NASA Says Ultima Thule Actually Looks Like A Pancake And A Walnut
They had initially thought the object four billion miles from Earth looked like a snowman. The New Horizons spacecraft flew by it on New Year's Day and new images give scientists a clearer picture. (Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Rats in augmented reality help show how the brain determines location
(Johns Hopkins University) Before the age of GPS, humans had to orient themselves without on-screen arrows pointing down an exact street, but rather, by memorizing landmarks and using learned relationships among time, speed and distance. They had to know, for instance, that 10 minutes of brisk walking might equate to half a mile traveled.A new Johns Hopkins study found that rats' ability to recalibrate these learned relationships is ever-evolving, moment-by-moment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells to Society: 130 Years of Innovation / Research News
This study explores experiences related to hearing loss and barriers to hearing health care among older Korean Americans.      Read more   Aging ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 6, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

AI-powered stethoscope can spot pneumonia by listening to how a patient breathes
Scientists based at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, have invented a stethoscope which uses noise-filtering technology and a database of around 1,500 people's lung sounds. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Burden of Sudden Cardiac Death Higher in Black Men, Women
TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 -- African-Americans have a higher burden of sudden cardiac death (SCD) than whites, especially among women, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Circulation. Di Zhao, Ph.D., from the Johns Hopkins University... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 5, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Anti-vaxxers are as dangerous to global health as HIV, doctor declares
Dr Amesh Adalja, of Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security in Maryland, writes in an op-ed that the invention of vaccines has given people 'the luxury to die of other diseases'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coming next month: Johns Hopkins Training to Better Impact the Lives of Parents and Their Young Children
p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ m...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 4, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Study: Fatal opioid-related car crashes in Maryland hold steady over decade
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new approach to defining opioid-related auto fatalities provides insight into the nature and distribution of opioid-involved deaths in the state of Maryland, say the authors of a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Assay Gives Greater Insight on HIV
A new assay developed by researchers at Johns Hopkins University can accurately count the cells that comprise the HIV reservoir- one of the biggest obstacles in curing the disease. The development of the assay could help researchers who are trying to eradicate the HIV reservoir to understand whether their strategies are working. The research was supported by the National Institute of Allery and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. To develop the assay, the team, led by Robert Siliciano, MD, analyzed DNA sequences from more than 400 HIV proviruses taken from 28 people with HIV. Siliciano and his t...
Source: MDDI - February 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: IVD Source Type: news

A new toolkit for studying how 'PARP' activity boosts cancers
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new method developed by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is likely to speed the study of an important biological process called ADP-ribosylation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pain-management firm SPR Therapeutics seeks to raise $20m
SPR Therapeutics has raised $8 million of a $20 million Series C round of funding that began Jan. 19, according to an SEC filing. The Cleveland-based company’s Sprint peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) system is FDA-cleared for both chronic and acute pain, including post-operative and post-traumatic pain. The product was launched in November 2018 for treating complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic pain condition affecting the limbs that can be caused by trauma, injury or surgery. The company also recently announced that it has named Peter Staats, M.D., as its chief medical advisor. Staats brings nearly three ...
Source: Mass Device - January 31, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Bioelectronic Medicine Blog Business/Financial News Funding Roundup Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation News Well Pain Management SPR Therapeutics Source Type: news

Care following opioid overdoses in West Virginia falls short
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Only a small fraction of people who had non-fatal opioid overdoses in West Virginia received treatment in the aftermath, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

West Virginia study details promising method for estimating rural intravenous drug use
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A study published today in the American Journal of Public Health estimates that 1,857 people injected drugs in the last six months in Cabell County, W.Va., a rural county with a population of 94,958. This estimate is based on an innovative survey technique that public health officials can now use in their own rural communities to address the opioid epidemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science in the New Congress
On January 3, 2019, 111 freshmen, including 10 newly elected Senators and 101 newly elected Representatives, were sworn-in to the 116th Congress. Eleven of these freshmen members of Congress, including eight Democrats and three Republicans, have a background in science, medicine, or technology. Below is a summary of expertise that has joined the new Congress. Representative Joe Cunningham (D-SC) is a former ocean engineer, who earned his BS from Florida Atlantic University and also holds a law degree. Representative Lauren Underwood (D-IL), is a registered nurse. She holds master's degrees in nursing and public heal...
Source: Public Policy Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest, new findings from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) suggest. CCP is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Can Medtech Help with the Opioid Crisis?
Pain control is one of the biggest challenges facing America today, believes Dr. Peter Staats, co-founder and chief medical officer of electroCore. Chronic pain is an ongoing, debilitating problem for many patients, but for some, overuse of opioid treatments has led to addiction. Such a condition has led to an increasing number of U.S. deaths—one study published in the JAMA Network Open1 found that the percentage of all U.S. deaths attributable to opioids increased 292% between 2001 and 2016. This same study reported that in 2016, 20% of deaths of adults aged 24 to 35 years involve...
Source: MDDI - January 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Better treatment for your patients – NEW program on lipid disorders
Better treatment for your patients – NEW program on lipid disorders p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:10...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 17, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Focusing on usability can limit medical device recalls: Here ’ s how
By Stephanie Van Ness and Rex Palmer of Boston UX Building great software has always been challenging. Building software that safeguards patients while flawlessly controlling sensitive embedded and connected medical devices — from room-sized proton radiation systems to portable automatic external defibrillators (AED) — magnifies the challenge. It should be no surprise that design issues cause many device recalls. So how do you mitigate potential problems when designing a medical device user interface (UI)? Begin with a strong focus on usability. The importance of usability According to ...
Source: Mass Device - January 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Boston UX Source Type: news

Ortho dev Ossio wins FDA nod for bio-integrative bone pins
Orthopedic device company Ossio said yesterday that it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its OssioFiber BonePin family of products. The Woburn, Mass.-based company said that products in the OssioFiber BonePin family feature a proprietary bio-integrative material that it claims provides stability and secures bone fixation during healing with no permanent hardware left behind. The company said its newly cleared OssioFiber BonePins feature a proprietary fixation material, composed of a natural mineral fiber matrix, that it says aims to be the “first credible replacement to permanent fixation implants.” “Surgical ...
Source: Mass Device - January 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance ossio Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—No. 1 for Online Education
Hopkins Nursing—No. 1 for Online Education body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass td,.Externa...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 15, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Fraction of US outpatient treatment centers offer medication for opioid addiction
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Despite the mounting death toll of America's opioid crisis, only a minority of facilities that treat substance use disorders offer patients buprenorphine, naltrexone or methadone -- the three FDA-approved medications for the long-term management of opioid use disorder, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Demi Lovato's overdose causes surge in media, but few mentions of lifesaving hotline
(Johns Hopkins University) Demi Lovato's drug overdose and Anthony Bourdain's suicide resulted in unequal news coverage of national help hotlines, finds a new study published Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Following Nepal's devastating 2015 earthquake, crisis in childhood malnutrition averted
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Despite widespread destruction, including severe agricultural-related losses caused by the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, child nutrition remained stable in the hardest hit areas, a new study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hello, Ultima Thule
What do we know about the furthest object we’ve ever observed from space?(Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute via Getty Images)) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers Must Face $1 Bln Syphilis Infections Lawsuit Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers Must Face $1 Bln Syphilis Infections Lawsuit
A federal judge in Maryland said The Johns Hopkins University, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and the Rockefeller Foundation must face a $1 billion lawsuit over their roles in a 1940s U.S. government experiment that infected hundreds of Guatemalans with syphilis.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins Training to Better Impact the Lives of Parents and Their Young Children
p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ m...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Older people who use hearing aids still report hearing challenges
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A high proportion of older people with hearing aids, especially those with lower incomes, report having trouble hearing and difficulty accessing hearing care services, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the brain decides whether to hold 'em or fold 'em
(Johns Hopkins University) Why do people make high-risk decisions -- in casinos or in other aspects of their lives -- even when they know the odds are stacked against them? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers must face $1 billion syphilis infections suit
A federal judge in Maryland said The Johns Hopkins University, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and the Rockefeller Foundation must face a $1 billion lawsuit over their roles in a 1940s U.S. government experiment that infected hundreds of Guatemalans with syphilis. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers must face $1 billion syphilis infections lawsuit
A federal judge in Maryland said The Johns Hopkins University, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and the Rockefeller Foundation must face a $1 billion lawsuit over their roles in a 1940s U.S. government experiment that infected hundreds of Guatemalans with syphilis. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Drinking too many sugar-sweetened drinks 'raises your risk of kidney disease'
The study, by researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, examined survey data on drink consumption among 3,003 African-American men and women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breath Test To Detect Multiple Cancers Early Begins Large Trial
(CNN) — A breathalyzer designed to detect multiple cancers early is being tested in the UK. Several illnesses are known to create signature smells from the body, including typhoid fever reported to smell like baked bread and the aroma of acetone, said to be similar to rotten apples, on the breath of diabetics. Recent research has also shown that a person’s breath could also indicate the presence of cancer. To test this theory, Cancer Research UK have launched a two-year trial into a clinical device, called the Breath Biopsy, to find out if exhaled airborne molecules can be useful for cancer detection. (Image cr...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cancer CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Images Reveal A 'Snowman' At The Frigid Outer Reaches Of Our Solar System
Scientists say Ultima Thule, a newly explored world out beyond Pluto, is a relic from our solar system's earliest days.(Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

NASA Spacecraft Opens New Year at Tiny, Icy World Past Pluto
(LAUREL, Md) — NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has survived humanity’s most distant exploration of another world. Ten hours after the middle-of-the-night encounter 4 billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away, flight controllers in Laurel, Maryland, received word from the spacecraft late Tuesday morning. Cheers erupted at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory, home to Mission Control. “We have a healthy spacecraft. We’ve just accomplished the most distant flyby,” announced Alice Bowman, mission operations manager. An anxious spill-over crowd in a nearby auditorium j...
Source: TIME: Science - January 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN/ AP Tags: Uncategorized Science space Source Type: news

A NASA Spacecraft Begins the New Year Observing an Unknown Region Beyond Pluto
(LAUREL, Md.) — The NASA spacecraft that yielded the first close-up views of Pluto opened the new year at an even more distant world, a billion miles beyond. Flight controllers said everything looked good for New Horizons’ flyby of the tiny, icy object at 12:33 a.m. Tuesday. Confirmation was not expected for hours, though, given the vast distance. The mysterious, ancient target nicknamed Ultima Thule is 4 billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) from Earth. Scientists wanted New Horizons observing Ultima Thule during the encounter, not phoning home. So they had to wait until late morning before learning whether t...
Source: TIME: Science - January 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

A NASA Probe Launched to Study Pluto Is About to Look at Another Mysterious Object
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The spacecraft team that brought us close-ups of Pluto will ring in the new year by exploring an even more distant and mysterious world. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will zip past the scrawny, icy object nicknamed Ultima Thule soon after the stroke of midnight. One billion miles beyond Pluto and an astounding 4 billion miles from Earth (1.6 billion kilometers and 6.4 billion kilometers), Ultima Thule will be the farthest world ever explored by humankind. That’s what makes this deep-freeze target so enticing; it’s a preserved relic dating all the way back to our solar syste...
Source: TIME: Science - December 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

News releases about health, Earth science and social sciences make up EurekAlert!'s 2018 trending news list
(EurekAlert!) Health news occupied six of the 10 most-viewed news releases on EurekAlert! in 2018. The most popular news release, 'Study: Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors,'' submitted by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health received 337,013 views. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The New Old Age: This Type of Illiteracy Could Hurt You
More than half of older Americans lack the skills to gather and understand medical information. Providers must simplify, researchers say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAULA SPAN Tags: Elderly Reading and Writing Skills (Education) Medicare Harvard University Johns Hopkins University Wichita State University Medicine and Health Source Type: news

Police interactions linked to increased risk of client violence for female sex workers
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The more abusive interactions street-based female sex workers (FSWs) have with police, the higher their risk of violence at the hands of clients, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do your services have a positive impact on parents and their young children?
p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ m...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - December 19, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—The Best of 2018
Hopkins Nursing—The Best of 2018 body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - December 18, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Study suggests shifts in Afghan attitudes towards increased education and delayed marriage
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) In Afghanistan's most underdeveloped regions, attitudes towards education and child marriage appear to have changed significantly since the overthrow of the Taliban government in 2002, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teen marijuana use may trigger inflammation linked to schizophrenia and mental illness, study finds
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University discovered that the psychoactive compound in marijuana 'turns on' genes that lead to brain inflammation which in turn may trigger schizophrenia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Geffen School of Medicine presents award for excellence in basic science
Dr. David Sabatini, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT, was honored by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth, propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases. The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Sabatini with the 2018  Switzer Prize on Dec. 13 before he delivered a high-energy lecture to a packed auditorium. Nearly 300 people attended, filling every seat and overflowing in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists discover genetic ‘missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases. Now, a new, large-scale study has linked many of those changes in DNA to their molecular effects in the brain, revealing for the first time mechanisms behind those diseases.In 10 studies published today in  Science and two related journals, UCLA researchers and collaborators from more than a dozen other institutions around the world provide a comprehensive data s...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Face masks may protect hog farm workers and their household members from staph bacteria
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Face masks appear to provide important protection against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria for hog farm workers and for household members to whom they might otherwise transmit the bacteria, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Young Breast Cancer Patients Face Higher Risk for Osteoporosis
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 -- The risk for bone loss rises sharply in young breast cancer patients who received standard treatment, according to a study recently published in Breast Cancer Research. Cody Ramin, Ph.D., from Johns Hopkins University in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

News release: Increased motor activity linked to improved mood
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Increasing one's level of physical activity may be an effective way to boost one's mood, according to a new study from a team including scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$5,000 Grant for Johns Hopkins Nurses
p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ m...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - December 12, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news