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More than half of Lyme disease survivors experience severe, persistent symptoms, even after being clinically cleared of infection
(Natural News) A study, published in the journal Frontiers in Medicine, found that more than 50 percent of Lyme disease survivors still suffer from severe, persistent symptoms even after being clinically cleared of the infection. A team of researchers from John Hopkins University School of Medicine evaluated 61 individuals who were either self- or physician-referred... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Computers outperform lab rats in detecting toxic chemicals
(SciCom - Making Sense of Science) UL, the science safety company, and Johns Hopkins University have embarked on joint research that has resulted in findings that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is superior in finding toxic substances to traditional animal testing. Beyond being more effective, UL's Cheminformatics REACHAcross ™ software computer processing can be performed in a matter of seconds and at a fraction of the cost to traditional testing methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are You Interested in Helping Parents and Their Young Children?
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 15, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

The One Thing Happy Couples Do Every Day to Keep Their Relationship Strong
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Danielle Friedman / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

Ending ovarian cancer without triggering menopause
Ovarian cancer doesn't actually begin in the ovaries. Instead, cancer cells start growing in the fallopian tubes, say researchers who believe that removing the tubes could prevent the spread of the deadly disease.   Scientists at the NYU Perlmutter Cancer and Center MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston found precursor lesions in women with ovarian cancer were most genetically similar to fallopian tube tissue, The Wall Street Journal reported. A second study at Johns Hopkins University found that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Effect of Variations in State Emergency Preparedness Laws on the Public Health Workforce's Willingness to Respond in Emergencies
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 11/2017 This Web page provides information about a project that assesses whether state laws influence the public health workforce's willingness to respond in emergencies. The project's aims include identifying and classifying variations in emergency response laws in the 50 U.S. states, and assessing the association between specific state emergency preparedness laws and willingness to respond during emergencies among the public health workforce. The page also provides publications, tools, and project materials. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disa...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Hearing loss linked to poor nutrition in early childhood, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Young adults who were undernourished as preschool children were approximately twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as their better- nourished peers, a new study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Would You Like to Learn How to Work More Effectively with Latino Patients?
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 6, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Farmed seafood and livestock stack up differently using alternate feed efficiency measure
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Dean on the Opioid Crisis
Hopkins Nursing—Dean on the Opioid Crisis body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass td,.External...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 1, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Life expectancy increases are slowing around the world
Researchers from John Hopkins University found that between 1950 and 1959, the average person's life expectancy increased by 9.68 years compared to 1.89 years between 2000 and 2009. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins-born pharma company raising $40.5 million, hunting for lab space
A Baltimore biotechnology company is raising up to $40.5 million and working to develop pharmaceutical technology born out of Johns Hopkins University. Dracen Pharmaceuticals Inc. is working to develop technologies conceptualized by Barbara Slusher, a professor of neurology, and Dr. Jonathan Powell, a professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dracen has entered an exclusive agreement with Hopkins and the Institute of Organic Chem istry and Biochemistry in Prague to license the jointly-owned… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 29, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Life expectancy gains are slowing in both rich and poor countries
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Increases in human life expectancy have slowed dramatically across the world since 1950, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prosecuting background check and straw purchase violations depends on state laws
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Study examined prosecutions following tougher sentencing for 'straw arm' purchases in Pennsylvania and a Maryland court decision that redefined private firearm transfers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed
(University of Liverpool) A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists Make Progress on Blood Test to Detect the Most Deadly Cancers
Scientists are reporting progress on a blood test to detect many types of cancer at an early stage, including some of the most deadly ones that lack screening tools now. Many groups are working on liquid biopsy tests, which look for DNA and other things that tumors shed into blood, to try to find cancer before it spreads, when chances of cure are best. In a study Thursday in the journal Science, Johns Hopkins University scientists looked to see how well their experimental test detected cancer in people already known to have the disease. The blood tests found about 70 percent of eight common types of cancer in the 1,005 pat...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Make Progress on Blood Test to Detect the Most Deadly Cancers
Scientists are reporting progress on a blood test to detect many types of cancer at an early stage, including some of the most deadly ones that lack screening tools now. Many groups are working on liquid biopsy tests, which look for DNA and other things that tumors shed into blood, to try to find cancer before it spreads, when chances of cure are best. In a study Thursday in the journal Science, Johns Hopkins University scientists looked to see how well their experimental test detected cancer in people already known to have the disease. The blood tests found about 70 percent of eight common types of cancer in the 1,005 pat...
Source: TIME: Health - January 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Blood test detects cancers in up to 98 per cent of people
Researchers from John Hopkins University found the assessment, known as CancerSEEK, picks up on DNA shed by mutating cells in the blood and averages at around 70 percent accuracy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood test detects cancers in up to 98% of sufferers
Researchers from John Hopkins University found the assessment, known as CancerSEEK, picks up on DNA shed by mutating cells in the blood and averages at around 70 percent accuracy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Holy Grail of cancer treatments is found
Scientists at Johns Hopkins University in the US have developed a test that screens for eight common forms of cancer and helps identify the location of the disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Namibia:Mobile Clinic Brings 'Smart Cut' to Erongo
[Namibian] THANKS to a donation by the Johns Hopkins University in the United States of America, a state-of-the-art mobile clinic used specifically for male circumcision, has enabled the ministry of health to take its delicate service literally to the doorstep of its customers. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 18, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Learn How to Help Your Community Deal with Psychological Distress
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 18, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Would You Like to Learn How to Work More Effectively with Latino Patients?
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 17, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Cells to Society: New Hypertension Guidelines / Caregiver-Researcher/ Research News
This study investigates whether improved communication and evidence-based recommendations for handover yield positive patient outcomes.     Read more   Family ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 16, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

What Products Will Ultimately Win in Diagnostics?
It turns out there are actually several classes of diagnostic technologies that seem like they are really hot right now, but are actually overhyped, according to a panel of laboratory experts who addressed the subject during the recent J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, CA. Perhaps one of the hottest topics that have emerged in diagnostics over the past few years is liquid biopsy and while that technology is finding its way into hospital laboratories for certain applications, Nick Papadopoulos, a professor at Johns Hopkins University, said that in early detection of cancer, at least, liquid biopsy is ...
Source: MDDI - January 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Dracen Licenses Immunometabolism Platform
Platform was created by key scientists at The Johns Hopkins University and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry(PRWeb January 09, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15066142.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Are You Interested in Helping Parents and Their Young Children?
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - December 22, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—The Best of 2017
Hopkins Nursing—The Best of 2017 body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - December 18, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Children exposed to air pollution are at risk of asthma
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University found a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions increases youngsters under 11's risk of the lung condition by 1.3 percent, a study revealed today. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter -- a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber -- are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Explore the all NEW Executive Education and Strategic Alliances Division within the School of Nursing.
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - December 13, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Next Pandemic: Are We Prepared?
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 11/13/2017 This two-hour, 25-minute event, co-hosted with Smithsonian magazine and the National Museum of Natural History, focuses on how the world prepares for the next global pandemic, raises public awareness, and explores potential responses and solutions. Speakers discuss the influenza dangers faced today; a historical overview of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic; and information on the latest flu research and pandemic preparedness. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

It’s not just kids: Study finds adults are also unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics
(Natural News) A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine has revealed that doctors are dispensing unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions, and that one in five hospitalized adults suffer the side effects of this irresponsible practice. As part of the study, a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine examined the electronic medical records of nearly 1,500 adults admitted... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors have horrible handwriting, but who knew it was dangerous? Handwritten opioid prescriptions have more mistakes, study finds
(Natural News) A study has revealed that a physician’s illegible handwriting may well affect the accuracy of opioid prescriptions and compromise patient safety. As part of the study, a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has reviewed numerous opioid prescriptions for patients 18 years and older. The prescriptions have been processed at an outpatient pharmacy for... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children on sex offender registries at greater risk for suicide attempts, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater risk for harm, including suicide attempts and sexual assault, compared to a group of children who engaged in harmful or illegal sexual behavior but who were not required to register. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss treatment opportunities, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

These 12 People Are Changing Science
On Sunday, some of the smartest minds in science and math will gather at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley for the Breakthrough Prize, one of the biggest prizes in science. Several scientists will be recognized for their research, with 12 individuals receiving substantial funding for their work in advancing life sciences, physics and mathematics. Founded in 2012 by Sergey Brin, Mark Zuckerberg & Priscilla Chan, Yuri & Julia Milner, and Anne Wojcicki, this year the annual prize provided $22 million in awards. Here are some of the winners whose work may be changing your life soon: PHYSICS Wilkinson Mi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park, Alexandra Sifferlin and Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anne wojcicki Breakthrough Prize healthytime Mark Zuckerberg Math onetime Physics priscilla chan Science sergey brin Silicon Valley Yuri Milner Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins Orthopaedic Surgery - Senior Clinical Research Assistant
The Division of Adult Reconstruction of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Johns Hopkins University invites all qualified, interested, and motivated individuals to apply for a Clinical research assistant position. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - November 30, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Dean and Faculty on Domestic Violence
Hopkins Nursing—Dean and Faculty on Domestic Violence body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 30, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Range of opioid prescribers play important role in epidemic, study finds
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A cross-section of opioid prescribers that typically do not prescribe large volumes of opioids, including primary care physicians, surgeons and non-physician health care providers, frequently prescribe opioids to high-risk patients, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Migration and Health Concepts, Categories and Global Governance
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 11/13/2017 This one-hour, 17-minute presentation, sponsored by the Center for Humanitarian Health, discusses categories of migration, including disaster-induced migration, and the migration continuum. It also details negotiating two new global compacts and addressing health concerns. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Genetic mutation could, if altered, boost flumist vaccine effectiveness, research suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a genetic mutation in the FluMist intranasal flu vaccine that has the potential to be altered to enhance the vaccine's protective effect. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 28, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New computer model sheds light on biological events leading to sudden cardiac death
(Johns Hopkins University) A powerful new computer model replicates the biological activity within the heart that precedes sudden cardiac death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing and Managing Congenital Zika and Congenital Syphilis Infections
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, MidAtlantic Public Health Training Center. 07/27/2017 This on-demand webinar provides health care providers with information on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of Zika and syphilis infections to address the emerging crisis of congenital Zika virus and the increasing number of congenital syphilis cases nationally and regionally. It describes the epidemiology and risk factors for congenital syphilis and congenital Zika syndrome, and discusses the difficulties of diagnosis of both diseases. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration. (Source: Disaste...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Are You Interested in Helping Parents and Their Young Children?
p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ m...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 21, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

Predicting Alzheimer's: Major inflammation in your 40s puts you at high risk, making the case for improving lifestyle habits
(Natural News) Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland found that extreme inflammation – which can be caused in middle age by weight gain and high blood pressure or diabetes – could be a sign of impending Alzheimer’s disease. When the scientists observed 1,633 people between the ages of 45 and 65 who... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cells to Society: Native American Heritage/ Endowment / Research News
This study evaluates treatment outcomes from a clinical cohort with task-sharing between a clinical nurse practitioner and a medical officer. The researchers examined opportunities to increase treatment rates for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in South Africa.     Read more   Climate Change ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 9, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news