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Diet, in addition to alcohol consumption, may play important role in liver problems
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in Alcohol and Alcoholism finds that mice bred to consume high amounts of alcohol, but controlled by diet, did not necessarily develop the most severe liver injuries, suggesting that diet may pay an important role in liver injury development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smoking negatively impacts long-term survival after breast cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that smoking negatively impacts long-term survival after breast cancer. Quitting smoking after diagnosis may reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Into more thin air
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Many research groups have explored human adaptation to high altitude living among three major far-flung global populations: Tibetans, Ethiopians and Peruvians. But few have simultaneously explored the other extreme---maladaptation----in the form of chronic mountain sickness (CMS).Now, in the largest whole genome study of its kind, an international research team led by University of California San Diego's Chairman of Pediatrics, Dr. Gabriel Haddad, has expanded on their recent study of understanding both adaptation extremes in a Peruvian population. (Source: EurekA...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using AI, citizen science and disaster response to help victims of Hurricane Irma
(University of Oxford) A highly unusual collaboration between information engineers at Oxford, the Zooniverse citizen science platform and international disaster response organization Rescue Global is enabling a rapid and effective response to Hurricane Irma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Disaster / Emergency Preparedness News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and Oxford University Press enter into publishing partnership
(Oxford University Press USA) The Crohn's& Colitis Foundation and Oxford University Press announced today that they have entered into a new partnership to publish the Foundation's journal Inflammatory Bowels Diseases beginning in 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Single-injection vaccine device still a long way off
Conclusion Injection of a microstructure device that can give time-delayed release of a vaccine or drug could have great potential in medicine. As the researchers noted, the structures are tiny and fully biodegradable, so they shouldn't cause a foreign-body reaction. But they also mentioned the size – the lightweight device could only hold a small amount of solution. However, the researchers suggested that varying the wall thickness to create larger cores could greatly increase the device's capacity. At this stage, the device has only been tested in a single experiment in mice. Further research in mice would be nee...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative Activated for Harvey and Irma
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for September 15, 2017 – October 14, 2017 in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or sup...
Source: MCR News - September 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Health Sciences Public Libraries Source Type: news

British Financial Times Journalist, 24, Thought to Have Been Killed by Crocodile in Sri Lanka
A British journalist working for the Financial Times is thought to have been killed by a crocodile while on holiday in Sri Lanka. Former Oxford University student Paul McClean, aged 24, was found dead in mud at a lagoon nicknamed ‘Crocodile Rock,’ near the coastal village of Panama in the southeast of the country. Witnesses told the Times that McClean had been seen waving in desperation as he was dragged underwater by the beast. A postmortem examination will be carried out later today. Alex Barker, the Financial Times‘ Brussels Bureau Chief, described McClean as “a first-class journalist in the maki...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Kingdom Source Type: news

'Mysterious' ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
(University of Oxford) It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else?A new study by researchers at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, and the British Geological Survey provides strong proof that Dickinsonia was an animal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds low-level radiation less harmful than other risks
Researchers at the University of Oxford have found that low-level radiation exposure may be less harmful to human health compared to other lifestyle risks. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-level radiation exposure less harmful to health than other modern lifestyle risks
(University of Oxford) Low-level radiation exposure poses less of a health risk than other lifestyle threats, such as smoking, obesity and air pollution, according to Oxford University research.Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life. Whilst the risks to human health from medium and high-level radiation are relatively well-understood, the risks at lower levels are less clear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oxford Uni says dads can alter the sex of their children
Researchers from Oxford University believe their findings could have economic significance in boosting levels of endangered species, as well as applying to humans and domestic animals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fathers can ALTER the sex of their children
Researchers from Oxford University believe their findings could have economic significance in boosting levels of endangered species, as well as applying to humans and domestic animals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fathers can influence the sex of their offspring, scientists show
(University of Oxford) It has traditionally been thought that in mammals only mothers are able to influence the sex of their offspring.But a new study in wild mice led by Dr Aurelio Malo of Oxford University's Department of Zoology has shown that fathers can, in fact, influence sex ratios. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smart phones are making us dim, say scientists
Oxford University scientist Susan Greenfield said growing use of technology is reducing the need for today ’s generation to work out problems and accumulate knowledge. (Pictured:stock image) (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Under-reporting of vertebral fractures by radiologists: A missed opportunity
(International Osteoporosis Foundation) A new retrospective study by researchers at the University of Oxford has found that within a cohort of hip fracture patients many had previous imaging studies showing incidental vertebral fractures -- but 54 percent of the vertebral fractures were not reported by radiologists. The study puts a spotlight on the under-reporting of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, particularly by radiologists who are not specialized in musculoskeletal imaging. This is a missed opportunity to prevent subsequent, often life-threatening hip fractures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fresh troubles for Royal Institution as director resigns after less than four months
Professor Sarah Harper took over as director in May; her resignation has been followed by the departure of three other senior staff membersThe Royal Institution, one of Britain ’s most revered scientific organisations, is facing fresh troubles following the resignation of its director and three senior managers.Professor Sarah Harper, a highly-respected gerontologist at Oxford University, took over as director at the institution in May, but has resigned after less than four months in the post. Three other senior staff, in HR, fundraising, and operations, have also stepped down.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Royal Institution Science Source Type: news

Lack of sleep is linked to depression and anxiety
People who do not get enough sleep are at greater risk of paranoia, depression, anxiety and nightmares, researchers at the University of Oxford have revealed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group releases priority setting report
The Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group, based at the University of Oxford in the UK, is one of the oldest groups working on Cochrane Reviews. It has produced dozens of these during the last two decades and in 2016, it embarked on a project to identify the top priorities for future research into tobacco control.  The Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's research prioritization exercise involved more than 300 people and identified a total of 183 unanswered questions in tobacco control through two online surveys and an Oxford-based workshop. It identified 24 priority questions, grouped into eight priority themes. This new se...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 5, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Biogerontology Research Foundation launches campaign for photographic biomarkers of age
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) Thursday, August 31st, 2017, London, UK: The Biogerontology Research Foundation (http://bg-rf.org.uk/) announces the launch of a crowdfunding campaign, MouseAge (http://mouseage.org/), to develop and test photographic biomarkers of ageing in mice in collaboration with scientists from Harvard School of Medicine, University of Oxford, Youth Laboratories and Insilico Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol abuse, dental conditions & mental health found to be causes of avoidable US emergency visits
(Oxford University Press USA) Alcohol abuse, dental conditions, and mental health were found to be the main causes of avoidable emergency room visits in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UK needs to act urgently to secure NHS data for British public, report warns
Algorithms based on NHS records could seed an ‘entirely new industry’ in AI-based diagnostics and mint billions for tech companies, strategic review revealsThe government must act urgently to ensure that patients and UK taxpayers – not just tech companies – gain from new commercial applications of NHS data, an independent review of the UK life sciences industry has said.Sir John Bell, a professor of medicine at Oxford university who led the government-commissioned review, said that NHS patient records are uniquely suited for driving the development of powerful algorithms that could transform healthc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science policy NHS Health Society Health policy Politics Technology Artificial intelligence (AI) UK news Medical research Source Type: news

Having a degree helps cut heart attack risk by a third
The researchers, from University College London and Oxford University, believe this is because educated people subsequently less likely to smoke, eat healthier diets and do more exercise. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sense of smell is key factor in bird navigation, new study shows
(University of Oxford) How do birds navigate over long distances? This complex question has been the subject of debate and controversy among scientists for decades, with Earth's magnetic field and the bird's own sense of smell among the factors said to play a part.Now, researchers from the universities of Oxford, Barcelona and Pisa have shown in a new experiment that olfaction -- or sense of smell -- is almost certainly a key factor in long-distance oceanic navigation, eliminating previous misgivings about this hypothesis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Martin Aitken obituary
My father, Martin Aitken, who has died aged 95, was a scientist who pioneered the application of physics to archaeology. He coined, with the archaeologistChristopher Hawkes, the termarchaeometry, helping to make huge advances in dating finds from as early as the Lower Palaeolithic period.He was born in Stamford, Lincolnshire, the younger son of Percy Aitken, an engineer draughtsman, and his wife, Ethel (nee Brittain), who farmed with her mother until her marriage. Martin was educated at Stamford school and studied physics at Wadham College, Oxford, before becoming a fellow of Linacre College and later a member of the Royal...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Aitken Tags: Science Physics Archaeology University of Oxford Source Type: news

MRI scan that can predict stroke risk has 'promise to save lives'
Scientists at Oxford University develop non-invasive technique to measure amount of cholesterol in carotid plaquesA new type of MRI scan can predict the risk of having astroke, researchers have said in a study.The non-invasive technique, developed by scientists at the University of Oxford, predicts whether plaques in the carotid arteries are rich in cholesterol and therefore more likely to cause a stroke.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Stroke Society Health UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Smoking linked to frailty in older adults
(Oxford University Press USA) A recent paper published in Age& Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, finds that current smoking in older people increases the risk of developing frailty, though former smokers did not appear to be at higher risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Elevated testosterone causes bull market trading
(University of Western Ontario, Ivey Business School) Study led by researchers from the Ivey Business School, University of Oxford, and Claremont Graduate University for the first time has shown that testosterone directly impacts financial decisions that drive prices up and destabilize markets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new method for the 3D printing of living artificial tissues
A team from the University of Bristol ’ s School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, together with scientists at the University of Oxford, has developed a new method to 3D-print stem cells to form complex living 3D structures. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - August 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements, Business and Enterprise, International, Public engagement, Research; Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Biogerontology Research Foundation announces partnership with Oxford Scientific Society
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) The Biogerontology Research Foundation and the Oxford University Scientific Society announce a partnership to elevate the impact of their respective public education and outreach activities in the area of biogerontology and aging research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new method for the 3-D printing of living tissues
(University of Oxford) Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3-D-print laboratory- grown cells to form living structures.The approach could revolutionise regenerative medicine, enabling the production of complex tissues and cartilage that would potentially support, repair or augment diseased and damaged areas of the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oxford University Press to publish American Society for Nutrition Journals
(Oxford University Press USA) Oxford University Press and the American Society for Nutrition are pleased to announce a new partnership to publish the society's four prestigious research journals, The Journal of Nutrition, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Advances in Nutrition, and Current Developments in Nutrition, beginning in 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A moth and its flame: Mate selection found to evolve from response to flower odors
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) For the first time, Jothi Yuvaraj and colleagues at Lund University, Sweden, have identified the corresponding pheromone receptors (PRs) from a primitive leafminer moth, called Eriocrania semipurpurella. Then, they show that these receptors also respond to plant odors and propose a scenario in which pheromone receptors evolved from plant odor receptors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Braunwald Receives Honorary Doctorate from Oxford
Eugene Braunwald, MD, chair emeritus of the Department of Medicine and founding chair of the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Study Group, was conferred an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Oxford. He was cited for (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - August 11, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

In terms of health, having any job is not necessarily better than not having a job
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the International Journal of Epidemiology finds that people employed in low paying or highly stressful jobs may not actually enjoy better health than those who remain unemployed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family break-ups lead to domestic violence in fruit fly relationships
(University of Oxford) Male fruit flies with strong family ties are less likely to become abusive during mating than others, according to new Oxford research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An updated classification for freshwater crayfishes
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the Journal of Crustacean Biology provides an updated classification system that includes all the known crayfishes worldwide. This makes available a single, comprehensive taxonomic summary of all the recognized species of crayfish of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cybercrime: Latest research suggests cybercriminals are not as anonymous as we think
(University of Oxford) Understanding a cybercriminal's backstory - where they live, what they do and who they know, is key to cracking cybercrime, new research suggests.Online crime is of course online, but there is also a surprisingly strong offline and local dimension. Cybercriminals are often seen as faceless, international, computer masterminds, who are almost impossible to identify or understand as a result. But, according to new Oxford University research, contextualising their threat and motivations is key to stopping them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane seeks Events and Office Coordinator - Oxford, UK
14-month maternity coverCochrane UK is seeking an organized and enthusiastic individual to join our small, friendly team at the UK Cochrane Centre in the role of Events and Office Coordinator. This is an exciting time to join us, as we are organizing a global healthcare evidence conference for 1200 delegates in September 2018. This role is vital to the organization of the event and offers an opportunity, as a 14-month post, to organize and deliver an inspiring and successful conference.Main responsibilities include day-to-day running of the office, coordination of our training programmes, diary management and events organi...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 4, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNA
(University of Oxford) A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University's Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Wildlife royalties -- a future for conservation?
(University of Oxford) Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation?That is the question asked in new research conducted by zoologists from Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mental health sufferers twice as likely to have conviction
Up to 7% of adolescent mental health sufferers have criminal convictions compared with 3.6% in the general population without depression, Oxford University researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More than nine hours sleep may cause nightmares  
Researchers from the University of Oxford believe more time asleep means a person spends longer in the late-night rapid eye movement phase, which is when nightmares usually occur. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Questions over advice to finish courses of antibiotics
Conclusions This narrative review challenges current medical advice that patients should complete their course of antibiotics, by suggesting that concerns around antibiotic treatment are driven by fears of under treatment, when we should instead be concerned about over use. Professor Peter Openshaw, President of the British Society for Immunology and Professor of Experimental Medicine at Imperial College London commented: "It could be that antibiotics should be used only to reduce the bacterial burden to a level that can be coped with by the person's own immune system. In many previously healthy patients with acute in...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication QA articles Source Type: news

Research finds increased risk of dementia in patients who experience delirium after surgery
(Oxford University Press USA) Delirium is common in elderly hospitalized patients, affecting an estimated 14-56 percent of patients. It frequently manifests as a sudden change in behavior, with patients suffering acute confusion, inattention, disorganized thinking and fluctuating mental status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How can plant science solve the global challenges of the 21st century?
(Wiley) The New Phytologist Trust, in partnership with John Wiley& Sons, is announcing the launch of a new crossdisciplinary Open Access journal: Plants, People, Planet, led by Professor Simon Hiscock (University of Oxford, UK and Director of the Oxford Botanic Garden and Harcourt Arboretum). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Link between income inequality and physical activity for women, but not for men
(Oxford University Press USA) A recent paper published in the Journal of Public Health finds that women from areas with high income inequality are less likely to meet overall physical activity recommendations than men from the same geographical area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social cancer patients are more likely to live
Researchers from the National Human Genome Research Institute and the University of Oxford found the risk of death is 68 percent among those who socialise and 69.5 per cent for those who do not. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Growing better trees faster
(University of Oxford) Using a breeding technique called 'genomic selection', researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh and from Forest Research, an agency of the Forestry Commission, hope to accurately identify, at a very early age, fast growing trees with superior timber quality. In doing so, the 'Sitka Spruced' research initiative could improve the economic value of future spruce plantations in the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news