MiSight 1 day Contacts to Slow Myopia: Interview with Michele Andrews of CooperVision
CooperVision, a contact lens developer based in San Ramon, California, recently received FDA approval for its MiSight 1 day contact lens. The lens is the first to slow the progression of myopia when worn by children aged 8-12 years old. Myopia is very common, but it doesn’t just affect the way someone sees objects at a distance, and can trigger other conditions such as detached retina and cataracts. The condition typically develops during childhood, and can makes things like seeing the blackboard at school difficult for kids. Myopia occurs when the eyeball grows too long, meaning that light rays are focused at...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Artificial Tissue Patches to Heal Damaged Hearts
Post myocardial infarction (heart attack), damaged heart tissue doesn’t tend to heal very well. Not only is the pumping action weakened due to muscle cells dying, but the electrical signaling through the heart can also be impeded. Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have now developed remarkable new patches that mimic the electrical conductivity of heart tissue while being able to withstand the physical forces that a moving heart produces. Such patches may one day be used to help overcome some of the consequences of heart attacks and provide a matrix within which new cells can make home. “Ours is one of...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Source Type: blogs

Electronic Bandage Delivers Drugs, Leaves No Scar
Chronic wounds, such as those associated with diabetes, can be incredibly difficult to manage. Even the process of accessing and medicating the wound can be detrimental to healing. Researchers from University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School, and University of Connecticut are now reporting on having developed an electronic bandage that can deliver multiple drugs deep into a wound and only when programmed to do so. Wounds require different drugs at different stages of progression, but simply placing topical medication on the wound is not optimal. The new bandage has tiny needles that penetrate into the wounded...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Dermatology Medicine Rehab Surgery Source Type: blogs

Smartphone With Laser and Thermal Cameras to Screen Passersby for Fever
The current coronavirus infecting thousands of people in China (COVID-19) is making public health authorities around the world responsible for screening millions of people going through airports, returning from cruises, and crossing borders by land. The number one tool is the thermometer and checking is usually done by placing it against the forehead of every individual undergoing screening. This is slow, tends to cause people to bunch together, and puts staff in close proximity to the people whose temperature they’re measuring, all contributing to increased chances of transmission of the virus. Just in time, ...
Source: Medgadget - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Diagnostics Informatics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

neuroQWERTY for Diagnosing, Tracking Parkinson ’s Wins FDA Breakthrough Device Designation
Parkinson’s disease doesn’t have many treatment options, but early detection and monitoring of its progression can bring important benefits to patients. However, most Parkinson’s patients are rarely assessed by movement disorder specialists and those only suspected of having the disease don’t have any tools to help them detect changes in movement while outside a clinic. Now, the FDA has granted Breakthrough Device designation to nQ Medical, a firm based in Cambridge, MA, for its neuroQWERTY software that monitors psychomotor performance and fine motor function while a person uses their computer o...
Source: Medgadget - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Informatics Neurology Source Type: blogs

Ethos AI-Powered Radiotherapy System Follows Movement of Tumors
Varian has won FDA clearance for its Ethos therapy technology, which the company describes as an Adaptive Intelligence solution for improved tumor targeting during radiotherapy. Adaptive therapy allows clinicians to target tumors based on imaging performed during treatment sessions. This is important, as the internal anatomy tends to shift and tumors can move away from where they were during prior CT, MR, or PET imaging. Better targeting should help with treatment outcomes while sparing healthy tissues from unnecessary radiation. The Ethos system provides planning and contouring tools that are powered by artific...
Source: Medgadget - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Oncology Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

First AI-Guided Ultrasound Gets Green Light from FDA
Caption Health, a company based outside of San Francisco, CA, won the first authorization from the FDA for an ultrasound software that guides clinicians at capturing images of the heart. The Caption Guidance software should work with any number of ultrasound system from different manufacturers, but currently it can only be used with a diagnostic ultrasound from Terason, of Burlington, MA, a part of Teratech Corporation. An apical two-chamber view of the heart captured by Caption AI. As part of the De Novo premarket review that the Caption Guidance software went through, an interesting study was conducted in which eig...
Source: Medgadget - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Education Emergency Medicine Informatics Military Medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

3D Printed Implants With Layers of Living Cells
A microCT image shows a 3D-printed scaffold with clear grooves meant for the deposition of live cells. The grooved lines hold ink deposited during the printing process. Scaffolds can be made in any shape, based on medical images, to fill the site of a wound. 3D printing replacement tissues and organs is still in the early stages of development, but it is clear that custom printed implants will have to integrate multiple types of cells in different locations in order to perform like native tissues. Researchers at Rice University have just unveiled a new method of 3D printing solid plastic implants that incorporate differ...
Source: Medgadget - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

BIOTRONIK ’s Orsiro Mission Drug-Eluting Stent
BIOTRONIK won the European CE Mark for its Orsiro Mission drug-eluting stent. The device is intended for widening coronary arteries at sites of stenotic and in-stent restenotic lesions, and is designed to be delivered through some of the more tortuous vasculature. The device is the next generation of the Orsiro drug-eluting stent and the redesign comes with ten additional indications, such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS), ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI), diabetes mellitus and complex (B2/C) lesions The “ultrathin” struts are only 60 μm (≤3.0 mm) in diameter, helping the stent to blend i...
Source: Medgadget - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients
In a world first, clinicians at Maastricht University have used a robot to perform “supermicrosurgeries”, which involved operating on vessels as small as 0.3 mm in diameter. The procedures were conducted on women with lymphedema, a condition that arose as a result of breast cancer, whose lymphatic vessels were connected to veins to provide a drain for lymphatic fluids that built up. This is normally very difficult, as working on such tiny vessels requires extremely stable hands. To overcome this, the researchers used the MUSA robot from Microsure, a Dutch firm, that was recently cleared in the EU. The device...
Source: Medgadget - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Textiles from Human Cells for Replacement Vessels, Tissues, Organs
Scientists at University of Bordeaux/French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) have developed a completely new biological material, made using human fibroblast cells, that can be turned into sutures, vascular grafts, and many other medical devices and tissue replacements. They showed that their Cell-Assembled extracellular Matrix (CAM) can be turned into yarns of different strength, flexibility, and to have various other characteristics. These yarns can be used as sutures, but also to create artificial vessels and other devices for implantation. Because these yarns are similar to those used in cl...
Source: Medgadget - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Materials Plastic Surgery Thoracic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

New Customizable Bio-Ink for Printing Organs, Tissues
3D printing of tissues and organs requires a bio-ink that can host the living cells that are required for every unique application. A viable construct requires an extracellular matrix that will have the right mechanical and biochemical properties for the intended cells. Researchers at Rutgers University believe they’re on track to being able to print a wide variety of tissues and organs thanks to a bio-ink that can be fine tuned so that living cells placed within structures printed using it will find comfort and proliferate as desired. The team used hyaluronic acid, a common biomolecule, and polyethylene glyc...
Source: Medgadget - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Genetics Materials News Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Chip Recreates Blood-Brain Barrier to Study Delivery of Drugs to Brain
The blood-brain barrier is one of the greatest challenges that modern medicine has to overcome if we want to be able to fight neurological diseases using drugs. Animal models serve a purpose, but they’re not very good at replicating the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) as results often don’t translate during clinical trials. A better way to study the BBB is needed and researchers at Georgia Tech have now developed a chip that accurately replicates its function using the human cells that form this important part of our anatomy. Astrocyte brain cells are the primary constituent of the BBB, interfacing betwe...
Source: Medgadget - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Genetics Medicine Neurology Source Type: blogs

SmartTab Wireless Pill for Targeted Drug Delivery: Interview with CEO Robert Niichel
Velóce Digital Health is working to make pills smarter. The Denver, Colorado company is developing the SmartTab, an ingestible capsule that can be wirelessly controlled via a smartphone to release its contents at precise locations within the gastrointestinal system. SmartTab CEO Robert Niichel “The idea is that [with] the smart capsule, you will have precision medicine and delivered to a very targeted area,” says Robert Niichel, Founder and CEO. This approach, he points out, could reduce drug dosages, adverse effects, and improve patient outcomes. SmartTab works using several key technological ...
Source: Medgadget - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Exclusive Geriatrics Informatics Medicine Psychiatry Public Health Source Type: blogs

Onera Bioimpedance Patch to Detect Sleep Apnea
In this study, the potential of using the bio-impedance (bioZ) of the chest as a respiratory surrogate is analyzed. A novel portable device is presented, combined with a two-phase Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) deep learning algorithm for automated event detection. The setup is benchmarked using simultaneous recordings of the device and the traditional polysomnography in 25 patients. The results demonstrate that using only the bioZ, an area under the precision-recall curve of 46.9% can be achieved, which is on par with automatic scoring using a polysomnography respiration channel. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy a...
Source: Medgadget - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology ENT Informatics Source Type: blogs

Robotic Phlebotomist Draws Blood, Automates Hematology Analysis
Engineers at Rutgers University have developed a robot that autonomously draws patient blood and immediately performs hematology analysis. Such technology may help to speed up patient care, free clinicians to do other tasks, and even reduce the number of failed IV starts. The device was recently tested in a clinical trial for the first time and the results, published in journal Technology, showed that the robot is as good or better than trained phlebotomists at obtaining venous access. Currently, clinicians can miss target veins in patients who lack visible veins and with veins that are not palpable. Trying the pro...
Source: Medgadget - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pathology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Wireless Lumee Oxygen Platform Cleared in EU
The European Union cleared Profusa’s Wireless Lumee Oxygen Platform, a system designed to measure tissue oxygen levels in patients with diseases such as peripheral artery disease and critical limb ischemia. The wired version of the Lumee was cleared in Europe back in 2016 and the new device fundamentally works the same. It consists of a small hydrogel sensor, which comes with its own injector, that has fluorescent particles attached to its body. An electronic wireless patch is placed over the spot where the sensor is injected under the skin. When the fluorescent molecules come in contact with oxygen they can be ma...
Source: Medgadget - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

BioSticker FDA Cleared for Month-Long Vitals Monitoring
BioIntelliSense, a Silicon Valley firm, won FDA clearance for its BioSticker wearable sensor and the company is also releasing its Data-as-a-Service platform. The BioSticker can track heart rate, respiratory rate, skin temperature, body position, sleep status, and activity levels, as well as provide a high-resolution gait analysis, fall detection, and can even spot certain symptomatic events that need to be reported. All this can be recorded for up to a continuous thirty days, providing physicians with an impressive set of data that can hold clues to patients’ diseases and conditions. The device is single-use and is ...
Source: Medgadget - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Informatics Medicine Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Credit Card Sized Diagnostic Lab Plugs into Smartphone
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have developed a tiny portable diagnostic device that can detect the presence of specific pathogens in a saliva sample, and relay the results to a doctor when plugged into a smartphone. The device can potentially diagnose a wide array of diseases, including malaria, HIV and Lyme disease, and could be useful for point-of-care testing and even self-testing. A custom app can relay the results of tests to one’s doctor for nearly instant diagnostic results. The technology includes single-use plastic chips that a user places in their mouth to load a saliva sample before pluggi...
Source: Medgadget - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Pathology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fitbit Health Solutions: Interview with Amy McDonough, GM and Senior VP
FitBit, a well know maker of wearable devices, is rapidly expanding into data-oriented health solution services. That was an overarching theme in our conversation with Amy McDonough, General Manager and Senior Vice President for Fitbit Health Solutions. She sat down with us recently to tell us about the company’s offerings and how its solutions improve outcomes and decrease healthcare costs for consumers, employers, and insurance companies. The following is a description of our conversation with Ms. McDonough, taken from notes of the meeting, supplemented by additional information from the company. Amy McDonough, ...
Source: Medgadget - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Contact Lenses, Skin Patches, Tatoo Inks Exposed to UV Change Color to Warn of Exposure
Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light can lead to the development of skin cancers, so limiting how much time one spends under the Sun’s rays and using sunscreen when necessary is critically important. Currently, there are few tools available that notify users of their UV exposure, especially those that are easy to wear, non-intrusive, and can be used even while at the beach. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich in Germany have now come up with a way to create all sorts of devices that change color when exposed to ultraviolet light. These include contact lenses, sunglasses, skin patches, and even tattoo ...
Source: Medgadget - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs

4D Printing to Make Barbs for Microneedle Arrays
Microneedle arrays are promising as a way to help heal wounds, administer drugs, and sense a variety of biomarkers of health and disease. Because of their tiny size and smooth surface, microneedles don’t stay put in the tissues they’re attached to and tend to fall off if not kept in place by some means. Now, engineers at Rutgers University have devised a way to integrate microneedles with backward facing barbs, the kind that fishing hooks often have, so that microneedle arrays can stay in place as long as needed. To make this possible, the team relied on 4D printing, a technique that uses 3D printing to ...
Source: Medgadget - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Plasma Protein Levitation Technique Could Provide New Diagnostic Tool
Researchers at Michigan State University have developed a technique to levitate plasma proteins using a magnetic field. The technique provides very accurate information on the density of the proteins, and could reveal signatures of disease, potentially allowing clinicians to diagnose various conditions, such as multiple sclerosis, more easily. The technique involves mixing a sample of plasma proteins with magnetic nanoparticles and then applying a magnetic field to separate different proteins into discernible bands. “When we put something in liquid, it separates into sediment by weight,” said Morteza Mahmoud...
Source: Medgadget - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Genetics Medicine Pathology Source Type: blogs

SELUTION SLR Drug Eluting Balloon Cleared by EU
MedAlliance, a Swiss company, won the EU CE Mark clearing its SELUTION SLR sirolimus-eluting balloon for use in treating peripheral vascular disease. This is the first CE Mark that the company has received and the clearance applies to SELUTION SLR devices in sizes from 2.0 x 20mm to 7.0 x 150mm. MedAlliance’s technology allows sirolimus, an antiproliferative drug, to be released comparatively to how many existing drug-eluting stents release this medication. Thanks to tiny identical balls within the balloon, made of a biodegradable polymer mixed with the sirolimus, the medicine seeps into the surrounding tissue...
Source: Medgadget - February 5, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Patch Automatically Delivers Insulin as Blood Glucose Rises
New technology has been making an impact on how diabetics control their blood sugar levels. A combination of a wearable glucometer and insulin pump, connected via a smart control mechanism, can function as an artificial pancreas, but researchers at University of California Los Angeles, University of North Carolina, and MIT have created and now tested an electronics-free wearable patch that automatically releases insulin based on rising glucose levels. The stick-on device is about the size of a U.S. quarter coin and features dozens of tiny needles loaded with insulin. They’re less than a millimeter in length and ma...
Source: Medgadget - February 5, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Source Type: blogs

Handheld 3D Bioink Printer for Wound Healing
Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a handheld 3D printer that can deposit a stem cell-loaded bioink onto wounds, such as burns, to promote tissue healing. The device acts like a paint roller, and a clinician could use it to deposit the biomaterial in even stripes on a wound surface. A recent study has shown that the deposited bioink can help tissue to heal. The researchers hope that the technique could help to heal large burns for which it is difficult to use skin grafts. At present, skin grafts are employed to replace tissue lost in burns. However, for large burns that cover much of the body, findi...
Source: Medgadget - February 5, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: News Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

FDA Clears Olympus TJF-Q190V Duodenoscope With Disposable Endcap
Olympus received FDA clearance for its TJF-Q190V duodenoscope that features a single-use endcap and novel flushing adapter that reduce the chance for pathogens to settle between cases. Olympus touts that the new device has a large field of view, a reliable guidewire locking system, and precise handling. Duodenoscopes are used to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures as an option over open surgery. A few years ago duodenoscopes were identified as carriers of infections, due to flawed design and insufficient processing, and even led to a number of patient deaths. The industry had to rei...
Source: Medgadget - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: GI Surgery Source Type: blogs

SAFIRA Lets Lone Anesthesiologists Administer Regional Blocks
Medovate, a two-year-old UK firm, is bringing its SAFIRA regional anesthesia system to the United States. The SAFIRA (Safer Injection for Regional Anesthesia) allows anesthesiologists to deliver regional anesthesia (block) without relying on an assistant to actually inject it at the right pressure. Regional anesthesia procedures currently demand one person to operate an ultrasound to guide a needle toward the target, while another is responsible for the actual injection that has to be performed at moderate pressure. Excessive pressure can result in damaged nearby nerves, something that still happens too often in clinic...
Source: Medgadget - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Flashing Light Into Eyes Lowers Buildup of Alzheimer ’s Amyloid Plaques
A few years ago scientists discovered that directing flashing light at 40 Hertz (cycles per second) into the eyes and noises into the ears of mice with Alzheimer’s disease led to a marked decline in amyloid plaques in their brains. The mechanism making this happen was pretty much a matter of speculation, so researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory universities set out to understand why the therapy seems to work on mice and what that means for how we fight Alzheimer’s. Amyloid plaques are one of the main suspects underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers in this study exposed healt...
Source: Medgadget - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Serenno System Unveiled for Continuous Kidney Monitoring
Serenno Medical, an Israeli firm, has unveiled its Sentinel automatic device for monitoring and detecting kidney damage. Designed for use within the hospital, the Sentinel works by continuously measuring urine output and volume to help detect cases of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). These days, nurses typically manually measure the amount of urine a patient produces. This happens intermittently, so events of reduced urine flow indicating possible kidney damage can go undetected. Being able to monitor urine production as it happens can help to catch cases of AKI sooner and so deliver therapy while it’s still effective. ...
Source: Medgadget - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Medicine Urology Source Type: blogs

New Membranes to Make Extracorporeal Oxygenation More Effective
When lungs fail because of acute respiratory distress and cannot be used to deliver oxygen to patients via conventional ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has to be employed. ECMOs remove carbon dioxide from whole blood and replace it with oxygen thanks to a membrane oxygenator. While such artificial lungs are effective for short periods of time for many patients, for others this procedure is just too difficult. The gas exchange process performed by ECMOs is just too slow compared with what healthy lungs can achieve. Now, researchers at Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research (IAP) in Germ...
Source: Medgadget - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Materials Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

LapTrainer Mixed Reality Simulator for Laparoscopy Training Unveiled
KARL STORZ, a German maker of surgical tools and endoscopy products, has partnered with VirtaMed, a Swiss maker of medical simulators, to release a simulator for laparoscopic training. The LapTrainer device is a mixed reality simulator combining real laparoscopic tools with a computer generated representation of what is going on inside the model patient. Students can use the device to do repeat practice sets of common techniques and procedures, improving their skills and gaining experience that would otherwise have to be acquired on real patients. Patient positioning, how to place trocars, and even how to prep...
Source: Medgadget - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Thoracic Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Biorobotic Hybrid Heart to Help Develop New Cardiac Implants
Prosthetic heart valves, ventricular assist devices, and other cardiac implants go through an extensive research and development process, followed by testing on animals before human trials. There is no machine that simulates the function of the heart with any sufficient accuracy for comprehensive use by device designers, but researchers at MIT are trying to change that by modifying real hearts with synthetic muscle components that behave like the real thing. The team developed a way to open up pig hearts and replace their muscles with a material consisting of tiny bubbles that, when inflated, pull in the same direction ...
Source: Medgadget - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Source Type: blogs

EU Clears Medtronic ’s Smart Cobalt and Crome Cardiac Implants
Medtronic has announced that its Cobalt and Crome implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators (CRT-D) won EU CE Mark clearance, allowing their introduction to the continent. The devices feature Medtronic’s OptiVol fluid status sensors that allow the introduction of the company’s new TriageHF technology. This classifies patients into one of three groups for potential for heart failure (high, medium, low) based on measures including heart rate variability, atrial fibrillation, and fluid status. Medtronic also announced that existing devices with the OptiV...
Source: Medgadget - February 1, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Source Type: blogs

MIT Researchers Prove Non-Invasive Glucose Sensing Possible
Measuring blood glucose concentrations still requires direct access to blood, whether through a finger prick or via a continuous glucometer. MIT scientists working with colleagues at Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology in South Korea are reporting that they’ve developed a non-invasive blood glucose measurement device that may finally turn a long-held goal of medicine into reality. The researchers, using a machine about the size of a printer, showed that it is possible to use Raman spectroscopy, a safe and non-invasive imaging technique, to measure the amount of glucose blood contains right through the skin. ...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Source Type: blogs

Wearable Monitor Provides Continuous Blood Pressure Data
Researchers at Monash University in Australia have developed a wearable device that can continuously monitor blood pressure during a variety of activities including while exercising and during sleep. The technology does not require uncomfortable inflatable cuffs or invasive measurements, and uses continuous wave radar and photoplethysmogram sensors to monitor blood pressure. “For close to a century, the health sector has used the cuff device to measure blood pressure. More invasive measures are used to monitor the continuous blood pressure of critically ill patients, which are uncomfortable and could potentially c...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Source Type: blogs

Researchers Develop High Sensitivity Electronic Skin Material
The development of electronic skin is certainly an important part of future prosthetic devices. To make a high quality artificial skin, one would have to make a very flexible system seeded with many sensors, all wired somehow to a central core where the data can be interpreted. This requires pretty impressive material design skill, but researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Chemnitz University of Technology, both in Germany, and Osaka University in Japan, have now managed to develop a way of integrating electronic components, that are all based on organic thin-film transistors,...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Rehab Source Type: blogs

CapMedic Measures Lung Function, Makes Sure Inhalers Used Correctly
The FDA has cleared the CapMedic device that helps to make sure that metered dose inhalers (MDIs) are properly used, even by young patients. MDIs are most commonly employed to deliver asthma medications deep into the lungs, but to work effectively they have to be used correctly and on a consistent schedule. The CapMedic snaps onto the top of many inhalers and, using built-in lights and a tiny speaker, it works to nudge users to inhale the medication correctly and at the right time. When a person is ready, the device talks them through all the steps, like shaking the inhaler, properly squeezing it while keeping i...
Source: Medgadget - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Informatics Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Liquid Metal Biosensors for Healthcare Monitoring
Flexible biosensors are a popular new field of research. Soft pressure sensors are of particular interest because there are many applications for them in healthcare. Most flexible pressure sensors are based on solid-state components that tend to rely on carbon nanotubes and graphene. Carbon nanotubes or graphene flakes are seeded through a stretchy material to maintain conductivity while being squeezed and pulled, but the signal that is passed through changes when the material is deformed. This makes sensing using such materials somewhat inaccurate. Now researchers at KAIST, South Korea’s institute of science and tec...
Source: Medgadget - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Materials Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Abbott ’s Tendyne First Transcatheter Mitral Valve to Win EU Clearance
Abbott just announced that it is the first company to receive European regulatory approval to introduce transcatheter mitral valve replacement procedures on the continent. The Tendyne Transcatheter Mitral Valve Implantation (TMVI) system is intended for mitral regurgitation patients for whom open-heart surgery is too risky and in cases where transcatheter valve repair is not appropriate. Mitral valves are considerably more difficult to implant using minimally invasive means and some researchers in this field have been using artificial valves indicated for aortic valve replacements combined with novel imaging and 3D prin...
Source: Medgadget - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Imricor ’s MRI-Compatible Ablation Catheters Cleared in Europe for Cardiac Arrhythmia Treatment
Imricor Medical Systems, based outside of Minneapolis, Minnesota, has won the European CE Mark for its Vision-MR Ablation Catheter and Vision-MR Dispersive Electrode. These devices allow for cardiac ablation procedures to be performed within MRI-equipped operating rooms, thereby utilizing the accuracy of intraoperative MRI to target sources of arrhythmias. The Vision-MR ablation catheter is a 9 French-sized open irrigated catheter that looks and works like a traditional ablation catheter but it is used with the company’s Advantage-MR EP Recorder/Stimulator System. It can be seen in real-time under MRI and may ...
Source: Medgadget - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Sony Releases NUCLeUS OR Platform in U.S.
Sony is releasing its NUCLeUS system in the United States. The system helps clinicians working in and around operating rooms to access and share imaging data. NUCLeUS already provides support at over 500 ORs in Europe, so it has already proven itself in clinical practice. The system supports images and video up to 4K resolution, as well as audio and other patient data, over existing in-hospital networks, delivering it all on a central dashboard and utilizing streamlined workflows for easy and relevant data access. Patient data are kept secure and access is provided as needed to help maintain privacy, while availa...
Source: Medgadget - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Informatics Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Nanocontainers to Invade Nuclei of Living Cells
The nuclei of cells in our bodies is where much of the important intracellular processes take place. The genomic code is mostly stored within the nucleus and gene expression is controlled there, so getting drugs inside this most important organelle is a long sought goal of many researchers. Some viruses have been used to deliver therapies, but overall this is often impractical and risky. Researchers at University of Basel in Switzerland have now developed polymer nanocontainers that can move through the nuclear membrane and into the nucleus, ferrying drugs along. Nuclear pore complexes are very selective at what they...
Source: Medgadget - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Genomic Profiling for Precision Medicine: Interview with David Spetzler, Caris Life Sciences
Caris Life Sciences, a Dallas-based innovator in molecular science focused on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, has developed the MI Genomic Profiling Similarity (GPS) score to compare the molecular characteristics of specific tumors against those in the Caris database. This allows clinicians to identify the molecular subtype of their patients’ tumors and guide personalized treatment. The system is driven by machine learning algorithms and is envisaged as being particularly useful in guiding the treatment of cancers in cases where there is ambiguity about the tissue of origin and in other atypical or diff...
Source: Medgadget - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Genetics Informatics Oncology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Eko ’s AI-Powered Stethoscopes Detect AFib, Heart Murmurs
Eko, a maker of high-end digital stethoscopes, has just received the first FDA clearance for its devices to use AI algorithms to automatically detect atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart murmurs. Using this capability, primary care physicians, who are not nearly as extensively trained at spotting heart issues, will be able to identify potential cases of AFib, as well as vulvular and structural heart diseases, with an accuracy similar to seasoned cardiologists. The physician’s workflow remains practically the same as using a conventional stethoscope, except that Eko’s devices, which include a built-in single-...
Source: Medgadget - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Nanoparticles Direct Immune System to Scrub Atherosclerotic Plaques
The buildup of plaques within blood vessel walls is the underlying cause of strokes and heart attacks. These plaques contain many dead or dying cells that are not flushed out by the immune system fast enough. Now, researchers from Stanford are reporting on a new drug-carrying nanoparticle that can seek out atherosclerotic plaques and stimulate white blood cells to clear out the cellular debris within. The process can reduce plaques while lowering the chances that they will destabilize and pop-off, causing strokes and other damage downstream. The nanoparticle, which is in the shape of a tube, targets monocytes and ma...
Source: Medgadget - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

GammaTiles Help Prevent Recurrence of Malignant Brain Tumors After Surgery
GT Medical Technologies, a company based in Tempe, Arizona, won FDA clearance for its GammaTiles to be used to prevent malignant brain tumors in newly diagnosed patients. The devices, about the size of a postage stamp, contain Cesium-131, a radioactive isotope with a half life of about ten days. The collagen material within which the radioactive seeds are placed is resorbable by the body and doesn’t require a separate extraction procedure. This surgically targeted radiation therapy procedure was recently made available in a few hospitals for patients with recurrent brain tumors, but the new indication makes the de...
Source: Medgadget - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Neurosurgery Oncology Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Device Links Up to 10 Organ Chips to Form Body-on-a-Chip
Researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute have developed a “body-on-a-chip” consisting of up to 10 organ-on-a-chip devices that are linked together to mimic blood flow between different organ systems. The new system allows for more comprehensive drug testing, enabling researchers to see the effects of a drug on multiple organ systems simultaneously. The Wyss team hopes that the technology could help to reduce the amount of animal testing required for drug development while providing more useful results. In the past decade, numerous organ-on-a-chip devices have been developed. Such technology has the potentia...
Source: Medgadget - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Medicine Pathology Source Type: blogs

Magnetic Microbots Deliver Stem Cells to Heal Knee Cartilage
As has been widely hyped for many years now, mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to heal all sorts of damage in our bodies. The reality has been more complicated, since it is actually very difficult to get these cells to perform their magic just where we want them to. Damaged cartilage, for example, doesn’t heal well on its own and so would be a prime beneficiary of well targeted stem cell therapies. Current injection methods are not very effective, but researchers from South Korea’s Chonnam National University and Korea Institute of Medical Microrobotics are reporting in journal Science Robotics on spe...
Source: Medgadget - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Mindray ’s New High End Point of Care Ultrasound
Mindray is releasing a new point-of-care ultrasound system, the TE7 ACE. The device, intended for a variety of applications including emergency, critical care, and anesthesia, features a large color touchscreen, fluid management features, needle guidance toolkit, and electronic medical records connectivity. The company claims that the fluid measurement algorithms within this ultrasound are based on deep learning methods and are clinically proven to provide accurate results. Other algorithms can measure the changing diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC), its Collapsibility Index or Distensibility Index and IVC Variati...
Source: Medgadget - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Radiology Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs