistance to two common hormone therapies.In a study published online this month in the journalClinical Cancer Research, the Duke-led team reported that they isolated multiple key gene alterations in t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 21, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Humira Provides Effective, Non-Steroid Alternative for Eye Inflammation
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email:amara.omeokwe@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgHumira Provides Effective, Non-Steroid Alternative for Eye InflammationEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 5 p.m. (ET) on Wednesday, September 7, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Patients suffering from noninfectious uveitis, a group of diseases that causes eye inflammation, can get effective treatment from a corticosteroid alternative that has previously been approved for treatment of arthritis and Crohn ’s disease, according to a study led by a Duke Health researcher.The Food& Drug Administration recently approved the additional use of ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 8, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Cancer Centers Often Misinform Patients About Supportive Care Services
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016DURHAM, N.C. – Using a “mystery shopper” approach, researchers atDuke Cancer Institute anonymously called most of the nation ’s comprehensive cancer centers to ask whether palliative care was available, and found barriers to accurate information nearly 40 percent of the time.Reporting their findings during the press program at the 2016 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium, the researchers said front-line misinformation can impede access to supportive services t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 7, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Researchers Find Molecular Link Behind Aspirin’s Protective Powers
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016Aspirin ’s ability to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular disease and colon cancer has been a welcome, yet puzzling, attribute of the pain reliever that has been a mainstay in medicine cabinets for more than 100 years. Now researchers atDuke Health have identified a new mechanism of aspirin ’s action that appears to explain the drug’s diverse benefits. Publishing in the journal EBioMedicine, the researchers describe how aspirin directly impacts the func...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 7, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Immersion Pulmonary Edema May Cause Swimming Deaths During Triathlons
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email:amara.omeokwe@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, September 1, 2016DURHAM, N.C. --  Heart abnormalities linked to immersion pulmonary edema were present in a greater-than-expected proportion of triathletes who died during the competition’s swim portion, according to astudy led by researchers at Duke Health.The findings, published Aug. 29 in the journal BMJ Open Sport& Exercise Medicine, are based on an analysis of autopsy reports of people who died in the United States and Canada between 2008 and 2015 while participating in tri...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 1, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Gastric Bypass is Better than Other Procedures for Sustainable Weight Loss
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email:amara.omeokwe@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 11 a.m. (ET) on Wednesday, August 31, 2016DURHAM, N.C. --  Gastric bypass surgery is more effective for weight loss and long-term weight maintenance than are other surgical procedures and non-surgical treatment, according to a study led by researchers at Duke Health and the Durham VA Medical Center.The study ’s findings, published Aug. 31 in the journal JAMA Surgery, are based on the analysis of ten years of medical records for veterans who underwent one of three different weight-loss surg...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 1, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Health Receives Support from IBM to Advance Community Wellness Program
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-13064 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016Duke Health Receives Support from IBM to Advance Community Wellness ProgramDURHAM, N.C. --Duke Health was named among the first recipients of the IBM Health Corps award, and will be receiving expertise from some of IBM ’s top employees to build a communications infrastructure that will help connect members of Durham community health partnerships.Duke was one of five institutions worldwide selected as part of IBM ’s new Health Corps program, which aims to address dispariti...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Mouse Study Points Way to Shut Down Harmful Immune Response in Lupus
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016DURHAM, N.C. – Molecules that scavenge debris from dying cells appear to halt the cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus, while also enhancing the body’s ability to combat flu, according to Duke Health studies in mice.The molecules, called polymers, have commonly been used in gene-transfer experiments because they bind to the nucleic acid in DNA and RNA. When deployed directly in mice with lupus or an acute flu infection, the polymers home in on the DNA and RNA refuse fro...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 18, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Probability Data Could Better Direct Lymph Node Removal for Thyroid Cancer
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email:samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Surgeons operating on patients with advanced thyroid cancer are often conflicted when deciding how many lymph nodes they should remove to reduce the patient ’s risk of recurrence.If surgeons don ’t evaluate enough lymph nodes, they could leave cancer behind; but extensive surgery close to structures such as nerves, the voice box and parathyroid glands can carry serious risks.A new study from the Duke Clinical Research Institute and Duke Cancer Institute ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 16, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Paraplegics Regain Some Feeling, Movement After Using Brain-Machine Interfaces
This study was funded by grants from the Brazilian Financing Agency for Studies and Projects (FINEP 01 ·12·0514·00), Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, and the Itaú Bank. The authors list additional acknowledgements in the manuscript. They declared no competing financial interests related to this work.### (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 11, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Warfarin Use May Not Bring Long-Term Stability for Atrial Fibrillation
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email:amara.omeokwe@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 11 a.m. (ET) on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Warfarin prescribed to prevent strokes in atrial fibrillation may not adequately control blood clotting over the long-term, even when patients have been historically stable on the drug, according to a study from the Duke Clinical Research Institute.The findings, published Aug. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), are based on an 18-month study of 3,749 patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm. T...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 9, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Compound Shows Promise as Next-Generation Prostate Cancer Therapy
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 11 a.m. (ET) Monday, Aug. 8, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- In the search for new ways to attack recurrent prostate cancer, researchers at Duke Health report that a novel compound appears to have a unique way of blocking testosterone from fueling the tumors in mice.The potential foundation for a next-generation therapy, called tetraaryl cyclobutane, or CB, is being studied as an option for prostate tumors that have grown resistant to current anti-androgen drugs, notably enzalutamide.“Prostate cancer is the mo...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 8, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Team Identifies New ‘Mega-Complex’ Involved in Cell Signaling
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. (noon, ET) on Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke Health-led researchers have discovered new information about the signaling mechanism of cells that could one day help guide development of more specific drug therapies.For years, well-established science detailed the intricacies of how cells change function after receiving chemical signals from hormones, neurotransmitters or even drugs.  Receptors on the outside of cells were known to launch the signaling process, which alerts proteins...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

U.S. News & World Report Ranks Duke University Hospital Among Nation’s Best
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke University Hospital has been named the No. 16 medical center in the country by U.S. News& World Report, which released its annual hospital rankings today.In addition to being included on the national Honor Roll, Duke University Hospital remains No. 1 in North Carolina and No. 1 in the Raleigh-Durham area.Honor Roll designations were awarded to just 20 hospitals out of nearly 5,000 institutions across the country. Rankings consider patient safety, survival rates, t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Coordinated Emergency Care Saves Lives, Lessens Damage During Heart Attack
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgEMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 4 p.m (ET) on Monday, Aug. 1, 2016DURHAM, N.C. -- Patients suffering from deadly heart attacks can be spared more extensive heart damage when emergency responders and hospitals work together to standardize their treatment processes, according to a study published August 1 in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association (AHA).  The findings are based on a national study launched in 2012 by the AHA and Duke Health that focused on ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), a type o...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Tracking How HIV Disrupts Immune System Informs Vaccine Development
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 2 p.m. (ET) on Friday, July 29, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- One of the main mysteries confounding development of an HIV vaccine is why some people infected with the virus make the desired antibodies after several years, but a vaccine can ’t seem to induce the same response. A research team led by scientists at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute has been unraveling that mystery, detailing new insights in a study published July 29 in the journal Science Immunology. Studying 100 HIV-infected peo...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 29, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study Identifies Potential New Avenue for Treating Pompe Disease
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email:   amara.omeokwe@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, July 25, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers at Duke Health have identified a potential new avenue for treating Pompe disease, a rare condition caused by the build-up of glycogen, a storage form of sugar, in cardiac and skeletal muscle, the liver and other tissues, due to deficiency of a particular enzyme.   There are more than 13 diseases like Pompe, which are known as glycogen storage diseases (GSDs), and they cause potentially fatal damage to the liver, heart and skeletal mu...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Physical Declines Begin Earlier Than Expected Among U.S. Adults
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, July 21, 2016 DURHAM and KANNAPOLIS, N.C. – Physical declines begin sooner in life than typically detected, often when people are still in their 50s, according to a Duke Health study that focused on a large group of U.S. adults across a variety of age groups. The finding suggests that efforts to maintain basic strength and endurance should begin before age 50, when it ’s still possible to preserve the skills that keep people mobile and independent later in life. “Typi...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke to Participate in Early Clinical Trials for Emerging Neurological Therapies
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, July 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke University could receive up to $19 million to lead early-stage clinical trials for new drugs to treat neurological conditions such as Alzheimer ’s disease and neuropathy. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, awarded the 10-year contract to Duke to design, manage, and conduct Phase I clinical trials. The trials will be conducted at the Duke Clinical Research Unit (DCRU), the ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 21, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Newly Described Cellular Defense Activity Could Guide Solutions to UTIs
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. noon (ET) on Tuesday, July 19th, 2016                                                                 DURHAM, N.C. – The process cells use to secrete chemicals also appears to be the way to clear urinary tract infections, or UTIs, according to a study by researchers from Duke Health and Duke-National University of Singapore Medi...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Moderate Exercise Might be More Effective at Combatting Pre-Diabetes
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email: amara.omeokwe@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ON Monday, July 18, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Walking briskly on a regular basis may be more effective than vigorous jogging for improving glucose control in individuals with pre-diabetes, according to research from Duke Health.  The findings, published online July 15 in the journal Diabetologia, are the result of a randomized, six-month study of 150 participants, each of whom was designated as having pre-diabetes based on elevated fasting glucose levels.  Study participants were randomized into fo...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists Trace Origin Cell of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors, Test Drug Target
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. (ET) on Thursday, July 14, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at Duke Health are part of a team that has discovered a type of cell surrounding blood vessels can also serve as a starting point for sarcoma, a form of cancer that occurs in bones and connective tissues. The findings, made through studies of mice, offer insights that could aid in the development of potential new treatments for the rare but devastating cancer, which has 15,000 new diagnoses annually in the U.S. In an article to be ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 14, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Women with BRCA1 Gene Mutation at Higher Risk of Deadly Uterine Cancer
This study received support in part from the Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Research Program (DAMD17-03-1-0375); the National Institutes of Health (R01-CA083855 and R01-CA102776); and the NIH/NCI Cancer Center Support Grants (P30 CA008748, P30 CA016520, P30 CA51008, P30 CA16042). Additional funding sources are listed in the study. ###   (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 30, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Scientists Identify Method of Action for Common Chemotherapy Drugs
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email: amara.omeokwe@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, June 14, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- A study by scientists at Duke Health is providing insight into how certain commonly-used chemotherapy drugs work, potentially opening new ways to enhance the benefits of treatment for cancer patients. The scientists focused on antimetabolites, chemotherapy drugs that target metabolism in cancer cells and induce cell death. These drugs are commonly used to treat colon, lung and blood cancers. Their study, published this week in the journal Cell Reports, soug...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 15, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Health Team Performs First Hand Transplant in North Carolina
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, June 8, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- A Duke Health team has performed the first hand transplant in North Carolina, attaching the limb to a 54-year-old patient from Laredo, Texas, whose hand was severed in a childhood accident. The highly complex, 12-hour procedure was performed May 27, 2016, by a team of surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, operating room staff and technicians, and was led by Linda Cendales, M.D., associate professor of surgery at Duke University School of Medicine and director of Duke&r...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 8, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study of 81,000 Adults Examines Mental Illness, Gun Violence and Suicide
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 4 p.m. (ET) on MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- People with serious mental illnesses who use guns to commit suicide are often legally eligible to purchase guns, despite having a past record of an involuntary mental health examination and brief hospitalization, according to a new Duke Health analysis. The study, released in the June issue of Health Affairs, looked at gun use, violent crime and suicide among 81,704 people diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression in Flo...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 7, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke’s Poliovirus Therapy Shows Survival Benefit in Early Patients
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org ASCO Abstract #2061 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, June 6, 2016  DURHAM, N.C. – An early group of patients who received a modified form of the poliovirus to treat recurrent glioblastoma brain tumors showed survival improvement over historical controls, according to researchers at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke Health. The findings, which have not been peer reviewed, were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago (ASCO abstract #2061).  “At the fi...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Cancer Patients with ACA Policies Swiftly Reach Out-of-Pocket Caps
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org ASCO Abstract #6504 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Saturday, June 4, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – A hypothetical leukemia patient buying the life-extending drug therapy for his condition would reach his annual out-of-pocket maximum in a month on most of the bronze policies and half of the silver policies offered through the Affordable Care Act marketplace.    The findings, reported by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago (Abstract #6504), found that cancer pati...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Among Sites to Train First Responders On Infectious Disease Safety
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, June 2, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – Duke Health is one of eight sites nationally selected to participate in a program to help train first responders and other workers in properly handling infectious disease emergencies.   The three-year, $9 million program is being launched by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other federal agencies. The Duk...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists Block Breast Cancer Cells From Hiding in Bones
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 2 p.m. (ET) on WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2016 Scientists Block Breast Cancer Cells From Hiding in Bones DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them.  Through years of experiments in mice, the scientists have found ways to outmaneuver this stealth tactic by not only preventing breast cancer cells...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke’s Poliovirus Therapy Wins “Breakthrough” Status to Expedite Research
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, May 16, 2016Duke’s Poliovirus Therapy Wins “Breakthrough” Status to Expedite ResearchDURHAM, N.C. – The recombinant poliovirus therapy developed at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke Health has been granted “breakthrough therapy designation” from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.The designation will expedite research into the poliovirus therapy, but it does not mean the investigational drug has been approved for clinical use. It is currently b...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 16, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Bioengineered Blood Vessel Appears Safe for Dialysis Patients
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 6:30 p.m. (ET) on Thursday, May 12, 2016. DURHAM, N.C. – Man-made blood vessels developed by researchers at Duke University, Yale University and the tissue engineering company Humacyte appear to be both safe and more durable than commonly used synthetic versions in patients undergoing kidney dialysis, the researchers report. The findings, published May 12 in The Lancet, resulted from a phase 2 study among 60 patients with kidney failure who required dialysis, which often requires a synthetic gra...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 13, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Mouse Model of Autism Offers Insights to Human Patients, Potential Drug Targets
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 5 a.m. (ET) on TUESDAY, MAY 10, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- A new mouse model of a genetically-linked type of autism reveals more about the role of genes in the disorder and the underlying brain changes associated with autism’s social and learning problems. Scientists at Duke Health who developed the new model also discovered that targeting a brain receptor in mice with this type of autism could ease repetitive behaviors and improve learning in some animals. Their report, published May 10 in the jo...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 10, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study Seeks Women’s Insights on What Works Best for Uterine Fibroids
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, May 9, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – A new registry that launches this month gives women who have uterine fibroids the opportunity to help determine which strategies are most effective in treating the common condition. The registry, called Comparing Options for Management: Patient-Centered Results for Uterine Fibroids (COMPARE-UF), will enroll more than 10,000 women at clinics affiliated with nine medical centers across the country. Participating women will be asked at annual intervals specific quest...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 10, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Antibody Appears to Attack Cancer Cells, Leaving Other Cells Unscathed
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. noon (ET) on Thursday, May 5, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- A research team from Duke Health has developed an antibody from the body’s own immune system that preferentially attacks cancer cells. The antibody works by targeting a natural defense mechanism that cancer tumors exploit. Cells in the body essentially use a home security system that relies on certain proteins to protect the cell surface and keep it safe. These proteins help the cell avoid injury and even death from unwanted activation o...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Cancer Leader Michael Kastan Is Named to National Academy of Sciences
Contact: Amara Omeokwe Phone: 919-681-4239 Email: amara.omeokwe@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, May 4, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Michael B. Kastan, M.D., Ph.D., executive director of the Duke Cancer Institute, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an advisory organization to the president and Congress composed of experts in all scientific fields. Kastan is one of 84 new members, who are elected by their peers in recognition of outstanding contributions to research.  “It is truly an honor to be counted among the members of the Academy, including many from Duke wh...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Walking Speed Could Be a New Indicator of Health
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, May 4, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. — Walking speed is making strides toward becoming a key metric of a person’s health with the launch of the 6th Vital Sign, a first-of-its kind study being conducted by the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI).  The Duke research team is asking volunteers to download a free ResearchKit app from the Apple iTunes store, answer some questions and then take a two-minute stroll. The app securely uploads walking speed captured on a phone along with demogra...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Researchers Find Alternative Pathways to HIV Antibodies
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, May 3, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – The immune system appears to hamper an investigational vaccine from inducing antibodies that protect against HIV infection, but there may be ways to overcome this impediment, according to research led by the Duke Human Vaccine Institute. Using mouse and monkey models, the researchers showed they could could identify the roadblocks to inducing the broadly neutralizing antibodies that are considered imperative for successful protection against infection.  They...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Expert: What Parents Should Ask Before Their Kids’ X-Rays, CT Scans
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on APRIL 26, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Whether a child is complaining of intense stomach pain or has a head injury after a car crash, doctors may recommend a computed tomography, or CT scan, to investigate possible injuries. CT scans use ionizing radiation to create images of bones, organs, blood vessels and other soft tissues. The technology is widely available, provides quick and detailed results, and its use is growing worldwide, according to a recent report from the World Health Organization. With increased...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 27, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Despite Efforts, Childhood Obesity Remains on the Rise
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12:01 a.m. (ET) on Tuesday, April 26, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – The alarming increase in U.S. childhood obesity rates that began nearly 30 years ago continues unabated, with the biggest increases in severe obesity, according to a study led by a Duke Clinical Research Institute scientist. “Despite some other recent reports, we found no indication of a decline in obesity prevalence in the United States in any group of children aged 2 through 19,” said lead author Asheley Skinner, Ph.D., asso...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Breast Cancer Expert Named One of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People for 2016
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, April 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Shelley Hwang, M.D., chief of breast surgery at the Duke Cancer Institute, has been named one of TIME’s 100 most influential people for 2016 as a pioneer in her field. One of the world’s foremost experts in early-stage breast cancers, Hwang has become an international leader calling for research to guide treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), in which abnormal cells are detected in the lining of a milk duct, but haven’t spread to other t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

23rd Annual “Angels Among Us” 5K Run and Family Fun Walk This Saturday
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-695-5334Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke Health will hold the 23rd Annual “Angels Among Us” 5K run on Saturday, April 23, to benefit brain tumor research.  The race is one of the largest and oldest running events to benefit medical research and is expected to draw more than 3,500 participants this year. Since its beginning in 1994, Angels Among Us has raised more than $18 million for brain tumor research at Duke.  Date: Satu...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Health Lifts Temporary Visitor Restrictions Due to Decrease in Reported Flu Cases
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Given the decrease in reported influenza activity in the community and the state, Duke Health has lifted temporary visitor restrictions that were enacted on March 17, 2016.   The restrictions last month temporarily limited visitors to a maximum of two adults over age 18 due to an increase of flu cases reported statewide. Regular visitation policies are now in effect. All visitors should continue to follow standard flu precautions, includin...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 13, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Diagnostic Tests for Heart Disease Function Differently for Women, Men
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on April 4, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – Tests used to diagnose and assess the severity of coronary artery disease appear to function differently for women and men who have stable symptoms, according to researchers from Duke Clinical Research Institute. The finding, presented April 4 at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions meeting in Chicago, adds new insights into the differences between men and women who are newly diagnosed with heart disease. Analyzing data from the PROMISE study (Prospect...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 5, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Shorter, Intensive Radiation Can Be Recommended in Early Prostate Cancer
This study has implications for public policy,” said the study’s principal investigator, W. Robert Lee, M.D., a professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Duke. “Because the shorter regimen has advantages such as greater patient convenience and lower costs, it’s important to establishing whether we can cure as many patients with the shorter regimen. Our study provides that information for the first time.” Lee and colleagues, working as part of NRG Oncology, a non-profit cancer research organization, enrolled about 1,100 men whose prostate cancer was diagnosed early, before it had spr...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Bypass Surgery Is Shown to Extend Survival in Heart Failure
In this study, 20 percent of patients assigned to drug therapy alone had undergone bypass surgery by the end of the study. Study co-author George Sopko, M.D., a program director within the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), said the long-term analysis of CABG among patients with severe heart disease is important for clinical practice. “There are risks associated with all surgical procedures, so the benefits need to be followed for a long time,” Sopko said. “If surgery can be done with reasonable risk and extends life, it becomes the recommended ap...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study shows that Wnt secretion preventing drugs may reduce renal fibrosis
For media queries, please contact: Ms Dharshini Subbiah                                                                  Duke-NUS Medical School Email: dharshini.subbiah@duke-nus.edu.sg Mobile: (65) 9616-7532 Renal fibrosis or the scarring of kidneys, following an injury, reduces their function and can cause kidney disease to progressively worsen. In a recent study, published in Kidney International, researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) in Singap...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 30, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Not Need Annual Screenings
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, March 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. The researchers found that even former heavy smokers appear to have a reduced incidence of lung cancer if their initial LDCT screening is negative, suggesting that less frequent screening might be warranted.  “This has significant ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news