Renaissance Radiologists: Meet AJ Gunn, MD
AJ Gunn, M.D. graduated magna cum laude from Brigham Young University in Provo, UT, earning a BS in exercise physiology with a minor in sociology. He then returned home to South Dakota to attend medical school at the University of South Dakota. During medical school, he participated in the competitive Howard Hughes Medical Institute – National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program and was awarded the Donald L. Alcott, M.D. Award for Clinical Promise. He graduated summa cum laude in 2009. He completed his diagnostic radiology residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital of Harvard Medical School in Boston,...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Rad Feature: Meet AJ Gunn, MD
AJ Gunn, M.D. graduated magna cum laude from Brigham Young University in Provo, UT, earning a BS in exercise physiology with a minor in sociology. He then returned home to South Dakota to attend medical school at the University of South Dakota. During medical school, he participated in the competitive Howard Hughes Medical Institute – National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program and was awarded the Donald L. Alcott, M.D. Award for Clinical Promise. He graduated summa cum laude in 2009. He completed his diagnostic radiology residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital of Harvard Medical School in Boston,...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

TriNav System Uses Pressure to Push Drugs into Solid Tumors
TriSalus, a Denver, Colorado firm, is launching a new solid tumor infusion system to target hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastases, and other tumors. The TriNav Infusion System features the company’s SmartValve and Pressure-Enabled Drug Delivery (PEDD) technologies to get more of the tumor killing drug inside the diseased tissue. The treatment is delivered in a similar manner as many existing intravascular procedures, as the device is compatible with common cath lab tools (0.035-inch and 0.038-inch standard angiographic catheters) and is easy to track through the vasculature because of a single-body design. ...
Source: Medgadget - January 15, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 29th 2019
In this study we show, for the first time, significant alterations in cholesterol efflux capacity in adolescents throughout the range of BMI, a relationship between six circulating adipocyte-derived EVs microRNAs targeting ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux capacity, and in vitro alterations of cholesterol efflux in macrophages exposed to visceral adipose tissue adipocyte-derived EVs acquired from human subjects. These results suggest that adipocyte-derived EVs, and their microRNA content, may play a critical role in the early pathological development of ASCVD. Commentary on the Developing UK Government Position on Hea...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali: April 2019
By BISHAL GYAWALI, MD Keynote speech on the JAVELIN not going far enough to improve survival The treatment landscape for metastatic renal-cell carcinoma has changed dramatically with the introduction of immunotherapies. Unfortunately though, we are promoting combinations over single agents without having much idea of added benefit of each drug. This is an important issue because when we combine two drugs, the only thing we are certain of are the added toxicities. PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab had improved OS when given in second line, however nivolumab was tested in combination with ipilimumab (not as a nivolumab monother...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Bishal Gyawali Clinical Trials Oncology PD-1 inhibitor Source Type: blogs

Hepatocellular Carcinoma : Triple Phase CT
Presenting brief teaching video under the DAMS Unplugged series on HCC and imaging features.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us at sales@teleradproviders.com (Source: Sumer's Radiology Site)
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - December 27, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Hepatocellular carcinoma risk, cirrhosis and hepatitis C
High profile public health strategy needed Related items fromOnMedica Overweight teens more likely to have severe liver disease later Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 JCVI recommends universal HPV vaccination Lower cancer risk in people with higher vitamin D levels Public drastically underestimates cannabis risks (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - December 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 13th 2018
We report that the disruption of excitation-contraction coupling contributes to impaired force generation in the mouse model of Sod1 deficiency. Briefly, we found a significant reduction in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activity as well as reduced expression of proteins involved in calcium release and force generation. Another potential factor involved in EC uncoupling in Sod1-/- mice is oxidative damage to proteins involved in the contractile response. In summary, this study provides strong support for the coupling between increased oxidative stress and disruption of cellular excitation contraction mac...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Will Increased Understanding of Cellular Senescence Lead to an End to Cancer?
Selective destruction of senescent cells in old tissues offers the promise of some degree of rejuvenation, coupled with effective therapies for a range of age-related diseases that currently cannot be controlled. In the past few years, a number of companies have raised venture funding for the development of senolytic therapies, those capable of removing some portion of senescent cells with an acceptable side-effect profile. The potential market is enormous, and thus despite the many potential competitors, any new mechanism by which senescent cells can be destroyed might be the pathway to success and revenue for the individ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 4th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Insurance denials: the law of the land
It all started out with Malaysian methimazole, and didn’t end until two highly trained medical professionals sat on opposite ends of a telephone call, scratching their heads and wondering how two digits being transposed could lead to so many problems. Those two transposed digits caused a thyroid uptake scan to become a bone marrow scan (whatever that is). But look at all it took to get there. Mystery illness, mystery medicine It started when a new patient came to see one of my colleagues with a mystery illness, and a medication in a pill bottle with a label in another language. After figuring out what this medicine w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/fred-n-pelzman" rel="tag" > Fred N. Pelzman, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Eponymythology: Atraumatic Abdominal Ecchymosis
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Overview We review the original descriptions of 5 eponymous signs (n=6) associated with non-traumatic abdominal ecchymosis. These commonly cited eponyms involving the abdominal wall and flanks (Grey Turner, Cullen and Stabler); scrotum (Bryant) and upper thigh (Fox) may be useful clues directing the examiner to consider potentially serious causes of abdominal pathology. Cullen sign Thomas Stephen Cullen (1869–1953) was a Canadian gynecologist Non-traumat...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Eponymythology Abdominal Ecchymosis Bryant sign Cullen sign fox sign Francis Edward Stabler George Grey Turner Grey Turner sign John Adrian Fox John Henry Bryant Stabler sign Thomas Stephen Cullen Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 57-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C infection
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 57-year-old man is evaluated during a routine examination. His medical history is notable for chronic hepatitis C infection with cirrhosis, which was diagnosed 3 years ago. He undergoes surveillance ultrasound for hepatocellular carcinoma every 6 months. On physical examination, temperature is 36.8 °C (98.2 °F), blood pressure is 110/82 mm Hg, pulse rate is 65/min, and respiration rate is 18/min; BMI is 22. Muscle wasting and scleral icterus are noted. There is no flank dullness and no asterixi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 005 RUQ Pain and Jaundice
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 005 Guest Post: Dr Branden Skarpiak – Global Health Fellow, Department of Emergency Medicine. UT Health San Antonio A 35 year old male presents to your emergency room for right upper quadrant pain that has gotten worse over the last 2-3 days. He also describes associated nausea, vomiting, and fevers. He denies other abdominal pain, or change in his bowel or bladder habits. His wife notes that he has started to “look more yellow...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine amebic amoeba amoebiasis amoebic dysentery amoebic liver abscess bloody diarrhoea e.dispar e.histolytica entamoeba histolytica Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: Detecting malignant focal lesions.
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. In this video, from the Abdominal Ultrasound Essentials course, Dr. Nikolaus Mayr discusses the basic principles of liver ultrasound including the differentiation of malignant pathologies such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma and metastases. Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitte...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 20, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Medmastery liver malignant Ultrasound Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: Detecting malignant focal lesions
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. In this video, from the Abdominal Ultrasound Essentials course, Dr. Nikolaus Mayr discusses the basic principles of liver ultrasound including the differentiation of malignant pathologies such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma and metastases. Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitt...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 20, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Medmastery liver malignant Ultrasound Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and Public Health (from Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease)
Excerpted fromPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human DiseaseDespite having the most advanced healthcare technology on the planet, life expectancy in the United States is not particularly high. Citizens from most of the European countries and the highly industrialized Asian countries enjoy longer life expectancies than the United States. According to the World Health Organization, the United States ranks 31st among nations, trailing behind Greece, Chile, and Costa Rica, and barely edging out Cuba [42]. Similar rankings are reported by the US Central Intelligence Agency [43]. These findings lead us to infer that acc...
Source: Specified Life - February 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: cancer cancer vaccines precision medicine prevention public health Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease (Book Index)
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a focus on diagnosis and screening
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 22, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: gastroenterology oncology Source Type: blogs

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn't show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer
In conclusion, this combined metabolic approach appears effective in treating advanced TNBC, given this patient’s complete response with a good quality of life.Now, there is one thing that is interesting here. The doses of chemotherapy used were considerably lower thanwhat is usually used, with doses decreased by at least half or more. Does this mean anything? Who knows? cPR rates for TNBC have been reported to range from 20-35%. It could mean the regimen made the chemotherapy more effective, or it could mean that this woman just happened to have a particularly chemosensitive tumor. Even if we take this case report a...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn't show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer
In conclusion, this combined metabolic approach appears effective in treating advanced TNBC, given this patient’s complete response with a good quality of life.Now, there is one thing that is interesting here. The doses of chemotherapy used were considerably lower thanwhat is usually used, with doses decreased by at least half or more. Does this mean anything? Who knows? cPR rates for TNBC have been reported to range from 20-35%. It could mean the regimen made the chemotherapy more effective, or it could mean that this woman just happened to have a particularly chemosensitive tumor. Even if we take this case report a...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

One ‐Step Multigram‐Scale Biomimetic Synthesis of Psiguadial B
AngewchemOne ‐Step Multigram‐Scale Biomimetic Synthesis of Psiguadial B: A gram ‐scale synthesis of psiguadial B, a purported inhibitor of human hepatoma cell growth, has been achieved in one step by a biomimetic three‐component coupling of caryophyllene, benzaldehyde, and diformylphloroglucinol.... (Source: Organometallic Current)
Source: Organometallic Current - September 27, 2017 Category: Chemistry Tags: Natural products Total synthesis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 28th 2017
In conclusion, CAVD is highly prevalent. Long understood as a passive process, it is now known to be complex and one which involves pathophysiological mechanisms similar to those of atherosclerosis. Understanding these mechanisms could help to establish new therapeutic targets that might allow us to halt or at least slow down the progression of the disease. Early Steps in the Tissue Engineering of Intervertebral Discs https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/08/early-steps-in-the-tissue-engineering-of-intervertebral-discs/ In this paper, researchers report on progress towards the manufacture of interver...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The 2017 Summer Scholars Working at the SENS Research Foundation
Each year, the SENS Research Foundation accepts a group of young life science academics and puts them to work on projects in aging research, both at the foundation and in allied laboratories, creating ties between research groups that can help to advance the state of the art. This year's batch has worked on a diverse set of projects that spread out beyond core SENS initiatives such as allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes. Reading through their projects is a reminder that a great deal can be accomplished these days given a small team, a little funding, and an equipped laboratory. Progress in medical research is no lo...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Rapid Hepatocellular Carcinoma Test Can be Administered Anywhere
Researchers at the University of Utah have developed a rapid and highly portable liver cancer screening test, that can be administered anywhere. One of the biggest challenges in treating liver cancer is that often symptoms don’t appear until the disease is in the later stages, meaning it is important that people are tested rapidly when doctors suspect they might have it. At the moment, testing for liver cancer involves sending a blood sample to a hospital lab, which could take weeks to return the results. The testing also typically requires patients to undergo ultrasound imaging, which is difficult for people living ...
Source: Medgadget - August 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics GI Oncology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 12th 2017
In this study, we focused on two pathways of cardiomyocytes or heart cells: the Hippo pathway, which is involved in stopping renewal of adult cardiomyocytes, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) pathway, essential for cardiomyocyte normal functions." Previous work had hinted that components of the DGC pathway may somehow interact with members of the Hippo pathway. The researchers genetically engineered mice to lack genes involved in one or both pathways, and then determined the ability of the heart to repair an injury. These studies showed for the first time that dystroglycan 1, a component of the DGC ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Top Companies in Genomics
From portable genome sequencers until genetic tests revealing distant relations with Thomas Jefferson, genomics represents a fascinatingly innovative area of healthcare. As the price of genome sequencing has been in free fall for years, the start-up scene is bursting from transformative power. Let’s look at some of the most amazing ventures in genomics! The amazing journey of genome sequencing Genome sequencing has been on an amazing scientific as well as economic journey for the last three decades. The Human Genome Project began in 1990 with the aim of mapping the whole structure of the human genome and sequencing ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 30, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Genomics Personalized Medicine AI artificial intelligence bioinformatics cancer DNA dna testing DTC gc3 genetic disorders genetics genome sequencing personal genomics precision medicine Source Type: blogs

A Demonstration in Mice of Whole Mitochondria Delivered as a Therapy
Mitochondria, the swarming power plants of the cell, become damaged and dysfunctional with age. Can this be addressed by delivering complete, whole, new mitochondria as a therapy? There have been signs in past years that cells can ingest and incorporate mitochondria from the surrounding environment, but few useful demonstrations to show whether or not this is common in living tissues. In the research here, researchers achieve that result, delivering mitochondria into tissues as a therapy, and using this approach to treat an animal model of Parkinson's disease. This neurodegenerative condition is associated with degraded mi...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Suddenly Everyone is Casting their Views of Aging in Terms of Cellular Senescence
I exaggerate in the title of this post, of course, but there is some truth in it. Certainly, a lot more attention is focused on the phenomenon of cellular senescence now that mouse life spans have been extended and aspects of aging have been reversed via clearance of senescent cells. The existence of several startup biotechnology companies aiming to bring senescent cell clearance treatments to the clinic is shining even more of a spotlight on this area. It has been something of a transformation. Five years ago, one of the few groups of researchers interested in this field struggled greatly to raise the funding for the pivo...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 17, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Reduced Levels of Myc Regulator Mtbp Modestly Extend Life in Mice
Despite the fact that we stand within reach of human rejuvenation, to be achieved through repair of the known forms of biological damage that cause aging, the majority of research into aging and longevity has next to nothing to do with that goal. It is instead a slow and painstaking process of mapping, an attempt to understand how exactly cellular biology produces aging, at the detailed level of genes and protein interactions. It takes years of work to obtain a useful amount of new information about the role of one specific gene, and there are thousands of genes of interest, formed into networks. There are many ways to inf...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 5, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Making Hepatitis C A Rare Disease In The United States
New breakthrough medicines for Hepatitis C present an important choice about setting goals and taking systemic action to achieve public health advances in the United States. Despite appearing to offer cure rates greater than 90 percent, high-priced Hepatitis C drugs have driven treatment rationing since their approval over two years ago. Gaps in the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of Hepatitis C pose significant public health consequences. In May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified Hepatitis C as the leading infectious killer in the United States in 2014—the first year in which new me...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 15, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Victor Roy, Dave Chokshi, Stephen Kissler and Prabhjot Singh Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Population Health Public Health Gilead hepatitis C Sovaldi Source Type: blogs

Interview with Thomas London
A major new feature of the fourth edition of Principles of Virology is the inclusion of 26 video interviews with leading scientists who have made significant contributions to the field of virology. These in-depth interviews provide the background and thinking that went into the discoveries or observations connected to the concepts being taught in this text. Students will discover the personal stories and twists of fate that led the scientists to work with viruses and make their seminal discoveries. For the chapter on Infections of Populations, Vincent spoke with Thomas London, MD, of the Fox Chase Cancer Center,&...
Source: virology blog - April 18, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information Fox Chase Cancer Center hepadnavirus hepatitis b virus hepatocellular carcinoma Principles of Virology textbook Thomas London video viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Highly effective HCV treatment: once daily oral Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir
The hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded RNA virus of the family Flaviviridae with six major genotypes, infects up to 150 million people worldwide. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection causes progressive liver fibrosis, which can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There is now an effective oral regimen. New research findings are summarized in this short video from NEJM: This is a ribavirin-free single-tablet regimen. There 2 medications in the single tablet:- Sofosbuvir is a nucleotide analogue inhibitor of the HCV NS5B polymerase approved for the treatment of HCV in combination with a variety of other ag...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - January 1, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Gastroenterology NEJM Source Type: blogs

Infant Dies Following 5 Vaccine Doses
Life after losing a loved one to vaccines is very painful. With a heavy heart, we share Sebastian Ryan Morley’s story. He was a healthy boy whose life ended after routine vaccinations. Sebastian’s mother and grandmother have worked many years in both the veterinary and human healthcare fields. What they were taught in school led them to believe vaccines were safe, but now they will never vaccinate again. We thank his family for coming forward and sharing very important information the public isn’t usually made aware of. Sebastian’s grandmother, Valerie Murfin, shared: “On December 11, 2002, wh...
Source: vactruth.com - September 5, 2015 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Augustina Ursino Tags: Augustina Ursino Human Top Stories adverse reactions dtap Hepatitis B vaccine Sebastian Ryan Morley truth about vaccines Vaccine Death vaccine injury VAERS Valerie Murfin Source Type: blogs

Jimmy Carter has announced that he has cancer and it has spread. What does that mean?
If there’s one thing about how cancer is discussed in the media that drives me absolutely bonkers, it’s how seemingly whenever a public figure announces that he has cancer information is rationed to the point where the announcement is basically meaningless. I can understand why someone might not want to disclose more about his disease… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - August 13, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Medicine Politics carcinoma of unknown primary colorectal cancer Jimmy Carter liver Source Type: blogs

The Fashion Challenges of the Emperor of Hepatitis C Treatment - Now in the BMJ, but Who Will Notice?
As we wrote, most recently last week, the hepatitis C screening and treatment bandwagon keeps rolling along.  There is constant public argument whether about the prices of treatment regimens, which approach $100,000 per patient in the US.  However, nearly all the public chatter, which seems mostly to come from corporate public relations people and marketers, investors and investment advisers, physicians with financial conflicts of interest, and pundits with little background in clinical epidemiology, seems never to question the assumption that the new drugs for hepatitis C are miraculous cures, which, of course, ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 15, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: clinical trials evidence-based medicine health care prices hepatitis C Sovaldi Source Type: blogs

How to Lower Your Risk for Breast Cancer
“TREE OF HOPE” Breast Cancer Survivor Tree I found out I had breast cancer on June 11th 2014. I had a double mastectomy on July 3rd 2014. I am 4 months out from surgery and I am feeling great. However, as you might imagine, it was no walk in the park. Lots of emotional upheaval. Lots of physical difficulty. But with great support from friends, family and good health care workers I’m doing very well. Over the last 4 months I have spent most of my free time learning about cancer and in particular breast cancer, what causes it and what cures it.  Before my diagnosis, it never crossed my mind that I...
Source: Life Learning Today - October 15, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AgentSully Tags: Healthy Living breast cancer lower breast caner risk prevent breast cancer prevent breast cancer naturally Source Type: blogs

Combination antiviral therapy for hepatitis C
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a single pill containing two different antiviral drugs for the treatment for hepatitis C. It is the first combination pill approved for the disease, and also the first treatment that does not contain interferon or ribavirin. The new hepatitis C drug, called Harvoni, is a mixture of the antiviral drugs ledipasvir and sofosbuvir. Ledipasvir (pictured) is an inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus protein NS5A, which has multiple roles in the viral replication cycle that include RNA synthesis and virus particle assembly. The mechanism of NS5A inhibition by led...
Source: virology blog - October 14, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information AIDS antiviral drug drug resistance ebola virus Harvoni HCV hepatitis C virus hepatocellular carcinoma HIV-1 ledipasvir liver mutation rate sofosbuvir triple therapy uridine Source Type: blogs

Sovaldi - a "Revolution" in Clinical Care, or in Marketing and Public Relations?
DiscussionWashington Post/ Kaiser Health NewsOn May 12, 2014, in an article on the dilemma the drug's US price of $1000/ pill presents to Medicare, Richard Knox wrote this about a patient with the infection:Previous drug treatments didn't clear the virus from Bianco's system. But it's almost certain that potent new drugs for hep-C could cure him. In other words, the article asserted that Sovaldi and similar drugs cure nearly everyone with hepatitis C, even those not cured by previous treatment.  ReutersOn May 20, 2014, in an article about how US health insurers are balking at the price of Sovaldi, was this statement b...
Source: Health Care Renewal - May 28, 2014 Category: Health Management Tags: evidence-based medicine Gilead health care prices manipulating clinical research Sovaldi You heard it here first Source Type: blogs

Management of hepatic encephalopathy in hospital
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Source: neurologyminutiae - May 16, 2014 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

A Fisherman’s Friend… or Foe?
aka Toxicology Conundrum 052 A 64 year-old male was brought in after a collapse at home. He had been sitting on the couch with his wife when she noticed that he had gone limp and was not breathing. Bystander CPR was performed for 15 minutes until ambulance crews arrived. He received 2x DC 200J shock for ventricular fibrillation, after which he had a return of spontaneous circulation, with HR 80 sinus rhythm, BP 90/60 and GCS 3. In the Emergency department he received 300mg Amiodarone, and cooling was commenced as per out of hospital cardiac arrest protocol at that time. He had a further episode of VF arrest soon ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kylie McNamara Tags: Clinical Case Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care Toxicology Toxicology Quiz cardiac arrest ECG Glycyrrhizic acidm hypokalemia laboratory results licorice liquorice Source Type: blogs

Trip in systematic reviews
Trip is mentioned thousands of times in articles in Google Scholar (click here) and in the last year over 300 times (click here).  Most of these are systematic reviews and I found two new articles today, these were:Sorafenib-based combination as a first line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A systematic review of the literatureTrauma center performance evaluation based on costs: A systematic review of cohort studies Needless to say Trip was not alone and other databases mentioned in these SRs were: PubMed Medline Cochrane Library Google Scholar EMBASE Web of Science C...
Source: Liberating the literature - January 26, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Hepatitis C in Egypt
The following background data on Hepatitis C in Egypt are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Primary references available on request. Incidence and Prevalence: Hepatitis C is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Egypt. The nationwide carriage rate in 1997 was estimated at 6 to 8 million, or 18.1% of the population – the highest rate in the world. A study published in 2010 estimated the yearly rate at 500,000 new cases (0.7% of the population); while a study published in 2013 estimated the yearly rate at fewer than 150,000 cases. An analysis published in 2009...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 19, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Egypt hepatitis c Source Type: blogs

Hepatitis B viruses in bats
Hepatitis B virus (HBV, illustrated) is a substantial human pathogen. WHO estimates that there are now 240,000,000 individuals chronically infected with HBV worldwide, of which 25% will die from chronic liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma. The hepatitis B virus vaccine is highly effective at preventing infection. Because there are no known animal reservoirs of the virus, it is believed that HBV could be globally eradicated. The recent finding of HBV in bats raises the possibility of zoonotic introduction of the virus. Serum and liver samples from 3,080 bats from Panama, Brazil, Gabon, Ghana, Germany, Papua New Guinea...
Source: virology blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information bat hepadnaviridae hepatitis b virus hepatocellular carcinoma liver viral zoonosis Source Type: blogs

Treating hepatitis C by blocking a cellular microRNA
Miravirsen is a drug that binds to and blocks the function of a cellular microRNA called miR-122 that is required for the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Treatment of chimpanzees chronically infected with HCV with this drug leads to suppression of viral replication. The results of a phase 2b human clinical trial in HCV infected humans indicate that Miravirsen reduces levels of viral RNA without evidence for viral resistance. I asked virologist Stan Lemon (who appeared recently on TWiV 235) his opinion of these findings. Are you surprised that the antiviral effect of Miravirsen is long lasting? The Janssen study pub...
Source: virology blog - June 6, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information cirrhosis HCV hepatitis C virus hepatocellular carcinoma liver microrna mIR-122 miravirsen viral Source Type: blogs

World Class
This is what can happen when a private practice surgeon refers a complicated colon cancer patient to a medical oncologist affiliated with a certain multinational, gigantic world-famous non-profit health care system. Let's say the surgeon is asked to see a patient with a large bowel obstruction.  Perhaps the colonoscopy demonstrated a high grade constricting lesion in the distal sigmoid/upper rectum and the CT scan revealed a massive, locally infiltrating mass invading into the bladder and a possible liver lesion.  Perhaps the patient has lost 30 lbs recently and has noted foul smelling material in her urine. &nb...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - May 3, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD Source Type: blogs

World Class
This is what can happen when a private practice surgeon refers a complicated colon cancer patient to a medical oncologist affiliated with a certain multinational, gigantic world-famous non-profit health care system.Let's say the surgeon is asked to see a patient with a large bowel obstruction. Perhaps the colonoscopy demonstrated a high grade constricting lesion in the distal sigmoid/upper rectum and the CT scan revealed a massive, locally infiltrating mass invading into the bladder and a possible liver lesion. Perhaps the patient has lost 30 lbs recently and has noted foul smelling material in her urine. Th...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - May 3, 2013 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Is Glyphosate Poisoning Everyone?
I've had a few people send along this article, on the possible toxicological effects of the herbicide glyphosate, wondering what I make of it as a medicinal chemist. It's getting a lot of play in some venues, particularly the news-from-Mother-Nature outlets. After spending some time reading this paper over, and looking through the literature, I've come to a conclusion: it is, unfortunately, a load of crap. The authors believe that glyphosate is responsible for pretty much every chronic illness in humans, and a list of such is recited several times during the course of the long, rambling manuscript. Their thesis is that th...
Source: In the Pipeline - April 30, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: The Scientific Literature Source Type: blogs