‘ Meat Taxes ’ Would Save Lives And Cut Health Care Costs, Study Says

(CNN) — It would drive up the price of your barbecue but a global “meat tax” could save 220,000 lives and cut health care bills by $41 billion each year, according to a new study. The numbers are based on evidence that links meat consumption to increased risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Three years ago, the World Health Organization declared red meat such as beef, lamb and pork to be carcinogenic when eaten in processed forms, including sausages, bacon and beef jerky. Health officials have also declared that unprocessed red meat like steak and burgers are “probably” carcinogenic. Other carcinogens such as cigarettes and alcohol are regulated in order to reduce cases of chronic disease. A team of researchers led by Dr. Marco Springmann, from the Nuffield Department of Population Health at Oxford University, estimated the rate of tax that would be necessary to offset health care costs related to red meat consumption. “The least intrusive form of regulation is a tax to raise prices and reduce consumption,” Springmann told CNN. Researchers concluded that the UK government should introduce a tax of 79% on processed meat such as bacon, and 14% on unprocessed meat such as steak. In the US these numbers would be 163% and 34% respectively. “The tax is higher in the US due to an inefficient health system that wastes a lot of money,” said Springmann. They also calculated the projected impact of a so-called meat tax...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Offbeat Local TV Meat Source Type: news

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New research, which was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference, has found that moderate drinking is linked to a longer life. Drinking about two glasses of wine or beer a day was linked to an 18% drop in a person’s risk of early death—an even stronger effect than the life-preserving practice of exercise, according to the researchers. The results came from the 90+ Study, a research project out of the University of California Irvine’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders that examines the habits of people who live to at least 90. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Conclusions: Population level of iAs% and DMA%, but not MMA%, were associated with arsenic exposure levels. Overall, study findings suggest that higher MMA% was associated with an increased risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, while lower MMA% was associated with an increased risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Additional population-based studies and experimental studies are needed to further evaluate and understand the role of arsenic exposure in arsenic metabolism and the role of arsenic metabolism in disease development. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP577 Received: 01 June 2016 Revised: 26 February 2017 Acce...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study builds on preliminary findings from the first phase of the INTERSTROKE study, which identified ten modifiable risk factors for stroke in 6,000 participants from 22 countries. The full-scale INTERSTROKE study included an additional 20,000 individuals from 32 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, and sought to identify the main causes of stroke in diverse populations, young and old, men and women, and within subtypes of stroke. To estimate the proportion of strokes caused by specific risk factors, the investigators calculated the population attributable risk for each factor (PAR; an esti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThis large and long-term cohort study showed that women with the top fifth highest average fibre intake during adolescence and early adulthood were around 25% less likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer decades later than those in the bottom fifth.This raises the suggestion that young women might be able to significantly lower their risk of breast cancer – the most common cancer in the UK – simply through eating more high-fibre foods such as fruits and vegetables.However, it’s worth noting a few points before accepting these promising results at face value. Total dieta...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet Source Type: news
It is now 2016, and Americans hope for a brighter, healthier new year. Are Americans healthier today than they were last year or the year before? Will there be fewer people diagnosed with cancer? According to the American Cancer Society, it is projected that in 2016 there will be 1,685,210 new cancer cases and 595,690 deaths due to cancer. This is an increase over previous years. While it is true that the death rate for several cancers has decreased (due mostly to better screening and earlier diagnosis), it is also true that several cancers are on the rise, including cancers of the thyroid, liver, pancreas, kidney, small i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion This laboratory study found that women with adenine on either strand of an SNP in a section of chromosome 16 have a lower risk of CVD, as evidenced by a slower increase in thickness of the carotid arteries over a six-year period. These findings were replicated in the meta-analysis of all five cohort studies. No association was found for men. Further laboratory studies found the gene called BCAR1 – which is located nearby on the same chromosome – is more active in women with guanine on both strands of the SNP. BCAR1 is not a new gene – it is present in men a...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Heart/lungs Source Type: news
October is breast cancer awareness month. Breast cancer is diagnosed in over 220,000 women each year in the US. With one in eight or 12.3 percent of women being diagnosed, what can we do to prevent breast cancer or at the very least reduce our risk? We have all heard the saying, "You are what you eat." If we can control breast cancer through our diet and healthy living, we can focus more on prevention as a viable means to reduce the incidence of this common cancer affecting so many of our family and friends. Diets High in Animal Fat The Nurses' Health Study II showed "premenopausal women who ate diets high ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ConclusionControlling diabetes may reduce the harmful effect of obesity on cancer. Recent advances in causal inference and mediation analysis can be readily applied to estimate the direct and mediated effects of lifestyle and metabolic risk factors on cancer.Citation Format: Goodarz Danaei. Mediators of the effect of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease and cancer: Evidence from pooling of prospective studies. [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the 106th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research; 2015 Apr 18-22; Philadelphia, PA. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2015;75(15 Suppl):Abstract nr...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Conclusion This large study has identified numerous risk factors associated with a person's risk of death within five years. Researchers used this information to develop an online tool that predicts someone's risk of death within the next five years. The study's strengths include its large sample size and the prospective nature of the study design. But there are some limitations. There may be some bias in the type of people who volunteered to take part. The death rate was lower than that of the average population in this age group, which may indicate that the participants were more interested in their health and so had he...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Cancer Lifestyle/exercise Medical practice Source Type: news
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