Immigrant women more likely to be overweight during pregnancy
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of Public Health finds that women in Norway from immigrant backgrounds are more likely to be overweight during pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep and aging: Two sides of one coin?
(University of Oxford) Oxford University researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and aging in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insomnia breakthrough: Scientists discover the brain cells that age us also control sleep
A new study by Oxford University reveals the 'internal stress' that ages our cells and triggers disease also activates neurones that control sleep in fruit flies, with human cells being similar. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top chronic fatigue researcher QUITS because online trolls are 'too hostile'
Dr Andrew Sharpe of Oxford University published one of the largest studies to-date on chronic fatigue syndrome, but activists trolled him so much online that he is quitting the field of study. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Matter: A History of the Iberian Peninsula, as Told by Its Skeletons
With an analysis of DNA from nearly 300 fossilized remains, scientists are peering into human prehistory in the region. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Skeletons Archaeology and Anthropology Basques Current Biology (Journal) Harvard University Oxford University Reich, David E (1974- ) Spain Portugal Europe Source Type: news

Matter: The Story of the Iberian Peninsula, Told in DNA
With an analysis of nearly 300 skeletons from various periods, scientists are peering into human prehistory in the region. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Skeletons Archaeology and Anthropology Basques Current Biology (Journal) Harvard University Oxford University Reich, David E (1974- ) Spain Portugal Europe Source Type: news

New evidence proves the work of UN agencies is effective
(University of Oxford) Academics led by Professor Lucie Cluver at Oxford University have shown how key services in lower and middle-income countries can contribute to multiple sustainable development goals (SDGs), even for the highest-risk children and adolescents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immigration is beneficial to economies, even after 100 years
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the Review of Economic Studies finds that US counties with more historical immigration have higher incomes, less poverty, and lower unemployment today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds robots can detect breast cancer as well as radiologists
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that artificial intelligence systems may be able to perform as accurately as radiologists in the evaluation of digital mammography in breast cancer screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Analysis of billions of Wikipedia searches reveals biodiversity secrets
(University of Oxford) An international team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Birmingham and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have found that the way in which people use the internet is closely tied to patterns and rhythms in the natural world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global maps enabling targeted interventions to reduce burden of mosquito-borne disease
(University of Oxford) The global population at risk from mosquito-borne diseases -- including yellow fever, Zika and dengue - is expanding with changes in the distribution of two key mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The spread of these species is largely driven by a combination of factors: human movements and climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pan-filovirus T-cell vaccine protects mice from Ebola and Marburg
(PLOS) Vaccines that induce protective T-cell responses could protect against members across the filovirus family, according to a study published Feb. 28 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Tom á š Hanke of the University of Oxford, Bette Korber of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and colleagues (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 28, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New affiliation to advance therapies for rare diseases
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) The University of Oxford and University Hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio, announced a multi-year affiliation to establish a global center for rare diseases. The Oxford-Harrington Rare Disease Centre will bring together the capabilities, resources and expertise of both institutions to deliver new treatments for rare diseases, for which therapeutic options are lacking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NHS 'soups and shakes' weight loss diet is cost-effective, study finds
Researchers from the University of Oxford predict patients who keep off just 1kg of the weight they lose could save the NHS almost £10,000 per person per year in future health costs, on average. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shoulder surgery leads to blood clots, infections and even DEATH in one in 28 patients
A study by the University of Oxford also found that despite the operation becoming increasingly popular among arthritis sufferers, as many as one in four require revision surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fertility clinics are making a killing, and many of the treatments are not necessary, a new study has found
(Natural News) Infertility is a serious condition that affects 48.5 million couples worldwide. Big pharmaceutical companies take these numbers as a business opportunity by producing fertility treatments which have no actual scientific evidence to back-up its claims. A study led by Carl Heneghan, a professor at the Oxford University‘s Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (CEBM),... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Increasing frailty may lead to death
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in Age and Ageing indicates that frail patients in any age group are more likely to die than those who are not frail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

American women have better control of high blood pressure but are more obese than men
(University of Oxford) The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford examined rates and management of diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and smoking and found that while there had been some improvements, women were now more likely to be obese and men less likely to have their blood pressure and diabetes under control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists launch first attempt to halt most common cause of age-related blindness with gene therapy
Surgeons at Oxford University have launched their first attempt at halting age-related macular degeneration, which is the most common cause of blindness and affects 600,000 people in the UK. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nice pay if you can get it
The Open University tops the list when it comes to high pay for vice chancellors. In 2017-18, it paid £718,000 for the services for former VC Peter Horrocks, including £255,000 ‘compensation’ for loss of office Image: Chris Valentine/Wikipedia   The newly established Office for Students has published its first statistics on senior management pay in England’s higher education sector. This has led to some strong headlines in the media. The Guardian reported that six university vice chancellors received more than half a million pounds for the 2017-18 pay year “in salary, bonuses a...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - February 18, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: P.S data he high pay higher education universities Source Type: news

Increased depression and suicidal behavior risk for young cannabis users
(McGill University Health Centre) Adolescent cannabis use has been linked to an increased risk of depression and suicidal behavior in young adulthood, according to the first meta-analysis by a team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and McGill University, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and Rutgers University-Camden, which is published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop technique to analyse cancer cells' life history
A team of researchers from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine at Oxford University has developed a technique that allows scientists to reliably track genetic errors in individual cancer cells, and find out how these might lead to uncontrollable growth. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - February 12, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Learning how (and how not) to learn
(Colorado State University) A Guide to Effective Studying and Learning, published by Oxford University Press, is co-authored by Professor Matthew Rhodes, Professor Anne Cleary, and Associate Professor Edward DeLosh, all faculty members in the Colorado State University Department of Psychology. Their experience as learning and memory scientists, as well as decades of established research, form the backbone of the book's major themes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GenesisCare and the University of Oxford establish innovative 10-year cancer research partnership
(Cello Health PR) 10-year partnership established between the UK's largest private provider of radiotherapy and world-leading university to drive cancer research and improve care services across the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insilico to contribute to Oxford CDT research and educational program in AI
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, a Rockville-based company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, announces its partnership with a new Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) at the University of Oxford, supported by EPSRC (The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study shows sitting, watching TV linked to colorectal cancer risk before age 50
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum has identified a connection between prolonged time spent sitting while watching TV and increased risk of colorectal cancer for younger Americans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

It's NOT Type 2 diabetes, it's "walking deficiency syndrome," says doctor
(Natural News) According to one medical practitioner, Type 2 diabetes is anything but. Sir Muir Gray, an Honorary Professor at Oxford University, asserts that it should be renamed “walking deficiency syndrome”, reports Daily Mail. Gray, a pioneer of breast and cervical screening, has promoted exercise and social remedies as means to repel a number of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers are worried that people with chronic disease are not being active enough
(University of Oxford) A study of over 96,000 UK men and women, of average age 64.5 years, has found that those with chronic conditions are spending considerably less time on physical activity than their healthy peers, so are missing out on its health management benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Cochrane review assesses the benefits and harms of exercise for preventing falls in older people living in the community
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today provides strong evidence that falls in people over sixty-years old can be prevented by exercise programmes.Falls are a leading cause of accidental or unintentional injury deaths worldwide. Older adults suffer the greatest number of fatal falls and over 37 million falls are severe enough to require medical attention each year.A new Cochrane Review produced by a team comprising researchers from the University of Sydney in Australia and University of Oxford, UK,summarizes the results from108 randomized controlled trials with 23,407 participants from across 25 countries. The...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 30, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Why large forest fires may not be a big threat to some endangered animals
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that certain endangered owls may continue to persist and even flourish after large forest fires. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research shows race and class do not affect a baby's development
A team of researchers from Oxford University tracked the physical and intellectual development of babies around the world while in the womb through to age two. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Warn that Proposed US-Mexico Border Wall Threatens Biodiversity, Conservation
Amidst increased tensions over the US-Mexico border, a multinational group of over 2500 scientists have endorsed an article cautioning that a hardened barrier may produce devastating ecological effects while hampering binational conservation efforts. In the BioScience Viewpoint, a group led by Robert Peters, William J. Ripple, and Jennifer R. B. Miller call attention to ecological disturbances that could affect hundreds of terrestrial and aquatic species, notably including the Mexican gray wolf and Sonoran pronghorn. The authors argue that the border wall will harm wildlife populations by fragmenting, degrading, and elimi...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

One Thing Leads to Another: Causal Chains Link Health, Development, and Conservation
The linkages between environmental health and human well-being are complex and dynamic, and researchers have developed numerous models for describing them. The models include attempts to bridge traditional academic boundaries, uniting fields of study under rubrics such as social-ecological frameworks, coupled human and natural systems, ecosystem services, and resilience theory. However, these efforts have been constrained by varying practices and a failure among practitioners to agree on consistent practices. Writing in BioScience, Jiangxiao Qiu of the University of Florida and his colleagues describe this state of affair...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Science Community Considers Approaches to Climate Disinformation
Despite overwhelming scientific agreement on the question of human-caused global warming, a major gap exists between this consensus and the public’s understanding of the issue. Writing in BioScience, Jeffrey A. Harvey, of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology, and his colleagues examine the causes of the consensus gap, focusing on climate-denier Internet blogs and the ways in which they use topics such as Arctic sea ice extent and polar bear well-being to foment misapprehensions about climate change among the public. Harvey and his colleagues performed an analysis of 45 climate-denier blogs, noting that 80% relied pr...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists Update Their " Warning to Humanity " on its Twenty-Fifth Anniversary
Scientists have long engaged the public and leaders on crucial matters of environmental stewardship. In 1992, the Union of Concerned Scientists, along with more than 1500 signatories, issued the "World Scientists' Warning to Humanity," in which they argued that human impacts on the natural world were likely to lead to "vast human misery" and a planet that was "irretrievably mutilated." On the twenty-fifth anniversary of the landmark declaration, William J. Ripple, his colleagues, and over 15,000 signatories from 184 countries revisit the original warning in what they deem "A Second Notic...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Benefits--and Potential Pitfalls--of Urban Green Spaces
With the rapid expansion of the urban landscape, successfully managing ecosystems in built areas has never been more important. However, our understanding of urban ecology is far from complete, and the data at hand are often patchy, leaving stakeholders without the tools they need to successfully manage human-affected ecosystems. Writing in BioScience, Christopher Lepczyk, a biologist working at Auburn University, and his colleagues discuss the future of urban biodiversity, highlighting trends and raising questions whose answers will be crucial for successful “green” management. According to the authors, manag...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Redomestication of Wolves
On landscapes around the world, environmental change is bringing people and large carnivores together--but the union is not without its problems. Human-wildlife conflict is on the rise as development continues unabated and apex predators begin to reoccupy their former ranges. Further complicating matters, many of these species are now reliant on anthropogenic, or human, foods, including livestock, livestock and other ungulate carcasses, and garbage. Writing in BioScience, Thomas Newsome, of Deakin University and the University of Sydney, and his colleagues use gray wolves and other large predators as case studies to explo...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Marine Ecosystems Show Resilience to Climate Disturbance
Climate-driven disturbances are having profound impacts on coastal ecosystems, with many crucial habitat-forming species in sharp decline. However, among these degraded biomes, examples of resilience are emerging. Writing in BioScience, Jennifer O'Leary, a California Sea Grant Marine Biologist based at California Polytechnic State University, and her colleagues describe these recoveries and highlight the possible implications for ecosystem-sparing management. To gain insight into disturbed coastal habitats, the authors surveyed 97 marine experts about their observations of climate-induced perturbations, including extreme ...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

AIBS Announces the Appointment of Scott Collins as BioScience Editor in Chief
AIBS is pleased to announce the appointment of Scott L. Collins to a three-year term as BioScience's editor in chief. He has held the position on an interim basis since April 2016, when he succeeded Timothy M. Beardsley. Collins, a Distinguished Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, received his PhD from the University of Oklahoma in 1981 and brings a wealth of experience to the position, both as a biologist and as a publications expert. In addition to his numerous academic positions, Collins served at the National Science Foundation as a Program Director for efforts ranging from Conservation and Resto...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hydropeaking Extirpates River Insects
Hydropower produces 19% of the world's electricity--far more than all other renewable sources combined. In the face of mounting climate-change effects, the rush to this profuse energy source is expected to continue. However, hydroelectric dams can also produce a number of environmental consequences, many of which are unrecognized or understudied. Writing in an article for BioScience, an interdisciplinary team led by Theodore A. Kennedy of the US Geological Survey identifies one such threat: these dams' ability to devastate aquatic insect populations and the food webs that those insects underpin. One of hydropower's be...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Current Methods Cannot Predict Damage to Coral Reefs
The potentially devastating effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs are well reported. However, the methods used to evaluate the potential harm are often focused on individual species, viewed in isolation. According to an international research team led by Peter J. Edmunds of California State University, Northridge, this simplistic approach neglects broad-scale inter-species and inter-population dynamics that may have unforeseen consequences for ecosystems. "Most studies address the effects of ocean acidification on single species of corals and calcified algae in tanks," write the team members in an artic...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nitrogen Is a Neglected Threat to Biodiversity
Habitat destruction and the direct exploitation of species often occupy center stage in discussions of biodiversity perils. However, indirect harms, such as that posed by nitrogen pollution, remain underappreciated and poorly understood despite playing a key role in species declines. In an article for the journal BioScience, a team of environmental researchers led by Daniel Hernández of Carleton College, in Minnesota, outline the challenges associated with nitrogen. To better understand nitrogen-induced biodiversity imperilment, the authors surveyed 1400 species listed under the Endangered Species Act, finding a t...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Insights into Animal-Borne Disease Outbreaks
In the wake of the recent Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa, a reevaluation of the ways plague spreads through prairie dog colonies in the western United States has yielded insights that could help explain outbreaks of plague, Ebola, and other diseases that can be transmitted by animals to humans. These include West Nile Virus disease and MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome). The study, led by Dan Salkeld and Mike Antolin of Colorado State University and described in the journal BioScience, suggests that even deadly diseases may persist unnoticed in a population for years as smoldering infections, rather than jump fro...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Greater access to information reduces unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy suggests that providing more information about how doctors prescribe drugs could reduce problems associated with overprescription. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

£ 20 million research hub could help African teens achieve their full potential
(University of Oxford) A long-term initiative championed by the UK Research and Innovation Council (UKRI) could significantly improve the health and life prospects of a generation of Africa's youth. The Oxford University-led project is one of 12 individual studies taking place as part of the new UKRI Global Research Hubs. The work is financially supported through the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), which has allocated nearly £ 200 million investment to the initiative -- the largest single investment ever by UKRI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males
(University of Oxford) Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection -- before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why haven't cancer cells undergone genetic meltdowns?
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Cancer first develops as a single cell going rogue, with mutations that trigger aggressive growth at all costs to the health of the organism. But if cancer cells were accumulating harmful mutations faster than they could be purged, wouldn't the population eventually die out? To get at the heart of the matter, a team of scientists from Beijing and Taipei wanted to get a new hint at cancer vulnerability from a mutational perspective by probing the most famous cultured cancer cells, HeLa cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Technology use explains at most 0.4 percent of adolescent wellbeing, new study finds
(University of Oxford) Study finds only 0.4 percent of wellbeing in adolescents is associated with technology use.Most definitive study to date, using data from 300,000 adolescents and parents in the UK and USAComparatively, eating potatoes has nearly as negative effect and wearing glasses has a more negative effect on adolescent mental health then screen use. Novel methodology to remove bias from data analysis revealed that problems in data analysis choice and selective reporting is a 'endemic' problem in technology research (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding an elusive mutation that turns altruism into selfish behavior among honeybees
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) For the first time, a group led by Denise Aumer and Eckart Stolle, at the Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg's Institute of Biology, have finally found the root cause responsible for thelytoky syndrome--which dramatically turns bees from altruistic helpers to selfish mercenaries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists call for more diversity in genomic research
(University of Oxford) Genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity. They show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries -- the UK, US and Iceland, and have specific demographic characteristics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news