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Sound Waves Sort Cells for Diagnostics, Cell-Based Therapies
Researchers at the Singapore University of Technology and Design have developed a microfluidic device that can isolate cells from complex biological samples using sound waves. The technique could help doctors to accurately isolate specific types of cells from blood and other bodily fluids, which is useful for diagnostics and cell-based therapies. Separating individual cells from complex biological samples, such as blood, is a challenge. The current gold-standard is a technique called fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). However, the equipment for FACS is expensive, bulky, and difficult to use, requiring specially tr...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Pathology Source Type: blogs

Rapid Phone-Based Test for Multiple Infectious Pathogens
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma have partnered to develop a compact, portable, and easy to use system for simultaneously detecting a variety of bacteria and viruses that cause disease. The system provides results in about a half an hour, which are nearly as accurate as laboratory equipment, and the technology can be used in the field and at the point-of-care. The technology revolves around a microfluidic chip that contains loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) reagents. Each of the chip’s parallel channels is loaded with reagents de...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Pathology Public Health Source Type: blogs

Flexible Skin for Prosthetics Can Sense Shear Force
Researchers at the University of Washington and University of California, Los Angeles have developed a flexible “skin” that can be applied to a prosthetic limb. The skin can sense vibrations and can also measure shear force, such as the feeling when your finger slides along a table or when an object slips out of your grasp. This technology could help prosthetic devices to act more like real limbs, or maybe even help surgical robots to better sense their environment and so surgical instruments more safely and accurately. So far, artificial skin for prosthetics has not been able to sense a full range of tactile i...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Cast21 Offers a Lightweight, Waterproof Cast: Interview with CEO Ashley Moy
Anyone who has been in an orthopedic cast knows their inconveniences. They are cumbersome, must be kept dry, which makes bathing difficult, and can cause the skin underneath to become itchy, smelly, and irritated. Cast21 has designed a cast that solves those problems. The Chicago-based company uses a lattice frame that provides more breathability, while the material itself is waterproof and performs better in a few key metrics when compared to traditional fiberglass casts. The company’s cast takes about three minutes to set and can last for the duration of the casting. The concept started as an undergraduate eng...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Exclusive Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Sensoria Health Powered by Genesis Rehab Services, a Partnership to Develop Smart Aging Solutions (Interview)
Another exciting announcement from Health 2.0 is a partnership between Sensoria and Genesis Rehab Services (GRS) to develop smart aging solutions under the name, “Sensoria Health powered by Genesis Rehab Services.” Sensoria is already known as a leading developer of smart footwear and clothing products based on the Sensoria Core microelectronics and cloud system. Sensoria’s expertise in using “internet of me” wearables for health and fitness will now be redirected towards addressing specific challenges older individuals at Sensoria Health. GRS is a holding company representing one of the natio...
Source: Medgadget - October 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Visits The Medical Alley Innovation Summit in Minneapolis 2017
MedTech Strategist working together with The Medical Alley Association for the very first time brought their premier innovation summit to Minnesota, a place now considered by many to be the global epicenter of health innovation and care. Over the two-day long event more than 35 start-up and emerging medical companies presented their technologies and devices to representatives of leading venture capitalist and investment banks, and also to large medical device companies. Considering that funding is of major importance to the field of medical innovation, this event gave both investors and entrepreneurs a chance to explore fu...
Source: Medgadget - October 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

OptiScanner 5000 Cleared in U.S. for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in ICU
OptiScan Biomedical, a company based in Hayward, California, won FDA clearance to introduce its OptiScanner 5000 in the U.S. The device is intended for use in intensive care units to continuously monitor blood plasma glucose levels, something the OptiScanner 5000 can do accurately without having to be regularly calibrated. The device works via an integrated blood centrifuge and spectrometer to provide directly measured plasma-based glucose levels in critically ill patients. The OptiScanner 5000 relies on a single-use disposable cartridge that is swapped out for every patient. Once activated, clinicians can see both real-t...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Joins the Verily Baseline Project Study, Part 1: The First Visit
Over the past few years, just about all the major tech giants have shown significant interest in health. It’s basically now a necessity for smartphones and smartwatches to contain sensors, apps, and other features to monitor your health and fitness. And many of these companies are partnering with research institutions to analyze and mine user data for insights about our bodies, such as Apple’s and Stanford’s recently announced study to use Apple Watch data to identify cardiac arrhythmias. One of the other notable studies uses technology from Verily (Alphabet’s life sciences division) and medical exp...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Medicine Net News Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Electronic Pills Powered by Gastric Acid to Guarantee Compliance: Interview with etectRx President & CEO Harry Travis
Patients are constantly lectured on the importance of taking their medications as directed. Yet, a disturbingly low adherence across patient populations remains a major challenge for clinicians, insurance and pharma companies, and of course the patients themselves. New technologies are coming out that are trying to solve this problem, and one of the more exciting ones that is already undergoing clinical trials is the ID-Cap from etectRx, a company based in Newberry, Florida. ID-Cap uses drug capsules that have a bit of electronics and simple chemistry within them to confirm that a patient truly ingested the pill and it end...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Geriatrics GI Medicine Source Type: blogs

Robotic-Assisted Surgery – Current Challenges and Future Directions: Interview with Dr. Mona Orady
During the last decade and a half, robotic-assisted surgery has led to smaller scars, less pain, and faster recoveries for patients. Concurrently, surgeons using this technology have benefited from being able to perform surgeries in a more comfortable position, while also experiencing greater visualization and enhanced precision. With all of these benefits, robotic-assisted surgeries are becoming increasingly common worldwide, particularly in the United States, where more than 67 percent of all of Intuitive Surgical‘s da Vinci robots are installed. Moreover, just yesterday we covered the FDA clearance of the Senhance...
Source: Medgadget - October 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Ob/Gyn Surgery Thoracic Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Portable 3D Scanner to Assess Elephantiasis Patients
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a portable 3D scanner that can help health workers to rapidly assess patients with elephantiasis, a condition that causes swollen limbs. The scanner allows medical professionals to measure the volume and dimensions of swollen limbs in the comfort of a patient’s home. Approximately 120 million people worldwide suffer from elephantiasis, a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitoes that causes significant swelling and deformity of the legs. At present, health workers assess the severity of the disease using a measuring tape to determine...
Source: Medgadget - October 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Abbott Releases Proclaim DRG Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulator for Chronic Pain
Abbott is releasing in the U.S. its Proclaim DRG neurostimulation system to fight chronic pain in patients with complex regional pain syndrome in their legs. The product consists of an implantable neuromodulator that stimulates the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), an Apple iPad for programming the device, and an iPod touch for the patient control of the device. In a recent clinical trial, dorsal root ganglion stimulation has shown markedly better outcomes over spinal cord stimulation in many patients suffering from chronic pain in the lower extremities. Bluetooth wireless connectivity is used to change the settings on the impl...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Nitric Oxide Absorbing Hydrogel Releases Drugs to Fight Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other Diseases
At the Institute for Basic Science in Daejeon, South Korea, scientists have developed a hydrogel that responds to the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and releases drugs when so activated. This kind of drug delivery system may be particularly effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis, as immune cells within inflamed joints release toxic NO in large quantities. Injecting a gel that actively responds to inflammation, absorbs NO, and immediately delivers anti-inflammatories or other drugs may allow for automatic long-term control of inflamed joints. The same applies to many other diseases and conditions involving inflamma...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Trapping Cancer Helps to Study Dormant Cells and How to Kill Them
Cancers often come back following successful treatment, a process at least partially due to the fact that dormant cells, which are particularly resistant to common therapies like chemo, remain in the body. They’re elusive and therefore difficult to study, so progress on targeting such cells has been limited. Now scientists at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities have developed a way to pick out dormant cancer cells from other cancer cells and to keep them in their quiescent state in order to study them. The technique consists of placing cancer cells within a silica-poly(ethylene glycol) material that prevents the cell...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Oncology Source Type: blogs

Esaote Unveils Its Flagship MyLab9 Ultrasound System
Esaote, the Italian ultrasound manufacturer, has just unveiled its brand new high-end MyLab9 ultrasound system. The device is designed for all sorts of diagnostic imaging procedures and clinical environments. The MyLab9 features non-composite single crystal probe technology and “Ultra-engine” platform that together generate high quality images in a variety of cases from OB/GYN to cardio to lesion detection. The new system includes something called easyMode, a software feature that automatically optimizes scans with minimal input from the user via a small built-in touch screen. Esaote’s i-motion techn...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Radiology Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound System Maps Tongue Movement to Help with Speech Therapy
A team of French researchers has developed a specialized ultrasound technique to allow people to visualize the shape of the tongue during speech. This “visual biofeedback” system could help with speech therapy. At present, speech therapists will listen to someone’s pronunciation, and use diagrams to help explain how to position the tongue in the mouth to form specific sounds. How easily someone can put a speech therapist’s advice into practice depends on how easily they can understand the instructions and apply them to their own speech. For something like positioning the tongue in the mouth, it can ...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

TransEnterix Gets FDA Clearance for Senhance Surgical Robot
TransEnterix, a North Carolina firm, won FDA clearance for its Senhance Surgical Robotic System. This is only the second company that’s offering an abdominal surgical robotic system to receive FDA’s green light, following Intuitive Surgical‘s da Vinci systems, the first of which was introduced nearly two decades ago. The multi-port system features some pretty high-tech capabilities, such as haptic feedback that lets the surgeon feel when the instruments come in contact with other objects, including tissues, and an eye-controlled endoscope that moves its point of view to follow the user’s gaze. The ...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Thoracic Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Olympus Releases New SB Knives for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissections
This week and next at the American College of Gastroenterology’s World Congress of Gastroenterology conference in Orlando, Olympus is unveiling its SB Knives. The devices are designed to be used for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), a procedure that was defined as unique from endoscopic mucosal resection only about fifteen years ago. The three-in-one SB Knives can be used for mucosal incision, submucosal dissection, and hemostasis when removing early GI cancers that have not yet penetrated into the muscle. In many cases such procedures can help patients avoid open surgeries, as long as the cancer...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Source Type: blogs

EchoPixel Lets Surgeons See CT, MRI, and Ultrasound Scans in 3D
Since the invention of the X-ray machine in 1895, medical imaging technology has improved dramatically, but the visualization of those images hasn’t changed enough to keep up. Even though CTs and MRIs capture 3D data, the consumption of that data by physicians is still almost entirely in 2D formats. EchoPixel, a company based in Mountain View, California, hopes to bridge the gap. The company’s technology uses a patient’s CT, MRI, or ultrasound scans to generate a holographic experience that can be manipulated, shared, or saved for later reference. By doing so, it allows medical teams to better understand ...
Source: Medgadget - October 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Informatics Medicine Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Highly Stretchable and Flexible Fiber Optic Measures Tiny Changes in Body Movements
The motion of our hands, fingers, feet, and other parts of our bodies is pretty complicated. Our bodies are curvy and their shape varies significantly from one person to the next, so accurately measuring the mechano-dynamics of different body parts requires more than just attaching accelerometers to them. There are pretty accurate electronic strain sensors in existence, but they have limitations such as being influenced by external electromagnetic fields. Engineers at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China have now developed a way to use a special optical fiber to detect minute changes in the movement of various body parts....
Source: Medgadget - October 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Tiny Breath Acetone Sensor to Measure Fat Burning During Exercise, Help Monitor Diabetes
Those wishing to lose weight have to watch their diet, but for optimal results they also have to burn existing fat in their bodies through exercise. Any amount of exercise simply won’t do, as body fat only burns when pressed to do so by specific physiological situations. Therefore, it would be nice to know that one’s exercise is actually achieving the fat burning goals. It’s been known for a while that when we burn built-up fat, the acetone in our breath increases in concentration. Additionally, acetone is also a biomarker that tracks closely with one’s blood glucose levels, making it potentially u...
Source: Medgadget - October 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Improved Brain Organoids for Zika Virus Research
Researchers at UCLA have developed a method to produce improved brain organoids, or “mini brains,” that they claim mimic the structure of the human brain more closely than previous attempts. The investigators used the organoids to study how the Zika virus infects and destroys brain tissue, and identify potential treatments, but the mini brains could also be useful in studying neurological/neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Brain organoids have been covered by Medgadget previously. However, what sets the new organoids apart is the researchers’ claims that they more c...
Source: Medgadget - October 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Neurology Source Type: blogs

Swallowable Flexible Sensor to Detect Stomach Movements
Scientists at MIT have developed a flexible sensor that patients can swallow. The sensor sticks to the stomach wall and can relay information about stomach peristalsis. This could help doctors to diagnose disorders that slow down the movement of food through the gastrointestinal tract, or monitor food intake in obese patients. The research team wanted a minimally invasive solution for monitoring stomach movements. To achieve this, they created a flexible device for increased safety. Because of the sensor’s flexibility, it can be rolled up and squeezed into a small capsule, which patients can swallow easily. The capsu...
Source: Medgadget - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics GI News Source Type: blogs

The Ozmo Smart Hydration Bottle: A Medgadget Review
Conclusion The $70 Ozmo Active smart hydration bottle is certainly a novel health and fitness device, but it’s tough to say how helpful it can actually be in improving one’s health. While it is true that hydration is important for healthy living, there isn’t a well-defined healthy vs. unhealthy level that is understood by most people, which we think limits the appeal of such a product. But if you’re the type of person who’s goal-oriented in every aspect of health and fitness, or you need to be reminded to drink more water, then Ozmo just might be what you need to drink up. More info and link...
Source: Medgadget - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive OTC Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Identifies Hand Gestures, May Lead to Hands Free Control of Surgical Systems
At the University of Bristol in the U.K., researchers have managed to use ultrasound to detect the hand gestures that a person is displaying. While there are many consumer applications of the technology, such as playing video games and controlling devices around the house, this new “physiologic”‘way may end up being used by surgeons to browse hands-free through radiological images during procedures. This can help to maintain sterility while avoiding having to have another clinician control the imaging device’s interface. The same approach may also lead to a time when in-clinic touchscreens, which cu...
Source: Medgadget - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiology Rehab Surgery Source Type: blogs

FDA Gives First Clearance to Siemens High-Field 7 Tesla MRI Scanner
Siemens Healthineers won FDA clearance to introduce its 7 Tesla MRI scanner, the MAGNETOM Terra. The device won European regulatory approval in August, kicking off an age of high-field MRI scanning that produces imaging details previously unavailable in a clinical setting. Previously, only scanners with a field strength of 3 Tesla were the most powerful MRIs cleared by the regulatory agencies for clinical use. Of note, 7 Tesla and more powerful scanners have been around in research institutions for years now. The MAGNETOM Terra can still be applicable in research, as it includes the ability to quickly switch it from commo...
Source: Medgadget - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Emergency Medicine ENT Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Genetically Programmed Bacteria Grow Into Electronic Devices
For folks that fear the consequences of genetic engineering and related fields, it’s time to dial it up to eleven. That’s because researchers at Duke University have now demonstrated that they’re able to genetically modify bacteria to coax them to produce electronic devices, potentially leading to a new and surprising way for to interface with our bodies. The investigators’ first device is a bacterial pressure sensor that, when squeezed, generates enough current for easy detection. Previously, similar research has relied on scientists to guide the growth of a bacteria using containers of different s...
Source: Medgadget - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

HeartyPatch, an Open-Source ECG for Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability Tracking
Team Protocentral, an open source hardware firm from Bangalore, India, is raising crowdfunds to release its HeartyPatch device. The HeartyPatch is a single lead ECG patch that can track the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) when stuck to the chest. Similar devices have been developed and commercialized previously, but the HeartyPatch provides open source access to the software running it, allowing anyone to implement it for unique use cases. The HeartyPatch features Bluetooth connectivity built into the small device, so data can be easily transferred onto tablets and computers for in-depth analysis. The entire de...
Source: Medgadget - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Medicine Net News Source Type: blogs

Ria Health Launches Mobile App to Help Reduce Drinking (Interview)
Last week we shared 12 new companies unveiling their innovative ideas at Health 2.0’s Launch! event this year. Back in the exhibit hall, a few more early stage businesses were also leveraging Health 2.0 to kickoff new programs and technologies. One of these was the official launch of Ria Health‘s mobile app solution to help people reduce their drinking through a combination of support from addiction specialists and daily progress tracking. The company began testing the product earlier this year and, having seen great initial outcomes, is now making the technology available to consumers seeking a new approa...
Source: Medgadget - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Net News Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Iridium-Coated Gold Nanoparticles Provide View of Blood Flow in Tiniest of Vessels
What happens to blood within the body’s narrow capillary vessels is not fully understood, but knowing more how blood cells and plasma propagate through all sorts of vessels may help us understand and treat a number of cardiovascular diseases. To help advance knowledge in this field, researchers at the University of Birmingham in the U.K. have developed gold nanoparticles that can be tracked as they travel along with blood through the tiniest arteries and veins. Previous attempts at using optical methods to track blood flow through capillaries have been limited because some of the components of blood, such as proteins...
Source: Medgadget - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Implantable, Biodegradable Optical Fiber to Stay in Body for Long Time Stretches
Light delivered via an optical fiber is used in medicine for tasks such as examination of tissues and destruction of tumors. Many other applications are on the way, including drug release and activation, optogenetics, and new diagnostic modalities. Some of these may require a source of light to be available for long periods of time. A major challenge with using a traditional fiber to reach a target deep inside the body for extended time periods is that it’s usually made of brittle, non-biodegradable glass. It therefore has to be removed eventually without leaving any parts behind. Now researchers at Pennsylvania Stat...
Source: Medgadget - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Source Type: blogs

Modus V High-Powered Robotic Neurosurgical Microscope Unveiled by Synaptive
Synaptive Medical, a Toronto, Canada firm, is releasing its Modus V digital robotic surgical microscope. The optical components of the microscope reside on a robotic arm, the technology in which is partially based on the Canadarm device on the International Space Station. The high powered microscope offers the greatest magnification of any comparable system, allowing neurosurgeons to see the smallest tissue details currently possible. Synaptive believes that the system will not only make work easier with neurosurgeons, but also allow for less invasive procedures in many cases, significantly benefiting patients. These benef...
Source: Medgadget - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

A Self-Propelled Catheter for Lung Biopsies
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a self-propelled catheter, which can move like an earthworm and could help doctors reach areas of the lung that can be tricky to access using conventional bronchoscopes. At the moment, if doctors want to take a closer look at the lesion in someone’s lungs, they typically use a bronchoscope. This is a thin flexible tube containing a camera, light, and other tools like forceps, that a doctor pushes down a patient’s airway and into the lungs. Bronchoscopes allow doctors to perform a variety of tasks, such as take a tissue sample from a suspected lung t...
Source: Medgadget - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: ENT Medicine Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

YoDerm Provides Consultations and Prescriptions Within 24 Hours
In many areas the wait time to see a dermatologist can span weeks or even months, leaving those with acute or chronic skin conditions frustrated. YoDerm is trying to change that. For a fee of $59, patients can submit skin problems and upload photos through an online platform, receive a consultation from a board-certified dermatologist, and have a prescription sent to their local pharmacy – in less than 24 hours. The idea for YoDerm stemmed from co-founder and CEO Ben Holber’s personal experiences. Growing up, he had chronic acne and was unhappy with the “pretty traditional experience” of scheduling ...
Source: Medgadget - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Dermatology Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Genetically Modified Skin Graft Works as Built-In Glucose Meter
Easy to use finger prick glucometers have helped diabetics to manage their disease and continuous glucose monitors that stay on the body for days at a time have made it even easier. Still, these will seem like technology from centuries past compared to the genetically engineered and grafted blood glucose sensor developed at the University of Chicago. To achieve this, the team used the CRISPR technique to modify skin stem cells so that they incorporate a special gene from E. coli bacteria. This gene produces glucose/galactose-binding protein (GGBP), and as the name implies, it attaches itself to sugar. In order to actu...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Surfaceskins Excrete Alcohol on Every Push to Prevent Spread of In-Hospital Infections
Hospital acquired infections continue to be a major source of patient morbidities. Hand washing guidelines, ubiquitously available alcohol sanitizers, and keeping patients away from each other has helped reduce the spread of nosocomial infections. Nevertheless, much more needs to be done to prevent hospitals themselves from being vectors that spread infections that walk through their doors. A spin-off of the University of Leeds in the U.K., called Surfaceskins, has developed a textile material that releases alcohol onto its surface any time someone touches it. The technology has been implemented in the form of pushpads tha...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Organoids of Human Kidneys Help to Study Renal Diseases
Polycystic kidney disease is a genetic condition in which the tubules of the kidneys grow to become deformed, leading to cysts to grow on the organ. Studying this disease has been a challenge because of the difficulty of modeling it in the laboratory. Now researchers led by a team at the University of Washington have been able to grow kidney organoids from human stem cells that form cysts much like those in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The investigators then used these organoids to study how different stimuli affect cyst formation and development. It’s been known that polycystin protein plays a key role in t...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Medicine Pathology Urology Source Type: blogs

Cellvizio Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy Now Cleared in EU for Robotic-Assisted Surgeries
Mauna Kea, a French firm, having recently made available its Cellvizio system in the U.S., now also won European CE Mark approval for the technology to be used during robotic-assisted surgeries. The Cellvizio Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) System allows urologists to analyze the cellular structure of tissues as part of retroscopic and cystoscopic procedures. No samples need to be taken, as the system’s probes feature a laser scanner and a detector that give a closeup look at the tissues in vivo. The reusable probes are introduced through an endoscope and the tip placed against the tissue to be analyzed. Rea...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Pathology Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

New Test Reveals Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in 30 Minutes
Researchers at Caltech have developed a new rapid test for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can give results within 30 minutes. Antibiotics are becoming less effective with the rise of multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria. At present, a doctor doesn’t know if their patient is infected with a drug-resistant strain without sending a sample to a lab, and it can take as long as three days to get the results back. This means that most antibiotic treatments are a shot in the dark. A new test, developed by Caltech researchers, could help change this. The research team aimed to develop a simple test that could be com...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Medicine Pathology Source Type: blogs

LivaNova ’s New SenTiva Neurostimulator for Epilepsy FDA Approved
LivaNova, a UK firm, won FDA approvals for its newest vagus nerve stimulation system for treating epilepsy in patients as young as four years old. The system, which includes the SenTiva implantable neurostimulator and the VNS Therapy Programming system, monitors brain activity and delivers therapy when it believes a seizure may be imminent. During therapy it continues its monitoring routine, increasing its stimulation if it detects its initial attempts failed to prevent a seizure. The SenTiva device is now the world’s smallest available responsive stimulator for epilepsy, which makes it compatible with pretty small ...
Source: Medgadget - October 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Remed ē Implantable System FDA Approved to Treat Moderate to Severe Central Sleep Apnea
The FDA has granted Respicardia, a company out of Minnetonka, Minnesota, approval to introduce its Remedē implantable sleep apnea treatment system. The Remedē treats sleep apnea by stimulating one of the phrenic nerves that regulates the activity of the diaphragm. People with central sleep apnea exhibit shallow breaths and/or pauses in breathing that can have a terrible effect on their sleep quality and, as it turns out, their overall cardiovascular health, and increase their chances for obesity and diabetes. The poor control of the diaphragm in such patients is caused by the brain sending improper si...
Source: Medgadget - October 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

Smart New Bandage Delivers Drugs on Wound Exactly When Required
Difficult to manage wounds do not heal oftentimes because topical medications can’t be administered in a controlled fashion and just when needed. To apply a drug onto a chronic wound, the dressing has to be removed, exposing the wound to potential infections and causing a good deal of discomfort to the patient. Now researches from University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School, and MIT have brought together their expertise in different fields to create a smart bandage that releases meds in a precise manner. The bandage is based on cotton threads that are wrapped by a conductive shell. These threads are also ...
Source: Medgadget - October 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Medicine Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Ascom Digistat Vitals: A New Offering to Record Patient Information at Bedside
Ascom, a Swiss firm, is releasing a new product designed to improve how clinicians record patient information into electronic medical records (EMR). The Digistat Vitals system relies on the dedicated Ascom Myco smartphone, or certain compatible Android phones, as the interface for data entry. A special app is used at the bedside to save vitals and other clinical data, which is automatically transferred to the in-clinic EMR without having to do any manual data management and avoiding transcription. To speed up visits with patients, the app provides automatic clinical calculators and scoring templates that make it easy...
Source: Medgadget - October 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Carrot Carbon Monoxide Breath Sensor System for Smoking Cessation Cleared for OTC by FDA
Carrot, a Redwood City, California firm, won FDA clearance for its Carbon Monoxide (CO) Breath Sensor System. It will be available as an over-the-counter product that’s designed to help smokers kick the habit as part of smoking cessation programs. The CO sensor features Bluetooth wireless connectivity, allowing it to interface with a smartphone app that records and displays the readings. The app is intended to be used by smokers themselves, providing them an important assessment of how their habit is affecting their health. The company hopes that its product will be a sort of mirror for smokers, that provides an uns...
Source: Medgadget - October 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine OTC Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Health 2.0 Fall Conference: 12 New Product Launches Announced
The Health 2.0 Fall Conference provides a number of opportunities for startups and entrepreneurs to share their novel innovations and ideas, including the Startup Pitch Competition, the Exhibit Hall, Market Connect sessions, 3.5 minute breakout session demos, and Launch! Launch! is Health 2.0’s annual closing event where early stage companies announce product releases for the first time, with the audience selecting a winner after a quick-fire session of demos. This year, the applicant pool was strong enough to invite twelve companies to the Health 2.0 stage. This year’s Launch! finalists were: 1upHealth is a pl...
Source: Medgadget - October 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Olympus Releases ORBEYE 4K-3D Surgical Microscope System
Olympus is releasing its latest surgical microscope, the 4K-3D ORBEYE video microscope. The device was developed by a joint venture called Sony Olympus Medical Solutions. The system comes with an accompanying 4K-3D 55-inch monitor, allowing surgeons to look directly at the screen rather than a microscope eyepiece and for the rest of the clinical staff to be aware of what’s going on. There’s not even the eyepiece option, as the only thing the adjustable arm keeps elevated is the lens and digital sensors. The microscope relies on two Sony 4K ExmorRTM CMOS sensors and an image processor that maintains proper ...
Source: Medgadget - October 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Neurosurgery Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Squeezing Cancer Cells Through Tiny Holes for Diagnostic Uses
The stiffness of a cell is often an indicator of whether it is healthy or cancerous, and the so-called mechanotype, a phenotype based on cell mechanics when squeezed, is indicative of other properties of cells. Being able to easily measure how a cell deforms when under pressure has great potential for diagnostic purposes. Now the researchers at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a device that can measure the stiffness and deformation of cells as they’re put under pressure. The device can be made to measure large numbers of cells, providing a range of pressure between 10 and 20,000 pascal...
Source: Medgadget - October 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics News Oncology Source Type: blogs

Tiny Nanopatch Shown Highly Effective Against Polio Virus
A new vaccine delivering “Nanopatch” has just been tested that may finally help put an end to polio. Developed by a scientist at Queensland University in Australia and commercialized by Vaxxas, a firm based in Sydney, the patch has microscopic needles projecting from its bottom that pass the vaccine directly to the antigen-presenting cells below the surface of the skin. This is a big advantage, as one doesn’t need to use a syringe and the vaccine is delivered more efficiently, requiring less of it. The latest study has shown that the Nanopatch activates a powerful immune response in rats to the three inac...
Source: Medgadget - October 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Pediatrics Public Health Source Type: blogs

Health 2.0 Fall Conference: SleepTech Summit Exhibit Hall Companies
A unique track at this year’s Health 2.0 Fall Conference is a SleepTech Summit focusing on innovations that enhance or improve a person’s ability to achieve a quicker, longer, and more refreshing sleep. As part of the main exhibit hall, six sleep-related companies were demoing their devices and technologies, and Medgadget had a chance to hold short interviews with each one. In addition to these six technology companies, Sleep-Geek was also in attendance. Sleep-Geek is a website and online community founded in 2010 with a mission to serve the mattress industry by connecting members with ideas that serve their pr...
Source: Medgadget - October 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Neurology OTC Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

New Microsurgery Robot Helps to Suture Tiny Vessels to Treat Lymphedema
At Maastricht UMC+, an academic hospital in The Netherlands, the first surgical procedure using a new microrobot has been successfully performed. The physicians used a system from Microsure, a Dutch firm that spun off from Eindhoven University of Technology and Maastricht UMC+, to suture sub-millimeter vessels in the arm of a patient suffering from lymphedema. The robotic device converts the movement of the surgeon’s hands into precise, but tiny actions of the robot, giving physicians an unprecedented level of dexterity that would be impossible with just bare hands. During the surgery, lymphatic vessels of ...
Source: Medgadget - October 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs