ADHD Study Links Teen ’ s Symptoms With Digital Media Use
(CNN) — The more teens check social media and stream video, the more likely they might develop symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a new study suggests. The study, published in the medical journal JAMA on Tuesday, sheds light on how more research is needed to determine whether symptoms of the disorder, commonly called ADHD, are possibly caused by digital media use. “If we can determine if there is a potential causal link that is consistent across studies, then we can design interventions to curb media exposure. Even simple educational information to let teachers, parents, and pe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Tech ADHD CNN JAMA Source Type: news

CT scans may increase the risk of brain cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oxford University Press to publish two journals of the American Ornithological Society
(Oxford University Press USA) The American Ornithological Society and Oxford University Press are pleased to announce their new partnership to publish The Auk: Ornithological Advances and The Condor: Ornithological Applications, the society's two peer-reviewed, top-ranked, Journal Citation Reports indexed journals. The Auk and The Condor will serve as OUP's flagship titles in ornithology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Country diary: metamorphosis in a museum tower
Oxford University Museum:For 70 years, researchers have been watching ‘particularly hideous’ young swifts turn into long-winged angelsThis glorious structure is a place rich in history. As we walked through the galleries our guide paused to show us the great oak door behind which Bishop Wilberforce confronted “Darwin’s bulldog”,Thomas Huxley, in their famous debate on evolution. We, however, were intent on a more modest fraction of the building ’s past. For it was here in 1947 that the ecologists Elizabeth and David Lack noticed how breeding swifts were vanishing into air vents in the ro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Cocker Tags: Birds Animal behaviour University of Oxford Science and nature books Wildlife Birdwatching UK news Environment Higher education Biology Research Animals Culture World news Source Type: news

Virtual Reality Treatments Can Alleviate Fear of Heights
THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 -- Automated virtual reality (VR) treatments can alleviate fear of heights, according to a study published online July 11 in The Lancet Psychiatry. Daniel Freeman, Ph.D., from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Parental controls do not stop teens from seeing pornography, new research finds
(University of Oxford) New research from the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford has found that Internet filtering tools are ineffective and in most cases, were an insignificant factor in whether young people had seen explicit sexual content. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart muscle can be regenerated to prevent organ failure
Researchers from Oxford University found that injecting a protein after heart attacks significantly reduces the amount of damaged heart muscle and allows the organ to pump as normal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Change health messaging to focus on potential impact to help stop the next pandemic
(City University London) Changing public health messaging to focus on the impact of our actions -- for example the potentially harmful impact of infecting a colleague with a cold, rather than whether we will infect them if we go into work in the first place -- could have significant implications for how we deal with global threats, according to a new study from City University of London, the Oxford Martin School (University of Oxford), and Yale University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When plants break up: Understanding cooperative relationships between soil microbes
(Natural News) Who knew even plants could “break up?” According to a study, even though plants can cooperate, there are also times when these cooperative relationships break down. Gijsbert Werner, Postdoctoral Fellow, and Stuart West, Professor of Evolutionary Biology, both in the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford, explained that plants have various “below-ground... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New hope for patients with incurable and disabling hand condition, Dupuytren's disease
(University of Oxford) Oxford scientists show anti-TNF inhibits the cells responsible for Dupuytren's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New model for predicting neuroblastoma outcomes incorporates early developmental signals
(Stowers Institute for Medical Research) Motivated by a desire to better understand the molecular circuitry underlying neuroblastoma and limitations of current methods for predicting disease progression and outcome, researchers from the Kulesa Lab at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and collaborators at the University of Michigan and Oxford University set out to construct a logic-based model incorporating information about developmental signaling pathways implicated in the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient American dogs almost completely wiped out by arrival of European breeds
(University of Oxford) The arrival of Europeans to the Americas, beginning in the 15th century, all but wiped out the dogs that had lived alongside native people on the continent for thousands of years, according to new research published in Science.But one close relative of these native dogs lives on in an unexpected place -- as a transmissible cancer whose genome is that of the original dog in which it appeared, but has since spread throughout the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Announcing the winners of the Rosamund Snow Prize
We are delighted to announce the winners of theRosamund Snow Prize. This prize will enable two people aged under 30 with experience as health service users to join other healthcare consumers*, researchers and health professionals at Cochrane ’s global conference (the Cochrane Colloquium), which takes place on 16th - 18th September 2018  in Edinburgh.The Rosamund Snow PrizeRosamund Snow (1971-2017) will be remembered by many for her work to champion patients ’ involvement in healthcare. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in her teens, Rosamund was later asked to help a consultant at her outpatient clinic invest...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 3, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Hard-hitting FAST stroke awareness campaign has failed
Oxford University experts found minor stroke and TIA patients who had seen the advert were 13 per cent less likely to seek help for their symptoms within three hours than those who hadn't. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Who shares similar experiences of climate change in a 1.5 ° C world and beyond?
(University of Oxford) A new framework to understand how uneven the effects of a 1.5 ° C world are for different countries around the world has been published today in Geophysical Research Letters, led by researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the Oxford University Department of Geography. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

You don't need to believe in free will to be a nice person, shows new research
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Social psychologist Damien Crone (University of Melbourne) and Philosophy professor Neil Levy (Macquarie University and the University of Oxford) conducted a series of studies of 921 of people and found that a person's moral behavior is not tied to their beliefs in free will. The results will appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social bonding key cause of football violence
(University of Oxford) As World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to 'social maladjustment' e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc. However, social bonding and a desire to protect and defend other fans may be one of the main motivations not only for football hooliganism, but extremist group behaviour in general, according to new Oxford University research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robots perform sight-saving eye operations BETTER than surgeons, reveals pioneering trial
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT Researchers from the University of Oxford carried out the study using PRECEYES Surgical System. Robots successfully restored vision in six patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dementia can be caused by hypertension
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in Cardiovascular Research indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Benefits--and Potential Pitfalls--of Urban Green Spaces
With the rapid expansion of the urban landscape, successfully managing ecosystems in built areas has never been more important. However, our understanding of urban ecology is far from complete, and the data at hand are often patchy, leaving stakeholders without the tools they need to successfully manage human-affected ecosystems. Writing in BioScience, Christopher Lepczyk, a biologist working at Auburn University, and his colleagues discuss the future of urban biodiversity, highlighting trends and raising questions whose answers will be crucial for successful “green” management. According to the authors, manag...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Redomestication of Wolves
On landscapes around the world, environmental change is bringing people and large carnivores together--but the union is not without its problems. Human-wildlife conflict is on the rise as development continues unabated and apex predators begin to reoccupy their former ranges. Further complicating matters, many of these species are now reliant on anthropogenic, or human, foods, including livestock, livestock and other ungulate carcasses, and garbage. Writing in BioScience, Thomas Newsome, of Deakin University and the University of Sydney, and his colleagues use gray wolves and other large predators as case studies to explo...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Marine Ecosystems Show Resilience to Climate Disturbance
Climate-driven disturbances are having profound impacts on coastal ecosystems, with many crucial habitat-forming species in sharp decline. However, among these degraded biomes, examples of resilience are emerging. Writing in BioScience, Jennifer O'Leary, a California Sea Grant Marine Biologist based at California Polytechnic State University, and her colleagues describe these recoveries and highlight the possible implications for ecosystem-sparing management. To gain insight into disturbed coastal habitats, the authors surveyed 97 marine experts about their observations of climate-induced perturbations, including extreme ...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

AIBS Announces the Appointment of Scott Collins as BioScience Editor in Chief
AIBS is pleased to announce the appointment of Scott L. Collins to a three-year term as BioScience's editor in chief. He has held the position on an interim basis since April 2016, when he succeeded Timothy M. Beardsley. Collins, a Distinguished Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, received his PhD from the University of Oklahoma in 1981 and brings a wealth of experience to the position, both as a biologist and as a publications expert. In addition to his numerous academic positions, Collins served at the National Science Foundation as a Program Director for efforts ranging from Conservation and Resto...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hydropeaking Extirpates River Insects
Hydropower produces 19% of the world's electricity--far more than all other renewable sources combined. In the face of mounting climate-change effects, the rush to this profuse energy source is expected to continue. However, hydroelectric dams can also produce a number of environmental consequences, many of which are unrecognized or understudied. Writing in an article for BioScience, an interdisciplinary team led by Theodore A. Kennedy of the US Geological Survey identifies one such threat: these dams' ability to devastate aquatic insect populations and the food webs that those insects underpin. One of hydropower's be...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Current Methods Cannot Predict Damage to Coral Reefs
The potentially devastating effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs are well reported. However, the methods used to evaluate the potential harm are often focused on individual species, viewed in isolation. According to an international research team led by Peter J. Edmunds of California State University, Northridge, this simplistic approach neglects broad-scale inter-species and inter-population dynamics that may have unforeseen consequences for ecosystems. "Most studies address the effects of ocean acidification on single species of corals and calcified algae in tanks," write the team members in an artic...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nitrogen Is a Neglected Threat to Biodiversity
Habitat destruction and the direct exploitation of species often occupy center stage in discussions of biodiversity perils. However, indirect harms, such as that posed by nitrogen pollution, remain underappreciated and poorly understood despite playing a key role in species declines. In an article for the journal BioScience, a team of environmental researchers led by Daniel Hernández of Carleton College, in Minnesota, outline the challenges associated with nitrogen. To better understand nitrogen-induced biodiversity imperilment, the authors surveyed 1400 species listed under the Endangered Species Act, finding a t...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Insights into Animal-Borne Disease Outbreaks
In the wake of the recent Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa, a reevaluation of the ways plague spreads through prairie dog colonies in the western United States has yielded insights that could help explain outbreaks of plague, Ebola, and other diseases that can be transmitted by animals to humans. These include West Nile Virus disease and MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome). The study, led by Dan Salkeld and Mike Antolin of Colorado State University and described in the journal BioScience, suggests that even deadly diseases may persist unnoticed in a population for years as smoldering infections, rather than jump fro...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Field Research Network to Address Looming Grain Failures
Across the United States, record quantities of corn and soybeans have been harvested in recent years. However, according to a BioScience article (http://io.aibs.org/gst) by David Gustafson of the International Life Sciences Institute Research Foundation and his colleagues, this trend may soon change. "By midcentury," the interdisciplinary team reports, "temperatures in Illinois will likely be closer to those of today's mid-South, and precipitation will range somewhere between that of today's East Texas and that of the Carolinas." Likewise, vapor-pressure deficits, which are a measure of the atmosphere's...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Contact with Nature May Mean More Social Cohesion, Less Crime
Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of contact with nature for human well-being. However, despite strong trends toward greater urbanization and declining green space, little is known about the social consequences of such contact. In the December issue of BioScience, an international, interdisciplinary team reports on how they used nationally representative data from the United Kingdom and stringent model testing to examine the relationships between objective measures and self-reported assessments of contact with nature, community cohesion, and local crime incidence. The results in the report, by Netta Weinste...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Successful Intervention Boosts the Gender Diversity of STEM Faculty
Eighty-one percent of US science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) university faculty members are men. To address this substantial gender disparity, an interdisciplinary team from Montana State University, led by Jessi L. Smith, devised a three-step search intervention, the results of which are published in BioScience. The approach, based on self-determination theory, was successful. "Searches in the intervention were 6.3 times more likely to make an offer to a woman candidate, and women who were made an offer were 5.8 times more likely to accept the offer from an intervention search," explain the authors...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tree Planting Can Harm Ecosystems
The world's grassy biomes are key contributors to biodiversity and ecosystem services, and are under immense pressure from conversion to agriculture and tree planting, report Joseph W. Veldman, of Iowa State University, and his colleagues in an article for the October issue of BioScience (https://bioscience.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/biosci/biv118). The authors argue that forest- and tree-focused environmental policies and conservation initiatives have potentially dire ecological consequences for undervalued ecosystems, such as grasslands, savannas, and open-canopy woodlands. To illustrate this forest bias and...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions, including the University of Bristol, provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5 ° C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Geographical Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Killer robots will only exist if we are stupid enough to let them
As long as humans are sensible when they create the operating programs, robots will bring enormous benefits to humanity, says expertThe idea of killer robots rising up and destroying humans is a Hollywood fantasy and a distraction from the more pressing dilemmas that intelligent machines present to society, according to one of Britain ’s most influential computer scientists. Sir Nigel Shadbolt, professor of computer science at the University of Oxford, predicts that AI will bring overwhelming benefits to humanity, revolutionising cancer diagnosis and treatment, and transforming education and the workplace. If problem...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Robots Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Consciousness Science Technology Elon Musk Source Type: news

How much is wildlife tourism affecting the animals it targets?
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in Conservation Physiology, published by Oxford University Press, reveals that white shark activity increases dramatically when the animals are interacting with cage-diving operators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Featured Review: Nicotine replacement therapy versus control for smoking cessation
High-quality evidence that all forms of nicotine replacement therapy can help increase chances of successfully stopping smoking.Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) aims to reduce withdrawal symptoms associated with stopping smoking by replacing the nicotine from cigarettes. NRT is available as skin patches that deliver nicotine slowly, and chewing gum, nasal and oral sprays, inhalators, and lozenges/tablets, all of which deliver nicotine to the brain more quickly than skin patches, but less rapidly than from smoking cigarettes. NRT aims to temporarily replace much of the nicotine from cigarettes to reduce motivation to smok...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Inadequate sleep could cost countries billions
(Oxford University Press USA) Inadequate sleep is a public health problem affecting more than one in three adults worldwide. A new study in the journal SLEEP, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that insufficient sleep could also have grave economic consequences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When Did Humans Discover Fire? The Answer Depends on What You Mean By ‘Discover’
Fire is one of the most important forces on Earth. The use of fire by humans has long been considered as a defining property of intelligence, separating us from other animals. The exact timing of the discovery and use of fire by humans has been a subject of continuing research, yet perhaps two questions have, until now, received little attention: What was fire on Earth like before humans appeared? And what experience of fire could early humans have had? Three main components are needed for fire. First, there must be a fuel to burn. Second, oxygen must be available — after all, combustion is essentially an oxidation p...
Source: TIME: Science - June 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew C. Scott Tags: Uncategorized Books Science Source Type: news

Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?
(University of Oxford) The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to the growing superbug crisis, including the use of defensive microbes and fecal transplants. In new research, Oxford University scientists have developed a lab-based approach, creating positive co-dependent relationships between hosts and bacteria, termed 'mutualisms,' quickly. These lab-developed bacterial relationships demonstrate how microbes can work with their hosts to prevent in...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Formula meal diet plan can tackle obesity in short term
Four drinks a day over eight weeks can help those at risk of heart disease, says studyObesity can be successfully tackled, at least in the short term, by giving up real food for formula meals for eight weeks, which removes temptation and any need to make difficult decisions about what to eat, a new study has found.The research, by the former government obesity advisor Professor Susan Jebb of Oxford University and colleagues, was designed to see whether a crash diet of just 810 calories a day – provided by four formula drinks – would help people whose obesity is putting them at high risk of health problems such ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Obesity Diets and dieting Health Diabetes Heart disease Society UK news Life and style Source Type: news

Be of good heart and cut risk of Alzheimer’s
A HEALTHY heart in middle age significantly reduces the risk of dementia in later life, a 30-year investigation shows. Initial results from a University of Oxford study prove that what is good for the heart in your 40s is good for the brain in old age. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating an egg a day reduces risk of stroke by more than 25%
Researchers from Peking University Health Science Centre and Oxford University were examining the links between egg consumption, strokes and cardiovascular disease during the study. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating an egg a day reduces risk of stroke by over 25 per cent
Researchers from Peking University Health Science Centre and Oxford University were examining the links between egg consumption, strokes and cardiovascular disease during the study. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sir Roger Elliott obituary
Specialist in theoretical physics who investigated the structure of matterOn Roger Elliott ’s 60th birthday, a conference in his honour displayed beneath his photograph the title: “Disorder in Condensed Matter Physics”. This reference to his speciality in theoretical physics, where he made important contributions to theories of optical, magnetic and semiconductor properties of the s olid state, was ironic, for Elliott, who has died aged 89, was a man of the soundest judgment.His opinion was widely sought and highly regarded, as professor at Oxford University (1974-96), as chief executive of Oxford Univers...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Frank Close Tags: Physics Materials science Education University of Oxford Higher education Source Type: news

Pig immunology comes of age: killer T cell responses to influenza
Researchers from The Pirbright Institute, University of Bristol, Cardiff University and University of Oxford have generated tools that allow scientists to understand a vital area of the pig immune system which was previously inaccessible. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research, Health; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

De Gruyter launches Sciendo
Publishing services division supports authors, societies and conference organizers The international independent scholarly publisher De Gruyter is increasing and expanding its publishing service offering and has launched a new division to do so:  Sciendo ([‘sjɛn|do] for the linguists). Sciendo provides specialized custom publishing services and solutions for third parties, especially academic and research institutions, societies, university presses, conference organizers and individual authors. In addition to services for journals and books – including open access – other allied services, such as se...
Source: News from STM - May 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

NHS should PRESCRIBE diet plans or vouchers for weight loss classes
Professor Susan Jebb, a Public Health England advisor and professor at Oxford University, says obesity should be treated by doctors and regarded as a serious health risk like high blood pressure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers may be underestimating roadkill numbers
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of Urban Ecology indicates that the number of wild animals killed by motor vehicles may be much higher than is generally reported or understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news