New Hydrogel Material for Vocal Cord Repair
Researchers at McGill University developed a tough hydrogel that can resist mechanical forces found in the body. However, the material still provides a friendly environment for encapsulated cells to grow and enables the deep perfusion of blood and other tissue fluids. The injectable biomaterial may be useful in repairing tissues that experience constant mechanical stress, such as the heart, skeletal muscles and vocal cords. “People recovering from heart damage often face a long and tricky journey. Healing is challenging because of the constant movement tissues must withstand as the heart beats. The same is tru...
Source: Medgadget - December 6, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: ENT Materials Oncology Surgery mcgilluniversitycanada Source Type: blogs

Progesterone Test Wands to Maximize the Chances of Conception: Interview with Sylvia Kang, CEO of Mira
Mira is a medical device company based in California specializing in technology that helps women maximize their chances of conception and monitor their reproductive health. Fertility problems are on the rise, with sperm counts dropping and many couples having difficulties conceiving. Technology can assist in maximizing the potential of conception by allowing women to track their cycle and observe trends in hormone levels that may reveal issues or highlight opportunities to conceive. This new device is a urine wand that detects pregnanediol glucuronide, which provides confirmation of ovulation. The technology is ...
Source: Medgadget - December 2, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Ob/Gyn Reproductive Medicine miracare Source Type: blogs

Health Gadgets to Help Beat Sitting All Day
Whether in front of the computer or TV, driving on long commutes, or attending a sporting event, the average person spends more than 12 hours a day sitting. This can take a serious toll on your body in a variety of ways, but muscle and joint pain can be the most immediately apparent. Sitting all day can lead to long term consequences, many of which affect the lower back, hips, and knees. We had the opportunity to review a few devices that target these areas to help avoid tissue damage, pain, and other symptoms originating from long periods of sitting down. Incredi-belt The new Incredi-belt (not the “Classic&rdq...
Source: Medgadget - December 1, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Orthopedic Surgery OTC Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Catheter-Deliverable Biomaterial Sealants: Interview with Natalie Artzi, Co-founder of BioDevek
BioDevek, a medtech company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has developed a biomaterial adhesive that acts to seal internal wounds and incisions. The material is designed to be sprayed through a catheter, and the primary application for the technology so far is to act as a sealant following colonic polyp resection. At present, following polyp resection, surgeons can use polyp clips to seal the resection site, which can hamper wound healing, or use no sealant at all, leading to an open wound that comes with a risk of bleeding or other complications. This can lead to additional surgeries to correct the issue and is inc...
Source: Medgadget - November 30, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive GI Materials Plastic Surgery BioDevek Source Type: blogs

Airway Chip as Benchtop Model of Cystic Fibrosis
Researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute created a microfluidic chip that mimics the airway of patients with cystic fibrosis. By including lung airway cells from cystic fibrosis patients within the device, the team was able to reproduce many of the hallmarks of the disease, including a thick mucus layer, inflammation, and bacterial growth. The chip could provide the first advanced preclinical testing platform for cystic fibrosis treatments and increase our understanding of the disease. This image shows how neutrophils (fluorescing in green) that were added to the blood channel have attached themselves to the endoth...
Source: Medgadget - November 30, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Laser Kills Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria for Wound and Blood Decontamination
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed an ultrashort-pulse laser that can kill multidrug-resistant bacteria and their spores, and without damaging human cells. The laser works by vibrating and breaking protein structures within the bacterial cell, resulting in biochemical disruption and eventual death. The researchers hope that the technique could prove useful in decontaminating wounds and blood products. Killing multidrug-resistant bacteria is no mean feat, as many of the common antibiotics we use are no longer effective against them. General antibacterial strategies that cou...
Source: Medgadget - November 29, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Military Medicine Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Wireless Electronic Sensor to Monitor Bone Health
Engineers and orthopedic specialists at the University of Arizona built an ultra-thin wireless sensor that is designed to monitor bone health over long periods of time. The battery-free device is intended to measure a variety of physiological parameters, such as temperature and bone strain, and could be useful for patients with osteoporosis or to monitor healing and guide rehabilitation after a fracture. The device is affixed to the bone surface using a calcium adhesive, which encourages the bone to grow and fuse with the device surface for long-term implantation. At present, it is difficult to know precisely how a bone...
Source: Medgadget - November 24, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Informatics Materials Orthopedic Surgery osteoporosis uarizona Source Type: blogs

3D Blood Vessel Map Reveals Location of Stem Cells
Scientists at Johns Hopkins used a combination of molecular labeling and imaging techniques to create a three-dimensional map of the blood vessels in the mouse skull. Their approach also reveals niches where stem cell populations lurk, which could help researchers to understand how blood vessels and cells behave in various states of disease or injury. The researchers are interested in tissue engineering to replace lost bone, and their new methodology could allow them to understand how interventions to repair bone defects in the skull, such as biomaterial implants, are working. Understanding the distribution of specific ...
Source: Medgadget - November 23, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Medicine Orthopedic Surgery Pathology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Voxel-Based Technique to Streamline Bioprinting
At the University of Virginia researchers developed a new bioprinting technique based on voxels. Voxels are 3D cubes that form basic building blocks in computer graphics, similar to what pixels are for 2D, and have been popularized by games such as Minecraft. The new technique involves printing discrete spherical blobs of bioink (as the voxels) within a supportive matrix that then swell to merge together, forming a porous structure. Sticky bioinks can be difficult to handle and print predictably, but this new technique helps to address this issue.     Bioprinting holds enormous promise as a method to 3D p...
Source: Medgadget - November 22, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Plastic Surgery Rehab Source Type: blogs

Fish-Shaped Microrobots to Deliver Chemotherapy to Tumors
Researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China, working with outside collaborators, have developed shape-shifting microrobots that are designed to be guided to a target area in the body using magnets, and then release a drug cargo in response to the local environment. The application that the researchers have pursued involves guiding the microrobots to a solid tumor using magnets outside the body, and then the tumor’s naturally acidic microenvironment stimulates a shape change, resulting in the local release of a chemotherapy drug.   Researchers are devising a variety of cunning ways t...
Source: Medgadget - November 19, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

New Technique Generates 3D Images of Bacteria for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a highly sensitive imaging sensor that can rapidly and accurately monitor bacterial growth. The technique involves shining laser light through a bacterial sample and taking images at multiple orientations, before reconstructing the diffracted light patterns, to produce a 3D image of the bacterial colony. These 3D images provide significant detail about the growth and characteristics of bacteria, and could be very helpful in rapidly identifying which antibiotics are most effective at killing them. Determining antibiotic susceptibility is a laborious process. A b...
Source: Medgadget - November 19, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Pathology Public Health Source Type: blogs

Crossing the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Lasers and Gold Nanoparticles
Delivering drugs to the brain remains a challenge due to the blood-brain barrier, a specialized endothelial layer that is highly selective in what it permits into the neural tissue beyond. At the University of Texas at Dallas, researchers have developed a technique that allows therapeutics to cross the blood-brain barrier, potentially allowing for new treatments for brain tumors and other conditions affecting the brain. The method involves administering gold nanoparticles into the blood stream and then activating them using transcranial laser illumination to cause temporary openings in the tight junctions between endot...
Source: Medgadget - November 17, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Neurology Neurosurgery blood brain barrier UTD Source Type: blogs

Washable Fabric Measures Electrical Activity of Muscles
Researchers at the University of Utah engineered a wearable fabric that can function as a biosensor, measuring electrical activity of muscles. The technology could be useful for physical rehabilitation, allowing clinicians and physical therapists to monitor patients’ progress. The fabric contains a network of silver flakes and gold nanoparticles that provide conductivity and allow electrical signals to be measured in high fidelity using a portable electromyography (EMG) device.   Physical rehabilitation is a cornerstone of recovery from a variety of illnesses and injuries, but obtaining hard EMG data on m...
Source: Medgadget - November 17, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Materials Neurology Orthopedic Surgery Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Cold Cap Therapy for Chemo Patients: Interview with Kate Dilligan, CEO of Cooler Heads Care
Cooler Heads Care, a medtech company based in San Diego, created Amma, a cold cap therapy device that aims to help chemotherapy patients to preserve their hair. Hair loss is a very common side-effect of chemo, and poses a significant psychological challenge for patients who are already struggling with their diagnosis and treatment. Simply cooling the scalp during chemotherapy can dramatically reduce the amount of drug absorbed by the hair follicles, leading to reduced hair loss. However, current technology to achieve this comes with a hefty price tag, and may cost the patient as much as $8,000. This is out of reach for ...
Source: Medgadget - November 16, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Personalized Exosuit Uses Ultrasound to Adapt to User ’s Needs
At Harvard University a team of scientists and engineers developed an exosuit that uses ultrasound to measure muscle activity. The capability allows for rapid calibration of the suit for users’ needs. The soft wearable device continuously assists when walking or running, reducing the energy required to perform these tasks, which could be very useful for patients with neurological issues or muscular dystrophy. By directly measuring muscle dynamics, the suit provides activity- and user-specific assistance, bringing such wearable technologies a step closer to fruition. Wearable ‘exosuits’ have significant...
Source: Medgadget - November 16, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Radiology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Synthetic Peptides Jump Around to Repair Spinal Injuries
Researchers at Northwestern University have developed an injectable therapeutic that consists of synthetic peptide sequences intended to regenerate spinal tissue. The team designed the material so that it would allow the peptides to ‘dance,’ with such movements increasing the chance that they will find and interact with receptor proteins in neural tissue. The technique has already been shown to promote repair of spinal cord injuries in mice. Longitudinal spinal cord section treated with the most bioactive therapeutic scaffold. Regenerated axons (red) regrew within the lesion. “Our research aims to f...
Source: Medgadget - November 16, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Orthopedic Surgery Rehab Source Type: blogs

Wireless Blood Pressure and Hemodynamic Monitoring: Interview with Jeff Pompeo, CEO, Caretaker Medical
Caretaker Medical, a company based in Virginia, developed the VitalStream wireless patient monitor, and the company recently announced that the device has received FDA clearance. The technology is intended to improve on traditional blood pressure cuffs that provide only a snap-shot of blood pressure data, while being an alternative, in many cases, over invasive arterial catheters that come with a variety of potential complications, including infections, and difficulties with insertion. The VitalStream provides continuous, wireless monitoring of a variety of hemodynamic parameters and blood pressure, which is particularl...
Source: Medgadget - November 11, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine News Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Reviews the Sleep Number i10 360 Smart Bed
Conclusion In the conclusion for our review ten years ago, we posed the question about whether such an expensive bed was worth it. Let’s be real: Sleep Number beds are not cheap. Our bed configuration for just the mattress alone was $4599. Even with the inclusion of Sleep IQ, you still may first want to consider other solutions to help monitor and improve your sleep. But we felt that the beds have improved much: the materials and appearance are more modern and advanced, and the added electronics make it as close as you can get to a smart bed. We just wish it could integrate with smart home systems; with so many li...
Source: Medgadget - November 10, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: etc. Exclusive Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management bam labs sleep number sleepnumber Source Type: blogs

Chip for Investigation of Coronavirus Intestinal Infection
This study demonstrates that we can explore complex interactions between cells, pathogens, and drugs in the human intestine using our Intestine Chip as a preclinical model,” said Don Ingber, a researcher involved in the study, via a press release. “We hope it proves useful in the ongoing effort to better understand the effects of SARS-CoV-2 and to identify drugs that could be used to combat future viral pandemics.” Study in Frontiers in Pharmacology: Enteric Coronavirus Infection and Treatment Modeled With an Immunocompetent Human Intestine-On-A-Chip Flashbacks: Intestine Chip to Study Human-Microbi...
Source: Medgadget - November 10, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: GI Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Multistep Lateral Flow Devices Perform Advanced Assays
Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed a lateral flow test platform that can perform advanced assays that would otherwise require a laboratory. By controlling the flow of liquid through the lateral flow test, the research team designed it so that it can perform advanced multistep assays that do not require sophisticated lab equipment and significant periods of time. So far, they have designed advanced dipstick tests that can detect both COVID-19 and influenza simultaneously, and others that can perform immunoassays to detect Zika virus, HIV, hepatitis B virus, or malaria.    Lateral flow assays, otherwise ...
Source: Medgadget - November 10, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Pathology Public Health georgiatech Source Type: blogs

Cactus Spine-Inspired Sweat Collection Technology
A team of researchers at the Pohang University of Science & Technology in South Korea created a passive sweat collection device that is inspired by cactus spines. The device is intended as a means to collect sweat for biomedical analysis; for instance, to measure glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Having the ability to operate without a power source, the patch can passively collect tiny amounts of sweat efficiently, helping to unlock the potential of sweat analysis technology.    Sweat analysis holds enormous promise as a way to diagnose and monitor a variety of diseases. The basic idea is that a pa...
Source: Medgadget - November 9, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Dermatology Materials Medicine Sports Medicine pohang Source Type: blogs

A Handheld X-Ray System: Interview with Evan Ruff and Gregory Kolovich, Co-Founders of OXOS Medical
OXOS Medical, a medtech spin-off out of Georgia Tech, has created the Micro C, an FDA cleared handheld X-ray system that is designed to image the distal extremities, from the shoulder to the hand and from the knee to the foot. The device is intended to prevent situations in which clinicians have to handle and operate large machinery to perform simple X-ray imaging of small bones in the extremities, and allows them to conduct imaging right at the point of care. The device can be deployed during surgical procedures, and allows surgeons to more easily capture images that could be difficult to obtain using large, fixed equi...
Source: Medgadget - November 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

A Handheld X-Ray System: Interview with Evan Ruff and Gregory Kolovich, Co-Founders of OXOS Medical
OXOS Medical, a medtech spin-off out of Georgia Tech, has created the Micro C, an FDA cleared handheld X-ray system that is designed to image the distal extremities, from the shoulder to the hand and from the knee to the foot. The device is intended to prevent situations in which clinicians have to handle and operate large machinery to perform simple X-ray imaging of small bones in the extremities, and allows them to conduct imaging right at the point of care. The device can be deployed during surgical procedures, and allows surgeons to more easily capture images that could be difficult to obtain using large, fixed equi...
Source: Medgadget - November 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Electrochemical Test Measures Antibiotic Resistance
Researchers at Washington State University have developed an electrochemical test that can rapidly identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in patient samples. The technology can provide a result in less than 90 minutes, and is based on measuring the electrochemical activity of the bacteria after they are exposed to antibiotics. The data reveal the metabolism and respiration of the bacteria, and if they are still happily metabolizing after exposure to an antibiotic, then they are considered to be resistant to it. By providing a rapid answer to the question of antibiotic resistance, the method could be very helpful for clinic...
Source: Medgadget - November 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Simple Color Change Test Identifies Wound Infections
Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK, along with outside collaborators, have developed a simple color change test that rapidly indicates whether a wound is infected with harmful bacteria. The test works by detecting virulence factors released by the bacteria, which prompt a simple color change in a solution. The test could help clinicians to determine whether to prescribe antibiotics, and may help to avoid unnecessary prescribing. As the test can be administered at the point of care, and does not require expensive and time-consuming laboratory analysis, it may be very useful in low-resource or remote regions. ...
Source: Medgadget - November 5, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Dermatology Diagnostics Materials Plastic Surgery uniofbath wound care Source Type: blogs

Breath Test Developed for COVID-19
Researchers at Ohio State University managed to develop a breath test for COVID-19 that can spot the infection within seconds. The basis for the test is a unique ‘breath print’ of COVID-19 that the researchers have identified, and this includes a specific combination of oxygen, nitric oxide, and ammonia in the breath. At this stage in the pandemic, many people have undergone a COVID-19 test, and testing remains a key tool in tracking and containing the virus. While PCR tests remain the gold standard method for detecting the virus, rapid testing methods have their place and typically involve a small sacrifice...
Source: Medgadget - November 2, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Vaccine Patch Does Not Require Cold Chain Transport
Researchers at the University of Queensland and Vaxxas, a medtech company, announced the development of a high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP) that can deliver a COVID-19 vaccine through the skin without the need for needles. While such minimally invasive vaccine technology is to be welcomed, the major breakthrough is the temperature stability of the vaccine. The researchers were able to stabilize the formulation on the patch so that it can last for one month at room temperature and one week at 40 degrees Celsius (104 F), meaning that the new vaccine technology could help to overcome the cold chain transport hurdles. ...
Source: Medgadget - November 1, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Battery-Free Device Acts as Artificial Cochlea
Researchers at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China created a battery-free device that could pave the way for an artificial cochlea to aid with hearing loss. The cochlea, a component of the inner ear, converts sound waves into electrical impulses, and the new device performs a similar function. The device consists of barium titanate nanoparticles within a conductive polymer to form a piezo-triboelectric material that generates an electrical signal when moved and jostled by sound waves. For many people who are hearing impaired, the issue may lie in damage to the tiny hairs in the cochlea that help t...
Source: Medgadget - November 1, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: ENT Materials Source Type: blogs

Robotic Cat Improves Mood and Cognition for People with Dementia
A research team at Florida Atlantic University has tested a robotic cat in its ability to influence the mood and cognition of patients with dementia. The furry device moves and make realistic noises, and can provide a source of companionship and entertainment for patients, without the commitment of caring for a real animal. As patients with dementia can experience psychological symptoms, such as anxiety and depression, the technology represents a low impact intervention that avoids the potential side-effects of pharmacological treatment. Dementia is extremely challenging for those who live with it, as well as for their ...
Source: Medgadget - October 28, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Geriatrics Psychiatry FAU Source Type: blogs

Carbon Nanotube Sensor Detects SARS-CoV-2 Within 5 Minutes
Scientists at MIT announced the development of a rapid COVID-19 test that can detect the virus in a saliva sample in as little as five minutes. The technology does not require antibodies or other expensive reagents typically associated with protein detection, and is instead based on carbon nanotubes. The nano-structures are encased in a web of polymers, into which the target molecules stick, altering the fluorescent signal generated when the nanotubes are illuminated using a laser. The researchers were able to rapidly adapt the nanotube technology to detect SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that it could be useful in future pandemics...
Source: Medgadget - October 27, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Public Health mit Source Type: blogs

DNA Aptamers for Rapid COVID-19 Testing: Interview with Steven Goh, CEO of Achiko and Dr. Michael Edel, Inventor of AptameX
Achiko, a company based in Switzerland, has developed AptameX, a saliva-based rapid COVID-19 test. The technology is based on DNA aptamers that are bound to gold nanoparticles. On binding with a viral protein the gold nanoparticles are released, causing a measurable color change. The test takes approximately 15 minutes in total, with the user spending just five minutes washing their mouth out and then providing a saliva sample. PCR testing is the current gold standard for COVID-19, but it is not always practical to undergo such testing, and it is complex, time consuming, and costly to perform the PCR procedure hundreds ...
Source: Medgadget - October 26, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Genetics Medicine Public Health Achiko AptameX covid Source Type: blogs

Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Suppress Oral Biofilms
This study involved volunteers who wore a denture-like device that contained real tooth enamel. The volunteers regularly applied sugar solution to the denture, mimicking the sugary snacks many of us like to consume. They didn’t brush the dentures, but applied the nanoparticle/hydrogen peroxide combination twice a day. The treatment reduced the biofilm formation caused by bacteria such as S. mutans, without adversely affecting other microbial populations in the mouth or causing adverse effects. “We found that this approach is both precise and effective,” said Hyun Koo, a researcher involved in the study...
Source: Medgadget - October 26, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Dentistry Materials Medicine Nanomedicine indianauniversity upenn Source Type: blogs

Antibiotic Combined with Neutrophil Attractant
Researchers at Monash University in Australia and Harvard University have developed a new treatment for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. To achieve this, they attached a chemoattractant to an antibiotic drug molecule, meaning that it attracts neutrophils to the site of an infection and primes them to kill the bacteria. The two-pronged technique could give clinicians an edge for a variety of treatment-resistant infections.   Treatment-resistant bacteria are a growing problem. New antibiotics are thin on the ground, and our current stock of treatments is becoming less effective as new resistant bac...
Source: Medgadget - October 25, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Vaccine Delivery Device Inspired by BBQ Lighter
A team at Georgia Tech tinkered together a battery-free electroporation device to deliver DNA vaccines, which is inspired by BBQ lighters. The details of the workings of the vaccine injector are described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The electric ‘spark’ that ignites the gas flowing from a BBQ gas lighter has been repurposed to provide the power behind the electroporation. The battery-free piezoelectric sparking mechanism from a lighter is attached to a microneedle patch that acts as an array of electrodes. When the device is pressed against the skin, it initiates electroporation and deli...
Source: Medgadget - October 21, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Pediatrics Public Health Source Type: blogs

Robotic Textiles for Breathing Recovery
Researchers at MIT, alongside collaborators from Uppsala University and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, developed a ‘robotic textile’ that consists of an array of actuatable fibers. The fiber actuators are powered using compressed air, and can perform an impressive array of movements. Garments made using such fibers can sense how they’re stretched and compressed, and can provide tactile feedback at the same time. Although these fabrics have a multitude of uses, the researchers initially propose that the technology could assist patients in recovering breathing patterns after surgery or respira...
Source: Medgadget - October 20, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Rehab kthuniversity mit uppsalauniversity Source Type: blogs

Wristband to Detect Strokes: Interview with Sandra Saldana, CEO of Alva Health
Alva Health, a medtech startup based in Connecticut, is developing a wristband that can detect the signs of stroke and promptly alert the wearer and/or healthcare staff. The technology is intended for those at high risk of stroke, such as stroke survivors and those diagnosed with transient ischemic attack. Strokes cause a huge level of patient morbidity every year, with many suffering debilitating symptoms that are life changing. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are very important, but in many cases the early symptoms of a stroke are subtle and are easily missed. These issues have inspired this startup to develop a ...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Neurology Neurosurgery alvahealth stroke Source Type: blogs

Wearable, Non-Invasive Sensor Measures Glucose in Sweat
Scientists at Penn State University developed a wearable glucose monitor that can non-invasively measure glucose levels within sweat in real time. The low-cost sensor consists of laser-induced graphene and a nickel-gold alloy that can detect the very low levels of glucose in sweat without the use of enzymes. The sensor contains a microfluidic chamber into which sweat is drawn, and then an alkaline solution reacts with the glucose in the sweat, causing a reaction in the alloy and a substantial electrical signal. Measuring glucose levels is a pain, literally. From traditional finger stick tests to implantable monitors, th...
Source: Medgadget - October 15, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Improving Medication Compliance with Connected Pill Bottles and More: Interview with Chris O ’Brien, CEO at AdhereTech
AdhereTech, a medtech company based in New York City, has developed the Aidia Smart Bottle (previously known as the Smart Pill Bottle), a connected pill bottle that helps to increase medication compliance using lights, audio alerts, and text message reminders. The bottle will remind patients to take their medication and remind them if they have missed a dose. Poor medication compliance can be the decider between disease management and disease progression. During the COVID-19 pandemic many patients with chronic health conditions were not in regular contact with their physicians and other healthcare providers, meaning tha...
Source: Medgadget - October 14, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine adheretech Source Type: blogs

Exoskeleton Helps Above-Knee Amputees to Walk
Researchers at the University of Utah built an exoskeleton that can ease walking for people with above-knee amputations. The new system, which uses an electromechanical actuator attached to the thigh and AI to adapt to each person’s walking style, significantly reduces energy consumption for users. Above-knee amputations are particularly challenging in terms of walking. Many of the leg muscles are removed, meaning that the remaining muscles, both residual and intact, have a lot of work to do. Conventional prosthetic legs do not provide any assistance while walking, so users have to exert significant amounts of ene...
Source: Medgadget - October 14, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Rehab universityofutah Source Type: blogs

Explorer Surgical Expands into Robotic Surgery: Exclusive with CEO Jennifer Fried
As cloud and digital platforms continue to gain traction, we’re seeing a trend toward increased investments in robotic surgery in medical technology fields. Surgical training, coordination, and collaboration in the operating room are areas where digital tools can help shorten learning curves. While robotic technology continues to transform healthcare worldwide by allowing surgeons to perform cases with increased precision and decreasing patient downtime, use of surgical robotics does have an increased learning curve and time required for mastery. This is where many companies have begun to make a difference in surg...
Source: Medgadget - October 13, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Cardiac Surgery Exclusive Neurosurgery Orthopedic Surgery Plastic Surgery Thoracic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs