Remote Monitoring for Cardiac Patients: Interview with Dr. Waqaas Al-Siddiq, CEO of Biotricity
Biotricity, a medtech company based in California, developed the Bioflux system, a mobile cardiac telemetry device. The system is a three channel ECG monitor, and it enables continuous data collection and data transmission to a call center in the case of anomaly detection. If the detected issue is considered to be serious, a clinician can contact the patient to check up and make a call about whether to intervene. Remote cardiac monitoring has made it easier to spot intermittent issues such as arrhythmias, and it allows clinicians to build up a long term picture of someone’s cardiac health as they go about their da...
Source: Medgadget - July 29, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Informatics Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Patch Monitors Blood Flow
Researchers at the University of California San Diego created an ultrasound patch that can measure blood flow in vessels as deep as 14 cm within the body. The stretchy patch can be applied to the skin and may help clinicians to monitor and diagnose various conditions, including blockages that could cause an infarct. The patch contains an array of ultrasound transducers that can measure blood flow in vessels directly beneath it and the ultrasound beam can also be steered to assess vessels that are nearby, but not directly below. Monitoring blood flow in specific vessels can help clinicians to diagnose various cardiovascu...
Source: Medgadget - July 28, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Materials Radiology Thoracic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Oscillating Magnetic Field Shrinks Glioblastoma Tumor
At the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, researchers have developed a device that generates a magnetic field and used it to successfully shrink a glioblastoma tumor in a patient volunteer. The device is worn on the head each day during treatment, and uses an oscillating magnetic field to disrupt biochemical processes in cancer cells. While the technique is in its infancy, this first-in-human test of this particular type of device shows promise, and could herald the first steps in a new non-invasive treatment modality. Glioblastoma is a brain cancer with a very poor prognosis, and which nearly always proves fatal...
Source: Medgadget - July 26, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Oncology Source Type: blogs

Heart Model Simulates Mechanical Load on Cardiac Tissues
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, along with collaborators in the Netherlands, have developed a heart model consisting of engineered cardiac muscle tissue that is attached to an elastic material. The design allows the team to mimic the mechanical forces experienced by heart tissue in the body, which should provide them with more accurate data when using the model to replicate disease or study the effects of various treatments. The design may eventually lead to new ways of more accurately recreating heart muscle tissue in the lab, which could function as replacement tissue for cardiac disease patients. Tissue en...
Source: Medgadget - July 26, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Source Type: blogs

Robotic Brace Measures Neck Mobility in Cancer Patients
Patients with head and neck cancer frequently require surgical removal of lymph nodes from the neck. While this is necessary, it can cause pain and stiffness that can persist for a long time after surgery. Assessing neck mobility of such patients would be useful, as it would allow doctors to identify deficits in range of motion, and design appropriate strategies to help improve them. However, current techniques to achieve this are somewhat crude and do not produce quantifiable data, or involve equipment that is not easily portable or easy to use, making routine clinical assessments challenging. Researchers at Columb...
Source: Medgadget - July 21, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Oncology Rehab Surgery columbia Source Type: blogs

Nanoparticles for Tumor Imaging and Cancer Urine Testing
Scientists at MIT have announced that they developed novel nanoparticles to detect cancer in urine samples. As well as detecting the presence of tumors, the nanoparticles can also accumulate at tumor sites and function as an imaging agent, helping to identify their location. These multifunctional particles could be very useful for routine cancer screening and helping clinicians to determine whether a tumor has spread or recurred. “This is a really broad sensor intended to respond to both primary tumors and their metastases,” said Sangeeta Bhatia, a researcher involved in the study. “It can trigger a ur...
Source: Medgadget - July 20, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Nanomedicine Oncology Radiology mit Source Type: blogs

AI Powered Health Assistant for Seniors: Interview with Ryan Howard, CEO of 100Plus
100Plus, a California medtech company, created a suite of remote patient monitoring technologies. These include a digital weight scale, blood pressure cuff, thermometer, and blood glucose monitor. The company recently launched Ava, an AI powered healthcare assistant that is specifically intended for senior patients who may not be tech savvy or as open to new technologies. The system aims to personify staff at the local physician practice of the patient, which helps to build trust and rapport, with the aim of engaging patients within their own home. The ultimate goal is to increase patient compliance with monitoring and ...
Source: Medgadget - July 19, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Geriatrics Medicine Source Type: blogs

DNA Origami to Trap Viruses Inside Body
Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have developed a method to create tiny virus traps that can bind viral particles and render them harmless within the body. The technique relies on DNA origami to create self-assembling hollow nanocapsules, which are lined with molecules that will bind viruses and prevent them from leaving. With a viral pandemic currently running riot, such technologies should be very welcome for the future. Effective anti-viral drugs are elusive for many viral infections, COVID-19 being no exception. These researchers have developed a new type of anti-viral technology that does not rely ...
Source: Medgadget - July 19, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Remote Monitoring for Peritoneal Dialysis: Interview with Aly ElBadry, CEO of CloudCath
CloudCath, a medtech company based in San Francisco, has created the CloudCath system, a remote monitoring technology that provides clinicians with data on the spent dialysate fluid of at-home peritoneal dialysis patients. CloudCath is incorporated into the drain line of peritoneal dialysis systems, and wirelessly transmits data to the cloud, with proprietary algorithms then highlighting issues, such as infection, to clinicians. At present, abnormalities with peritoneal dialysis patients may not be flagged in a timely manner. For instance, patients are advised to check their dialysate using the “newspaper test,&rd...
Source: Medgadget - July 14, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine cloudcath peritonealdialysis Source Type: blogs

AI and Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging to Diagnose Thyroid Cancer
This study is significant in that it is the first to acquire photoacoustic images of thyroid nodules and classify malignant nodules using machine learning,” said Chulhong Kim, a researcher involved in the study, in a Pohang press release. “In addition to minimizing unnecessary biopsies in thyroid cancer patients, this technique can also be applied to a variety of other cancers, including breast cancer.” “The ultrasonic device based on photoacoustic imaging will be helpful in effectively diagnosing thyroid cancer commonly found during health checkups and in reducing the number of biopsies,” ...
Source: Medgadget - July 13, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Biomaterial-Based Vaccine Against Bacterial Infection
Researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute have developed a biomaterial-based vaccine technology that could provide prophylactic protection against bacterial infection and septic shock. The technology is delivered as a biomaterial scaffold. Once inside the body, it captures bacterial pathogens and then recruits and activates dendritic cells to initiate a broad immune response against the pathogen of choice. So far, the technology has demonstrated protective efficacy against sepsis in animals. Bacterial infections, once largely controllable with antibiotics, are becoming a growing problem with the rise of bacterial resist...
Source: Medgadget - July 12, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Critical Care Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Aortic Occlusion to Enhance Blood Flow to Brain and Heart: Interview with Habib Frost, CEO of Neurescue
Neurescue, a medtech company based in Denmark, created the NEURESCUE system, a balloon catheter designed to occlude the aorta, resulting in a significant increase in blood flow to the heart and brain. The mechanism is intended to provide emergency treatment for patients suffering a hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. Both hemorrhage and cardiac arrest represent unmet needs, resulting in a significant number of deaths each year. At present only one in ten people survive a cardiac arrest, illustrating the stark outcomes of this patient population. Aortic occlusion can help to control blood loss and, by increasing blood flow ...
Source: Medgadget - July 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Emergency Medicine Exclusive Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

AI System Spots Prostate Cancer During Routine CT Scans
Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, created an AI system that can identify prostate cancer during routine CT scans. It is typically difficult to spot prostate cancer in CT images, and the radiation makes CT unsuitable as a screening modality. However, if men are undergoing abdominal or pelvic scans for other reasons, this latest system can help spot prostate cancer and let clinicians initiate early treatment. Prostate cancer remains a significant cause of cancer mortality in men. In Australia, where this technology was developed, prostate cancer is responsible for approximately 12% of male cancer dea...
Source: Medgadget - July 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Oncology Radiology Urology Source Type: blogs

Chest Strap System Monitors Severity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona in Catalonia, Spain, have developed a system to monitor the severity of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), also known as chronic fatigue syndrome. The system includes a commercial chest strap sensor that measures heart rate variability and a paired app that collects, collates, and presents these data, allowing patients to monitor their condition and share information with their clinician. ME is a debilitating condition, characterized by severe fatigue that interferes with daily activities. The prevalence of ME is expected to drastically increase in the coming year...
Source: Medgadget - July 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Source Type: blogs

Microchip Nanosensor Detects Stress Hormone from Drop of Blood
Researchers at Rutgers University have developed a microchip that can perform real-time measurements of stress hormone levels in a drop of blood. The technology could provide a replacement for bulky and expensive lab tests for such hormones, and allow patients to monitor their stress levels more easily. The chip includes tiny wells that contain antibodies, and the technology monitors antibody binding through impedance measurements performed using electrodes within the device. Life has been stressful for many people during the pandemic, where illness, lockdowns and general societal turmoil have contributed to mental heal...
Source: Medgadget - July 8, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Nanomedicine Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip for Neuro Drug Testing
Researchers at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, engineered a blood-brain barrier on a chip using human-derived stem cells. The device closely mimics the blood-brain barrier and allows the researchers to study its function and the effect of drugs without having to use experimental animals. By incorporating sensors, the chip can monitor barrier function in near real time. The blood-brain barrier is a layer of endothelium that lines the vessels of the brain, and prevents the ingress of various small molecules. This layer protects the brain from many substances in the blood that could otherwise ca...
Source: Medgadget - July 6, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Neurology Source Type: blogs

Sweating E-Skin for Long-Term Health Monitoring
Researchers at MIT have developed an e-skin technology that contains artificial sweat ducts. The ducts prevent sweat accumulation underneath the e-skin, helping to prevent interference with built-in sensors. Incorporating a kirigami-style design, the material conforms to human skin but maintains a high porosity and reduced sweat accumulation. The design should help the e-skin to stay in place over extended periods, allowing incorporated sensors to monitor health over this time. Wearable patches or ‘e-skin’ are a hot research area at present, with the ultimate of goal of unobtrusive health monitoring that doe...
Source: Medgadget - July 6, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Materials Medicine Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Inexpensive Filter Isolates Circulating Tumor Cells
Researchers at Kumamoto University in Japan have designed an inexpensive and convenient filter that can isolate circulating tumor cells from as little as 1 mL of patient blood. The highly sensitive filter can successfully work in samples containing as few as five tumor cells in 1 mL of blood, and does not require expensive equipment or reagents, unlike certain pre-existing cell capture technologies. The filter may help in developing diagnostic technologies that can aid clinicians in identifying cancer early. Circulating tumor cells are those that have detached from a tumor and travel through the blood stream. Although t...
Source: Medgadget - July 2, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Oncology Source Type: blogs

Fluorescent mRNA to Track, Optimize Delivery
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and collaborators created a technique to produce fluorescently labeled mRNA, allowing them to track its entry and distribution into cells. Using such molecules could help scientists develop better ways to deliver mRNA therapeutics into the body, potentially playing a vital role in the new wave of mRNA therapies, including vaccines. mRNA therapies are enjoying a moment in the spotlight, as two of the most effective and coveted COVID-19 vaccines, produced by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna, employ the technology. Once thought too fragile for therapeutic use, the COVID...
Source: Medgadget - July 2, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Battery-Free Wireless Pacemaker Dissolves Post Treatment
Researchers at Northwestern University and collaborators have developed a temporary cardiac pacemaker that dissolves away in the body into harmless byproducts. The technology avoids the need for leads penetrating the skin as well as follow-up procedures to remove a pacemaker. The device could make temporary pacemaker placement a safer and more convenient experience for patients.    Patients frequently need temporary pacemakers, including after cardiac surgery. Typically, such devices are not wireless, but require electrical cables to penetrate through an incision, causing an infection risk. “Sometimes pa...
Source: Medgadget - June 30, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Source Type: blogs

Face Mask Detects SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute and MIT have developed a face mask that can detect SARS-CoV-2 in a wearer’s breath. The mask employs freeze dried molecular components including CRISPR-based technology, and a lateral flow assay strip to detect the virus and alert the wearer. To initiate the test, the wearer simply presses a button on the mask, and it can provide a result within 90 minutes, with a similar level of accuracy as a standard PCR test.    “We have essentially shrunk an entire diagnostic laboratory down into a small, synthetic biology-based sensor that works with any face mask, an...
Source: Medgadget - June 29, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Military Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Cell Cloaking to Reduce Foreign Body Response to Medical Implants
Researchers at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have developed a technique to coat implantable materials, such as stents, with extracellular matrix components and cells. The new approach could lead to implantable devices that suffer fewer adverse events, such as fibrosis, inflammation, and clotting, because of the foreign body response. Implantable devices all suffer the same limitation – the foreign body response. It is difficult to make the body accept a foreign object, and the foreign body response is behind the majority of failures of implants, especially in devices intended for long-term stay wit...
Source: Medgadget - June 29, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Radiology Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Inflatable Neurostimulator for Minimally Invasive Pain Control
Researchers at the University of Cambridge created a spinal stimulation device that can help to control severe pain. Unlike existing technologies, which require invasive surgery for implantation, the new device can be delivered using a needle. Once implanted, the device unfurls and inflates in place to provide extensive coverage during spinal cord stimulation to control severe pain. The technology could make spinal cord stimulation more accessible for millions of chronic pain sufferers. For many patients chronic paint does not respond to conventional treatments and can be severe and debilitating. For such individuals, s...
Source: Medgadget - June 28, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Neurology Pain Management @cambridge_uni Source Type: blogs

Microarray Rapidly Identifies Antibodies Against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at the Technical University of Munich in Germany have developed a sensitive and inexpensive microarray technology that can rapidly identify antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 virus in blood or serum samples. The test can provide a result in as little as eight minutes, but the researchers believe that this can be further reduced to just four minutes with additional development. The technology could be very helpful in confirming immunity against the virus, which will help us to identify how long the vaccines confer immunity and whether booster shots will be required. With vaccination campaigns in full swing in ...
Source: Medgadget - June 25, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Rapid Diagnosis of Infectious Disease at Point of Care: Interview with Shawn Marcell, CEO of Torus Biosystems
Torus Biosystems, a medtech startup that spun out of Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, has developed the Synestia system, a point of care diagnostic tool for infectious disease. The system aims to provide rapid, point-of-care identification of pathogens, and incorporates microarray and qPCR technology.    The company reports that the system allows a clinician to run multiple tests on one device to detect all the pathogens associated with a specific disease. The run-time is rapid, with the device providing results in as little as 30 minutes, and for each sample over 1000 targ...
Source: Medgadget - June 24, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Medicine Public Health torusbiosystems Source Type: blogs

Rapid Diagnosis of Infectious Disease at Point of Care: Interview with Shawn Marcel, CEO of Torus Biosystems
Torus Biosystems, a medtech startup that spun out of Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, has developed the Synestia system, a point of care diagnostic tool for infectious disease. The system aims to provide rapid, point-of-care identification of pathogens, and incorporates microarray and qPCR technology.    The company reports that the system allows a clinician to run multiple tests on one device to detect all the pathogens associated with a specific disease. The run-time is rapid, with the device providing results in as little as 30 minutes, and for each sample over 1000 targ...
Source: Medgadget - June 24, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Medicine Public Health torusbiosystems Source Type: blogs

In Silico Clinical Trial Replicates Results of Traditional Trials
Researchers at the University of Leeds in the UK have conducted a virtual ‘clinical trial’, using parameters from a real patient population and in silico modeling, to investigate the use of a flow diverter device in brain aneurysms. The virtual trial successfully predicted the results of real trials in humans, suggesting that the approach could be used to supplement and expedite clinical trials in the future. Clinical trials are a massive investment of time, money, and effort. When the results are not positive, it is hugely disappointing for everyone involved. Techniques that can help to speed up the proces ...
Source: Medgadget - June 24, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Informatics Neurosurgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Mobility-Enabled Compression Device for Lymphedema: Interview with CEO of Koya Medical
Koya Medical, a medtech company based in California, has developed the Dayspring active compression system for the treatment of lymphedema. The company received FDA clearance for the use of Dayspring on the upper extremities in June 2020, and just recently announced 510(k) clearance for use in the lower extremities. Lymphedema involves impaired lymphatic drainage resulting in painful swelling, and typically occurs after surgical procedures, such as the removal of cancerous lymph nodes. At present, the condition is treated through manual manipulation of the lymph system by a healthcare professional or using a compression...
Source: Medgadget - June 23, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Optical Fiber Imaging for Next-Generation Endoscopes
Researchers at the University of Exeter in England have developed a technique to image tissues through an ultrathin optical fiber, potentially allowing for high-resolution imaging of single cells within the body. The optical fibers are as thin as a human hair, and could lead to tiny endoscopes that can be inserted into human tissues to image individual cells. If developed further, the technique could help clinicians identify diseased cells within the body, and help with the accurate placement of needles to obtain biopsy samples. Endoscopy is an invaluable technique that allows clinicians to peer inside our bodies while ...
Source: Medgadget - June 23, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: ENT GI Pathology Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Spray-On Hydrogel to Prevent Post-Surgery Adhesions
Researchers at University of California San Diego have developed a spray-on hydrogel that forms a protective coating on tissue surfaces, such as the surface of the heart. The new material is intended to prevent the formation of adhesions, where tissues inside the body adhere together abnormally following a surgical procedure. The crosslinked gel persists on the tissue surface for as long as four weeks, protecting the tissue when there’s the greatest risk for adhesions. Adhesions typically form within the first month after surgery. However, they can interfere with repeat surgeries in the same location, increasing t...
Source: Medgadget - June 22, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Materials ucsdnews Source Type: blogs

AI-Powered App Interprets HIV Test Results
This study is a really strong partnership with AHRI that demonstrates the power of using deep learning to successfully classify ‘real-world’ field-acquired rapid test images, and reduce the number of errors that may happen when reading test results by eye,” said Rachel McKendry, a researcher involved in the study, in a UCL announcement. “This research shows the positive impact the mobile health tools can have in low- and middle-income countries, and paves the way for a larger study in the future.” Study in Nature Medicine: Deep learning of HIV field-based rapid tests Via: UCL (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - June 22, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Informatics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Drinking Straw Device for Hiccups Treatment
Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have developed a device to treat hiccups. The drinking straw-like device allows a user to apply forceful suction to draw water into it, with subsequent swallowing triggering both the phrenic and vagus nerves, which helps to relieve hiccups. The treatment may be the first science-based approach to treating hiccups, which can be a major problem for people who suffer from protracted or painful bouts. For most of us, hiccups can be inconvenient and embarrassing. However, for some people they can be more of a burden. Imagine suffering a bout of the h...
Source: Medgadget - June 21, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Neurology Source Type: blogs

Nanodecoys Bind SARS-CoV-2 for Destruction by Immune System
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a nanodecoy system that provides binding sites for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The vesicles help to prevent the virus from binding to lung cells and lead to its eventual destruction by the immune system. The nanodecoys are derived from lung spheroid cells, and contain the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor on their surface. The ACE2 receptor is the binding site and entry point for the SARS-CoV-2 virus into lung cells, so the vesicles essentially act as fake binding sites, tricking the virus. The nanodecoys have shown promise as an inhaled treatment in rod...
Source: Medgadget - June 21, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Artificial Skin Bruises Like The Real Thing
Researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong have developed an artificial skin that can effectively indicate if damage has occurred, in the same way that our skin bruises naturally. The new skin is made using an ionic hydrogel, and demonstrates changes in electrical signaling when it is deformed. It also produces a purple color change, providing a visual indicator. The technology could be useful in making prostheses more life-like and responsive, and alert users to possible damage. Prostheses are becoming more advanced, with various technologies aiming to allow users to feel and respond to their environment more e...
Source: Medgadget - June 18, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Rehab CUHK Source Type: blogs

Graphene Sensor for Rapid COVID-19 Detection
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a graphene-based sensor that can rapidly detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The system includes graphene sheets that are coupled with an antibody against the viral spike protein. When viral particles bind to the antibodies, they change the vibrational properties of the graphene sheets, and the researchers can measure this using Raman spectroscopy. The test takes less than five minutes, and could provide another useful tool in the fight against COVID-19. While vaccination programs are picking up speed, the global fight against COVID-19 is still a long way from ov...
Source: Medgadget - June 18, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Materials Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Highly Maneuverable Magnetically Controlled Miniature Robots
Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have developed miniature robots that are highly maneuverable, and can rapidly move in six degrees of freedom. These tiny devices are magnetic and can be controlled using an electromagnetic coil system that precisely manipulates the direction and strength of magnetic fields. The researchers hope that their technology could pave the way for tiny surgical robots that could access difficult to reach areas in the body, such as the brain. Microrobots are a significant focus for researchers at present, and their potential in the biomedical realm is significant. Tiny ro...
Source: Medgadget - June 16, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Kirigami Stent for Localized Drug Delivery
Researchers at MIT have developed a kirigami-style stent that can provide localized drug delivery through needle-like projections that pop out when the stent is extended. The ‘spines’ on the stent’s surface deliver drug-loaded microparticles into the surrounding tissue, allowing for sustained drug release for an extended period. The technology is well suited to administering drugs within tubular structures, such as those found in the GI tract, the respiratory system, and blood vasculature. Treating inflammatory gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is frequently performed thr...
Source: Medgadget - June 15, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: GI Materials Medicine Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Anti-Restenotic Drug Delivery with the AGENT Drug-Coated Balloon: Interview with Dr. Ian Meredith, Global CMO, Boston Scientific
Boston Scientific recently announced a clinical trial of its AGENT drug coated balloon. The device is coated with paclitaxel, an anti-restenotic drug, and aims to deliver the medication to the affected vessel wall during a percutaneous procedure. Coronary in-stent restenosis (ISR) is caused by occlusive scar tissue that develops in the stented portion of a vessel. At present, ISR is treated through the addition of extra stents and radiation therapy is also sometimes used. Both of these approaches pose safety risks for patients. Balloon angioplasty represents an alternative approach, but is not always successful, with mi...
Source: Medgadget - June 14, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

High-throughput 3D Bioprinting for Drug Development
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a high-throughput technique for 3D bioprinting. Using the new technology, the researchers can very quickly print large numbers of custom tissue samples that are suitable for drug screenings. Their printing method can yield a 96-well plate with tissue samples in each well in as little as 30 minutes, which takes closer to 100 hours using previous technologies. This approach would be useful for researchers who need to test the effects of drug candidates on specific human tissues or model diseases. High-throughput drug screens using human tissue samples ca...
Source: Medgadget - June 14, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Battery-Free Smart Fabrics to Monitor Health
Researchers at Purdue University have developed a technique to create smart garments that can harvest electrical power from nearby Wi-Fi networks and radio waves in a process known as magnetic resonance coupling. This power can then be used to energize on-board electrical systems, including body monitors. The fabrics are water repellent, breathable, and fully machine washable, making them practical for use in everyday life. The myriad of already existing wearable devices are making it easier to monitor health on the move, and can typically communicate wirelessly with smartphones. However, they usually require a battery ...
Source: Medgadget - June 10, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Geriatrics Materials Source Type: blogs

Localized Prostate Cancer Therapy: Interview with Shyam Natarajan, CEO of Avenda Health
Avenda Health, a medtech company based in Santa Monica, California has developed the Focal Therapy System. It provides AI-powered prostate cancer therapy with the aim of treating only tumorous tissues, while reducing side-effects compared with conventional therapies. The system recently received FDA breakthrough designation.   At present, there are limited treatment options for men with prostate cancer, with surgery and radiation therapy being the most commonly used approaches. However, these techniques pose significant risks for patients, including urinary and sexual dysfunction. The Avenda Focal Therapy System us...
Source: Medgadget - June 7, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Informatics Oncology Urology Source Type: blogs

Non-Invasive Deep Brain Stimulation Using Ultrasound and Genetic Modification
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a technique they call sonothermogenetics, which combines ultrasound and genetic modification to achieve non-invasive neural control in deep brain regions. The technique involves using viral vectors to introduce genetic material encoding for ion channels to specific neurons in the brain. An external ultrasound probe can then provide gentle heating, which activates the ion channels, effectively allowing researchers to turn specific neurons on or off. The new approach may eventually lead to effective non-invasive treatments for neurological conditions such as Pa...
Source: Medgadget - June 4, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Diagnosing Acute Compartment Syndrome: Interview with Charles Allan, CEO of MY01
MY01, a medtech company based in Montreal, has developed the Continuous Compartment Pressure Monitor, a sterile, single-use device for the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome. If undiagnosed and untreated, acute compartment syndrome, a condition caused by high pressure around muscles typically following an injury, can have significant consequences for patients. Long-term disability and amputation is too often the result. At present, the condition is diagnosed using subjective measurements such as pain. These can be unreliable, and given the potential for serious consequences, often clinicians will err on the sid...
Source: Medgadget - June 2, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Emergency Medicine Exclusive Source Type: blogs

AirPop Active+ Halo Smart Mask: Medgadget Review
Conclusion The AirPop Active+ Halo Smart Mask is an absolutely brilliant idea…in theory. It was designed to capture useful information about our breathing and the air around us using a product that lots of people everywhere are wearing, but failed to do so. Moreover, at the time of writing, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has lifted its mask recommendations from many public environments, providing a long-awaited sense of freedom for many Americans. It remains to be seen what the market for face coverings will be like in the future, but given that they’ve never been widely accepted in soc...
Source: Medgadget - May 28, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs

When HIPAA is Outpaced by Technology and the Cyber-Elephant We Need Confront: Exclusive with CEO of VigiTrust
Mathieu Gorge is the author of The Cyber-Elephant in the Boardroom, as well as CEO and founder of VigiTrust, which provides Integrated Risk Management SaaS solutions to clients in 120 countries across various industries. He helps CEOs, CxOs, and boards of directors handle cyber accountability challenges through good cyber hygiene and proactive cybersecurity compliance programs. He is a multi-award-winning CEO and an established authority on IT security, information governance, and risk management, with more than 20 years of international experience. Mr. Gorge is also a prominent member of the international cybersecurity...
Source: Medgadget - May 27, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Informatics Source Type: blogs

PerQseal+ for Large Diameter Arterial Closure: Interview with Andrew Glass, CEO of Vivasure Medical
Vivasure Medical, a medtech company based in Galway, Ireland, has developed the PerQseal device, a synthetic implant designed to seal large bore blood vessel punctures. The implant has utility in a wide variety of transcatheter endovascular procedures, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR), and endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR), and aims to significantly improve on current approaches to close large vessel punctures. The implant is an intravascular patch that is applied to the puncture from inside the vessel and is fully absorbable. The patch does...
Source: Medgadget - May 26, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Exclusive Radiology Vascular Surgery Vivasure Source Type: blogs

Reverse 3D Printing to Make Tiny Medical Implants
Researchers at RMIT University in Australia have developed a new 3D printing technique that allows them to create incredibly small and complex biomedical implants. The approach involves printing glue molds that can then be filled with biomaterial filler. Once the mold is dissolved away, the biomaterial structure remains. Excitingly, the technique uses standard 3D printers, such as those now commonly even found in high schools, and PVA glue as a printing material. Printing tissue replacements is a huge area of research, but teams around the world have struggled to create highly intricate structures that could help to imp...
Source: Medgadget - May 26, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Cardiac Organoids Self-Organize to Mimic Human Heart
Researchers at the Austrian Academy of Sciences have developed the most realistic cardiac organoids to date. The tiny structures self-organize from pluripotent stem cells to form a hollow chamber that can beat. The method to create the ‘cardioids’ involves stimulating a variety of signaling pathways in stem cells and does not rely on conventional tissue engineering techniques, which typically employ a scaffold material as a basis for such structures. Consequently, the resulting tissue growth mimics the developmental process in humans. The researchers hope that the organoids will provide more valuable data about...
Source: Medgadget - May 25, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Source Type: blogs

Magnetic Cilia to Propel Soft Biomedical Robots
Researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands have developed artificial cilia that can beat just like the real thing. The tiny projections typically adorn the outside of certain cells in nature, and this artificial version could help to propel tiny biomedical robots or power microfluidic pumps. The artificial cilia rely on magnetic fields to generate movement, and the researchers have already shown that they can move tiny soft robots in a variety of ways, including allowing them to ‘walk’ up vertical surfaces and even upside down.    Soft robots have enormous biomedical p...
Source: Medgadget - May 25, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs

Engineered Surfaces Reduce Bacterial Attachment and Growth
Researchers at Monash University in Australia have developed a technique to create 3D engineered surfaces that reduce bacterial growth. Their approach could lead to frequently touched surfaces in healthcare facilities that result in less bacterial transmission. This should lead to a reduction in the incidence of hospital acquired infections, such as urinary tract infections in patients with urinary catheters. Approximately 20% of patients are fitted with a urinary catheter during hospitalization, meaning a huge number of people suffer urinary tract infections. Such infections can be difficult to treat, particularly if a...
Source: Medgadget - May 24, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Public Health Source Type: blogs