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Are You Interested in Helping Parents and Their Young Children?
p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ m...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 21, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

Predicting Alzheimer's: Major inflammation in your 40s puts you at high risk, making the case for improving lifestyle habits
(Natural News) Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland found that extreme inflammation – which can be caused in middle age by weight gain and high blood pressure or diabetes – could be a sign of impending Alzheimer’s disease. When the scientists observed 1,633 people between the ages of 45 and 65 who... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cells to Society: Native American Heritage/ Endowment / Research News
This study evaluates treatment outcomes from a clinical cohort with task-sharing between a clinical nurse practitioner and a medical officer. The researchers examined opportunities to increase treatment rates for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in South Africa.     Read more   Climate Change ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 9, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and   teenage   years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of   Public   Health researchers suggests.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CAAT Refinement Symposium: November 30, Baltimore, MD
The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT) will present “Progress in Refinement: Enhancement of Scientific Integrity and Animal Well-Being” on November 30, 2017, at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. This one-day symposium is for IACUC members and administrators, principal investigators, attending veterinarians, regulatory personnel and labor atory animal care staff. The program focuses on refinement and will include discussions on social housing, pain assessment and management, environmental enrichment, and other critical topics.  (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - November 3, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Viewpoint: How Maryland could become a biotech leader
The Baltimore region and state of Maryland appears to have all the critical components to emerge as a nationwide leader in the biotech and life sciences market. Indeed, the Maryland Life Sciences Advisory Board, an agency that reports to the Department of Commerce, has adopted as its vision statement “to become a top three biohealth ecosystem by 2023.” Buoyed by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, and together with an entrepreneur ial private sector, state officials are optimistic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David S. Rosen Source Type: news

Viewpoint: How Maryland could become a biotech leader
The Baltimore region and state of Maryland appears to have all the critical components to emerge as a nationwide leader in the biotech and life sciences market. Indeed, the Maryland Life Sciences Advisory Board, an agency that reports to the Department of Commerce, has adopted as its vision statement “to become a top three biohealth ecosystem by 2023.” Buoyed by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, and together with an entrepreneur ial private sector, state officials are optimistic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 2, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: David S. Rosen Source Type: news

Breast cancer patients forego post-surgery treatment due to mistrust, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Nearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor's advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

America's Opioid Epidemic: From Evidence to Impact
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 10/30/2017 This two-hour, 28-minute panel discussion focuses on elevating high-impact solutions to the nation's opioid epidemic. Speakers, panelists, and thought leaders representing diverse stakeholders affected by the crisis consider critical components needed to reduce the injury and death rates nationwide. They discuss evidence-based recommendations that reflect the most current science, and translating that evidence to action. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

UC San Diego Health researchers help launch second pancreas cancer 'dream team'
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists and physicians at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, in partnership with colleagues at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas, Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and elsewhere, have been awarded a $7 million grant over four years by Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) to create a " dream team " to develop new ways to prevent pancreatic cancer -- one of the nation's deadliest malignancies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Junk food almost twice as distracting as healthy food
(Johns Hopkins University) When we haven't eaten, junk food is twice as distracting as healthy food or non-food items. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sidetracked by a donut?
(Springer) Sugary, fatty foods are a distraction -- more so than low-calorie foods and everyday objects -- even if you are busy with a task that isn't remotely related to food, or are not even thinking about eating. This is according to Corbin Cunningham and Howard Egeth of Johns Hopkins University in the US, in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin& Review which is published by Springer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

You ’re more likely to lose your hair in summer and autumn
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, said their findings confirmed the 'clinical suspicion' that the summer and fall seasons are associated with greater hair loss. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Men who perform oral sex on women 'more at risk of mouth and throat cancers'
Conclusion This study uses a large amount of national data to give us an idea about which groups of people have the greatest risk of carrying potentially cancer-causing oral HPV . But while oral HPV may increase people's risk of mouth and throat cancers, the actual number who would go on to develop cancer is extremely small. This study has limitations, which are worth bearing in mind: It only looked at whether people had oral HPV at a single point in time. This makes it difficult to know at what point they became infected and how much this could be down to other risk factors such as smoking, oral sex and number of partne...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

New function in gene-regulatory protein discovered
(Umea University) Researchers at Ume å and Stockholm universities in Sweden and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US have published a new study in the journal Molecular Cell. In the article, they show how the protein CBP affects the expression of genes through its interaction with the basal machinery that reads the instructions in our DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Dean on the Future of Nursing / #We(Still)GotThis
Hopkins Nursing—Dean on the Future of Nursing / #We(Still)GotThis body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.Ex...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - October 19, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

What do Jennifer Aniston and Heidi Montag have in common?
Researchers from Johns Hopkins University in the US found a certain procedure causes outsiders to rate people as being of higher than average attractiveness, success and health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk for developing HPV-related throat cancer low
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers shows that the risk of developing HPV-related throat cancer remains generally low. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rethinking the Public Health Response to the Indirect Effects on War
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 10/12/2017 This one-hour, 13-minute presentation discusses the need to understand and confront the epidemiology of the indirect effects of war - the effects due not to direct battlefield injuries but rather the destruction of the necessities of life, including water, food, shelter, and health services. Of special concern is the growing risk to health personnel and facilities operating in conflict settings. These concerns demand a reconsideration of public health strategies to assess, prevent, and mitigate the indirect effects of war. (Video or Multimedia) (Source...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins finds training exercise that boosts brain power
(Johns Hopkins University) One of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention. It also results in more significant changes in brain activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NAM Honors Members for Outstanding Service
For their outstanding service, the National Academy of Medicine honored members Barbara J. McNeil, Ridley Watts Professor and founding head of the department of health care policy at Harvard Medical School and professor of radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital; Richard O. Hynes, investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research in the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Ruth R. Faden, Philip Franklin Wagley Professor of Biomedical Ethics and founder of the Berman Center for Bioethics at Johns Hopkins Univer...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

NIH awards almost $10 million to UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment
The National Institutes of Health, recognizing UCLA ’s leadership in understanding and developing interventions for autism spectrum disorder, has renewed its support of the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment with a five-year, $9.7 million grant.The Autism Center of Excellence grant is directed by Susan Bookheimer, director of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center at UCLA. It supports research projects led by autism experts Mirella Dapretto, Dr. Shafali Jeste, Connie Kasari, Elizabeth Laugeson, Dr. Daniel Geschwind and Dr. Jim McCracken.“This renewed support will allow UCLA t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins scientists help show links between genes, body tissues
(Johns Hopkins University) A research team is assessing how a person's genetic profile affects his body. The results could help show how individual genetic differences contribute to disease and guide treatments for heritable disorders such as Alzheimer's, high cholesterol or Type 1 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Faculty on Cancer and Work-Life Balance / Specialty Leaders
Hopkins Nursing—Faculty on Cancer and Work-Life Balance / Specialty Leaders body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClas...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - October 11, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Don't Wait - Register Today and Honor that Special Nurse Who Touched Your Life or Your Heart
Don't Wait - Register Today and Honor that Special Nurse Who Touched Your Life or Your Heart p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - October 10, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Safe motherhood campaign associated with more prenatal visits, birth planning, study finds
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) In Tanzania, pregnant women who were exposed to a national safe motherhood campaign designed to get them to visit health facilities for prenatal care and delivery were more likely to create birth plans and to attend more prenatal appointments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Humanitarian System is Not Just Broke, But Broken: Recommendations for Future Humanitarian Action
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 09/27/2017 This one-hour, 20-minute presentation discusses the unprecedented number of humanitarian emergencies of large magnitude and duration, which are causing the largest number of people in a generation to be forcibly displaced. Yet the existing humanitarian system was created for a different time and is no longer fit for purpose. On the basis of lessons learned from recent crises, particularly the Syrian conflict and the Ebola epidemic, the speaker recommends actions that would make the humanitarian system relevant for future public health responses. (Video...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Former Hopkins radiologist gets prison time for fraud
A radiologist once employed at Johns Hopkins University has been sentenced...Read more on AuntMinnie.com (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 29, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Dean on Thought Diversity / Specialty Leaders
Hopkins Nursing—Dean on Thought Diversity / Specialty Leaders body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.Extern...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - September 29, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Navigating the River of Transitions for a Smoother Journey
When health care practitioners talk about transitions of care, they are really asking, “Is everyone on the same page?” said Alicia Arbaje, MD, MPH, PhD, associate professor of medicine and director of transitional care research at Johns Hopkins University, at AMDA – the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s Annual Conference. Dr. Arbaje and others talked about s uccessful efforts to bring practitioners along the health care continuum together to improve and streamline transitions in and out of health care facilities. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - September 29, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Disease resistance successfully spread from modified to wild mosquitoes
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Using genetically modified mosquitoes to reduce or prevent the spread of disease is a rapidly expanding field of investigation. One challenge is ensuring that GM mosquitoes can mate with their wild counterparts so the desired modification is spread in the wild population. Investigators at Johns Hopkins University have engineered mosquitoes with an altered microbiota that suppresses human malaria-causing parasites. These GM mosquitos preferred to mate with wild mosquitoes and passed the desired protection to offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 28, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Promising results for 2 genetic weapons against malaria
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Antimalarial bacteria and immune-boosted mosquitoes show strong potential to spread in the wild. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 28, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Losing Weight Could Help You Save Money
BOSTON (CBS) – Losing weight may not only help you feel better and live longer, it could save you some cash. A study from Johns Hopkins University suggests that a 20-year old who goes from being obese to a healthy weight can save more than $28,000 over her lifetime. A 50-year old could save more than $36,000. Researchers say you’re saving productivity losses, higher insurance premiums, and higher medical costs for chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease and cancer. While it is certainly hard to lose weight and change your lifestyle, money can be a great motivator. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Johns Hopkins University Weight Loss Source Type: news

Honor that Special Nurse Who Touched Your Life or Your Heart  
Honor that Special Nurse Who Touched Your Life or Your Heart   p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ widt...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - September 27, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Weight loss for adults at any age leads to cost savings, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Helping an adult lose weight leads to significant cost savings at any age, with those savings peaking at age 50, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Ambulance ride may lower survival chance for some injuries
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that for some types of injury, an ambulance may not be the best option for hospital transportation. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood Samples
TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 -- A new distance record for delivery of blood samples by a medical drone has been set. A Johns Hopkins University drone transported dozens of human blood samples across 161 miles of Arizona desert. Throughout the three-hour... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kids Believe Gender Stereotypes By Age 10, Global Study Finds
In almost every society, from Baltimore to Beijing, boys are told from a young age to go outside and have adventures, while young girls are encouraged to stay home and do chores. In most cultures, girls are warned off taking the initiative in any relationship and by 10 years old, already have the distinct impression that their key asset is their physical appearance. These are the findings of a new six-year study of gender expectations around the world, which gathered data on 10- to 14-year-olds from 15 different countries of varying degrees of wealth and development. The research teams interviewed 450 adolescents and their...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized boys gender girls Global global study health Johns Hopkins Mental Health/Psychology Stereotypes Source Type: news

Researchers Had Duty Of Care In Lead Abatement Study, Split Maryland Panel Rules
ANNAPOLIS, Md. - A split panel of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals on Sept. 6 reversed a trial court ruling and concluded that the Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI) and parties affiliated with Johns Hopkins University had a special relationship with the sibling of a girl who was a participant in a lead-paint abatement study in the 1990s and that they owed the sibling a duty of care (Ashley Partlow v. Kennedy Krieger Institute, Nos. 44 and 530, Sept. Term, Md. Spec. App.; 2017 Md. App. LEXIS 906). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - September 20, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

DNA triggers shape-shifting in hydrogels, opening a new way to make 'soft robots'
(Johns Hopkins University) Biochemical engineers at the Johns Hopkins University have used sequences of DNA molecules to induce shape-changing in water-based gels, demonstrating a new tactic to produce 'soft' robots and " smart " medical devices that do not rely on cumbersome wires, batteries or tethers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

$3 million collaboration to develop new approaches for HIV therapy
(University of Liverpool) A collaboration between the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSM) has been awarded a further $3m ( £ 2.2m) to develop sophisticated new medicines for HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Honor that Special Nurse Who Touched Your Life or Your Heart  
Honor that Special Nurse Who Touched Your Life or Your Heart   p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ widt...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - September 13, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news