Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality
(University of Oxford) Sociable people have a higher abundance of certain types of gut bacteria and also more diverse bacteria, an Oxford University study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists closer to finding the cell of origin for ovarian cancer
(University of Oxford) Researchers have used a new technique to identify six previously unknown cell types in human Fallopian tubes, paving the way for faster identification and treatment of ovarian cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study resurrects mammoth DNA to explore the cause of their extinction
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in Genome Biology and Evolution, published by Oxford University Press, resurrected the mutated genes of the last herd of woolly mammoths and found that their small population had developed a number of genetic defects that may have proved fatal for the species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists find new ways to prevent skin scarring
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in Burns& Trauma, published by Oxford University Press, reveals promising new strategies to prevent skin scarring after injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fish that can repair their OWN HEART: Scientists discover immune cell involved
University of Oxford scientists were 'surprised' to find that immune cells, called macrophages, helped zebrafish regenerate their own heart tissue. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New target identified for repairing the heart after heart attack
(University of Oxford) An immune cell is shown for the first time to be involved in creating the scar that repairs the heart after damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows why women have to be likeable, and men don't
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in The Economic Journal finds that likeability is an influencing factor in interactions between women, as well as interactions between men and women, but not in all-male interactions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In memoriam: Stuart Schweitzer, 80, internationally renowned health economist
Stuart Schweitzer, longtime professor of health policy and management in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, died of cancer Jan. 5. He was 80.Schweitzer taught at UCLA beginning in 1976, when he became the first faculty member in the public health school who had formal economics training. Forty-two years later, he retired, having served in a variety of leadership positions, including division and department chair and vice chair. He was esteemed for his genuine care about his students ’ well-being and was an exceptionally kind mentor.Esteemed across the globe for his scholarship in the field of health economics...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 24, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers launches ‘STM 2020 Research Data Year’
To accelerate the implementation of research data solutions, The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) has launched the ‘STM 2020 Research Data Year’ – a dedicated action plan to increase the number of journals with data policies, expand the number of journals depositing data links and grow the volume of citations to datasets. In any field of study, the sharing of data is one of the most fundamental aspects of maintaining the integrity of research. The availability of research data plays a vital role in ensuring reproducibility and the ongoing develop...
Source: News from STM - January 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Latest Source Type: news

Study reveals pre-Hispanic history, genetic changes among indigenous Mexican populations
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) To better understand the broad demographic history of pre-Hispanic Mexico and to search for signatures of adaptive evolution, scientists have sequenced the complete protein-coding regions of the genome, or exomes, of 78 individuals from five different indigenous groups from Northern (Rara?muri or Tarahumara, and Huichol), Central (Nahua), South (Triqui, or TRQ) and Southeast (Maya, or MYA) Mexico. The genomic study is the largest of its kind for indigenous populations from the Americas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Terrain may help identify habitats that are resilient to the effects of climate change
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, published by Oxford University Press, finds that models which use terrain features offer both practical and theoretical advantages in identifying climate resilient habitats for migratory birds whose populations are impacted by climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plant pigment can significantly reduce blood pressure
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in Nutrition Reviews finds that intake of the flavonoid quercetin can greatly reduce high blood pressure in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds persistent gender gap in medical paper publication
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the journal Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, shows that there remains a meaningful gender gap between the number of biomedical papers written by women and those written by men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infectious disease defenses among ancient hominid contributions to adaptation of modern humans
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) In a new study published in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, scientists Alexandre Gouy and Laurent Excoffier have developed new computational tools to better analyze human genome datasets, and found more evidence of a legacy of ancient hominid adaptation, particularly to help fight off infectious diseases like malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Britons' consumption of sugar has dropped by a teaspoon a day since tax on sweetened drinks launched
The sugar in soft drinks sold in the UK has dropped by 30 per cent - equivalent to a daily reduction of 4.6g per person since 2015. Oxford University researchers credit the soft drinks levy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Herpes simplex viruses: new relationships between epidemiology and history
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) An Italian research team has refined the history and origins of two extremely common pathogens in human populations, herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2. Using and applying rather precise data methods they estimated that the circulating strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 migrated from Africa about 5000 years ago. The exit from Africa of herpes simplex virus type 2 was even more recent and probably occurred in the eighteenth century, during the height of the slave trade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Amount of sugar sold in soft drinks drops by 29% in the UK
(University of Oxford) There was a 29% reduction in the total amount of sugar sold in soft drinks in the UK between 2015-2018, despite an increase in sales of soft drinks by volume of 7%, according to new research from the Nuffield Department of Population Health (NDPH) at the University of Oxford. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Malnutrition linked with increased risk of Zika birth defects
(University of Oxford) Environmental factors, such as the diets of pregnant women, have been shown to have an effect on the extent and severity of developmental malformations in babies associated with Zika virus (ZIKV) congenital infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Risk for Suicide Increased in Children, Teens Who Self-Harm
THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 -- Children and adolescents who self-harm have an increased risk for suicide, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in The Lancet Child& Adolescent Health. Keith Hawton, D.Sc., D.M., from the University of Oxford... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

'Resurrection ecology' of 600-year-old water fleas used to understand pollution adaptation
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) By taking advantage of the unique genomic model organism of tiny waterfleas, or Daphnia, an international team of researchers has now analyzed Daphnia from a phosphorus-rich Minnesota lake -- and compared it to revived, 600-year-old Daphnia dormant eggs found in the bottom sediments -- to better understand how these creatures cope with a dramatic environmental change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shark and ray vision comes into focus
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Until now, little has been known about the evolution of vision in cartilaginous fishes, particularly sharks and their genetic cousins, the rays. In a new study, it has been shown that all cartilaginous fishes, similar to the marine mammals, have lost the SWS1 and SWS2 opsin genes. Sharks and rays do contain both rod and cone photoreceptors; however rays possess two cone opsin genes whereas sharks have only one cone. Sharks therefore were found to have lost the ability to see colors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo FRS 1959-2020
It is with great sadness that we learnt of the death of Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo FRS, Director of the MRC Human Immunology Unit at the University of Oxford. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - January 9, 2020 Category: Research Source Type: news

Removing body clock gene protects mice against pneumonia
(University of Oxford) This is the first time a clock gene has been found to affect resistance to bacterial pneumonia, a fatal disease responsible for 5% of all deaths in the UK each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Podcast: Can people stop smoking by cutting down the amount they smoke first?
There are more than 50 Cochrane Reviews of the effects of interventions to help people quit smoking; one of which investigates whether reducing smoking before quitting might be an alternative to stopping suddenly. It was updated in September 2019 and we asked lead author, Nicola Lindson, from the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group based in the University of Oxford in the UK to tell us about their latest findings.The standard way that people are told to quit smoking is to smoke as normal until a quit day, and then stop using all cigarettes. However, this is daunting for many, and those who have tried it without success might ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 2, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Starry eyes on the reef: Color-changing brittle stars can see
(University of Oxford) Scientists have shown for the first time that brittle stars use vision to guide them through vibrant coral reefs, thanks to a neat color-changing trick. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 2, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biomarker predicts which patients with heart failure have a higher risk of dying within 1 to 3 years
FINDINGSA UCLA-led study revealed a new way to predict which patients with “stable” heart failure — those who have heart injury but do not require hospitalization — have a higher risk of dying within one to three years.  Although people with stable heart failure have similar characteristics, some have rapid disease progression while others remain stable. The resea rch shows that patients who have higher levels of neuropeptide Y, a molecule released by the nervous system, are 10 times more likely to die within one to three years than those with lower levels of neuropeptides.BACKGROUNDAbout half ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The birds and the bees and the bearded dragons
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Though sex itself is widespread among lifeforms, the mechanisms determining an individual's sex vary spectacularly across organisms. How these systems evolve and transition from one to the next across evolutionary time is slowly being revealed. A novel method provides new insight into the evolution of sex determination systems in bearded dragons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vitamin D Supplementation Alone May Not Reduce Fracture Risk
FRIDAY, Dec. 20, 2019 -- Supplementation with vitamin D alone does not appear to reduce the risk for fracture, according to a review published online Dec. 20 in JAMA Network Open. Pang Yao, Ph.D., from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Ruth van Heyningen obituary
Biochemist and ophthalmologist whose research concentrated on the formation of cataractsRuth van Heyningen, who has died aged 101, was a pioneering explorer of ophthalmic biochemistry, a field to which she made major contributions after she joined the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology, at Oxford University, in 1951.Her research, much of which was carried out in collaboration with the laboratory ’s then director,Antoinette (Tony) Pirie, was focused on the lens, in particular the biochemical pathways involved in the formation of cataracts. Tony and Ruth wrote a key book together, Biochemistry of the Eye (1956), whic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gillian Morriss-Kay Tags: Biochemistry and molecular biology Cataracts People in science University of Oxford Diabetes Wales Source Type: news

Renegotiating domestic violence: police attitudes and decisions concerning arrest - Myhill A.
This paper presents findings from a comparative study of police decision-making. Interview data are used to revisit Hoyle's [1998. Negotiating domestic violence: police, criminal justice and victims. Oxford: Oxford University Press] explanatory model of po... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Elsevier Signs Open Access Deal with U.S. Institution
Elsevier, which now describes itself as an “information analytics business,” has inked an open-access agreement with Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), the first U.S. institution to enter such an agreement with Elsevier. The “transformative agreement” was announced on November 22, 2019. The agreement allows researchers at CMU to both publish open-access articles in any Elsevier journal and access paywalled Elsevier articles by paying one flat fee. Previously, publishing and accessing open-access articles involved two separate payment mechanisms. CMU was engaged in negotiations for an open-access dea...
Source: Public Policy Reports - December 10, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Aspirin may no longer be effective as cardiovascular treatment
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, found that the widespread use of statins and cancer screening technology may have altered the benefits of aspirin use. Researchers concluded that aspirin no longer provides a net benefit as primary prevention for cardiovascular disease and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
(University of Oxford) A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Elizabeth I identified as author of Tacitus translation
(Oxford University Press USA) A new article in the Review of English Studies argues that a manuscript translation of Tacitus's Annales, completed in the late sixteenth century and preserved at Lambeth Palace Library, was done by Queen Elizabeth I. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows how cancer survivors develop opioid addictions
(Oxford University Press USA) Opioids play an important role in how cancer patients manage pain, but the ongoing opioid epidemic has raised concerns about their potential for abuse. A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reveals that several factors are associated with a risk for persistent opioid use, including younger age, white race, unemployment at the time of cancer diagnosis, lower median income, and current or prior tobacco use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Alzheimer risk gene discovered
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in the Journal of Neuropathology& Experimental Neurology finds a gene that may help explain a large part of the genetic risk for developing Alzheimer disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women raised in poor neighborhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
(University of Oxford) Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One NHS patient DIED and another became seriously ill after receiving infected organs
A doctor at Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust accidentally cut the donor's stomach during the original procedure. However, the surgeon did not record the incident. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Radiation from CT scans associated with increased risk for cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that exposure to radiation from CT scans is associated with higher risks of developing thyroid cancer and leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Talking with trained doctors can help abused women
(Oxford University Press USA) Women who are experiencing intimate partner violence feel better supported, more confident, and less depressed when trained family doctors counsel them, according to new research in the journal Family Practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Creating fake rhino horn with horse hair to help in saving the endangered rhino
(University of Oxford) Scientists from the University of Oxford and Fudan University, Shanghai, have invented a way to create fake rhino horn using horse hair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Doctors say better support is needed for self-harm patients
Oxford University researchers found suicide rates were 55 times higher among such patients in the year after being hospitalised, compared to the general population. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Did you solve it? Would you get into Oxford?
The solution to today ’s puzzleEarlier today I set you a question from Oxford university ’s Mathematics Admissions Test.You need to pack several items into your shopping bag without squashing anything. The items are to be placed one on top of the other. Each item has aweight and astrength, defined as the maximum weight that can be placed above that item without it being squashed. A packing order issafe if no item in the bag is squashed, that is, if, for each item, that item ’s strength is at least the combined weight of what’s placed above that item. For example, here are three items and a packing o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Computer science and IT Oxbridge and elitism University of Oxford University of Cambridge Higher education Source Type: news

Podcast: Methods to help people quit smoking
Cochrane podcasts deliver the latest Cochrane evidence in an easy to access audio format, allowing you to stay up to date on newly published reviews wherever you are. Each Cochrane podcast offers a short summary of a recent Cochrane review from the authors themselves. They are brief, allowing everyone from healthcare professionals to patients and families to hear the latest Cochrane evidence in under five minutes. Here we have curated three recent Cochrane podcasts on the subject of quitting smoking.Podcast: What is the best way to use nicotine replacement therapy to quit smoking?Nicotine replacement therapy has been used ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 4, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Would you get into Oxford?
Try your luck at its fiendish maths entrance examUPDATE: To read the solution click hereLast week about 3,500 of Britain ’s most mathematically gifted sixth formers sat Oxford university’s annual Mathematics Admissions Test.The exam is designed to test “mathematical understanding…rather than a breadth of knowledge.” Today’s puzzle is taken from a recent paper. It’s about stacking items in a shopping bag.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Science Mathematics Education Computer science and IT University of Oxford University of Cambridge Higher education Source Type: news

Oxford University bans clapping to keep people from being ‘triggered’
(Natural News) Student union representatives at the University of Oxford passed a motion this week to ban clapping and replace it with silent “jazz hands” waving, insisting that applause “could trigger anxiety”. (Article by Thomas D. Williams, Ph.D. republished from Breitbart.com) The motion to “mandate the encouragement of silent clapping” proposed using the more “inclusive” British Sign... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assaults on staff: clear policies needed - Foster S.
Sam Foster, Chief Nurse, Oxford University Hospitals, discusses what a health organisation's response should be to a report of a sexual assault on a member of staff. Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Promising therapy for common form of eczema identified in early-stage trial
A therapy that targets the immune system showed promise for treating atopic dermatitis– the most common form of eczema– in a small proof-of-concept trial, led by scientists from the MRC Human Immunology Unit at the University of Oxford. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - October 24, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Pioneering eczema jab 'improves the skin of patients within a month'
Charities today said the results of the Oxford University study were 'hugely exciting' and claimed the medication, called etokimab, is part of the 'future of treatment'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Max P Science Writing Award 2019 - Winner announced
MRC-funded PhD student Akira Wiberg, of the University of Oxford, scooped the main prize of this year's Max Perutz Science Writing Award. At the awards ceremony on 15 October, Akira received the first prize of£1,500 for his article:"Getting on your nerves. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - October 16, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news