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Uranus Smells Terrible. There, We Said it
Let’s stop pretending, shall we? Because really, we’re not fooling anyone. Uranus is funny. It was funny when you were twelve, and it’s funny now. It was certainly funny when I was a boy and went to a space-themed summer camp where all the bunks were named after planets and Uranus happened to be where we stored the sports equipment, meaning that every now and then a counselor would say, “Somebody put those bats in Uranus,” and then would have to walk over and put them there himself because we were too busy falling over one another laughing. And it was absolutely funny in 1986 when the Voyager ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Scientists Say Uranus Really Does Smell Like Rotten Eggs. Here ’s Why
Scientists have determined that the atmosphere above the planet Uranus is full of a gas that makes the distant planet smell like rotten eggs. A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy, established the chemical composition of Uranus’ upper cloud deck for the first time. Using an instrument called the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) at the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, researchers determined that Uranus’ cloud cover is composed of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas, which is what gives rotten eggs their distinctive, noxious scent. “If an unfortunate human were ever to descen...
Source: TIME: Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Scientists identify genetic catalysts that speed up evolution of antibiotic resistance
(University of Oxford) Researchers at Oxford University have shown that it is possible to identify genetic catalysts that accelerate the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria -- and that this knowledge could be used to design treatments to stifle the development of resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Murder most fowl: Oxford dodo 'shot in the back of the head'
Revelation astonishes experts, who thought the renowned bird lived out its life in London as a money-spinning curiosityWith its plump head and bulbous beak, the renownedremains of a dodo at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History have long captivated visitors, Lewis Carroll among them. Now researchers say they have uncovered how the dodo died – a discovery that makes the old bird’s past curiouser and curiouser.Researchers used a form of CT scanning and sophisticated software to probe the anatomy and habits of the Oxford dodo - the world ’s best preserved specimen of the bird – anddiscovered ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Birds Endangered species Wildlife University of Oxford Science Biology Animals Source Type: news

Prescribing of Gluten-Free Foods Declining in England
THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 -- Recent policy changes have led to a decline in the prescribing of gluten-free foods in England, according to research published online April 16 in BMJ Open. Alex J. Walker, Ph.D., from the University of Oxford in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

GPs at one in 12 practices are still prescribing homeopathic treatments
Research by Oxford University found that doctors at one in 12 practices had used the controversial alternative therapies, costing the NHS an estimated £4 million a year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GPs at one in 12 practices are still prescribing homeopathic treatments for their patients
Research by Oxford University found that doctors at one in 12 practices had used the controversial alternative therapies, costing the NHS an estimated £4 million a year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Thousands of donated livers could be saved by warming them
The new technology from the University of Oxford that acts as life support for the liver could increase the number of transplants for the more than 115,00 people in the US on the waiting list. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Digital remains should be treated with the same care and respect as physical remains
(University of Oxford) An Oxford University study published in Nature advises that people's digital remains, such as, social media activity and online history, should be viewed in the same way as the human body, and treated with care and respect rather than manipulated for commercial gain.The paper suggests regulation akin to those used in museums and commercial use of organic human remains, is the best way to create explicit boundaries around acceptable afterlife activity and grief exploitation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly announce an academic collaboration with University of Oxford
Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE:LLY) have announced an academic collaboration with the University of Oxford. EMPA-KIDNEY will investigate the effects of empagliflozin on the progression of kidney disease and the occurrence of cardiovascular death, in people with established chronic kidney disease with and without diabetes. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Boehringer Ingelheim Business and Industry Source Type: news

Plants play greater role than megaherbivore extinctions in changes to ecosystem structure
(University of Plymouth) Plants may have exerted greater influence on our terrestrial ecosystems than the megaherbivores that used to roam our landscapes, according to new research by the University of Plymouth, University of Oxford, Queen's University Belfast, Swansea University and the Natural History Museum, London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NHS trusts are spending millions outsourcing staff to private companies, says UNISON
NHS trusts across England are spending millions of pounds outsourcing staff to new arms-length private companies, says UNISON today (Monday). Using a Freedom of Information (FoI) request, UNISON has revealed that NHS trusts are shelling-out huge amounts of money on consultants. These companies are advising trusts on the setting up of wholly owned subsidiaries, to which staff are then outsourced. UNISON says that these new companies appeal to NHS trusts because they can reduce their VAT payments, and cut the pay and pensions for any new staff recruited. The health workers that are being transferred tend to be the lowest pai...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - April 15, 2018 Category: Food Science Authors: Clare Santry Tags: Press release 2018 Health Conference Freedom of information NHS wholly owned subsidiaries Source Type: news

Matter: All by Itself, the Humble Sweet Potato Colonized the World
Many botanists argued that humans must have carried the valuable staple to the Pacific from South America, a hidden chapter in human history. Not so, according to a new study. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Sweet Potatoes Genetics and Heredity Flowers and Plants Indigenous People Archaeology and Anthropology Agriculture and Farming Exploration and Explorers Natural History Museum (London) Current Biology (Journal) Oxford University Columb Source Type: news

There's a better way to screen for cervical cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that high-quality cervical cancer screening can be done effectively using a completely automated approach. The researchers involved in the study indicate that automated technology could increase cervical screening coverage in underserved regions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Say what? Smoking found to increase risk of hearing loss, according to study
(Natural News) Still dying for a smoke? Besides, emphysema, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, blindness and of course cancer, here’s one more reason to stop smoking  — hearing loss. A recently-published study published by Oxford University Press showed that the more than 50,000 participants of the over eight year-study showed that “smoking is an independent risk factor... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Losing weight can be a cancer warning and not a sign of good health
A review by Oxford University has found that weight loss is directly linked to cancer including bowel, ovarian and prostate. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Later school start times really do improve sleep time
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in SLEEP, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that delaying school start times results in students getting more sleep, and feeling better, even within societies where trading sleep for academic success is common. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Losing weight can be a cancer warning and not a sign of good health
A review by Oxford University has found that weight loss is directly linked to cancer including bowel, ovarian and prostate. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brainomix raises $10m for AI stroke imaging tech
Brainomix said today that it raised nearly $10 million for the e-ASPECTS stroke imaging technology it’s developing using artificial intelligence. The £7 million round was led by Parkwalk Advisors, joined by existing backers Chimera Partners and Oxford University Innovation Fund and the venture arm of pharma giant Boehringer Ingelheim. Oxford, England-based Brainomix said its tech is designed to automate the evaluation of stroke patients using CT scan data and the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score method. The funds are earmarked for commercializing e-ASPECT, the company said. “We welcome Boehringe...
Source: Mass Device - April 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Diagnostics Funding Roundup Imaging Neurological Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Brainomix Stroke Source Type: news

Combining B-vitamins and omega-3s found to reduce risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s
(Natural News) A recent study by the University of Oxford discovered that a combination of B-vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids could lower the risk of dementia by reducing the rate at which the disease develops. Part of the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing (OPTIMA), the study found that the interaction between the two nutrients... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deep impact: Deep-sea wildlife more vulnerable to extinction than first thought
(University of Oxford) The existence of the unusual yeti crabs (Kiwaidae) -- a family of crab-like animals whose hairy claws and bodies are reminiscent of the abominable snowman -- since 2005, but already their future survival could be at risk.New Oxford University research suggests that past environmental changes may have profoundly impacted the geographic range and species diversity of this family. The findings indicate that such animals may be more vulnerable to the effects of human resource exploitation and climate change than initially thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Super-fit Ben was left fighting a deadly superbug
Ben May, from Haslemere in Surrey, was a popular Oxford University student when a chance infection rendered him bed-ridden for 44 days. This is his cautionary MRSA tale. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Music therapy aids healing of military personnel
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in Music Therapy Perspectives examines the importance of music therapy in military healthcare. There has been an increase in music therapy to treat combat-related injuries in recent years. With this growth in the use of the therapy, the researchers involved believe it's important for practitioners to publish more program evaluations and patient outcomes data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Super-fit Ben, 21, was left fighting a deadly superbug
Ben May, from Haslemere in Surrey, was a popular Oxford University student when a chance infection rendered him bed-ridden for 44 days. This is his cautionary MRSA tale. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Neuroscientist Explains: the origins of social behaviour – podcast trailer
Inepisode two of the second season of ourA Neuroscientist Explains podcast,Daniel Glaser explores the evolutionary origins of social conformitySubscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom&Mixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitter and email us at scienceweekly@theguardian.com.Daniel Glaser explores the evolutionary origins of social behaviour in humans, as per his columnDoes Our Social Behaviour Hold Us Back?. We hear from the University of Oxford ’s emeritus professor of evolutionary psychology,Robin Dunbar, about what our evolutionary past can tell us about our behaviours in the her...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Daniel Glaser and Produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Neuroscience Source Type: news

Famed Physicist Stephen Hawking Has Died at the Age of 76
(LONDON) — Stephen Hawking, whose brilliant mind ranged across time and space though his body was paralyzed by disease, died early Wednesday, a University of Cambridge spokesman said. He was 76 years old. Hawking died peacefully at his home in Cambridge, England. The best-known theoretical physicist of his time, Hawking wrote so lucidly of the mysteries of space, time and black holes that his book, “A Brief History of Time,” became an international best seller, making him one of science’s biggest celebrities since Albert Einstein. “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work a...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robert Barr / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight remembrance Source Type: news

Study finds smokers at greater risk of hearing loss
(Oxford University Press USA) Smoking is associated with increased risk of hearing loss, according to a study of over 50,000 participants over eight years in Nicotine& Tobacco Research, published by Oxford University Press. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using whole genome analysis to home in on racing pigeon performance
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) A scientific team led by Malgorzata Anna Gazda and Miguel Carneiro, performed the first whole genome sequencing of 10 racing pigeons as well as data from 35 different breeds, and has now identified new clues in racing pigeons that may help enhance their performance. The study also including looking at gene expression differences (using RNA sequencing expression data) in the brains and muscle tissue of racing pigeons versus other breeds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oxford University orders lowly woman to scrub "Happy International Women's Day" message off campus building steps
(Natural News) The endless push from the left to turn anything and everything into some kind of coordinated attack against women continues. Last week, political theory professor Sophie Smith of Oxford University tweeted a photo of a female custodian scrubbing the words “Happy International Women’s Day” off the Clarendon steps on the university’s campus. Along... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University education makes students more agreeable, conscientiousness
(Oxford University Press USA) A study published in Oxford Economic Papers indicates that university education has a dramatically positive effect on the development of non-cognitive skills like conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness, in addition to the expected intellectual benefits. The paper also shows that the impact of education on these skills is even more dramatic for students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Men watching over four hours of TV more likely to get bowel cancer
The scientists, from the University of Oxford, Imperial College London and the UN International Agency for Research on Cancer, found the strongest link was among sedentary men. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Race science’ depends on dubious genetics | Letters
Martin Yuille,Steven Rose, Jonathan Bard,John Wilson andIain Climie on the controversy over race and intelligenceGavin Evans ’s criticisms of attempts to demonstrate a robust association between surrogate measures of ill-defined concepts (“race” and “intelligence”) are to the point (The unwelcome return of ‘race science’, The long read, 2 March). However, the dogma underpinning these attempts – genetic determinism – is left unchallenged. This determinism asserts that sequences of nucleotides comprising our chromosomes specify the characteristics – in their entiret...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Genetics Biology Science Neanderthals Anthropology Migration Race issues Source Type: news

Many clinical trial status discrepancies identified between ClinicalTrials.gov and EUCTR
Approximately one sixth of clinical trials registered on both ClinicalTrials.gov and the EU Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) have discrepancies in their completion status, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jessica Fleminger and Ben Goldacre from the University of Oxford, UK. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Dying for the group: What motivates the ultimate sacrifice?
(University of Oxford) Whether idolized as heroes or demonized and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why? New Oxford University research, suggests that there is a unique psychological process that may play a crucial role in motivating the ultimate sacrifice: identity fusion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Apple-shaped figures raise women's risk of a heart attack
Researchers from the University of Oxford found that even among slim women, carrying fat around the abdomen makes them 10-to-20 per cent more likely to suffer a cardiovascular event. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Cochrane Review evidence suggests that nutritional labelling on menus in restaurants and cafes may reduce our calorie intake
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library shows that adding calorie labels to menus and next to food in restaurants, coffee shops, and cafeterias could reduce the calories that people consume, although the quality of evidence is low.Eating too many calories contributes to people becoming overweight and increases the risks of heart disease, diabetes, and many cancers, which are among the leading causes of poor health and premature death.Several studies have looked at whether putting nutritional labels on food and non-alcoholic drinks might have an impact on their purchasing or consumption, but their findings have been ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 27, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Military personnel seeking mental health care outside of the military
(Oxford University Press USA) A new article in Military Medicine, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that military personnel are making extensive use of outside mental health services, suggesting that military health and mental health services do not meet the needs of active duty service members. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Calorie counts on menus reduces how much diners eat by 12%
Professor Susan Jebb, the Government ’s former obesity tsar and co-author of the review at Oxford University, has said politicians should consider making calorie information mandatory. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Major hospital trust bans women from having caesareans
Oxford University Hospitals will not offer them to those who are frightened or have had previous traumatic births. Some women have had to travel miles to other hospitals to give birth. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study says GPs should hand out more antidepressants
A major review led by an Oxford University research team, which claims thousands more anti-depressants should be dished out by GPs, has been criticised for ignoring the side effects. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antidepressants DO work and millions more should be on them
ANTIDEPRESSANTS are effective in the treatment of the mental health condition, according to the authors of an international study. Led by researchers at the University of Oxford, the study aimed to clear up lingering questions about the efficacy of medicine to treat acute depression in adults. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Antidepressants Are Most Effective, Study Says
Millions of people take antidepressants for depression. But there’s long been debate over just how effective the medications actually are. On Wednesday, a large new study provides evidence that antidepressants are more effective than placebo at treating acute depression in adults. The study, published in the journal The Lancet, looked at the published data from 522 randomized controlled trials testing 21 different types of antidepressants. The study authors also reached out to pharmaceutical companies and study authors for additional unpublished study data. All told, the data collection included 116,477 men and women...
Source: TIME: Health - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

International team publishes roadmap to enhance radioresistance for space colonization
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) An international team of researchers from NASA Ames Research Center, Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate at Health Canada, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Oxford University, Insilico Medicine, Insilico Medicine Taiwan, the Biogerontology Research Foundation, Boston University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Liverpool, University of Lethbridge, Ghent University, Center for Healthy Aging and many others have published a roadmap toward enhancing human radioresistance for space exploration and colonization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rediscovered Andy Warhol interview explores pop art and queerness
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in the Oxford Art Journal examines the significance of a newly discovered recoding of Andy Warhol's famous 1963 interview with Gene Swenson, published in ARTnews under the heading 'What is Pop Art?' The printed interview omitted a large part of the recording, which actually starts with the question 'What do you say about homosexuals?' Warhol's early and explicit on-the-record statements about Pop's relationship to homosexuality were suppressed from publication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

There may be a better way to reduce hospital readmission rates
(Oxford University Press USA) A recent study published in Health Education Research suggests that lay-health workers may be able to significantly reduce readmissions rates to hospitals for high risk patients following surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media and internet not cause of political polarization, (new research suggests)
(University of Oxford) New Oxford University research suggests that social media and the internet are not the root of today's fragmented society, and echo chambers may not be the threat they are perceived to be. In fact most people use multiple media outlets and social media platforms, meaning that only a small proportion of the population, at most, is influenced by echo chambers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eating yogurt may reduce cardiovascular disease risk
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the American Journal of Hypertension, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that higher yogurt intake is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Soft tissue fossil clues could help search for ancient life on Earth and other planets
(University of Oxford) Fossils that preserve entire organisms (including both hard and soft body parts) are critical to our understanding of evolution and ancient life on Earth. However, these exceptional deposits are extremely rare. New Oxford University research suggests that the mineralogy of the surrounding earth is key to conserving soft parts of organisms, and finding more exceptional fossils. Part-funded by NASA, the work could potentially support the Mars Rover Curiosity in its sample analysis, and speed up the search for traces of life on other planets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Back to the Future: Institute for Scientific Information Re-established Within Clarivate Analytics
Clarivate Analytics, the global leader in providing trusted insights and analytics to accelerate the pace of innovation, today announced it will re-establish the prestigious Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) to its Scientific and Academic Research Group. This new incarnation of the institute will be focused on the development of existing and new bibliometric and analytical approaches, fostering collaborations with partners and customers across the academic community. Annette Thomas, CEO of the Scientific and Academic Research group at Clarivate Analytics explains: “For 50 years the Institute for Sc...
Source: News from STM - February 7, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Manchester University Press to Migrate All Books and Journals to PubFactory in Spring 2018
Sheridan PubFactory and Manchester University Press are developing an online hosting platform that will bring together all of Manchester’s books and journals, vastly improving the accessibility and support for institutions and the user experience for readers. Simon Ross, CEO of Manchester University Press said: “PubFactory services and technology will allow Manchester University Press to directly control and manage the growth of our publishing program. They understand the needs of both our books and journals and can fully support a smaller publisher that by necessity needs thoughtful, creative solutions that ar...
Source: News from STM - February 6, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news