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Real-Time Intravascular Imaging for PAD by Avinger: Interview with CEO Jeff Soinski
The objective of the clinical trial was to demonstrate that Pantheris can be used to effectively remove plaque from diseased lower extremity arteries while using on-board visualization as an adjunct to fluoroscopy. Two groups of patients were treated in VISION: (1) optional roll-ins, which are typically the first two procedures at a site, and (2) the primary cohort, which are the analyzable group of patients. Based on final enrollment, the primary cohort included 130 patients. VISON’s primary efficacy endpoint required that at least 87% of lesions treated by physicians using Pantheris have a residual stenosis of less...
Source: Medgadget - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Calypso Anchored Beacon Transponder for Lung Radiotherapy FDA Cleared
Varian won FDA clearance for its Calypso Anchored Beacon transponder for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy procedures. The device is positioned within a narrow airway close to or even on the tumor to be targeted. During radiotherapy procedures involving a Varian linear particle accelerator, the system tracks the motion of the transponder and adjusts the beam’s targeting 25 times per second. The device holds onto the airway using five fork-like anchors and it emits electromagnetic signals that the tracking panel on the Calypso console uses to keep an eye on the implant in three dimensions. Such technologies help to ...
Source: Medgadget - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiation Oncology Source Type: blogs

Functional Connectivity MRI Scans May Identify Variety of Neurological Conditions
Most brain related diseases are identified through the symptoms that patients experience. Real, direct testing may be on the horizon thanks to researchers at Washington University in St. Louis who have been looking at whether functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), a new technique that maps outs the interconnectedness of the brain, may help spot unusual patterns and therefore disease. The team focused on spotting “fundamental differences” in the wiring of the brains of individual human volunteers. “This is a step toward realizing the clinical promise of functional connectivity MRI,” in a stat...
Source: Medgadget - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Motion-Capture and Eye-Tracking Tech to Help Find New Treatments for Mobility Impairments
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed new technology to investigate the relationship between vision and foot placement during walking. The devices include an eye tracker and a motion-tracking suit that record gaze and full-body kinematics as a wearer navigates various terrains. The insights provided by the technology could help researchers to understand what is going on in the brain during walking. This technology could assist them in developing new prosthetics, robots, and new treatments for diseases that affect mobility, such as Parkinson’s. Walking requires precise coordination between ou...
Source: Medgadget - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Students Working on Leadless, Multi-Site Heart Pacing Tech
Pacemakers have gotten so small that they can now reside inside the heart itself. This avoids reliance on electric leads that snake from the implant to the interior of the heart, which come with a number of potential problems. On the other hand, advanced multi-site sensing leads are able to provide considerably more nuanced monitoring of the heart than a pacemaker attached to one spot in the heart. Students at Rice University are working on overcoming this limitation by developing a very different approach. They are working on tiny, grain of rice sized implants a number of which would be permanently adhered to the heart an...
Source: Medgadget - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

iFertracker Review: An Easy Way to Monitor Basal Body Temp
Conclusion: Although some aspects of the iFertracker could use a few improvement, such as its adhesive patches and smartphone app, we still believe iFertracker is a convenient, accurate, easy-to-use, and reliable way to track one’s BBT and predict ovulation. The iFertracker is available at Amazon or directly from Raiing Medical… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Ob/Gyn Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Graphene Spike Coating for Implants Kills Any Bacteria Trying to Settle
Graphene, the material that consists of a one atom thick layer of carbons, is so impressive that its development was awarded a Nobel Prize in physics. To add to its abilities, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden used it to create microscopic spikes that kill bacteria upon contact. Because our native cells are generally much bigger than bacterial cells, the same spikes, working as a bed of nails, don’t seem to damage human tissue. The technology surely has incredible potential for preventing the growth of bacterial infections on implants, particularly those used in orthopedics. Here’s a cu...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Implant for Detecting Oncoming Heart Attacks
Angel Medical Systems, based in Tinton Falls, New Jersey, won FDA approval for its AngelMed Guardian implantable device that may help detect oncoming heart attacks before they even happen. It looks like a pacemaker and it monitors for ST segment changes, an ECG sign of ischemia. When it detects sustained ST segment changes, the implant sends a signal to an external device that then warns the patient to seek medical care. The hope is that early detection will lead to many heart attacks avoided, or at least whose effects would be minimized by earlier attention from trained clinicians. “The Guardian device fills an unme...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Medicine Source Type: blogs

Silk-Based Polymer to Help Repair Damaged Bones
University of Connecticut researchers have created a new orthopedic material for fixing bones that’s made out of spider silk, itself one of the world’s strongest natural materials. While silk fibroin, the protein in silk that gives it strength, is already in use in sutures and other medical devices, this is the first time it was made into an extremely tough polymer composite. The new material, a combination of silk and  polylactic acid, a biocompatible plastic,  has impressive mechanical characteristics that are siumilar to metal. But, since there’s no metal, there aren’t metal&rsquo...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Exoskeletons May Do More Harm Than Good
The promise of exoskeletons is to make manual labor easier by providing extra strength to the arms, and hopefully alleviating injuries and overall impact on the body. Researchers at Ohio State wanted to study whether this is really true, so they evaluated whether a Steadicam device, commonly used passive device for stabilizing cameras during filming, really does help workers in the long run. In short, what they found out is that the unpowered device, really transfers the impact to other parts of the body, increasing the load on the spine and making the muscles in the torso work harder. They suggest that the design of futur...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Text Messaging System Helps Care Providers and Patients Manage Opioids
Opioid abuse having become a serious health threat for many and a dire societal problem in many parts of America. Perhaps a simple messaging app can help? A collaboration from Washington University School of Medicine and Epharmix, a nearby company based in St. Louis, has released a simple text-based service to help people kicking the addiction. It questions the patients about their feelings, keeps tabs on their progress, and provides an easy way to seek help. It helps care providers to direct their effort where needed, while helping to automate and process many patients at the same time. More at NEJM Catalyst: M...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Net News Pain Management Public Health Source Type: blogs

Remote-Controlled Signal Activates T Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy
Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed a technique to remotely activate genetically-modified T cells to attack cancer. The method employs a near-infrared laser that heats gold nanorods present in the tumor, causing local heating. This heat activates the T cells, making them more aggressive in killing cancer cells. Immunotherapies, such as T cell therapy, hold significant promise in treating cancer. However, the technique is still very new, and isn’t always effective. “Right now, we’re adept at harvesting a patient’s own T-cells, modifying to target cancer, growing them outside the body until the...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

BioSig Technologies Announces FDA 510(k) Submission for PURE EP (A Follow-up Interview)
Last year, Medgadget spoke with BioSig Technologies about the company’s PURE EP System for detection of cells that cause arrhythmias. PURE EP is a surface electrocardiogram and intracardiac multichannel recording system that acquires, processes, and displays high fidelity cardiac recordings required during electrophysiology studies and catheter ablation procedures. A nationwide survey of electrophysiologists in 2017 highlighted the noise reduction and overall signal clarity and accuracy as differentiating factors setting PURE EP apart from other electrophysiology signal recording and processing sy...
Source: Medgadget - April 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Amazing New Microscope Looks Deep Through Cells in Living Tissues
A team of researchers from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard, Stony Brook, Caltech, and UC Berkeley have developed a remarkable new microscope for looking at living cells in 3D still inside the body. The microscope relies on a technique dubbed as lattice light-sheet microscopy, which involves passing a plane of light through tissue repeatedly. The beam of light is powerful enough to image the insides of individual cells, but because it’s focused into a very narrow sheet it doesn’t seem to disturb the processes taking place inside the cells. Here are a video of a bunch of amazing imagery captured usi...
Source: Medgadget - April 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Pathology Source Type: blogs

New Organ Preservation Device Keeps Livers Alive Longer and Better for Transplanation
The success of a liver transplant is significantly limited by the quality of the donor organ. Currently this results in a severe shortage of acceptable organs, as many potential organs do not tolerate the static cold storage (SCS) of the conventional transplant procedure. Despite significant clinical advances in transplant procedures over the past 30 years, the mechanism for liver preservation has changed very little: the organ is flushed and placed on ice, lowering metabolic activity ten-fold in the hope of reducing damage. However, over time ischemic damage occurs, which reduces organ viability, and the cooling process r...
Source: Medgadget - April 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tom Peach Tags: Surgery Source Type: blogs

New Glasses Slow Down Myopic Progression in Children
Scientists working at Hong Kong Polytechnic University have developed a lenses for glasses that are able to slow down myopic progression in children. The center of the lens works as in a common pair of glasses, adjusting for myopia and astigmatism, while around this region the lens consists of dozens of spots of myopic defocus that help with vision correction. These so-called Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) Spectacle Lenses work at all viewing distances. “We have tried to incorporate myopic defocus optics into different treatment modalities, such as contact lens. For spectacle lens, the challenge is the...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ophthalmology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Genetically Engineered Tattoo Shows Up if Person Has Cancer
As everyone knows, early diagnosis brings the best chance of fighting cancer. At ETH Zurich, a Swiss technical university, researchers genetically modified skin cells to produce a tattoo that makes itself visible only when the person wearing it has signs of cancer. The technology consists of a “synthetic gene network” that activates the production of melanin pigment when calcium levels rise. Spikes in calcium are related to the growth of some neoplasms, so the technology has the potential to identify the presence of cancer earlier than anything available now. While it may be anxiety inducing to have a spot on o...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Oncology Source Type: blogs

Music Improves Function of Blood Pressure Medication
Scientists working at São Paulo State University, Juazeiro do Norte College, ABC Medical School in Brazil and Oxford Brookes University in the UK have shown that music improves the performance of anti-hypertensive medications. The study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, involved 37 patients with high blood pressure that normally responded well to drugs. They listed to music on some days and not others and their blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured at 20 minute intervals following treatment. The results were that for at least an hour following listening to music, the heart rate was lowe...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Join the Rosenman Symposium on Health Technologies, June 20 at UC San Francisco
Meet entrepreneurs, engineers, surgeons and other key players in the ecosystem at the Fifth Annual Rosenman Symposium, a half-day conference held at the UCSF Mission Bay campus on Wednesday, June 20. Registration is free. Join the 450+ who have already registered by reserving your spot today. The symposium, a forum for the growing health technology community in San Francisco, features leading speakers from industry, and lightning pitches by founders of selected startups. The event is produced by the Rosenman Institute, a University of California initiative based at UCSF Mission Bay. The institute helps entrepreneurs commer...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Rosenman Institute Tags: Sponsored Content Source Type: blogs

GE Unveils Factory-in-a-Box for Virus-Based Therapies
The production of emerging virus-based gene therapies, cell therapies, vaccines, and cancer treatments requires new types of facilities for manufacturers to build. GE Healthcare promises to help make it easy by unveiling their KUBio “factory-in-a-box” offering. The company in particular hopes to fill a need for facilities that can produce vaccines quickly and as the need arises. “The investment needed to build these facilities has been high, and the lack of flexibility has hindered the capability to invest,” in a statements aid Daria Donati, director of business development and innova...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

ADVANTAGE PLUS Pass-Thru Automated Endoscope Reprocessor Cleared in U.S.
MEDIVATORS, a Cantel Medical company, won clearance from the FDA for its ADVANTAGE PLUS Pass-Thru Automated Endoscope Reprocessor. It works with all kinds of clinical scopes, including duodenoscopes, but what’s cool is that it is supposed to be fit into a wall so that anything passing from a “dirty” room to a “clean” room goes through the device. About five endoscopes can be cleaned in the system per hour and it relies on Cantel’s own RAPICIDE PA Disinfectant. This avoids many common human errors and will hopefully reduce the chances of infection passing through endoscopes, an issue that...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Public Health Source Type: blogs

Spying on Your Social Media to Fight STDs
Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studied whether certain search terms that are used on Google and topics covered on Twitter can point to a outbreak of a contagious disease. They focused on syphilis and found that by monitoring the incidence of certain terms, such as “STD” and “find sex”, they were able to identify hotspots that were eventually noticed by the CDC. The research relied on machine learning algorithms that can crunch through a lot of data and spot correlations within it. If put into practical use, simple monitoring of pub...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Net News Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

Transgenic Silkworms Produce Fluorescent, Bacteria Killing Silk
Fluorescent proteins tend to be toxic, so their clinical applications are sometimes limited and suspect. Researchers from Purdue University and the Korean National Institute of Agricultural Research engineered a new material, made of silk and some genetic engineering, that fluoresces well under green light without causing too much toxicity. The technology works thanks to a protein, which glows in the far-red spectrum, whose genetic code was transferred to silkworms that then produced the silk. The researchers have already developed smart bandages that kill bacteria when illuminated by green light. They put E. co...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Source Type: blogs

4Dx Uses Algorithms to Better Visualize Lung Function
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects millions of people in the United States. The main method of diagnosis is the pulmonary function tests (PFTs), in which a patient breathes into a machine that measures pulmonary parameters. The disadvantage, however, is that pulmonary function tests take an “average” of a patient’s lung without being able to detect specific areas of lung function and compare them over time. 4Dx is hoping to improve that. Using principles of air flow dynamics and applying them to data from a simple X-ray, the company’s algorithms can calculate the amount of air that each a...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Exclusive Medicine Radiology Surgery Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

LivaNova ’s SenTiva Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Epilepsy Cleared in Europe
LivaNova won European CE Mark clearance for its SenTiva generator and accompanying Programming System for treatment of epilepsy in patients that don’t respond well to drugs. It is able to detect the onset of certain seizures and deliver extra stimulation to help to avoid or lessen the impact of the seizure. The same system received FDA approval last year. The device measures the person’s heart rate and body position, logging the data so that it can be accessed by a physician following seizures to better understand what happened. It comes with a programming wand and a tablet computer to wirelessl...
Source: Medgadget - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

J & J Cleared for World ’s First Transition Contacts
Johnson & Johnson Vision received FDA clearance for the first contact lens that gets darker in response to bright light. This kind of technology has existed for decades in glasses, called transition lenses, but the Acuvue Oasys Contact Lenses with Transitions Light Intelligent Technology are the first contacts to do so. The soft contact lenses are indicated for people with near- and farsightedness and this coming Summer in the Northern Hemisphere will allow many to avoid having to bring sunglasses with them when going outdoors. The lenses also filter out a lot of blue light, which is related to the body’s in...
Source: Medgadget - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Siemens Gets FDA Cleared for Two New Budget Friendly Yet Powerful CTs
Siemens Healthineers is on an FDA clearing streak of its newest CT scanners. The latest news, following up clearances of the SOMATOM Force and SOMATOM Edge Plus, is that SOMATOM go.All and SOMATOM go.Top can also now be marketed in America. The SOMATOM go.All and SOMATOM go.Top are more budget friendly scanners, yet offer tablet control, a remote, and imaging capabilities that are frequently found only in more expensive devices. SOMATOM go.All images using 64 slices per gantry rotation, while the SOMATOM go.Top can generate potentially twice the resolution using 128 slices or re...
Source: Medgadget - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Emergency Medicine Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

“Doctors to You” Rely on High Tech Gadgetry to Revive House Calls
House calls by family physicians was the way entire generations expected primary healthcare to be delivered. Things have changed over the decades, much of it due to the fact that many of the tools a modern doctor would use are too big for travel. But, while technology got rid of the house call, it is now helping to bring it back. Dr Ernest Brown works in northern Virginia and visits his patients in-person, in part thanks to a pocket-sized ultrasound from GE. He founded an organization called Doctors to You to help revive the ancient practice of the house call. You can read more about his team’s efforts and results at...
Source: Medgadget - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Society Source Type: blogs

3D Printed Model of Cervix to Train Doctors to Spot Cervical Cancer, Deliver Treatment
In many resource poor areas of the world cervical cancer screenings and related therapeutic procedures are rare due to a lack of training. Students at Rice University, with help from Rice 360° Institute for Global Health and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, have developed an affordable model of the female pelvic region that can be used to train and practice various procedures. The model is a follow up to the work of previous student teams. It is produced using a 3D printer and consists of six different versions including healthy, pre-cancerous, and ones with cancerous lesions. An attachment for t...
Source: Medgadget - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Source Type: blogs

Digital Voice Assistants Changing Lives of Blind People
Many of the technologies that have changed the lives of healthy consumers over the past couple of decades have done little to improve the lives of those with disabilities. Yet, a number of developments, such as smartphones and GPS devices, have truly helped out those who are blind, for example. A new article in The Atlantic magazine describes how Alexa, Amazon’s voice assistant, has made an impact in the life of the author’s father. It’s quite fascinating and reveals not only the benefits of voice assistants, but also the challenges that blind users, that have essentially skipped the recent technological ...
Source: Medgadget - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Google Augmented Reality Microscope to Help Automate Pathology
Google has developed an “Augmented Reality Microscope” that allows various deep learning algorithms to be tried on the images that it captures and for the results to be immediately seen in the microscope’s field of view. Moreover, the same technology can be integrated into existing clinical microscopes. This can really help the people working on getting computers to take over a lot of the responsibilities of pathologists. Here’s a Google video presenting its microscope technology: Related paper: An Augmented Reality Microscope for Real-time Automated Detection of Cancer (Google Drive)…...
Source: Medgadget - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Pathology Source Type: blogs

Researchers Develop Smartphone App to Measure Arterial Stiffness
The stiffness of arteries is an important indicator of cardiovascular health, but this parameter is somewhat difficult to evaluate and requires a specialist to do it. And yet regular monitoring of arterial stiffness can help to monitor a variety of diseases or help in their diagnoses. Now researchers at University of Southern California (USC) have developed an app that that uses only a smartphone’s camera to measure arterial stiffness. Tonometry, which is a combination of blood pressure measurement and electrocardiography (ECG), is the standard method for measuring arterial stiffness. USC researchers realized that wi...
Source: Medgadget - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Complex Brain Organoids to Help Study Neuro Diseases and Cures
At the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, researchers have been building 3D models of bits of living brain. In a new study appearing in Nature Biotechnology, the investigators have now come up with a technique for delivering oxygen to these organoids, growing them into more complex units, and transplanting them into living rodents. The major achievement was that they were able to graft organoids made of human brain cells, originally derived from stem cells, into areas of mouse brains that had a lot of vasculature. The organoids settled in and grew new neurons and related structures. The new capability should allow for...
Source: Medgadget - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Source Type: blogs

Fischer Releases an Update on a Classic Cardiac Electrophysiology Stimulator
Fischer Medical, a company based outside of Denver, Colorado, won FDA clearance for its BLOOM2 cardiac electrophysiology stimulator. The all-digital device provides a fresh interface over the original Bloom, the design of which has withstood over 40 years. The new BLOOM2 takes design cues from the classic machine, helping EP docs and staff to easily transition to the digital model. Protocols commonly used by a physician can be pre-programmed to easily pull up as necessary, and can be modified on a per-case basis. While the setups are done on the touchscreen, more traditional looking switches are used during procedures...
Source: Medgadget - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

A Closer Look at Portal Instruments ’ Needle-Free Injector
At SXSW last month, we had the opportunity to take a closer look at Portal Instruments‘ upcoming needle-free drug delivery device. As we wrote previously, Portal Instruments has developed a injection system that involves delivering a tiny jet of liquid through the skin at a high speed. We naturally had to ask how similar an experience this would be to Star Trek’s hypospray device (which seems to actually be kind of painful), and we were told that the jet of vaccine is so tiny and moves so fast that most only feel a small tickle. We also learned more about Portal’s recently announced partnership with Taked...
Source: Medgadget - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

asEars Assists People With Single-Sided Deafness – With Style!
Last month at South by Southwest (SXSW), we came across a team of students from the University of Tokyo who were in Austin, Texas to demo their prototype glasses for people with unilateral hearing loss. Called “asEars”, these high-tech and stylish glasses consist of a tiny microphone in the upper rim on the side of the impaired ear. The microphone is connected to an integrated audio processing unit that helps detect what direction the sound is originating from and helps filter out noise. The sound is transmitted through a bone conduction transducer that is cleverly embedded in the temple closest to the working ...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: ENT Rehab Source Type: blogs

Researchers Release Instructions to Convert 3D Printers Into Bioprinters
If you want to try doing 3D bioprinting at home or at a budget-strapped lab, commercial devices that only start at $10,000 may be out of reach. But researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have now published a series of instructions, as part of a study in Elsevier’s journal HardwareX, that let you turn a cheap consumer 3D printer into a high quality bioprinter that rivals many of the commercial devices. Their approach lets you build a bioprinter for under $500 that has combines precision with being able to work on large scale applications. The open source instructions essentially focus on how to attach a large-volum...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs

Flexitouch Plus Released for Treating Lymphedema Symptoms
Lymphedema is a disease in which fluid is retained in the legs, arms, and other parts of the body, resulting in pain, discomfort, and even disability. A new device from Tactile Medical, a company out of Minneapolis, Minnesotta, is designed to activate the lymphatic system so as to help move fluids away from where they’ve gotten trapped. The Flexitouch Plus, cleared by the FDA last year, consists of a blanket with dozens of individual air pockets and a controller pump that sequentially inflates and deflates the pockets. The result is a pressure wave over the affected part of the body that works like a programmed...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

FujiFilm Releases New Minimally Invasive Imaging Systems in U.S.
FUJIFILM is releasing a couple surgical visualization systems that were designed to improve minimally invasive procedures. The FUJIFILM EL-580FN Ultra-Slim Video Laparoscope System uses the firm’s own Super-Honeycomb CCD sensor to produce high quality images that are sharp and reproduce colors accurately. So-called “Chip on the Tip” high definition digital image processing helps improve quality and anti-fogging features allow for a quality image to appear in the first place. The imaging device is autoclaveable, is light, and features a 3.8 mm distal end diameter, nearly half that of most of the compe...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Thoracic Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

ECGlove Helps Medical Personnel Rapidly Monitor for Arrhythmias
Last month, Medgadget had the opportunity to visit the great state of Texas for the annual South by Southwest (SXSW) event. We had a chance to chat with Yoku Méndez, CEO of Jalisco, México-based Soluciones Kenko. Their product is an innovative wearable called ECGlove which is designed to help doctors and paramedics quickly check patients for arrhythmias. ECGlove consists of a common suede glove that a cyclist might wear, except that the fingertips of the thumb, index, and middle fingers are studded with metal electrodes. By placing the three fingers on a patient’s chest near the heart, ECGlove can rapid...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Military Medicine Source Type: blogs

Caffeine-Containing Biocompatible Gels for Drug Delivery
Researchers at MIT have developed a biocompatible polymer gel with potential for drug delivery. The new gel uses caffeine as a gentle and biocompatible catalyst during its manufacture, unlike many other gels that require harsh catalysts or manufacturing conditions that can ruin sensitive biological drugs intended for delivery or pose health risks for patients. The researchers are developing a variety of biocompatible drug delivery materials. In the case of hydrogels, these consist of a flexible polymer matrix loaded with a therapeutic drug, which is released over time, either at a site of implantation, or in the gut if the...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs

Hair-Sized Fiber-Optic Probe Can Measure Temperatures Deep Inside the Body
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have developed a tiny fiber-optic probe that can measure temperatures deep inside the body, while imaging structures in the region of interest. The probe, which has a similar thickness to a human hair, could help researchers to investigate the effects of drugs that raise temperatures in specific parts of the body, or optimize thermal treatments for cancers. Because the probe is so thin, it is minimally invasive and could also help researchers to record other types of physiological data. The research team wanted to develop a way to find better treatments for drug-induced brain overh...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

IBM Watson Artificial Intelligence System for Cancer Care: Interview with Elekta ’s Andrew Wilson
Elekta, the big name in radiotherapy, radiosurgery, and oncology informatics that’s based in Sweden, recently partnered with IBM to offer the Watson for Oncology artificial intelligence (AI) platform along with its MOSAIQ Oncology Information System and other cancer care solutions. According to Richard Hausmann, the CEO of Elekta, it is “the first radiation therapy company to offer capabilities that combine conventional health information systems with artificial intelligence and cognitive cloud computing.” The hope is to introduce AI in a meaningful way to treatment planning and delivery so as to improve ...
Source: Medgadget - April 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Informatics Oncology Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Siren Diabetic Socks Monitor Temperature of Feet, Detects Early Signs of Injury
Many patients suffering from diabetes and diabetic neuropathy are prone to having foot ulcers that can be remarkably difficult to manage. The best approach is to catch ulcers developing early on and to receive treatment as soon as possible. The Siren Diabetic Socks may be just the thing, as they monitor the temperature of the feet and if there’s an unusual increase, as from an injury, they let the patient know. The socks have embedded temperature sensors and they communicate via Bluetooth to a matching app installed on the patient’s smartphone. There’s also an option to use a hub to transmit the informati...
Source: Medgadget - April 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Defibrillator Pads with Needles to Deliver More Effective Shocks
External defibrillators that shock hearts out of life threatening arrhythmias are pretty brutal devices. They have to deliver a great deal of electrical energy into the skin so that enough of it reaches the heart, sometimes even to the point of burning the person being treated. The skin is a major barrier to the flow of electric current, as it has an impedance of about 500 kilo ohms per square centimeter, necessitating the use of high power devices. At Rice University students came up with an add-on device to improve the delivery of current toward the heart, potentially resulting in higher chances of rescuing patients...
Source: Medgadget - April 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Materials Military Medicine Source Type: blogs

Siemens SOMATOM Force Dual Source CT with Auto Patient Positioning Cleared by FDA
Siemens Healthineers won FDA clearance for its SOMATOM Force dual source CT scanner. Just like the recently cleared SOMATOM Edge Plus, this device includes the company’s FAST (Fully Assisting Scanner Technologies) Integrated Workflow that relies on a 3D camera positioned over the patient bed to recognize the head, torso, and other parts of the body. This allows the system to automate scan prep, getting patients in and out of the scanning room quickly. Touchscreen tablets are built in on both sides of the gantry, allowing adjustments to be made without walking away from the patient, providing an additional b...
Source: Medgadget - April 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Emergency Medicine Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Anti-Microbial Nanotechnology: Interview with Adrian Fellows, Head of R & D at AGA Nanotech
AGA Nanotech, a medtech company based in the UK, has developed nanotechnologies aimed at overcoming antimicrobial resistance, with a view to offering an alternative to conventional antibiotics. The company has collaborated with researchers from University College London to create poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles that can deliver highly oxidative biocides, using a Thermally Induced Phase Separation (TIPS) technique to load the particles. The nanoparticle payloads consist of precursors for hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid. These oxidative components are toxic to many antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but b...
Source: Medgadget - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Materials Nanomedicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Electric Monitoring of Gut ’s Muscles to Avoid Invasive Procedures
Engineers at University of California San Diego have developed a device for measuring the electric activity of the muscles of the guts in people that are ambulating and throughout the day. The device has 10 electrodes that are placed on the skin over the abdomen similar to how ECG electrodes are attached. It measures the myoelectric activity for up to 24 hours straight, which is indicative of the muscle motion taking place beneath. The researchers tested their device on ten children and one adult, comparing their readings against those obtained with more traditional means, including a catheter (manometry). They found a goo...
Source: Medgadget - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Source Type: blogs

FDA Gives First Clearance for Autonomous Diagnosis of Medical Condition
IDx, a company out of Coralville, Iowa, won FDA de novo clearance to introduce its artificial intelligence-powered IDx-DR diabetic retinopathy detection system. This is the first device cleared in the United States to autonomously diagnose a medical condition without requiring a review by a specially trained clinician. It’s intended to provide an easy screening option for general practitioners and other doctors that deal with diabetic patients but are not trained in ophthalmic diagnostics. The new capability may drastically increase the number of diabetic people receiving screenings, as many of them don’t visit...
Source: Medgadget - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

EyeGate Non-Invasive System Uses Electricity To Pull Drug Into Eye
EyeGate Pharma, a company out of Waltham, Massachusetts, has developed a novel ocular drug delivery system that doesn’t use needles or any other invasive techniques. The EyeGate II iontophoresis drug delivery system instead relies on electric current to pull an ionizable drug into the eye. This is achieved by placing an electrode on the forehead of the patient, while having the opposite electrode within the applicator carrying the drug. As the ionized drug liquid is dispensed into the eye, a tiny amount of current is pushed between the electrodes, helping the drug to become absorbed into the eye. The company just re...
Source: Medgadget - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs