Evening With The Stars Nominations Now Open
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - August 15, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

“Snake oil” BP app got high user marks despite inaccurate results
People may like mobile blood pressure apps better when the apps reveal positive results, even if those results are inaccurate 80% of the time, according to a recent study. A team of researchers who previously revealed the inaccuracy of the Instant Blood Pressure (IBP) app returned to the topic to study 81 adults who compared the app’s readings against their own BP estimates. Those whose systolic BP measured lower on the IBP app than they expected reported that they were more inclined to use the app again than those whose systolic blood pressure was higher than they estimated, the study showed. Get the ...
Source: Mass Device - August 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Cardiovascular News Well Research & Development auralabs Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Johns Hopkins University universityofvermont Source Type: news

Study reveals broad 'genetic architectures' of traits and diseases
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Training the next-gen workforce in standards development with $30 million grant
(Binghamton University) The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has awarded a five-year Professional Research Experience Program (PREP) grant of $30 million to Binghamton University, Johns Hopkins University (the lead institute for the grant) and Morgan State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elderly patients on dialysis have a high risk of dementia
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Older kidney disease patients who are sick enough to require the blood-filtering treatment known as dialysis are at high risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Support increases when opioid 'safe consumption sites' called 'overdose prevention sites'
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) 'Safe consumption sites,' where people can use pre-obtained drugs with medically trained personnel on hand to treat overdoses, garner higher public support when they are called 'overdose prevention sites,' according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who Has Your Vote? Evening With The Stars Nominations Now Open
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - August 3, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

F.D.A. Did Not Intervene to Curb Risky Fentanyl Prescriptions
Powerful cancer pain drugs were given to patients with other conditions who cannot tolerate them. A program to curb the practice was run by companies that sell the drugs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Opioids and Opiates Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Food and Drug Administration Fentanyl McKesson Corporation Labeling and Labels (Product) Insys Therapeutics Inc Johns Hopkins University Cephalon Inc Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing Dean on Global Networking
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - July 30, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Experimental drug could reverse hair loss and skin inflammation caused by fatty diets  
A drug that stops the production of a molecule that doesn't allow the body to rid itself of cholesterol could reverse aging effects due to a fatty diet, a study from Johns Hopkins University has found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol In Breast Milk May Lead To Lower Cognition In Kids, Study Finds
(CBS Local/CNN)– Children’s exposure to alcohol through breast milk may cause a comparable drop in their cognitive abilities, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. “This is the first study in which associations between alcohol exposure through breast milk and cognition in children are examined,” the researchers from Macquarie University in Australia wrote in the report. Previously Undisclosed TSA Program Tracks Unsuspecting Passengers The authors obtained data from a longitudinal study, a continuous study of data over a period of time, of 5,107 Australian infants who were...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News breastfeeding CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Sequencing a malaria mosquito's motherline
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins researchers find that low levels of vitamin D increase risk of lung disease
(Natural News) A decade long study by researchers from Johns Hopkins University, the results of which were published in the Journal of Nutrition last month, offers new hope for the prevention of an incurable disease that claims close to half a million lives annually. The 2013 Global Burden of Disease study found that each year,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dr. Kimishige Ishizaka, Who Found Allergy Link, Dies at 92
Working with his wife, he identified an antibody that, in allergic individuals, produces excess amounts of histamine, which makes them sneeze. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SAM ROBERTS Tags: Asthma Immune System Antihistamines Hay Fever Johns Hopkins University Deaths (Obituaries) Kimishige Ishizaka Source Type: news

Feeling lightheaded when standing up could be a warning sign of dementia, study says   
A new study from Johns Hopkins University has found that those who feel lightheaded or faint when they go from sitting to standing have a 1.5 times greater risk of developing dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Puppy to the Rescue: Dogs Sense Need, Run to Help
Dogs not only sense what their owners are feeling, but if a dog knows a way to help them, they'll go through barriers to provide help to them, researchers at Johns Hopkins University report. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here ’s More Proof That Your Dog Really Does Love You
Most dog owners would do just about anything for their pups. And a new study says the feeling may be mutual. Plenty of research has shown that dogs respond to signs of their owner’s distress, such as crying, but it hasn’t been clear to what extent pups will try to make their owners feel better. A paper published Tuesday in the journal Learning & Behavior, however, suggests that “dogs will actually take an action trying to alleviate that distress,” says Julia Meyers-Manor, an assistant professor of psychology at Ripon College in Wisconsin and a co-author of the study. The results suggest that you...
Source: TIME: Health - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

What would your dog do to help if you were upset? Quite a bit, study finds
(Johns Hopkins University) Dogs are thought to be very aware of people's emotions, but if a pup's owner was really upset, would it actually go out of its way to offer help and comfort? Some not only will, but they'll also overcome obstacles in a hurry to do it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Empathetic dogs lend a helping paw
(Springer) Many dogs show empathy if their owner is in distress and will also try to help rescue them. This is according to Emily M. Sanford, formerly of Macalester College and now at Johns Hopkins University in the US. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Learning& Behavior that tested whether there is truth in the notion that dogs have a prosocial and empathetic nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who Has Your Vote? Evening With The Stars Nominations Now Open
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - July 17, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Why men might recover from flu faster than women
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Men may recover more quickly from influenza infections because they produce more of a key lung-healing protein, a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers Find Link Between Vitamin D and Asbestosis
This study was not designed to explain whether supplementing with vitamin D will protect against asbestosis. This new research also does not examine if taking vitamin D will slow down the progression of existing ILD. Still, there are a lot of good reasons to pay attention to the sunshine vitamin. Regardless of whether a person has been exposed to asbestos, no one should ignore very low vitamin D levels. People already diagnosed with an asbestos-related cancer, may benefit from a quick check of vitamin D levels. According to the medical literature, up to 80 percent of people with cancer may be vitamin D deficient. People ca...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 16, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Too Few Kids Screened For Developmental Delays
Fewer than one-third of U.S. children under 3 years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems, researchers at John Hopkins University report. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Developmental screening and surveillance rates remain low, new study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Only about one-third of young children in the US receive recommended screenings or surveillance designed to catch developmental delays. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

These are the top NIH grant recipients in Greater Baltimore
Johns Hopkins University is again the top NIH grant recipient in Greater Baltimore in 2017, with a total grant value of $651.8 million last year. The university also led all U.S. universities in research and development expenditures for the 38th consecutive year in fiscal year 2016, spending $2.4 billion on various research projects. Below, you can see the top five NIH grant recipients in Greater Baltimore, ranked by 2017 grant value. Sub scribers can view the full top 25 List here. 5. Profectus… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 29, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Maria Sieron Source Type: news

These are the top NIH grant recipients in Greater Baltimore
Johns Hopkins University is again the top NIH grant recipient in Greater Baltimore in 2017, with a total grant value of $651.8 million last year. The university also led all U.S. universities in research and development expenditures for the 38th consecutive year in fiscal year 2016, spending $2.4 billion on various research projects. Below, you can see the top five NIH grant recipients in Greater Baltimore, ranked by 2017 grant value. Sub scribers can view the full top 25 List here. 5. Profectus… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 29, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Maria Sieron Source Type: news

Change in brain cells linked to opiate addiction, narcolepsy
This study was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Medical Research Service of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breast cancer studies ignore race, socioeconomic factors
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Studies of breast cancer risk and treatment outcomes are not taking sufficient account of race/ethnicity, economic status, education level, health insurance status and other social factors, according to scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are You Interested in Helping Parents and Their Young Children?
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - June 26, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing Dean on Solutions to Trauma, Violence, Social Issues
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - June 26, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, University of Maryland named state's best children's hospitals
Johns Hopkins Children's Center is the best pediatric hospital in the state, and one of the top 10 in the country, according to new rankings from U.S. News& World Report. The annual Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help families of children with complex and rare conditions find the best medical care. The rankings highlight the top 50 hospital centers in 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, g astroenterology and gastrointestinal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, University of Maryland named state's best children's hospitals
Johns Hopkins Children's Center is the best pediatric hospital in the state, and one of the top 10 in the country, according to new rankings from U.S. News& World Report. The annual Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help families of children with complex and rare conditions find the best medical care. The rankings highlight the top 50 hospital centers in 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, g astroenterology and gastrointestinal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Prosthetic skin that can feel both pain and touch could help amputees avoid injury
Feeling pain is vital to a fully-functioning limb as the sensation helps us to remove our bodies from danger, according to the researchers at John Hopkins University in Baltimore. Maryland. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health insurance plans may be fueling opioid epidemic
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Health care insurers including Medicare, Medicaid and major private insurers have not done enough to combat the opioid epidemic, suggests a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A blood test can tell your doctor if you're cheating on your diet   
Johns Hopkins University researchers have found significant differences in metabolites in the blood of dieters and non-dieters, which they hope to soon use to test whether patients are cheating. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patterns
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a 'lawn' of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is vitamin D deficiency to blame for lung disease?
New research from Johns Hopkins University has found that individuals with low blood levels of vitamin D may be more exposed to disabling lung disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Respiratory Source Type: news

New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic hands
(Johns Hopkins University) Engineers have created an electronic 'skin' in an effort to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are you sticking to your diet? Scientists may be able to tell from a blood sample
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) An analysis of small molecules called 'metabolites' in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Have Johns Hopkins Biomedical Engineering Students Solved The Nuisance Of Nasal Congestion?
A team of five biomedical engineering undergraduates at John Hopkins University (JHU) plan to manufacture and sell a device that they say would achieve the same effect as nasal reconstructive surgery for sufferers of chronic nasal obstruction - a condition that affects tens of millions of Americans. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Baltimore biotech WindMIL Therapeutics raises $32.5 million
Baltimore biotechnology firm WindMIL Therapeutics has raised a $32.5 million to support clinical trials and further development for new cancer therapies. The Series B round was led by QiMing USA Venture Partners, the new U.S. entity of China firm QiMing. WindMIL, a cell therapy company, is previously backed by about $11 million in funding. WindMIL was founded out of Johns Hopkins University by researchers Kimberly Noonan and Dr. Ivan Borrello. Th e clinical stage company is working to develop… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 18, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of 2018 Switzer Prize
Dr. David Sabatini, an MIT biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, will be the 2018 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Sabatini ’s pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth are propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases.As a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sabatini identified the central protein, mTOR,  that turns cell growth on and off. At the Whitehead Institute and MIT, his laboratory ’s research&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nurses are Groundbreakers.
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - June 14, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Older Adults Increasingly Have HPV & #43; Oropharyngeal Cancers
WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 -- Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancers are increasing among older adults, according to a study published online April 30 in Cancer. Melina J. Windon, M.D., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Urban violence can hurt test scores even for kids who don't experience it
(Johns Hopkins University) Children who attend school with many kids from violent neighborhoods can earn significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

1.35 million children's lives saved by HiB and pneumococcal vaccines since 2000
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Childhood deaths from two leading bacterial causes of pneumonia and meningitis, pneumococcus and Hib, declined sharply during the period 2000 to 2015, especially as vaccines against these pathogens were introduced in high-burden countries, according to new estimates from a team led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

1.45 million children's lives saved by HiB and pneumococcal vaccines since 2000
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Childhood deaths from two leading bacterial causes of pneumonia and meningitis, pneumococcus and Hib, declined sharply during the period 2000 to 2015, especially as vaccines against these pathogens were introduced in high-burden countries, according to new estimates from a team led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Recorded calls beat Facebook ads in getting residents to request free smoke alarm
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found automated phone calls were far more effective than Facebook ads in getting Baltimore City residents to request a smoke alarm through the city's free installation program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Handgun purchaser licensing laws linked to fewer firearm homicides in large, urban areas
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) State laws that require gun purchasers to obtain a license contingent on passing a background check performed by state or local law enforcement are associated with a 14 percent reduction in firearm homicides in large, urban counties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital Health: New Frontiers in Humanitarian Interventions
Johns Hopkins University. 04/25/2018 This one-hour, 19-minute presentation discusses new technologies and their possible applications in the context of humanitarian response, and the progress that has been made with them in the past five years. It describes the challenges of creating a hand-held device to diagnose health conditions in the field, and technologies needed in disaster areas with no electricity. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news