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Exclusive Interview with Dr. David Rhew, Chief Medical Officer of Samsung Electronics America
During our time at CES 2018 in Las Vegas, we noted that large firms, previously known for their consumer products and services, are jumping into the healthcare space. Samsung may be the best example of this, as over the past few years it has expanded its offerings to include even high-end ultrasound machines. We had a chance to sit down with Dr. David Rhew, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung Electronics America, and ask him a bunch of questions about how contemporary technology can improve medical care, help individuals monitor their health, and improve clinical outcomes while lowering over...
Source: Medgadget - January 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Informatics Source Type: blogs

Broadcasting Surgeries With Ease: Interview with B-Hive Co-Creator Steven Thekan
A great deal of advanced medical training involves witnessing surgeries and listening to the guidance, suggestions, and recommendations of the people performing them. Typically, this is done on-site, which often involves costly travel expenses plus a lot of time wasted simply getting to the lesson. There are alternatives available, such as hiring a video crew to film and broadcast a surgery, but this is an expensive and often not very practical in small operating theaters. The Florida Hospital Nicholson Center, having its own production crew, decided that they can cut educational costs while making it easy for clinicians t...
Source: Medgadget - January 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Surgery Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Applications Open for 2018 Johns Hopkins Healthcare Design Competition Sponsored by Boston Scientific
Applications are open for the 2018 Johns Hopkins Healthcare Design Competition facilitated by the Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design (CBID) and sponsored by Boston Scientific. The competition is open to all student-led design teams from around the world developing innovative health-related solutions. The competition includes three tracks for submissions: Designs of Solutions for Advanced Health Systems Global Health or Humanitarian Designs Healthcare Apps or Information Technology Designs Eligibility criteria for submitted projects include: Focused on a healthcare application Started on or after January 1, ...
Source: Medgadget - January 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Willow, a Wearable Breast Pump (CES 2018)
What you see is what you get. This sleek wearable breast pump from Willow, a Mountain View, CA-based company is an autonomous unit designed to pump and collect breast milk. There are no wires or any other external components. The milk is collected in a specially designed bag that fits inside the unit. The bag can easily be removed to transfer the milk to a feeding bottle or for storage inside a refrigerator. The device is rechargeable and smart thanks to an accompanying cellphone app. The company went as far as to bring a lactating woman to the CES 2018 floor to demonstrate the subtle presence of the device, but out of the...
Source: Medgadget - January 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Medically Home Wants to Shift Advanced Medical Care from Hospital to Home (CES 2018)
Healthcare is evolving and even where clinical care is delivered is changing. Fifty years ago, patients stayed in the hospital for weeks after an appendectomy. Today they go home the same or the next day. Some patients nowadays stay due to common problems: for DVT prophylaxis after surgery, for physical therapy, for antibiotics and serial CBCs to monitor the progress of infection, and so on. But as technology evolves, some of these clinical tasks could be done at home. Consider that we now have wearables that can monitor basic vital signs better than CNAs (nursing assistants) on the hospital floor. We also have a growing l...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Informatics Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

3M Wants to Make Medical Adhesive Selection a Simpler Process for Design Engineers (CES 2018)
It was remarkable to observe at CES 2018 how many wearable devices have been developed for health and lifestyle applications. Many of these devices use adhesives to stick to people’s skin, sometimes for an hour, sometimes for a day, or even a week or longer. Also, there are developers out there that want implantable devices that need adhesives. 3M is arguably a leader in the field of adhesive materials. The company’s products, anything from Tegaderm to Ioban to various medical tapes, have been used extensively in hospitals and clinics for many years. Over a long period of time, the company has acquired signific...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs

Biomeme ’s Portable PCR System Expands Research Possibilities
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most widely used techniques in biological research and testing, allowing researchers to amplify and identify even small quantities of DNA or RNA. It serves a wide variety of uses, from genetic testing to infectious disease identification to forensics. Thermal cyclers, the machines that run PCR, are a staple in research laboratories. However, they are also large and expensive. Biomeme hopes to expand those limitations. The Philadelphia-based company started in 2013 with one simple but powerful idea. “We wanted to empower anyone, a lay person, a researcher, a clinician, who...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Diagnostics Genetics Source Type: blogs

Cynosure ’s TempSure Envi Released to Improve Skin Aesthetics
Cynosure, now a part of Hologic, is releasing a radiofrequency system for performing aesthetic procedure on the skin, including for reduction of wrinkles and other facial lines, tightening of skin by coagulating soft tissue, and making cellulite look more attractive than its natural self. The system is already FDA cleared. The TempSure Envi device generates heat in the deeper layers of the skin while simultaneously monitoring the temperature of the affected area. It features so-called Therapeutic Logic Control, a technology that correlates the temperature of the therapy to how much time it is delivered to achieve optimal r...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Mira, the Home-Use Quantitative Hormone-based Fertility Tracking Device (CES 2018)
Mira is a new compact ovulation predictor device from Mira, a Pleasanton, CA firm, that is based on a fluorescent immunoassay test with 99% accuracy at detecting the Luteinizing hormone (LH), which peaks just before ovulation. At CES 2018 we had a chance to check out the device and talk to co-founded Dr. Zheng Yang, who has a PhD in biophysics and computational biology from University of Pittsburgh. According to Dr. Yang, for many couples, “starting a family can have its challenges and becomes a bit of a guessing game on the best time to conceive. After looking at the fertility monitors currently available, we found ...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Ob/Gyn Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

QuickSee Autorefractor to Help Prescribe Glasses in Poor and Remote Areas
Eyeglasses have gotten pretty cheap over the decades, but the process of obtaining a prescription is still too expensive for many people around the world. One reason for the high cost of prescriptions is the expense, and size, of traditional autorefractors. These devices are bulky, and so can’t be easily transported between places lacking proper eyecare facilities. They also tend to cost many thousands of dollars, often much too much for poor regions of the world. There are cheap solutions out there, but they have limitations, including Opternative that requires a computer and smartphone to be connected to the intern...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ophthalmology Public Health Source Type: blogs

High Tech Solution to Inhaler Compliance: Interview with Arik Anderson, CEO of Adherium
Patients taking inhaled medications, particularly those with asthma, have to comply with the prescribed regimen in order to achieve optimal results. As anyone in medical practice knows, medication compliance among patients can be remarkably low. Adherium, a company based in Auckland, New Zealand, has come up with technology to tackle this issue for patients using inhalers. We spoke with Arik Anderson, CEO of Adherium, about the company’s gadgets, how they help patients, and what potential the technology has in the future. Medgadget: Please give us a short introduction to your technology from a clinician’s and p...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Philips Releases Its Latest Patient Monitoring Solution in U.S.
Philips is releasing its latest Patient Monitoring solution in the U.S., a product designed to help hospitals keep track of patient monitor data as they move from one clinical area to another. The offering revolves around the company’s IntelliVue X3 transport monitor and it allows clinicians to easily combine all the data gathered in the OR, ICU, as well as during transport, and review it all together as a continuous record. This is important, as moving from one monitor to another typically means that clinicians can’t go back and review a patient’s history, limiting their decision making. Using ...
Source: Medgadget - January 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Advisor HD Grid Mapping Catheter, Sensor Enabled, Cleared in Europe to Map Cardiac Arrhythmias
Abbott has announced that its Advisor HD Grid Mapping Catheter, Sensor Enabled, landed CE Mark approval in Europe. The device is used to track down sources of difficult to diagnose cardiac arrhythmias in order to locate targets for therapeutic ablation procedures. It relies on both electrical impedance and magnetic sensing to map out the heart.  The catheter connects to the company’s EnSite Precision Cardiac Mapping System, which displays the maps, and can be utilized to work within any chamber of the heart. The 16 electrode array at the distal end of the catheter has an unconventional, slotted spoon-like s...
Source: Medgadget - January 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

International Biophysics FloPump 32 Centrifugal Disposable Heart Pump FDA Cleared
International Biophysics, a firm out of Austin, Texas, won FDA clearance for its FloPump 32 centrifugal disposable heart pump. The device is designed to be powered by the Maquet ROTAFLOW console, which can be used as a stand along unit or a part of a heart-lung machine. The new pump won the CE Mark approval in Europe last year. This is one of the smaller pumps available on the market, with only a 32ml priming volume. It can move up to seven liters of blood per minute at a maximum pressure of 750 mmHg. In the United States, the device will be distributed by Origen Biomedical, also an Austin, TX firm. Link: Interna...
Source: Medgadget - January 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Biodegradable Pressure Sensor Doesn ’t Need to be Removed After Implantation
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a biodegradable pressure sensor that can be implanted in the body and help clinicians to monitor a variety of conditions over extended periods of time. What makes this sensor different from existing ones is that it doesn’t need to be removed and will eventually dissolve in the body, eliminating the risk of infection and the longer recovery associated with an invasive surgical procedure to remove a sensor. Clinicians can use implantable pressure sensors to monitor a variety of health conditions, including brain swelling as in hydrocephalus, chronic lung disea...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Source Type: blogs

New Device Combines Different Ophthalmology Equipment Into Single Instrument
Patients receiving comprehensive eye exams have to go from one imaging device to another in order to properly assess their vision. In addition to the hassle, there are costs associated with maintaining and housing multiple pieces of equipment of which only one is usually used at any one time in a typical ophthalmology office. Now researchers at Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland and Universidad de Murcia, Spain have developed a device that can provide different views of the eye, and with an image quality even better than using multiple instruments. Current technology images the eye to about 3 millimeters in depth and c...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Cryogenic 3D Printing to Make Replica Brain and Lung Tissues
Printing biological tissues, a necessary precursor to creating replacement organs, is not easy, but constructing extremely soft and fragile tissues that resemble the brain and lungs is even more difficult. Researchers at Imperial College London and Kings College London are now using extremely cold temperatures in combination with 3D printing to create objects out of a composite hydrogel that are about as stiff as grey matter and lung tissue. The team used solid CO2 (dry ice) to quickly cool a composite hydrogel ink below its freezing point while in an alcohol bath, allowing the structure to solidify and take on whatever s...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Source Type: blogs

X-Ray Pill for Colon Cancer Screening: C-Scan System Cleared in Europe
Traditional colonoscopies that are used to screen patients for presence of colon cancer can be physically unpleasant, much too invasive, and require diets and laxatives that leave patients feeling empty and exhausted. A new option, in the form of a pill that emits X-rays to image the colon, has just been cleared by European regulators via a CE Mark. The C-Scan System from Check-Cap, an Israeli firm, features a swallowable pill that has an X-ray source, a positioning system, computing components, and a battery. The patient first swallows a contrast agent and then wears special sensors attached to the skin over where the co...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Corti Intelligent Assistant Helps Emergency Dispatchers Diagnose, Triage Callers
Artificial intelligence is a popular buzz term in medicine these day. While there’s a lot of simple things pretending to be smart, there are also some pretty impressive AI applications that can be very useful. Thanks to Fast Company, we learned of Corti, an AI assistant that listens to calls to emergency services (911) and helps dispatchers form the right questions, suggests next steps, and even proposes possible diagnoses. The software not only detects the words that are spoken, but also the tone of the voice and the callers breathing patterns. All this information is combined and compared to many thousands of previ...
Source: Medgadget - January 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Emergency Medicine Informatics Source Type: blogs

Robot Lengthens Disconnected Bowels to Restore a Contiguous Gut
A number of congenital conditions result in missing parts of the gastrointestinal tract, such as esophageal atresia, while a few others can necessitate surgical removal of a part of the bowel that then has to be reconnected. Fragile and precious newborns are perhaps the most common patients for procedures requiring bowel regeneration and reconnection. In terms of esophageal atresia, the current standard of care, known as a Foker process, puts the child into an induced coma so that body movement doesn’t hamper the disconnected ends of a malformed esophagus from being pulled together by sutures attached to the back. N...
Source: Medgadget - January 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Surgery Source Type: blogs

RAPAEL, a Futuristic Pegboard, Turns Boring Rehab Into a Game
At CES 2018 in Las Vegas, NEOFECT, a South Korean firm, was showing off its RAPAEL Smart Pegboard, a new take on a simple rehab device. Pegboards are commonly used in rehabilitation settings to practice hand dexterity, as well as to assess an individual’s state and progress. They’re particularly useful for those recovering from a stroke, but their design typically doesn’t differ much from a children’s play toy. The RAPAEL Smart Pegboard is certainly a 21st century pegboard, recognizing when the correct objects are placed into it, lighting up the peg holes in amusing ways to motivate use, and pr...
Source: Medgadget - January 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Hologic Brevera Biopsy System Slices and Images Breast Tissue, Now Cleared in Europe
Breast biopsies, which can conclusively diagnose the presence of a tumor, suffer from a number of procedural limitations. One big issue is that during the excision of every sample, the physician can’t easily confirm whether the taken tissue really does come from the targeted lesion. Hologic‘s Brevera biopsy system has now been approved in Europe to provide such functionality, allowing the doctor performing a biopsy to quickly pass high quality, useful samples to the pathologist for review. The Bevera features the company’s Cor-Lumina imaging technology, which feeds tissue slices taken by a slice...
Source: Medgadget - January 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Pathology Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Biomaterial Scaffold to Culture T Cells for Immune Cell Therapy
Researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute have developed a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the actions of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in stimulating T cell growth and survival. The scaffold allowed the researchers to significantly expand T cell numbers in a dish, compared with existing culture methods, and could bring T cell therapies, such as anti-cancer treatments, closer to clinical reality. Anti-cancer T cell therapies involve culturing and modifying patient-specific T cells in a dish before administering them to a cancer patient, where they can attack and kill cancer cells. A major challenge with this technique l...
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Materials Oncology Source Type: blogs

New Electronic Pill Monitors Gas Contents of Guts
The goings on deep inside our guts are still very much shrouded in mystery. The mystery arises partially from the fact that it’s hard to sample the gasses that exist inside our bowels. Much of our knowledge about the gaseous content of the GI system really comes from stool samples and when the guts are surgically accessed. A new electronic pill is now allowing scientists to study the contents of the gut like never before, providing detailed data about the gasses inside the guts previously impossible to gather. Developed at RMIT University and trialed by a team at Monash University, both in Australia, the pill is able...
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI News Source Type: blogs

Boston Sci ’s WaveWriter Spinal Cord Stimulator Delivers Paresthesia-Based and Sub-Perception Pain Therapy
This study established in de novo patients that similar pain relief and improvement in quality of life measures are achieved independent of the type of frequency (from 1 kHz up to 10 kHz) used in sub-perception SCS therapy when the proper target and dose are identified. The WHISPER study is a multi-center, prospective, cross-over, randomized, and controlled study evaluating the long-term safety and effectiveness of sub-perception SCS pain relief therapy. Via: Boston Scientific… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurosurgery Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Surgibox: a Portable Operating Room for Surgery Anywhere
A well equipped surgical team not only has a bunch of equipment, but also an operating theater to work in. There are charitable organizations traveling the world over providing free-of-charge surgeries, but their reach is limited because a proper OR is still a rarity in many places. A new device is being developed that wraps around the patient and isolates the surgical area from the nearby environment while allowing access for surgeons to do their work. The Surgibox is still a work in progress, but it’s being rapidly developed by a company of the same name that’s partnered with some folks at MIT to push things...
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Public Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

Medgadget ’s Best of CES 2018
CES 2018 is over. We assessed the many health-related gadgets that were shown off by a myriad of companies, concluded our deliberations, and now is the time to present the winners of Medgadget’s Best of CES 2018. We extend our congratulations to the winners! SmartSleep from Philips Here’s an exciting device with a huge potential to improve the lives of millions. This simple looking head band is steeped in some serious science, and as the Philips folks told us, study results have shown significant improvement in sleep for many people that were enrolled in the company’s trials. We were able to ask Dr...
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

GE ’s Augmented Reality Technology for Ultrasound Training
Training clinicians to properly scan patients with ultrasound probe, particularly in countries with a poor medical education infrastructure, can be a slow process. While the cost and accessibility of ultrasound is dropping rapidly, the number of people qualified to use this equipment is not keeping up. A team at General Electric is now working on utilizing augmented reality, produced by Microsoft HoloLens, to teach sonography students how to locate and properly scan different organs. The student wears the HoloLens, which projects a virtual image of the relevant organs onto a physical model of a human body. There’s al...
Source: Medgadget - January 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

QuickCool System Spares Brain from Lack of Oxygen During Emergencies
Decrease in perfusion, which happens during heart attacks and other critical conditions, can cause irreversible damage to the brain. Cooling the brain as soon as possible has been shown to reduce such damage, but doing so is often hindered by the cooling equipment itself. A new product is slated to soon come out that was designed to allow clinicians to cool the brain quickly and easily, perhaps even inside an ambulance. Moreover, because the equipment is compact and stays out of the way once deployed, it allows other procedures to be performed at the same time. The QuickCool system, from a Swedish company of the same name,...
Source: Medgadget - January 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Neurology Source Type: blogs

Zoll ’s External Defibrillators All Approved by FDA
ZOLL, now a part of Asahi Kasei Group Company, won the FDA’s premarket approval to market all of its external defibrillators in the U.S. These include the company’s R Series and X Series of monitors/defibrillators, as well as the AED Pro and AED Plus automated external defibrillators. The R Series is intended for use inside of hospitals and clinics, while the X Series is designed for paramedics to use on-site or inside an ambulance. AED Pro is intended for professional rescuers to bring to sites of emergency, while the AED Plus is made for average folks to respond inside of airports, stadiums, and other facili...
Source: Medgadget - January 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Medgadget @ CES 2018: Prevent Head Impact Monitor Helps Detect Concussions
Prevent Biometrics is showing off its head impact monitoring technology at CES this year. We stopped by their booth to checkout an electronic mouthguard that can detect unusual movements of the head, and which provides assessments of such impacts on a paired smartphone or tablet. The technology may help detect concussions and prevent subsequent brain damage caused by continued participation in a sports activity. Link: Prevent Biometrics… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - January 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Medgadget @ CES 2018: BACtrack View Breathalyzer for Watching Over Loved Ones
Breathalyzers used to only be thought of as devices the police use to stop drunk drivers. But thanks to miniaturization and integration with modern smartphones, breathalyzer technology can be used in novel ways. One interesting product we saw on our visit to CES 2018 in Las Vegas is the BACtrack View. This device allows individual consumers to monitor their loved ones, or doctors to watch over their patients intake. It works similar to the Soberlink that we reviewed a few years ago, but in a smaller package and relying on your smartphone. Check out our quick visit by the BACtrack booth: Product page: BACtrack View… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - January 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: OTC Public Health Source Type: blogs

Medgadget @ CES 2018: Follow Along on Twitter
We’re at CES 2018 in Las Vegas and are just beginning to publish our coverage of the health and medical gadgets that we encounter. You can follow along with us on our Twitter feed, which will have links to all our videos and stories, along with other interesting tidbits and details that we find amusing. Link: @Medgadget on Twitter… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - January 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Medgadget @ CES 2018: Omron ’s Blood Pressure Cuff Built Into a Smartwatch
We’re just started our visit to CES 2018 in Las Vegas, and things are already looking pretty exciting for fans of consumer medical technologies. Large companies and small are showing off all kinds of health monitoring gear. Some of this gear would have been called hospital equipment not long ago, while other products introduce new healthcare concepts of how to better take care of yourself that were previously not even imagined. Here’s something that takes a well established technology, a blood pressure cuff, and integrates it into a smartwatch. It’s from Omron, one of the biggest manufacturers of blood pr...
Source: Medgadget - January 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Medicine Source Type: blogs

DIY In-Home Environmental Assessments with yogi by Live Pure, Interview with CEO Greg Sancoff
While consumers have long been able to buy a variety of tests for in-home assessment of environmental contaminants, a new company, Live Pure, is seeking to simplify the effort required to perform these assessments with yogi, an all-in-one test kit. The new product is designed to deliver peace of mind to consumers concerned about their home environment, simplicity in the form of an intuitive device that makes it easy to capture samples which are sent to a lab for testing, value with a price point claimed to be 60% lower than hiring individual specialists to perform the tests, and quick results returned within ten business d...
Source: Medgadget - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs

Draper ’s Microfluidic Artificial Kidney Reproduces Real Thing at Cellular and Tissue Levels
Kidney injuries from exposure to too many drugs are common among certain groups of patients, particularly those spending time in the ICU. Kidney injuries can also happen during drug testing, wounding subjects while eliminating candidate drugs far along their development pipeline. Engineers at Draper have now developed a so-called kidney-on-a-chip, an organoid that mimics a real kidney’s function, to use as a platform to test chemical compounds for their nephrotoxity. Human kidneys have a lot of complexity within their structural components, nephrons. These undergo rapid pressure changes due to blood and other fluids ...
Source: Medgadget - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

The AliveCor KardiaBand: A Medgadget Review
Conclusion Kudos to Dr. Dave and the AliveCor team for creating another great product that makes another Apple device more useful. We’ll just say it up front: KardiaBand is one of the most impressive examples of an Apple Watch accessory we’ve seen, health-related or not. The Kardia app is the best Apple Watch app we’ve used. We know from experience the resolution and amount of data required to record an ECG, and we’re blown away with how everything performs quickly and seamlessly. Thanks to the ingenious ultrasonic audio tone data transmission system, there’s hardly any pairing or setup requir...
Source: Medgadget - January 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Nima Announces Pocket-Sized Sensor to Check Food for Peanuts
Those with peanut allergies can have a little more peace of mind, thanks to a new product announced today from San Francisco based Nima. The Nima Peanut Sensor is a device that can detect as little as 20 parts per million of peanut protein in virtually any food or drink sample. It’s nearly identical in appearance and function as the company’s first product that detects for the presence of gluten: simply place a pea-size sample of food or liquid (excluding alcohol) into the disposable cartridge and screw the top on. The sample drops into the bottom of the chamber which contains the reagent to test for the p...
Source: Medgadget - January 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: GI Medicine News Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Planmed ’s Budget Friendly, but Attractive Clarity 2D Mammography System
Planmed, a Finnish company specializing in breast cancer radiography systems, won FDA approval for its Clarity 2D digital mammography device. The Clarity 2D is a budget mammography system that has a lot of the features that exist in more expensive systems. Planmed touts its TriFilter technology that produces high quality images at a low radiation dose. The company’s MaxView technology uses swappable radiolucent sheets that put pressure around the breast to optimize the imaging results. Interestingly, the Clarity 2D is designed to work within mobile clinics and high humidity environments, allowing for it to be used to...
Source: Medgadget - January 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

S.T.Stent Keeps Sinus Cavity Supported Post Surgery for Nearly a Month
STS Medical, a company based in Israel, won FDA clearance for its sole product, the S.T.Stent sinus stent. The composite device is indicated for treatment of chronic sinusitis, as part of Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS), to help keep the sinus cavity open post surgery. It can also be used to address nose job failures, chronic allergic rhinitis, as an option over sinuplasty. The device is flexible and conforms to the sinus cavity of the patient it’s placed in, relying on a balloon delivery system for expansion. Once positioned, it’s designed to anchor in place and not move around. It is...
Source: Medgadget - January 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Source Type: blogs

FDA Clears MEVION S250i Proton Therapy System with Pencil Beam Technology
Mevion Medical Systems, a company specializing in accelerating protons to very high energies, has now received FDA clearance for its new MEVION S250i system for intensity modulated proton therapy. The product features the company’s HYPERSCAN pencil beam scanning technology, that involves “energy layer switching” and automated collimation, which produces a narrow beam of protons to attack tumors. The device is already approved for sale in Europe. Since proton therapy, unlike gamma ray and X-ray based system, can be used to target specific regions of a tumor in 3D, the MEVION S250i is able to volumetrically...
Source: Medgadget - January 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Oncology Radiation Oncology Source Type: blogs

Implant Containing Living Pancreatic Cells Controls Blood Sugar Without Insulin Injections
Patients with Type I diabetes have a poorly functioning pancreas that doesn’t produce enough, or any, insulin to metabolize blood glucose. Constant and regular injections are a norm for millions suffering from the disease. But now researchers at Cornell University, working with others from Novo Nordisk and University of Michigan Medical School, have developed an implantable device that harbors live stem cell-derived pancreatic cell clusters, known as islets, that are able to generate insulin much like a healthy liver. The research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and it ...
Source: Medgadget - January 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

DiffuserCam: Lensless 3D Imaging without Scanning
Three dimensional images can now be created from a single two dimensional image using a new computational imaging technique developed by a research team at the University of California, Berkeley. A hallmark of the new approach is that it does not require a complex, expensive hardware setup, but instead relies on a compact, inexpensive, lensless relative of the light field camera, which the research team has called the DiffuserCam. Typical light field cameras utilize an array of lenses in front of the camera to capture incoming light angles, which are transformed into the 3D image. Loss of spatial information during collec...
Source: Medgadget - January 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Genetics Radiology Source Type: blogs

New and Improved Power Delivery for Implants: Interview with Cambridge Consultants ’ John Genova
As technological advances in implant design get more and more impressive, one hurdle seems to persist. How can you efficiently deliver power within the body? Many contemporary implants rely on single-use batteries while others require regular recharging, a process that is generally a frustrating one. Using a bulky charging device, one must synchronize the external inductive coil with the one inside the implant, eventually taking a few hours to fully charge and usually leading to some tissue heating and discomfort around the implant. Thus, new solutions that optimize power delivery while decreasing charge duration and ...
Source: Medgadget - January 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Device Delivers Sound and Electric Stimulation to Reduce Tinnitus
At the University of Michigan, scientists have developed a non-invasive technology to treat tinnitus, in most sufferers, by training the brain to “desynchronize” and to begin responding properly to real sounds. Their approach involves stimulating touch sensitive nerves using electrodes attached to the skin, while producing sounds, heard through headphones, that coordinate with the electric skin stimulation. This produces so called long-term depression (LTD) in the cochlear nucleus, which led to a reduction in tinnitus symptoms in both guinea pigs and in humans. (Of note, those interested in learning more about ...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Neurology Source Type: blogs

Microbeads Significantly Improve Ultrasonic Targeting for Therapy, Research
Ultrasonic therapy, sonogenetics, and ultrasounic modulation are techniques that rely on focused, high precision sound waves to do things like stimulating neural cells to fire, motivating other cells to repair themselves, and killing tumors by damaging their cellular membranes. So-called cavitation bubbles, in which air bubbles rapidly vibrate, are the mechanism through which ultrasound acts on targeted cells and tissues, but the location of where these bubbles form is hard to pre-set accurately. This leads to limitations of what is possible, but researchers at Duke University are now attaching special microscopic beads di...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Developed: Brain-on-a-Chip Featuring Multiple Cell Types
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a way to create “brain-on-a-chip” devices that can be used to study brain function, how various chemical compounds influence it, and what can be done to protect the brain from toxic chemicals, etc. The technology may help lessen the need for laboratory animals, speed up drug development, and help us understand how the brain works at the cellular level. The development is part of the iCHIP (in-vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform) project that aims to create ex vivo platforms that mimic the workings of different organs and body proces...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology Source Type: blogs

Biotricity ’s Bioflux Live Cardiac Monitoring System FDA Cleared
Biotricity, a Silicon Valley firm, won FDA clearance for its Bioflux ECG monitoring system. The 3-channel device is used to help spot and identify cardiac arrhythmias. The mobile cardiac telemetry system transmits any likely cardiac events via its built-in 3G/4G cellular connectivity. The triggers can be set and changed remotely by the patient’s cardiologist, allowing for notifications to be programmed for each patient’s unique needs (bradycardia, tachycardia, atrial fibrillation) and diagnostic requirements of the cardiologist. This allows patients to go just about anywhere while being monitored in real t...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Medicine Net News Source Type: blogs

Skin Patch Controls Blood Sugar Without Finger Pricks or Injections
Researchers at National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed a special patch for Type 2 diabetics that helps to control glucose levels in a novel way. The technology, once fully proven out and optimized, may work for days or even weeks at a time. The patch is made of alginate, a material produced from algae, that is biocompatible and has the strength necessary to penetrate the skin when formed into needles. As such, the patch has alginate needles protruding from its bottom, but in addition there’s also exendin-4 and glucose oxidase m...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Proximity Tags Emit Radio Waves to Monitor Heart, Lungs, Blood Pressure
Contact-free measurement of vital signs is already a reality, but with a few important limitations some of which researchers at Cornell University may be able to overcome. Currently used devices typically require the patient to be in close proximity to the sensor, and they’re only able to measure the breathing and heart rates, along with body movement. Technology developed at Cornell involves tags worn on clothing, or just placed near the patient, that emit radio waves toward the lungs and heart to measure their activity accurately, while allowing the patient to move around. Additionally, blood pressure may also be m...
Source: Medgadget - January 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Medicine Source Type: blogs