Sorry, Cheese Is Still Not Great For Your Heart

The internet went wild this week over a new study that suggests eating dairy products like cheese might be healthier than we thought. Headlines like “Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds” were published multiple times. But those reactions are oversimplified and the actual research should be taken with a heavy dose of skepticism, according to experts. “I rolled my eyes at this study,” Christopher Gardner, a nutrition scientist at Stanford University, told HuffPost. Not only is the report funded by organizations associated with the dairy industry, the study simply didn’t reach the conclusion media reports say it did, Gardner said. The study wasn’t designed to make diet recommendations In a meta-analysis, researchers examined 29 old studies, which contained nearly 1 million participants total among them, to understand how consuming dairy can affect human health. Then the researchers looked over the combined data to draw conclusions. “We need to take this meta-analysis with a grain of salt,” James J. DiNicolantonio, a cardiovascular research scientist and author of the upcoming book The Salt Fix, told HuffPost. “[The study] is based on observational studies not randomized controlled trials so it cannot prove causation.” In other words, there’s no definitive way to say that eating cheese did or did not cause cardiovascular health issues...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTo review randomized interventional clinical and imaging trials that support lower targeted atherogenic lipoprotein cholesterol goals in “extreme” and “very high” atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk settings. Major atherosclerotic cardiovascular event (MACE) prevention among the highest risk patients with ASCVD requires aggressive management of global risks, including lowering of the fundamental atherogenic ap olipoprotein B-associated lipoprotein cholesterol particles [i.e., triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholester...
Source: Current Diabetes Reports - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 2 September 2019Source: The Lancet Global HealthAuthor(s): Stephen Kaptoge, Lisa Pennells, Dirk De Bacquer, Marie Therese Cooney, Maryam Kavousi, Gretchen Stevens, Leanne Margaret Riley, Stefan Savin, Taskeen Khan, Servet Altay, Philippe Amouyel, Gerd Assmann, Steven Bell, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Lisa Berkman, Joline W Beulens, Cecilia Björkelund, Michael Blaha, Dan G Blazer, Thomas BoltonSummaryBackgroundTo help adapt cardiovascular disease risk prediction approaches to low-income and middle-income countries, WHO has convened an effort to develop, evaluate, and illustrate revised risk mode...
Source: The Lancet Global Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
For decades, doctors have known that losing weight can significantly lower risk of heart disease and by extension, reduce the risk of dying from heart-related events such as stroke and heart attack. Studies have shown that both lifestyle changes including diet and exercise as well as medications and weight-loss surgery can improve heart disease risk factors such as obesity and diabetes, for example, but data supporting the benefits of any of these approaches in actually lowering rates of heart events such as heart attack and atrial fibrillation, or in reducing early deaths from heart disease, have been less robust. The dat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diabetes Heart Disease Source Type: news
This study aimed to investigate factors associated with orthostatic hypotension in 14,833 individuals 35-74 years of age. This was a cross-sectional study of baseline data (2008-2010) from the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Postural testing was performed after 20 minutes resting in supine position and active adoption of orthostatic posture. Blood pressure was measured in supine position and at 3 minutes in orthostatic position with an oscillometer (HEM 705 CP, Omron, São Paulo, Brazil). Orthostatic hypotension was defined as a drop of ≥ 20mmHg in systolic blood pressure and/or a drop of ≥ 10...
Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72Ô...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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