3m Littmann Stethoscope Now with ECG, PCG Superpowers
Modern technologies allow clinicians to assess the heart in all sorts of ways (electrocardiography (ECG), ultrasound, phonocardiography (PCG)), and just about anywhere. Yet, this reality is nowhere near ubiquitous because of high costs, interoperability issues, legacy tools, and frequent dependence on performing exams in a clinical setting by trained professionals. A team of clinicians and engineers at the IT – Instituto de Telecomunicações and Polytechnic Institute of Setúbal in Portugal have now modified an off-the-shelf electronic stethoscope to also perform ECG and PCG recording and aut...
Source: Medgadget - March 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Informatics Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

First Cardiac Contractility Modulation Device Approved by FDA
Most cardiac implants, such as pacemakers and AICDs, are designed to correct the underlying heart’s rhythm, and synchronize atrial and ventricular contractions. That’s how these devices can improve cardiac performance in people with heart failure. They don’t do anything to boost the intrinsic myocardial contractility of the heart. Now the FDA has just given approval to the first implant that actually uses electrical pulses to improve how hard the heart pushes blood through the body. The Optimizer Smart system from Impulse Dynamics, a company out of Orangeburg, New York, is implanted like any cardiac impla...
Source: Medgadget - March 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

New Microscope Sees Large Groups of Neurons in Living Brains
Most current methods of looking at the activity of the brains of living animals are very limited in their field of view and/or frame rate. This makes it difficult to understand the complex activity taking place inside the brain that involves more than one small region of the organ. This is all rapidly changing as Boston University scientists are now reporting on a new microscope that can provide live video imaging of the activity of brain tissue over a diameter larger than a millimeter. This is quite large by today’s standards and can provide a complete overview of the neurons firing over the entire brain of some of...
Source: Medgadget - March 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Future Healthcare 2019: A Medgadget Report
Future Healthcare 2019 came to London’s Olympia with a two-day exhibition and conference featuring speakers from industry, the clinical setting, and a strong showing of start-up companies. The event was opened by former UK Secretary of Health Patricia Hewitt and former UK Science Minister Lord Drayson who addressed a crowd drawn from both the UK and internationally. The event was a prime opportunity to learn about the latest developments in the B2B healthcare market, collaborate with colleagues spread across scales—from healthcare providers to start-up companies—and to explore future commercial oppor...
Source: Medgadget - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tom Peach Tags: Exclusive Medicine Society Source Type: blogs

Fingertip Elasticity Probe Helps Spot Breast Tumors
Our fingertips are incredibly sensitive biomechanical devices. They’re regularly used by physicians to feel out tumors during biopsy or excision surgeries. While reasonably effective, too many patients return for repeat procedures to remove missed bits of target lesions. Researchers at University of Western Australia have been working on giving superpowers to surgeons’ fingers so they can better discern healthy from cancerous tissues. The team built a quantitative micro-elastography (QME) probe that relies on optical coherence tomography to detect how tissue gives way under stress. It has a fiber opti...
Source: Medgadget - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Ob/Gyn Surgery Source Type: blogs

Light and Sound Induce Brainwaves to Clear Brains of Amyloid Plaques
Alzheimer’s disease has no cure at this point. Only a few therapies that try to slow the progression are available, but there’s a light, and some sound, at the end of the tunnel. Researchers at MIT and Georgia Tech have now shown they can reduce the buildup of amyloid plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease using nothing but light and sound. Moreover, they were able to achieve a notable improvement in the mental abilities of the mice. Previously, auditory gamma entrainment using sensory stimuli (GENUS), a technology that uses sound to sync up the brain to a certain frequency, was shown to improve h...
Source: Medgadget - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

Lantos 3D Scanning System Makes Digital Impressions of Ears
Lantos Technologies, a company out of Wilmington, Massachusetts, is releasing the first FDA-cleared 3D ear scanner that can image everything from the outer ear to the ear drum. The Lantos 3D Scanning system is used to alleviate the need for silicone impressions when making hearing aids and other custom-made hearing products. Each scan produces about a million data points, which results in a highly detailed volumetric representation of the ear. It uses a special membrane to perform the scan that helps to avoid artifacts that can result from moisture, hair, and wax still being present inside the ear canal. The system ca...
Source: Medgadget - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Source Type: blogs

WatchPAT 300 Uses Multiple Sensors to Detect Sleep Apnea at Home
Itamar Medical, an Israeli firm, released the latest model of its WatchPAT sleep apnea detection system. It’s indicated for use by patients at home to help clinicians diagnose sleep apnea without requiring a visit to the sleep lab. It uses Itamar’s Peripheral Arterial Tone (PAT) technology, which involves measuring the arterial tone changes in peripheral arterial beds.  This data, along with that coming from an accompanying pulse oximeter and heart rate sensor, lets an algorithm detect obstructive as well as central sleep apnea. The new WatchPAT 300 doesn’t require any nasal canul...
Source: Medgadget - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Medicine Source Type: blogs

Device Helps Make Incisions Along Skin Tension Lines to Reduce Scarring
Surgeons working on delicate areas and visible areas of the body, particularly in plastic and cosmetic surgery, have to keep in mind the direction of skin tension lines. These are formed by collagen fibers that are aligned within the dermis of the skin. If incisions are made against the grain, more visible scars will be a result. Sometimes it’s hard to tell the direction of skin tension lines, so there are printed surface maps that are used, but individual patients may have their tension lines grow differently than in most people.  There are also devices that can estimate the direction of these lines, but these ...
Source: Medgadget - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Interview with Tom Reeves, CEO of Interface Biologics
Interface Biologics Inc (IBI) is a company from Toronto, Ontario, Canada that develops medtech and pharmaceutical materials. Their surface modification technology is called Endexo, which involves fluorine-based additives that migrate to a material’s surface during polymerization. This non-stick fluorination prevents platelets and bacteria from sticking, keeping the biomaterial clot-free and clean. The Endexo additive technology has significant advantages over competitive offerings, including heparin coatings. It’s easier to manufacture (no change in the manufacturing, low cost, wide compatibility) and easier to...
Source: Medgadget - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Exclusive Materials Source Type: blogs

Deep Learning System to Track Patient Recovery
Researchers from Stanford University have developed a new tool to track patient recovery in a hospital setting. They have created a deep learning-based system to see if patients are able to perform mobility tasks, such as getting in and out of bed or sitting in a chair. In an ICU setting, improved mobility is associated with better recovery, quality of life, and overall survival. In partnership with Intermountain LDS Hospital ICU, in Salt Lake City, Utah, the researchers set up depth sensors in eight patient ICU rooms. The team chose the unique depth sensors because they can only capture shapes and silhouettes of people, a...
Source: Medgadget - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Critical Care Informatics Medicine Rehab Source Type: blogs

Injectable Bone Scaffolding Made of Plant Cellulose
The majority of bone implants, cements, and grafts are hard objects that don’t always work well in filling the space they’re supposed to inhabit. Soft objects can gently expand and relocate their mass evenly over a volume, and they tent to be less dense so as to leave room for cells to make home inside of. Researchers at the University of British Columbia and McMaster University in Canada have just reportred on a plant cellulose-based bone scaffolds that can be injected into areas of damage. The material allows native tissue cells to invade into its interior and to propagate. Eventually, because it is biodegrad...
Source: Medgadget - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Highly Sensitive Point-of-Care Sensor Measures Dopamine in Whole Blood
The concentration of dopamine in a patient’s blood can be an important biomarker for a variety of diseases, including certain cancers, depression, and Parkinson’s. Measuring dopamine in whole blood still requires a laboratory, making it slow and expensive and not always suited for things like screenings. Scientists at the University of Central Florida have now developed a portable, enzyme-free dopamine detector that takes just a sample of blood and which provides in a matter of minutes. It is hoped that the technology will be available for point-of-care applications, potentially making dopamine a common paramet...
Source: Medgadget - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Pathology Source Type: blogs

Augmented Reality System Lets Severely Disabled Operate Own Robots
Robots that help severely disabled people are generally assumed to have to be super smart, capable of replacing human caretakers. Engineers at Georgia Tech decided to take a very different approach, instead empowering disabled people to control the robots that help them. The technology allows disabled people to see what the robot is seeing, since a video feed is passed from the robot’s cameras to the bedside computer. It also allows for careful, planned control of the robot’s movements. The robot used was the PR2 mobile manipulator from Willow Garage, a Silicon Valley robotics firm. It’s a huma...
Source: Medgadget - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

Mobilett Elara Max X-ray Cleared in the United States
Siemens Healthineers won clearance from the FDA for its Mobilett Elara Max X-ray system. The mobile device can be wheeled from room to room while the cables are safely hidden inside and the antimicrobial coating prevents the transfer of pathogens. The firm touts the system’s IT security features that help to maintain patient privacy while being compatible with a hospital’s own IT systems. It can be used to access previous scans and other patient data right at the bedside, helping clinicians to maintain continuity of care. This is thanks to a Windows 10-based virtual workstation built into the device, which...
Source: Medgadget - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Nyxoah ’s Genio Implant for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Cleared in Europe
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is often caused by the tongue blocking the airway during night-time breathing.  Positive airway pressure (PAP) is the most common way of raising the tongue and allowing air to flow through, but it requires wearing a face mask with a connected hose through the night. Nyxoah, a company headquartered outside of Brussels, Belgium, just obtained European regulatory approval for its Genio implant-based solution that treats OSA in an entirely new way. The Genio includes a tiny implant which is surgically inserted, in about 15 minutes into the back of the tongue. It electrically stimulates ...
Source: Medgadget - March 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology ENT Medicine Source Type: blogs

Bioreactors Inside Body Grow New Bones for Transplantation
This study demonstrated that we could create viable bone grafts from artificial bone substitute materials. Study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: Biomaterials-aided mandibular reconstruction using in vivo bioreactors… Via: Rice… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - March 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Genetics Materials Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Macular Degeneration Treated with Viral Delivery of Gene Into Eye
A number of degenerative eye diseases are related to photoreceptors no longer functioning properly. There can be a host of reasons that photoreceptors don’t work, but soon it may not be that important to know why the disease is happening. That is because researchers at University of California, Berkeley have come up with a way of treating retinal degenerative diseases by turning cells that normally can’t sense light into ones that can. The researchers used an inactivated virus to introduce a gene into the ganglion cells of mice suffering from macular degeneration. Normally, ganglion cells can’t see a...
Source: Medgadget - March 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology Ophthalmology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Caregivers Want Robots to Take Care of Annoying Dementia Sufferers
People with dementia, as well as those that take care of them, can benefit from a bit of robotic assistance. There are a few robots on the market that are designed to help elderly people around the house, but not too much exists for those suffering from cognitive decline. While there’s been development in this field, researchers at the University of California, San Diego wanted to find out what kinds of robots would actually help. The team brought together a group of caregivers that have a good deal of experience with dementia patients. These included social workers, family members, and others, and they helped ...
Source: Medgadget - March 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Geriatrics Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

CareAlert, A Non-Intrusive Home Monitoring System: Interview with Fereydoun Taslimi, CEO of SensorsCall
The world’s aging population continues to grow. Today, in the U.S. alone, there are more than 46 million people 65 years and older, accounting for around 15 percent of the population. This is expected to swell to 20 percent by the year 2030. One of the main decisions that we are bound to make as we get older is whether or not we will continue to live at our own place. Unsurprisingly, studies have shown that nearly 90 percent of seniors living in the U.S. prefer to grow old in their own homes. Despite the obvious advantages of growing old at home, or what is now dubbed “aging in place,” safety remains a ma...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Geriatrics Source Type: blogs

BD Venovo Stent Approved in U.S. to Treat Iliofemoral Venous Occlusive Disease
BD (Becton Dickinson) won FDA approval for its Venovo venous stent, which is the first stent available for treating iliofemoral venous occlusive disease. Typically, arteries are the vessels that become narrow or even blocked from calcified plaque, but veins can also suffer from similar issues. The iliac and femoral veins near the groin are particularly prone to being occluded and that’s where the Venovo stent should help. The Venovo is made of nitinol and it’s made to be very flexible, so as to be able to reach the target treatment zone. It sports high radial strength, resists compression, and a variety of...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Microfluidic Device Measures Platelet Health in Minutes
Platelets are an important component of blood’s clotting mechanism. When platelets are not aggregating as well as they should, there might be a need for a platelet transfusion during clinical care. Platelet functionality is hard to determine quickly with current methods, but researchers at the University of Washington have developed a microfluidic device that can directly assess how well the platelets are doing. The device produces results within about two minutes, which is fast enough in most cases to let clinicians decide a timely course of action. “Our system requires a tiny amount of blood to look at h...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Pathology Surgery Source Type: blogs

FundamentalVR Integrates HaptX Gloves Into Virtual Reality Surgical Trainer
FundamentalVR, a company that makes virtual reality training tools for medical education, has integrated the HaptX Gloves into its Fundamental Surgery platform. Fundamental surgery can be used on different computers and with a variety of virtual reality headsets and haptic tools. Most systems that can provide a sense of touch have relied on pointer-like tools that the user holds with the fingers. The HaptX Gloves make each finger and the entire hand into a virtual reality, haptic controller. Her’es a video FundamentalVR released showing off what’s possible: Via: FundamentalVR… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Education ENT Neurosurgery Ob/Gyn Thoracic Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

3D Brain Organoids Model Rare Neural Disease
Direct studies on the brain are inherently difficult, as it’s a complex and fragile organ hidden behind a thick skull. Animal studies can help, but animal brains are different from human ones. In order to better study how the brain works and its pathophysiology, researchers have been working on growing tiny replicas of specific parts of the brain in the lab. Now scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry and Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany are reporting the development of a brain organoid model of neuronal heterotopia, a rare condition in which the cortex of the brain, its...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology Source Type: blogs

Triboelectric Generators to Power Implantable and Wearable Medical Devices
Wearable and implantable medical devices are constantly hungry for electricity to power their functions. Batteries, their lifetime, whether they can be recharged, and other related issues influence the design, usability, and functionality of electrically powered medical tech. Triboelectric generators that convert mechanical energy into electricity are an ideal solution, but their efficiency and other limitations have prevented their adoption in the medical space. Researchers at Purdue University have now developed a liquid-metal-inclusion based triboelectric nanogenerator, dubbed LMI-TENG, that can produce meaningful ...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs

Sonavex EchoSure Vascular Blood Flow Monitor Cleared in U.S.
Following peripheral vascular and microvascular surgeries, it is important to be able to monitor how blood is flowing through the treated vessels and whether there may be an occlusion or compromise. This monitoring typically requires a nurse or a trained sonographer to use Doppler ultrasound, but now a new option is available. Sonavex, a company based in Baltimore, won FDA clearance for its EchoSure system that combines 3D ultrasound with deep learning algorithms that can nearly completely automate the process of blood flow monitoring. The system provides both visual and quantitative outputs for quick and intuitive underst...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Alternative Orthopedic Fixation Company Ossio Developing Absorbable Fixation Devices
Ossio, a medical device company with offices in Caesarea, Israel and Woburn, Massachusetts, recently announced a $22 million Series A venture investment round led by LA-based OCV Partners. This brings the company’s total venture funding to $35 million. This technology received FDA 510(k) clearance in January 2019. Ossio has developed the OSSIOfiber Intelligent Bone Regeneration Technology, which provides a biocompatible framework for bone regeneration after traumatic fractures or orthopedic surgery. The platform is a bioabsorbable polymer resin (PLDLA) combined with natural mineral fibers, constructed in a sturd...
Source: Medgadget - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kurt Yaeger Tags: Materials Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

BIOTRONIK Wins FDA Approval for Two High-Voltage Families of Cardiac Implants
The FDA has given BIOTRONIK approval to introduce the company’s Acticor and Rivacor lines of high-voltage cardiac rhythm implants. They’re designed to treat tachycardia (likely supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) and have been made to be smaller and have a longer battery life. Some of the implants have a nearly 15 year lifetime, helping to lower the number of replacement procedures. All of the implants are 3 Tesla MR-conditional, meaning that patients can undergo most MRI scans as long as certain precautions are taken. BIOTRONIK touts the shape of the implants, which are supposedly less irritating on tissues. Th...
Source: Medgadget - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Withings Releases Breathing Disturbance Sleep Monitor
Withings, the famous French maker of stylish activity trackers, blood pressure cuffs, and other personal healthcare and fitness devices, is releasing a breathing disturbance monitor. Built into its Sleep tracking mat, the technology can detect many of the instances when a person’s breathing is interrupted. These events can be signs of sleep apnea, which in turn can lead to a variety of cardiovascular conditions. As a matter of fact, Withings is planning to add true sleep apnea detection to the Sleep mat once it received FDA and European regulatory clearances, something it expects to obtain soon. Sleep apnea is a cond...
Source: Medgadget - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine OTC Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

da Vinci Surgical Robot Given Sense of Touch to Prevent Injury
Intuitive Surgical effectively brought robotics into the operating room with its da Vinci systems. The company now dominates this market and its robots are now used all over the world to conduct all kinds of minimally invasive surgeries. While the da Vincis give surgeons incredible precision when working with tissues deep inside the body, they lack any force-feedback and therefore the physician can’t feel what’s being worked on. This is a serious problem, as our sense of touch lets us know when something is in the way, when a tear may start forming, and when it feels like tissue is about to give. Engi...
Source: Medgadget - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Siemens Healthineers to Unveil SOMATOM go.Top Cardiovascular Edition CT Scanner
Siemens Healthineers is releasing a new CT scanner tuned specifically for cardiovascular imaging. The new SOMATOM go.Top Cardiovascular Edition provides advanced radiation dose management features for routine cardiovascular procedures. It’s a 128-slice scanner that’s expected by the company to be adopted by outpatient cardiology clinics and hospitals to perform a variety of procedures, including CT angiographies (CCTA) and HeartFlow FFRCT analysis. One of the main features of the new system is called CARE kV that automatically chooses which kV setting to go with, depending on the patient and procedure. It does ...
Source: Medgadget - March 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Omeo Evolution 1 Wheelchair for Off-Road Adventures
Conventional wheelchairs can only go where the ground is relatively smooth and flat, which means nature is mostly out of bounds to those that can’t walk. A new wheelchair developed by Omeo Technology, a company out of New Zealand, allows people to go off-road and visit new places. The Omeo Evolution 1 has only two wheels, so it automatically balances the user during the ride. It has powerful motors to get up inclines and can rotate in place. The wheelchair can be controlled with either a joystick or by the user leaning the torso forward and back, just like on hoverboards and Segways. This allows the user to control ...
Source: Medgadget - March 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Diagnosing Esophageal Cancer More Accurately: Interview with Mark Rutenberg, CEO of CDx Diagnostics
Cancer of the esophagus is often related to chronic heartburn, something patients too often end up ignoring. The onset of the potentially deadly disease can be detected, though, given good enough imaging and regular screenings. The imaging component, that we’re particularly interested in, relies on physicians to take biopsies of random bits of the esophageal tissue and to then examine it under the microscope. Since precancerous cells are spread out randomly, it is very easy to miss the development of cancer. CDx Diagnostics has developed a technology that allows physicians to take more comprehensive samples and to ha...
Source: Medgadget - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive GI Pathology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Boston Sci ’s Next Generation WATCHMAN FLX Stroke-Preventing Device Cleared in EU
Boston Scientific landed the European CE Mark for its next generation of the WATCHMAN FLX Left Atrial Appendage Closure (LAAC) device. The device is used to isolate the left atrial appendage of the heart, the place where stroke-causing blood clots tend to form in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AFib). The technology is minimally invasive, and the new generation of the WATCHMAN FLX is designed to make implantation easier and to make it applicable to a greater range of patients. The previous generation of the device received European regulatory approval back in November of 2015. The physician decides the orie...
Source: Medgadget - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Multi-Parameter Sensors Detect Chemical and Physical Stimuli
Sensors are usually made to detect specific chemical or physical stimuli, making it difficult to create devices that can monitor a variety of different parameters at the same time. Now researchers at  Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed an unusual sensor, built  out of conductive ink formed into origami arrays, that can detect both chemical and physical stimuli. The device can measure the temperature, humidity, light, and the presence of volatile organic compounds. The technology is also impressive in that it can be used to tell apart isomers and chiral enantiomers of volatile organic com...
Source: Medgadget - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Genetics News Source Type: blogs

Brain-Computer Interface with Neurofeedback Improves Human Performance
When performing challenging and dangerous tasks, our state of mind can have great effect on whether we succeed or fail. During emergencies some people panic while others remain calm. Some people get so influenced by emotion that an easy task, such as simply running out of a building, can turn into a disaster all of its own. Turns out that this state of mind can be pretty easily manipulated, as researches at Columbia University have shown. This poses exciting possibilities for human potential as well as interesting ethical dilemmas that will have to be dealt with in the future. The Columbia team used a brain-computer interf...
Source: Medgadget - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Psychiatry Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Scientists Make MRI Practical for Breast Cancer Screening
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Source: Medgadget - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Unyte ’s iom2 Helps You Meditate With Ease: Medgadget Review
Conclusion We believe that iom2 might give people an opportunity to experience meditation in a more attainable way. We found iom2 to be well designed and easy to use. Unyte offers a wide variety of meditation programs, which helps keep the users engaged. However, when it comes to the way these programs were organized, there is definitely some room for improvement. In terms of cost, iom2 retails for $149.99 on Unyte’s official website. To gain access to Unyte’s meditation programs, the company offers two subscription plans, an annual for $199 (including the iom2 at $139) and a lifetime for $349.99 (including th...
Source: Medgadget - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Psychiatry Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Wireless Body Network Keeps Implants and Body-Worn Devices Safe from Hackers
It’s been known for a number of years that certain implantable devices with wireless capabilities can be hacked, given certain conditions. These include cardiac pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators, the proper functioning of which helps to keep many people alive. Now researchers at Purdue University, who have been studying this problem intensely, have come up with a universal way to block all wireless attempts at hacking medical implants. The idea is to get away from using wireless transmission completely, and instead to rely on the body’s own conductivity to pass signals from an implant or body-worn dev...
Source: Medgadget - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Public Health Source Type: blogs

Smart Cane Works as Activity Tracker
There are all kinds of activity trackers out there, but in many cases these devices just can’t provide the proper data. Once a person starts using a cane, for example, monitoring their movements throughout the day becomes difficult when using a wrist-worn tracker. Researchers at the University of Malaga in Spain have now developed a high tech cane that provide a lot of important data while not requiring the user to do anything about it. The cane uses two pressure sensors to measure how much weight is placed on the cane and in what direction, and each step is recorded in minute detail. The pressure sensors are integra...
Source: Medgadget - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Major Depression Treated with Transcranial Alternating Current Brain Stimulation
There are implantable devices out there that are very effective at treating depression in a lot of patients. These look like pacemakers and they have electrical leads stretching out, usually, to the vagus nerve, and there are transcranial direct stimulation devices with electrodes placed directly onto the brain. Of course implants have a whole host of consequences, including a limited battery lifetime, a chance that the therapy won’t work and explantation will be required, as well as potentially limited ability to receive MRI scans. Researchers at the University of North Carolina have been testing a new approach, cal...
Source: Medgadget - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

Scientists Image Crawling Fruit Fly Larvae Down to Individual Cells and Even Reveal Activity Inside
Scientists at Columbia University have developed an amazing new microscope for viewing neurons, and they used it to image proprioceptive neurons in living fruit fly larvae. These neural cells help the larvae orient itself. The videos the Columbia team created are simply incredible, particularly if you consider how small these animals are and that the imaging was done in 3D. The technology is called high-speed volumetric swept confocally aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) and it allows the scientists to see individual neural cells as they move and bend along with the body, as well as the calcium activity taking pla...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Source Type: blogs

Handheld Skin Bioprinter Heals Deep Open Wounds With Patient ’s Own Cells
The human organism has a number of physiologic processes that work together to heal skin wounds. Sometimes wounds are so large and difficult that these healing mechanisms simply can’t access damaged tissues. Researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina are now reporting the development of a bioprinter that uses a patient’s own skin cells to heal wounds faster and more consistently. The device is loaded with dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes harvested and grown from the patient’s own skin. A scan is performed of the wound, which provides a three-dimensi...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

CAPE: A CleanRoom for Any Need and Location
Cleanrooms are important tools when manufacturing drugs, creating certain medical devices, performing specialized research, and for other tasks in a number of fields. Cleanrooms are typically located in built-to-suit facilities that can provide power, clean air, and other necessities that help maintain an ultra-clean environment. In order to make possible the production of pharmaceuticals and make conducting research easier anywhere, engineers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA in Stuttgart, Germany have developed a portable clean room. The CAPE, as their system is called, can be p...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: etc. News Source Type: blogs

Tea Bag Implant Protects Islet Cells While Letting Insulin Flow Out
Type 1 diabetes patients have to inject themselves with insulin to replace the inability of beta cells of pancreas to produce the hormone. To cure Type 1 diabetes will require either a way to “fix” the pancreas and prevent it from being damaged by the immune system, or some sort of implant that can generate insulin as the body requires. Researchers at University of Arizona, working with others, including researchers at Novo Nordisk and University of Alberta, are now perfecting a new device that can generate insulin from within the body. This artificial pancreas relies on donated islet cells. Islet cell transpla...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Resistance-Sensing Needle Helps Improve Injection Accuracy
While most medical tools have seen incredible advances over the past century, the syringe has remained relatively unchanged despite room for improvement. Without the use of live imaging or sensing systems, which require additional time and resources, nurses and physicians must rely on blind insertion techniques using superficial anatomical landmarks, fluid return, and tactile feedback to accurately deliver a syringe’s contents. These techniques can be problematic when targeting smaller areas, or regions where overshoot can result in harm to the patient. One such region is the suprachoroidal space, located between the...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mark O'Reilly Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ophthalmology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Bioengineered Gel to Reduce Risk of Bone Marrow Transplants
Bone marrow transplantation is a potentially life-saving treatment for leukemia, multiple myeloma, and HIV. The procedure involves depleting the patient’s immune system, then infusing blood stem cells from a donor, which develop into a new immune system. Unfortunately, during the transplant process, patients are susceptible to disease and infection, making it risky and not recommended in certain cases. Harvard engineers and scientists have developed an injectable, sponge-like gel that may address these challenges. The gel is designed to be injected under the skin at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Over the c...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Genetics Materials Oncology Source Type: blogs

Tiny Microrobot Created Using Silicon Wafers Could Aid in Drug Delivery
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed wireless bug-shaped microrobots using nanofabrication techniques. They are able to produce a million of the devices from a 4-inch silicon wafer. The microrobots can “walk,” survive in harsh environments, and can function even after passing through a hypodermic syringe, suggesting that they may have potential as injectable drug-delivery devices. The microrobots are powered using on-board silicon solar cells and are only 70 microns long, the width of a thin human hair. Consisting of a glass skeleton coated with a thin silicon layer, the devices contain ...
Source: Medgadget - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Scientists Explain Why Electric Bandages Work
Electrical bandages, ones that allow electric current to make contact with the wound, have been known for a while to be very effective at speeding up healing. Over the past decade there’s been a great deal of technological development in this field, but the mechanism behind why these “electroceuticals” really work has been poorly understood. Now researchers at Ohio State University have shown that these devices disrupt the formation of bacterial biofilms, which are how cells group together to defend themselves against antibiotics and the body’s immune system. Biofilms are held together by so-called&...
Source: Medgadget - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

New Coating Keeps Intravascular Catheters Clean for Weeks
Intravascular catheters are a bane of clinical medicine, being one of the chief ways people get infected inside of hospitals. They have to be replaced routinely, putting extra strain on nurses and doctors and causing discomfort to patients. There are a ways to keep catheters relatively clean with sterile technique and specialized dressings, but there’s a great deal of room left for improvement, something that scientists at Brown University are now tackling. The Brown team has developed a highly stretchable coating made of a polyurethane that releases auronafin, an antirheumatic drug that has been shown to also b...
Source: Medgadget - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Source Type: blogs