Weekend Sleep-In Might Ruin Your Waistline And Your Health, Study Says

(CNN) — Wake up, America, and raise your hand if you try to repair your exhausted body by sleeping in on weekends. A new study says the habit may not be such a good idea for your waistline — or your health. “Weekend catch-up sleep is not protective,” said Dr. Vsevolod Polotsky, director of sleep research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “The bottom line of this study is that even if you sleep longer on weekends, if you continue to sleep poorly, you will still eat too much, and you will still gain weight.” The common behavior of “sleeping in on the weekends doesn’t correct the body’s inability to regulate blood sugar if that weekend is followed by a workweek or school week full of insufficient sleep,” said study author Kenneth Wright Jr., who directs the sleep lab at the University of Colorado in Boulder. “And when we go back to getting too little sleep again,” Wright said, “we’re doing things that could be negative for our health long-term.” The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends at least seven hours of sleep each night for adults and much more for children. Sleep deprivation leads to overeating The study, published Thursday in the journal Current Biology, assigned 36 healthy young men and women to three groups that had different sleep requirements over a total of 10 days. None of the participants had newborns in the home or any health impairments that would...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Sleep Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Conclusions: We classified p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE as “presumed” to be obesogenic for humans, based on a moderate level of primary human evidence, a moderate level of primary in vivo evidence, and a moderate level of supporting evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP527 Received: 17 May 2016 Revised: 04 May 2017 Accepted: 09 May 2017 Published: 18 September 2017 Please address correspondence to M.A. La Merrill, Dept. of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave., 4245 Meyer Hall, Davis, CA 95616-5270 USA. Telephone: (530) 754-7254. E...
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In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
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Dear JJ: My doctor just diagnosed me with pre-diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in my family, but I will not accept it as my fate. You've written about sugar's detrimental impact, so how can I get this under control so it doesn't blow up into full-blown diabetes? Diabetes doesn't happen overnight or linearly, but when your metabolic machinery breaks, serious havoc ensues. The massive repercussions can become deadly. Every time you eat, you raise blood sugar, which triggers your pancreas to release a hormone called insulin. Every food raises blood sugar, but high-sugar impact foods do it big time. Your pancreas "secre...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ImageContent(562a59d3e4b0ec0a3894369d,562a59b81400002b003c8fc6,Image,HectorAssetUrl(562a59b81400002b003c8fc6,Some(),Some(jpeg)),Paul Bradbury via Getty Images,) (Reuters Health) - People who get less than six hours of sleep a night may be more likely to have risk factors that increase their odds of diabetes, heart disease and strokes, a Korean study suggests. This combination of risk factors - including high blood sugar, high cholesterol, extra fat around the midsection, high blood pressure and excess amounts of fats in the blood - is known as metabolic syndrome. “The 'short' sleepers should be aware of the risks of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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