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New method to stop cells dividing could help fight cancer
(Uppsala University) Researchers at Uppsala University, Karolinska Institutet, and the University of Oxford, have used a new strategy to shut down specific enzymes to stop cells from dividing. The method, published in Cell Chemical Biology, can be used as a strategy to fight cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groups
(Oxford University Press USA) A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research Associate - Digital Health
Location: Oxford, United Kingdom Job Type: Full-Time Employer: The University of Oxford Closing Date: 12.02.2018 An opportunity has arisen for a researcher to support an established research programme led by Professor Andrew Farmer. You will have responsibility for working on one or more of a series of related studies intended to develop and evaluate new approaches to monitoring and supporting people with long term (and multiple) conditions including diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, building on the availability of novel digital-health technologies...
Source: eHealth News EU - January 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Jobs Source Type: news

Is it time for a new financial services tribunal?
(Oxford University Press USA) A new article published in Capital Markets Law Journal argues that consumers and banks could benefit from the creation of a quick and inexpensive financial services tribunal, modeled on the Employment Tribunals, to resolve substantial disputes between banks and small and medium sized companies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Girls who menstruate before 12 at heart attack risk
The findings came from a University of Oxford study. Earlier menstruation has been previously linked to reduced blood flow, lowering oxygen levels in the brain and causing tissue death. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One THIRD of a pint of beer reduces brain function
Researchers from Oxford University found consuming more than 10g, or one unit, of alcohol every day significantly reduces people's cognitive function, which worsens as the drinker ages. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

War in Ukraine has escalated HIV spread in the country
(University of Oxford) Conflict in Ukraine has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks throughout the country as displaced HIV-infected people move from war-affected regions to areas with higher risk of transmission, according to analysis by scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Restaurant and bar smoking bans do reduce smoking, especially among the highly educated
(Oxford University Press USA) Smoking risk drops significantly in college graduates when they live near areas that have completely banned smoking in bars and restaurants, according to a new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aussie flu is more severe than the Swine flu, expert warns
EXCLUSIVE: The warning from Professor Peter Horby at Oxford University comes after actress Julia Stringer, 42, of Harrogate, revealed she cries every day after catching the killer 'Aussie flu'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oxford University press to publish Journal of Burn Care & Research
(Oxford University Press USA) Oxford University Press (OUP) is pleased to announce its partnership with the American Burn Association (ABA) to exclusively publish the Journal of Burn Care& Research, the only US journal devoted exclusively to the treatment and research of patients with burns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new research
(University of Oxford) Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation.A new study, carried out in the Department of Plant Sciences, together with international colleagues, has shown for the first time that DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR), which corrects mutations that arise during the replication of the genome during cell division, is targeted to particular regions of the genome, and preferentially repairs genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals
(University of Oxford) A new set of principles are needed to address the moral challenge of climate change. These principles, developed by a team of researchers at the Oxford Martin School, and published this week in Nature Climate Change, are a set of scientifically-grounded tools for the use of both investors and companies to assess corporate strategy against climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The foods you're most likely to indulge in this Christmas
EXCLUSIVE A scientist from the University of Oxford is warning people not to watch out for mince pies, mulled wine and turkey with cranberry sauce as their complex flavours are 'addictive'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UK children glued to screens for almost five hours a day
British children spend nearly five hours a day in front of screens. An Oxford University study shows their average daily screen time has leapt from just under three hours to almost five hours. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Young people spend five hours a day looking at a screen
The study, by an academic at Oxford University, is based on diary entries from eight to 18-year-olds, gathered in 2000 and 2015, on how they spend their time (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase
(University of Oxford) With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University research has revealed that as digital pasttimes have become intertwined with daily life, children have adapted their behaviours to include their devices. Much like adults, they are able to multi-task and also do all the things that they would do anyway. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decriminalizing prostitution could reduce sexual violence and STD transmission
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in the Review of Economic Studies finds that Rhode Island's 6-year prostitution decriminalization policy increased the size of the sex market, but it also appears that during this period both rape offenses and female gonorrhea incidence declined dramatically. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget youthquake: here are the real words of the year | Martin Kelner
Oxford Dictionaries ’ word of 2017 is hardly earth-shaking. But instead of being broflakes, let’s join in on the funCasper Grathwohl has the rather fine title of president of dictionaries at Oxford University Press, so it was he who chose the much-discussed but rarely used “youthquake” as 2017 word of the year, over some other equally unlikely suggestions. I only mention that in case, in skimming over the story at this busy time of the year, you read Grathwohl alongsideAntifa,gorpcore andbroflake, and assumed it was one of the contenders.Why not? The Microsoft spellchecker puts the same wobbly line ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Martin Kelner Tags: Language Reference and languages Society Young people Science UK news Source Type: news

New study shows how birds work to sing together
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Children's screen-time guidelines too restrictive, according to new research
(University of Oxford) Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Pediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact of overusing technology on people's wellbeing. However, new Oxford University research suggests that existing guidance managing children's digital media time may not be as beneficial as first thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treating depression requires a multifaceted approach
Depression affects one in four women and one in six men. It is the cause of more than $200 billion in lost productivity, work absenteeism, and disability and health care costs annually, and is believed to contribute to roughly a million suicides worldwide each year.These were among the statistics experts shared at aZ ócalo/UCLA discussion on depression and the efforts UCLA is undertaking to better diagnose and treat it. The event, which was held Dec. 11, drew a packed house to the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy in downtown Los Angeles.The evening featured panelists Gene Block, UCLA chancellor; &nb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Oxford and Berlin to partner in wide-ranging new research partnership
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Four Berlin institutions, the Freie Universit ä t Berlin, Humboldt-Universit ä t zu Berlin, Technische Universit ä t Berlin, the Charit é -- Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin, and the University of Oxford, have set out to create a new partnership which will open up exciting new initiatives across all academic disciplines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anesthetics have the same effects on plants as they have on animals and humans
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in Annals of Botany has shown that plants react to anesthetics similarly to the way animals and humans do, suggesting plants are ideal objects for testing anesthetics actions in future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women harmed because vaginal mesh regulation 'not fit for purpose'
Oxford University team calls for mandatory clinical trials for invasive devices following scandal that emerged this yearWomen have been exposed to unnecessary harm due to poor regulation for vaginal mesh products, medical experts have warned.The team, from the University of Oxford, have called for clinical trials to be made mandatory for invasive medical devices and for a registry to be created in response to thevaginal mesh scandal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Vaginal mesh implants Health Society Women UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Activity matters: How Fitbit can help us understand cancer surgery recovery
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in Annals of Behavioral Medicine finds that more activity during inpatient recovery predicted lower risk of 30- and 60-day readmission after surgery for metastatic peritoneal cancer. By monitoring patients using Fitbit, researchers found that higher Fitbit steps forecast better patient outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New study shows how ant colonies behave differently in different environments
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that some ant colonies defend more gallantly than others, revealing that colonies themselves may have personalities. Trees that have more active, aggressive colonies have less leaf damage, suggesting that colony personality may play an important role in plant health and survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real?
(University of Oxford) Was St Nicholas, the fourth century saint who inspired the iconography of Santa Claus, a legend or was he a real person?New Oxford University research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the saint, do in fact date from the right historical period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

These 12 People Are Changing Science
On Sunday, some of the smartest minds in science and math will gather at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley for the Breakthrough Prize, one of the biggest prizes in science. Several scientists will be recognized for their research, with 12 individuals receiving substantial funding for their work in advancing life sciences, physics and mathematics. Founded in 2012 by Sergey Brin, Mark Zuckerberg & Priscilla Chan, Yuri & Julia Milner, and Anne Wojcicki, this year the annual prize provided $22 million in awards. Here are some of the winners whose work may be changing your life soon: PHYSICS Wilkinson Mi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park, Alexandra Sifferlin and Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anne wojcicki Breakthrough Prize healthytime Mark Zuckerberg Math onetime Physics priscilla chan Science sergey brin Silicon Valley Yuri Milner Source Type: news

The BGRF & Oxford University Scientific Society announce launch of 'The longevity podcast'
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) The Biogerontology Research Foundation announces the launch of The Longevity Podcast, a podcast produced in partnership with the Oxford University Scientific Society (OUSS) by Jakub Stefaniak, Director of Public Outreach& Education for the BGRF and President of the OUSS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Journal of the Canadian Assoc of Gastroenterology now published by Oxford University Press
(Oxford University Press USA) Oxford University Press and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) are pleased to announce their new partnership to publish the Journal of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (JCAG), CAG's official journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

T Austin professors discover copy of Jesus' secret revelations to his brother
(University of Texas at Austin) The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University by biblical scholars at The University of Texas at Austin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The world needs to rethink the value of water
(University of Oxford) Research led by Oxford University, published today in Science, highlights the accelerating pressure on measuring, monitoring and managing water locally and globally. A new four-part framework is proposed to value water for sustainable development to guide better policy and practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heart failure kills more Brits than top four cancers
More of us are now developing the deadly condition than getting the four commonest forms of cancer, a major study from Oxford University shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Military Medicine is now published by Oxford University Press
(Oxford University Press USA) Oxford University Press and AMSUS, the Society of Federal Health Professionals, are pleased to announce their new partnership to publish Military Medicine, the AMSUS bi-monthly scientific journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decompression surgery 'may not benefit people with shoulder pain'
This study suggests that other treatments such as physiotherapy can be just as effective as shoulder surgery, and should be taken into consideration with patients considering surgery and could influence the decisions made by health providers. "Often shoulder pain can be short-lived, but if you’re experiencing shoulder pain which continues for more than two weeks, or gets worse, speak to your doctor or aphysiotherapist in case you have a more complex problem." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of the link between obesity and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

EBR Systems pulls in $50m for wireless pacer
EBR Systems said yesterday that it raised $50 million to back a clinical trial for the wireless cardiac pacemaker it’s developing after winning CE Mark approval for a second-generation wireless transmitter. EBR’s device, which it calls wireless stimulation endocardially or Wise, uses a subcutaneous generator to wirelessly deliver ultrasound energy to a “pellet” implanted in the right ventricle, which it uses to synchronize the left and right ventricles. The system is designed to eliminate the need for a left ventricular lead by allowing the operating physician to place the stimulation “pe...
Source: Mass Device - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Funding Roundup Regulatory/Compliance Wall Street Beat Cardiac Rhythm Management EBR Systems Inc. Source Type: news

HPV testing is better than the Pap test at detecting cervical cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that testing for cervical cancer using HPV testing in addition to the Pap smear is unlikely to detect cancer cases that wouldn't be found using HPV testing alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

From southeast Asia to the sewers: Study determines new geographical origins of brown rats
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) an international research team of more than 20 institutions has performed the largest, whole genome DNA sequencing of 110 wild brown rats from across the world. The new study, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, has revealed that brown rats originally migrated 'Out of Asia' from southern East Asia about 3,600 years ago, rapidly spreading, first into the Middle East, and then to Europe and Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Super-fuel designed for military allows you to eat carbs
Oxford University has created a drink – dubbed 'keto in a bottle' and a San Francisco firm has launched the first commercial version. Keto followers include Kim Kardashian. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Congratulations to Professor John Wass newly appointed GIRFT Endocrinology Clinical Lead
The Society for Endocrinology congratulates Professor John Wass, Professor of Endocrinology at Oxford University and former president of the Society of Endocrinology, on his new appointment as GIRFT Clinical Lead for Endocrinology.Getting It Right First Time (GIRFT) is a national programme led by frontline clinicians, to help improve the quality of care within the NHS by identifying and reducing unwarranted variations in service and practice. It is a partnership between the NHS Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust (RNOH) and the Operational Productivity Directorate of NHS Improvement (NHSI).Professor Tim Briggs, Chair...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Breast cancer can return 20 years after first diagnosis
The disease can ‘lie dormant’ for years, reappearing long after patients get all-clear, say Oxford University researchers. Women may be told to continue drugs like tamoxifen for longer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical Researcher (Digital Health)
Location: Oxford, United Kingdom Job Type: Full-Time Employer: NIHR Oxford BRC Closing Date: 29.11.2017 12:00 The University of Oxford is seeking a committed and enthusiastic post-foundation stage clinician with an interest in community-based care, to drive forward an emerging area of clinically-focussed translational research. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - November 8, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Jobs Source Type: news

In small study, wearable technology helps smokers quit
Wearable technology could be key to reminding smokers looking to quit to put down the cigarette, according to a new study recently published by Oxford University Press ’ peer review journal “Nicotine and Tobacco Research.” (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - November 7, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

PMRA launches new journal: Perspectives on Public Management and Governance
(Oxford University Press USA) Oxford University Press is pleased to announce the launch of a new journal, Perspectives on Public Management and Governance, published on behalf of the Public Management Research Association (PMRA). The journal will be led by incoming editor Kirk Emerson. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Former cricketers 'more likely to experience osteoarthritis and joint surgery'
Elite-level cricketers are more likely than most to experience osteoarthritis and other related bone health issues, according to new research. The University of Oxford-led study, which was supported by theArthritis Research UK Centre for Sport,Exercise andOsteoarthritis* and the England and Wales Cricket Board, has offered evidence that more needs to be done to monitor and address the specific health risks associated with the sport, and to offer tailored support for those in need. The impact of cricket on musculoskeletal health For this research, a group of 113 former elite cricket players were asked to complete a health q...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

What Darwin ’s theories tell us about the shape alien life will take
All aliens must evolve, says a new study from scientists at the University of Oxford – and that gives us something to look for“It’s life, Jim, but not as we know it.” How many times did we hear Mr Spock say this back in the day when classic Star Trek ruled the airwaves?* What always interested me back then was how did he know that it was life if it was so barely recognisable by Earthly (or Vulcan) standards?Turns out a group of scientists from the zoology department at the University of Oxford may have the answer. Don ’t look for faces, eyes, limbs or any of the large-scale things that are so ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Alien life Science Astronomy Biology Space Charles Darwin Evolution Source Type: news

Ms Smith Goes to Westminster
This article first appeared in the Autumn 2017 edition of U Magazine.  The article Ms Smith Goes to Westminster first appeared on the UNISON National site. (Source: UNISON Health care news)
Source: UNISON Health care news - November 2, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Magazine Black history month labour link nursing one team for patient care race discrimination Save our NHS women members Source Type: news

Unemployment triggers increase in child neglect, according to new research
(University of Oxford) The number of reported cases of child neglect in the United States of America increased as a result of the spike in unemployment following the financial crisis of 2007-08, according to new Oxford University research. The first study of its kind, suggests that unemployment can cause an increase in child neglect because parents have more limited access to the resources required to provide for a child's basic needs, such as clothing, food and medical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is gun violence contagious?
(University of Pennsylvania) Gun violence is mostly not contagious but rather an endemic issue for particular neighborhoods, according to researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oxford. That means place-based interventions like hotspot policing or greening vacant lots have the best chance to improve this problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news