Hepatitis A in the United States
  Few Americans are aware of a major epidemic that has taken hold of large areas of their country in recent years – by a disease that is easily diagnosed and prevented. Sadly, public – and even professional interest in these events have been overshadowed by COVID-19.    AN UPTICK IN CASES Hepatitis A had been largely under control until three years ago and can be easily prevented through the use of a safe and effective vaccine.  From January 2017 to January 2019, at least 26 separate outbreaks were reported, to a total of 11,628 cases and 99 deaths, nationwide. Homeless individuals and ...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 21, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

From the desert to the lab: dr. berger
Today is the birthday of our co-founder Dr. Stephen A. Berger, and the perfect time to share his personal story and the history behind the creation of GIDEON. Steve has been the “beating heart” of the company’s medical knowledge and insight since its inception. GIDEON could not be what it is today and will be tomorrow, without him. Join us on Memory Lane as we celebrate Dr. Berger’s contribution to the medical community. A TALENTED YOUNG DOCTOR Steve was brought up in New York and was destined to become either a lawyer or a doctor. Thankfully for us, he fell in love with the latter field. Dr. Berger...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Events News Tech Source Type: blogs

Disease names – what do they mean?
In the midst of the continuing pandemic, World Dictionary Day seems like the perfect occasion to consider the meaning and origin behind some of the most well-known disease names. We’ve been speaking with Dr. Steve Berger, our co-founder, to learn more. CORONAVIRUSES Let’s start with the obvious one. COVID 19, which began as a localized outbreak of “Novel Coronavirus” infection,  is now a name almost every household in the world will know. COVID-19 comes from COrona VIrus Disease which first appeared in 2019, with the disease itself being caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. SARS was a prominent name...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

“Under the radar” – Ongoing Lassa Fever Outbreak
By Dr. Stephen A. Berger Nigeria is battling the largest recorded Lassa Fever outbreak to-date   Lassa Fever in Nigeria is a paradigm for Infectious Disease outbreaks that continue to threaten massive populations “under the radar” during the COVID-19 pandemic. As of October 3, 2020, a total of 1,112 fatal cases of COVID-19 had been reported in Nigeria. In terms of population size, the statistical likelihood of dying from this disease in Nigeria – or in Singapore – is exactly the same. But then…nobody in Singapore is dying these days from Lassa Fever.     WHAT IS LASS...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 13, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Monkeypox
By Dr. Stephen A. Berger   Cynomolgus monkey, a known reservoir of the Monkeypox virus   WHAT IS MONKEYPOX? Monkeypox, as the name implies, is a disease of monkeys (unlike chickenpox – which has no relation to chickens). Although the condition is reported in a group of eleven African countries, the virus was first discovered in a laboratory in Denmark in 1958, when it was first isolated from cynomolgus monkeys. The signs and symptoms are similar to those of smallpox. Following a three-day prodrome of fever, headache, myalgia, and back pain, patients develop a papular rash in the face, extremities, and genit...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Antigen vs antibody – what is the difference?
3D illustration of antigen in the human body   What is the difference between antigen vs antibody, and what role do they play in creating an effective vaccine? With the recent focus on the development of a COVID-19 vaccine there has been much talk of antigens and antibodies, often interchangeably, and little clarity on what they are – or the role they play in creating an effective vaccine. In this blog, we’ll cut through the jargon and discover the facts together. Antigen An antigen is any substance or organism that is unrecognized by our immune system. It could be anything from bacteria to chemicals, to v...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Examples News Therapy Source Type: blogs

Rabies – a dumb disease
Dog vaccination programs are the most effective way to prevent Rabies   Rabies is endemic to over 150 countries, and according to the World Health Organization, 99% of all transmissions to humans are from dogs, potentially bringing into question the animal’s status as the ‘man’s best friend’.  In Europe, southern Africa, and parts of North America, most cases are acquired from wild carnivores; mongooses, and vampire bats in Latin America and the Caribbean. In more recent years, humans have acquired rabies from inhalation of aerosols in bat caves, ingestion of dogs and cats for food, ticks...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 28, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Penicillin: the accident that saved many lives
Alexander Fleming in his laboratory, 1881 – 1955   There have been many happy accidents in science. Several of these were of great benefit to medicine. For example, in 1895, a German physicist working with a cathode ray tube happened to place his hand in front of the rays and found that he could see his bones in the image projected onto the screen. Soon after that, the first X-ray images were produced. There have been other instances where serendipity played a role in unearthing effective treatments against diseases.    THE FIND OF THE 20TH CENTURY The most famous of these happy accidents is the discov...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 28, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Brucellosis – how dangerous is it?
Brucellosis is most frequently transmitted via unpasteurized dairy products   Zoonotic diseases to be keeping the world on its toes. What is the disease responsible for the latest outbreak in China and what is its pathogenic potential? Not the next COVID-19 Brucellosis is a category B bioterror disease, as classed by CDC. While it is one of the most important zoonotic diseases worldwide, brucellosis has limited pandemic potential, since human-to-human transmission is sporadic and occurs via blood, sexual exposure, or breastfeeding.  63% of cross-border events since 1965 were directly linked to the consumption of ...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 19, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Leeuwenhoek: scientist who saw ‘animalcules’
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and a drawing of animalcules   Some discover their aptitude for science by natural curiosity, which causes them to investigate their surroundings. In doing so they find many hidden secrets that only curiosity like theirs could have revealed. However, an inquisitive nature alone doesn’t make one a scientist. Explorers, adventurers, reporters, and criminal investigators all lead lives based on it too. Something special happens when curiosity is coupled with an empirical mind. That combination begins to approach the scientific method. The only thing left is to provide a record of findings so...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Streptomyces – the smell of life
The Mall in Central Park, New York City in late autumn on a rainy day   Did you know that humans can detect the smell of wet soil 200,000 times better than sharks sense blood? [1] It appears our olfactory abilities are not that bad after all, at least when it comes to finding potential sources of food. Petrichor, the term to describe the scent was coined in 1964, by scientists I. Bear and R.G. Thomas, meaning “petros” – stone and “ichor” – the blood of the gods [2] in Greek. Divine or not, Streptomyces is a genus of over 800 bacterial species and subspecies responsible for the eart...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Mosquito: more than a bug
Anopheles mosquito, a vector of Malaria   In one half of the world, the mosquito is seen to most as a minor annoyance, but for others, mosquitoes are synonymous with disease, pain, and death. Today is the World Mosquito Day and the perfect reminder of the devastating impact of such diseases as Malaria, Zika, and various kinds of Encephalitis for which mosquitoes are a major vector. Malaria – a headline disease Malaria is the headline disease associated with mosquitoes and it was on this very day in 1897 that Sir Ronald Ross discovered that female mosquitoes can transmit malaria between h...
Source: GIDEON blog - August 20, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Case Series: Publishing Trends in High-Incidence Countries
Written by GIDEON co-founder, Dr. Steve Berger Medical publishing has been significantly influenced by this year’s events. An unfortunate side effect of the COVID-19 pandemic has been an explosion of professional publications dealing with every possible aspect of the disease. Innumerable studies dissect the clinical features, epidemiology, imaging characteristics, and risk factors of a series of patients treated in hospitals or clinics. The GIDEON database collates all case series dealing with COVID-19 that have been cited in PubMed. These numbers do not include drug trials and disease prevalence surveys. 1,316 relev...
Source: GIDEON blog - August 14, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Testing the new GIDEON – what did clinicians say?
It is GIDEON’s mission to provide robust support to clinicians, microbiologists, and educators that interface with the infectious diseases field. As such, consulting with our users when developing the product is paramount to ensuring GIDEON continues to meet their expectations. On 12th August GIDEON closed its last alpha testing round, dedicated to gathering feedback on the brand new ‘Diagnose’ module. Medical experts from 26 countries have explored the new interface and shared their thoughts on what works and what can be improved. WHAT IS ALPHA? Alpha is an early release of a major product...
Source: GIDEON blog - August 13, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Product Source Type: blogs

What is ME – Myalgic Encephalomyelitis?
  Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, is a little-understood, female-biased [1] illness. It is estimated that up to 90% of people with the condition go diagnosed [2] and about 25% of sufferers are severely ill [3]. In recognition of the profound physical and psychological impact this disease has on its victims, August 8th has been designated as a Severe ME Awareness Day. What is Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)? The disease is best known for a state of extreme and unremitting fatigue. A range of additional symptoms may suggest the presence of an infectious disease: myalgia, nausea, cogniti...
Source: GIDEON blog - August 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Identify News Source Type: blogs

Vaccines save lives
August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) and this year vaccines and immunology are probably on many more people’s minds than usual – for obvious reasons. While medical professionals and researchers work tirelessly on developing and testing a COVID-19 vaccine (amongst others), let’s briefly remind ourselves how far we have come in such a brief segment of human history. 224 years, 40 vaccines The first vaccine, developed in 1796 for smallpox, was not put into mass production until many years later – but was a monumental breakthrough in Medicine. It took almost another 100 years before th...
Source: GIDEON blog - August 6, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus effect on other diseases
  The effect of coronavirus on the economy and our daily lives has been huge. COVID-19 has rightly dominated government and organization policies, social life, and media headlines so far this year – but are other diseases getting the right attention? Neglected diseases The World Health Organization maintains a department dedicated to the research and treatment of Neglected Tropical Diseases. These conditions are considered “neglected” by mainstream Medicine by virtue of a relative lack of impact and presence in Western countries. In January 2020, GIDEON listed 360 generic infectious diseases in huma...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 23, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Source Type: blogs

National Picnic Month and how to enjoy it amid COVID-19
Did you know July is National Picnic Month? It was a pleasant surprise for us too!  Summer picnics are a fantastic way to spend time with the family, enjoying beautiful parks and weather – but as we all know this year is different. Unfortunately, COVID-19 is still very a much threat to much of the country, but don’t you worry, we’ve put together our top 5 helpful tips for staying safe while still making the most of your local recreational spaces. So before you pack that hamper, take a few minutes to learn how you can stay safe and be prepared. 1. Keep it outside This might seem an odd piece of advice...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Tips Source Type: blogs

How to safely visit loved ones during COVID-19
Since COVID-19 arrived, there has been a constant stream of concern and curiosity about how to safely visit loved ones during the pandemic. Can I give them a hug? Should we enjoy a meal together? Are my elderly grandparents off-limits?  GIDEON Founder, Dr. Stephen Berger, shares with Livestrong what to consider before planning an in-person visit with family and friends.  First, it is important to acknowledge that keeping yourself safe is just as important as keeping those whom you are visiting safe.    Secondly, realize that not everyone has obvious symptoms who may be carrying the virus....
Source: GIDEON blog - July 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Tips Source Type: blogs

Insurance risk solution powered by gideon data
Read the full case study here   INCREASING EPIDEMIC FREQUENCY There’s mounting evidence that the rates of infectious disease outbreaks have been increasing in frequency over the past few years. Perhaps even in the past two decades. From the period of the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918 to the HIV/AIDS epidemic around 1981, there were only six pandemics on record. Approximately one per decade. However, since the SARS outbreak of 2002, there has been an increased frequency of outbreaks. The records show that SARS was quickly followed by several recurring and new outbreaks. AVIAN flu, MARBURG virus, SWINE flu, MERS, a...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 9, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Case studies News Reviews Source Type: blogs

Independence Day: 5 tips to stay healthy and safe
Independence Day is a time for celebration, family reunions, good food, good drink and momentarily escaping the everyday. The 4th of July has been one of the biggest national holidays since 1776 and draws millions across the country to gatherings for fairs, fireworks, and fun. The significant difference this year is the lingering threat of the coronavirus. How can you and your family still enjoy the day and limit the risk of bringing home more than just fond memories? Here are our top 5 tips for staying safe this Independence Day: 1. Don’t get locked up While we highly recommend keeping your enjoyment legal, in this ...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 3, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Tips Source Type: blogs

Diagnosis tool of choice for 27 years
GIDEON is ideally suited to assist infectious diseases specialists   Read the full case study here Medical Doctors have a serious enough job to do when caring for people’s health. But when their patients have recently been to other countries this may increase the complexity even more. They must get information on the current state of infectious diseases in the country where the patient has been. With over 200 countries worldwide, doctors would have to be walking databases of infectious diseases. SITUATIONS MEDICAL DOCTORS HAVE TO DEAL WITH For example, now the flight restrictions due to COVID are being eased, it...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Case studies News Reviews Source Type: blogs

Diagnosis tool of choice for 30 years
GIDEON is ideally suited to assist infectious diseases specialists   Read the full case study here Medical Doctors have a serious enough job to do when caring for people’s health. But when their patients have recently been to other countries this may increase the complexity even more. They must get information on the current state of infectious diseases in the country where the patient has been. With over 200 countries worldwide, doctors would have to be walking databases of infectious diseases. SITUATIONS MEDICAL DOCTORS HAVE TO DEAL WITH For example, now the flight restrictions due to COVID are being eased, it...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Case studies News Reviews Source Type: blogs

Md prefers gideon to the library
GIDEON is ideally suited to assist infectious diseases specialists   Read the full case study here Medical Doctors have a serious enough job to do when caring for people’s health. But when their patients have recently been to other countries this may increase the complexity even more. They must get information on the current state of infectious diseases in the country where the patient has been. With over 200 countries worldwide, doctors would have to be walking databases of infectious diseases. SITUATIONS MEDICAL DOCTORS HAVE TO DEAL WITH For example, now the flight restrictions due to COVID are being eased, it...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Case studies News Reviews Source Type: blogs

Predicting the future with GIDEON data
“Study the past if you would define the future.” – Confucius If you want to study the past then GIDEON is a great place to do so. The question is, what would you do with over 750,000 data points, dating back to the 17th Century? A team of researchers answered in a recent interview. Tad Dallas, Assistant Professor at Louisiana State University Colin J. Carlson, Assistant Research Professor at Georgetown University Timothée Poisot, Assistant Professor at Université de Montréal Idea “The three of us have talked a lot about why predictions and ecology work or don’t ...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 18, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Case studies News Reviews Source Type: blogs

Catching COVID-19 In A Crowd (Even If You ’re Outside)
Recent waves of crowd protests throughout the country in the wake of George Floyd’s death have set off alarming new concerns about the spread of COVID-19.  Even though it is thought to be safer outside where the virus may be less contagious, those who are not practicing social distancing and congregating in close crowds could be putting themselves and others at risk.  GIDEON Founder, Dr. Stephen Berger, recently explained in both Healthline and YahooFinance how easily COVID-19 could be transmitted in a crowd.  “The center of a large crowd is no different than a sealed off...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

Dr. Berger On Face Shields: Are They Functional or Just Fashionable?
Plastic face shields, or now “COVID visors,” are one piece of PPE still questionable as to how effective and necessary they are at protecting against the virus.  Unlike fabric face masks which are recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) in many situations and settings, there are no official guidelines or suggestions for wearing face shields.  This begs the question: are face shields merely just in fashion at the moment – with many style influencers on social media sporting them — or are they actually functional?  GIDEON Founder, Dr. Stephen B...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

Dining Out Amid COVID-19: Dr. Berger speaks with Healthline
Missing dining out in your favorite restaurant? As businesses have begun to reopen, many are wondering if it is safe to eat out again. GIDEON Founder and infectious disease and microbiology specialist, Dr. Stephen Berger, recently answered questions about safe dining amid COVID-19 for Healthline.  One of the most important things to take into consideration, Dr. Berger says, is whether a restaurant is set up for safe social distancing and keeping the designated six-foot separation between tables.  Also, he says, “before sitting down and asking for a menu, check to confirm that the restaurant staff is we...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 4, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

Do gloves protect you from COVID-19?
There have been many recommendations set forth over the past few months by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) on wearing face masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Gloves have also been suggested as a way of preventing the spread, there are no official recommendations on wearing them. Because the virus is transmitted via respiratory droplets and not through the skin, the jury is still out on whether or not gloves are beneficial at all.  Our co-founder and infectious disease expert, Dr. Stephen Berger, recently commented on the efficacy of gloves for an article in InStyle m...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

First alpha testing is complete!
It takes a lot of courage to share a vision with users and critics, but the GIDEON team is in no short supply of that. In our recent alpha testing round, we opened up our brand new interface to medical experts from 25 countries who have very kindly shared their feedback on our successes and shortcomings. What is alpha? Quite simply, it is an early release of a major product upgrade. Our first alpha testing round focused on the display of our extensive database in a brand new ‘Explore’ module. How did we do it? We opted for feedback gathering mechanisms that support user independence and...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 29, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Product Reviews Tech Source Type: blogs

Estimating the True Case-Fatality Rate of COVID-19
For several months, we have been inundated by reports summarizing incidence and mortality data for COVID-19, on both the national and global level. In a previous ProMED post I cautioned that “reported cases” cannot be equated with “total cases” without inclusion of individuals with asymptomatic of sub-clinical infection that do not seek medical care. [1] If a large segment of the population is found to be seropositive, we might conclude that the true case-fatality ratio of COVID-19 is lower than official data might suggest. A seroprevalence study reported this week seems to provide solid evidence th...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks ProMED Source Type: blogs

Can Cell Phones Carry COVID-19?
It’s long been known that cell phones can carry a multitude of germs, bacteria, and different forms of fungi. With the arrival of the COVID-19 virus, it begs the question if it too can live on the surface of a phone and subsequently be transmitted to another person.  A compilation of studies from across 24 countries over the past 13 years indicates that it is a very likely possibility.  Although COVID-19 was not included in any of these original studies, the rapid rate at which it has spread throughout the world, and the increased and ever-growing physical attachment that people have to their cell phones, l...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 14, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

Why Some Countries Have Fared Better in Fighting COVID-19
There are more than 1.2 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States right now with nearly 80,000 related deaths on record. This number is greater than a quarter of the total deaths suffered worldwide.  What has America gotten wrong in its response to the deadly virus, and what have other countries done right?   New Zealand, South Africa, and Vietnam—even sharing a border with China where the virus originated —all have experienced relatively few cases and minimal deaths from COVID-19.  Our co-founder and infectious disease expert, Dr. Stephen Berger shared his thoughts ...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 12, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

Antibody vs antigen testing
Our co-founder and infectious disease expert, Dr. Stephen Berger, recently explained the differences between diagnostic, antibody, and antigen testing for the virus in Business Insider.  Diagnostic test: conducted via a nasal or throat swab; best suited for someone with severe symptoms; results may take several days or even weeks to become available.  Antibody test: taken via a blood sample; confirms if you had a previous infection of the virus, but may not detect if it is still in your system as it generally takes 14 days following symptoms for antibodies to appear; does not determine if you will...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 11, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Tips Source Type: blogs

Is it Safe to Go Back to the Gym? Dr. Berger talks to Shape.com
Many states are relaxing their stay-at-home guidelines, which includes opening up fitness facilities to the public again.  Most must operate under a limited capacity, enhanced cleaning and sanitation practices, and use signs and floor markers to ensure social distancing. But the big question is whether it’s safe to go back? Experts warn social distancing may not be so easy at a gym. “A gym is just another venue in which disease can be passed from person to person, and the risk of contracting COVID-19 might increase there, where group sports and games require close personal contact,” our co-founder an...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 6, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Outbreaks Press Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and Fame
Ask anybody on the planet, “What do Tom Hanks, Boris Johnson, and Prince Charles have in common?” and they will instantly shout – “Corona.” Ask these same people, “Who were the three Prime Ministers that died of Coronavirus last month?” Few will respond, “Well…there was Nur Hassan Husein from Somalia, Mahmoud Jabril from Libya and Joachim Yhombi-Opango from Congo – who died (respectively) in London, Cairo, and Paris.” As of May 4, no fewer than eleven movie stars had contracted COVID-19, nine with fatal results. Other victims include retired Commanders of ...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 4, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Cases Events VIPatients Source Type: blogs

PEOPLE shares Dr. Berger ’s advice about how to correctly and safely wear a face mask
Wearing face masks is now a part of our everyday life. In early April, the CDC made the official recommendation that everyone should wear one to help slow the spread of COVID-19 after near research showed that 50% of people who get it don’t show symptoms. So they will likely be around for quite some time, but unfortunately, many people aren’t wearing them correctly and could be exposing themselves unnecessarily.  Our founder, Dr. Stephen Berger, who is double board-certified in infectious disease and microbiology, provided important tips to People. “Masks should be as closely fitted to the skin as po...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 2, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Press Tips Source Type: blogs

LA Times: Dr. Berger Answers Questions About Food and COVID-19
LA Times Cooking Editor, Genevieve Ko, turned to GIDEON founder, Dr. Stephen Berger, to get an expert opinion about COVID-19 and food transmission. Dr. Berger provided answers to some common questions people are asking such as: Can COVID-19 be transmitted through food? If so, how? Dr. Berger: There have been no cases of COVID-19 associated with the ingestion of food, but the question is well-founded. COVID-19 is, after all, caused by a virus that enters the body through the nose or mouth. Food items are, after all, objects which may be contaminated with the virus and placed in the mouth — but like many other viruse...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Press Tips Source Type: blogs

HealthDay talks to Dr. Berger about ‘best practices’ for disinfecting
If you are one of those people who think you need to scrub down everything after an outing, here’s some good news…you can save some of that disinfectant. GIDEON’s co-founder Dr. Stephen Berger provided practical advice about what items should be disinfected in your home. [Spoiler alert: It’s not your keys, money, or credit cards!]  Here’s what Dr. Berger had to say to HealthDay:  “We are all swimming through an invisible swamp of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Those bookshelves and those pictures on the wall are teeming with ugly microbes. Not to mention your ce...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 24, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Press Source Type: blogs

What ’ s The Difference Between a Face Mask and a Condom?
Cloth surgical masks were first used in the late 19th century and were replaced by modern masks during the 1960s. Surgeons do not wear masks to protect themselves from the patient, but to protect the patient from their own oral and nasal bacteria.  In any case, masks do protect the users themselves. A variety of masks are currently marketed in a wide range of design, material, filtering specifications, and prices. Both cloth and paper masks will offer protection against COVID-19…. but not one-hundred-percent protection. For this reason, we must observe additional precautions such as social distancing, hand...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology Outbreaks Tips Source Type: blogs

GIDEON ’ s Dr. Stephen Berger offers up important coronavirus safety tips in Parade.com article
Besides consistent hand washing, self-quarantining, and social distancing, people want to know the best ways to remain healthy and reduce their risk of getting COVID-19.  Parade.com wrote about ‘14 Ways to Stay Safe During the Coronavirus Pandemic’, which included everything from maintaining good support systems to consistent exercise to covering your face and how that can and can’t protect you. GIDEON co-founder Dr. Stephen Berger discussed important information to remember when it comes to wearing face masks. Here’s what was covered in the article: Realize that covering up your face is not an...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 21, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Outbreaks Press Source Type: blogs

… But There Are No Cases in Turkmenistan
written by Dr. Stephen A. Berger If you search the Internet for countries which have reported COVID-19, an endless variety of sources will describe the status of this disease in 207 countries and their dependencies. Few if any of these sites mention countries where this disease does not exist! As of April 19, GIDEON lists twenty-four countries (10.4% of the global total) that had not yet encountered a single case. Ironically, at this point, these countries enjoy a form of “medical isolation” – thanks to the disease itself! The chance that a traveler – let alone an infected trave...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 19, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Neglected Diseases – Neglected Once Again
written by Dr. Stephen A. Berger For several years, the World Health Organization has been following a group of twenty-or-so Neglected Tropical Diseases. In the Developed World, these conditions are largely unknown to the general public, and even to physicians working in fields outside of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases. In only three months, the list of neglected diseases has grown to include more than 360 infectious conditions – all because of a single new viral disease called COVID-19. As of this morning, 287 cases of COVID-19 had been reported in the DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo) resulting in 23 d...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Diagnosis Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Dr. Stephen Berger on why COVID-19 is different for men than women in Healthline article
GIDEON founder, Dr. Stephen Berger was recently interviewed about gender disparities and COVID-19. Experts have been watching the data in Europe and have found that 68% of the COVID-19 deaths have been among men. And in New York City, men have been dying at twice the rate of women, according to the city’s health department. Dr. Berger says genetics, preexisting conditions, and bad habits may be to blame. “Some of the underlying reasons why COVID-19 may be more deadly for men than women may include the fact that heart disease is more common in elderly men than in elderly women,” Dr. Berger told Healthline....
Source: GIDEON blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Press Source Type: blogs

Dr. Stephen Berger on why COVID-19 is different for men than women
GIDEON founder, Dr. Stephen Berger was recently interviewed about gender disparities and COVID-19. Experts have been watching the data in Europe and have found that 68% of the COVID-19 deaths have been among men. And in New York City, men have been dying at twice the rate of women, according to the city’s health department. Dr. Berger says genetics, preexisting conditions, and bad habits may be to blame. “Some of the underlying reasons why COVID-19 may be more deadly for men than women may include the fact that heart disease is more common in elderly men than in elderly women,” Dr. Berger told Healthline....
Source: GIDEON blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Press Source Type: blogs

Dr. Stephen Berger discusses why COVID-19 is different for men than women in Healthline article
GIDEON founder, Dr. Stephen Berger was recently interviewed about gender disparities and COVID-19. Experts have been watching the data in Europe and have found that 68% of the COVID-19 deaths have been among men. And in New York City, men have been dying at twice the rate of women, according to the city’s health department. Dr. Berger says genetics, preexisting conditions, and bad habits may be to blame. “Some of the underlying reasons why COVID-19 may be more deadly for men than women may include the fact that heart disease is more common in elderly men than in elderly women,” Dr. Berger told Healthline....
Source: GIDEON blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Press Source Type: blogs

Drugs for COVID-19: A Publishing Epidemic
As of April 9, PubMed listed 2,868 scientific publications which incorporate the word “COVID”.   323 of these (11.3%) were related to drugs under study for treatment of the disease. No fewer than thirty-one such drugs had been proposed since this pandemic first appeared on the planet four months earlier.    Graph 1 depicts the cumulative numbers of COVID-19 infection (per 100,000 global population) and introductions of relevant drugs into the Literature during February 14 to April 3. Note that both increased by a factor of approximately 16-fold during this perio...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 12, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Uri Blackman Tags: Epidemiology Graphs Source Type: blogs

Don ’ t panic. Prepare
Dr.Tracey McNamara on West Nile Fever and COVID-19   As interviewed by Edward Borton, GIDEON What was the experience of discovering a new virus outbreak on your doorstep? When New York City announced that people were dying of unusual encephalitis, I was struck by the timing and proximity between this event and an outbreak of crow deaths. Upon ruling out all known viruses that cause inflammation of the brain in birds, in the United States: exotic Newcastle, avian influenza, and Eastern Equine encephalitis (EEE), I knew this was something new. It wasn’t until I picked up the phone and called the U.S. Army and sai...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology Events Outbreaks Tips Source Type: blogs

Is COVID-19 the new plague?
written by Dr. Stephen A. Berger A frightening pandemic arises from animals in Asia and spreads westward, killing thousands in Italy, France, Spain, and many other countries. The more severe infections are characterized by cough and fever, leading to progressive pneumonia. There is no specific treatment available, and entire cultures live in fear and uncertainty.   And so, during 541-542 C.E. Yersinia pestis the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, spread out from China into the Byzantine Empire. Few were spared, and an estimated 25 to 100 million Europeans went on to die during repeated waves of infec...
Source: GIDEON blog - March 27, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Events Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Ebola, forgotten but not gone
The recent WHO decision to declare the novel coronavirus outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), while both appropriate and hardly surprising, offers the opportunity to reflect on the previous PHEIC which was declared, namely the Ebola epidemic in Kivu region, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). And you should really say the ongoing Ebola epidemic, as during the time since the declaration in July 2019 through to the present day (March 2020), a total of 3,453 cases have been reported [1]. The nCoV-2019 outbreak is still ballooning; as of today, over 400,000 confirmed cases worldwide with no ...
Source: GIDEON blog - March 25, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs