A Tissue Transparency Technique Lets Us Examine Organs Like Never Before
German researchers have created 3D technology to view every micrometer of an entire human organ. The unprecedented imaging technique called SHANEL allows for scientists to label tissues on a deep level and clear large organs such as the brain and kidney. Using deep learning, SHANEL analyzes cellular and molecular architecture that takes mere hours. It requires removing pigment and fats from organs and a large specialized microscope to take photos. In a recent issue of  Cell,the method ’s developers explain that the technology is still fairly conceptual and needs further research for it to fully come to life...
Source: radRounds - April 20, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Can Artificial Intelligence effectively and ethically detect COVID-19?
Is Artificial Intelligence (AI) a viable solution to the COVID-19 testing crisis? This has been a major question buzzing in the minds of healthcare leaders as they scramble to come up with solutions to the short-supply of the conventional tests. Some researchers believe that it ’s possible to develop a specialized method to detect specific markers of the virus via AI. However, COVID-19-detecting algorithms are based on data from only dozens or hundreds of patients, whereas a fully effective and functional algorithm requires thousands of patient scans. Recently written algorithms were developed using scans o...
Source: radRounds - April 20, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Will Radiologists Continue to Work From Home in a Post-COVID-19 Society?
COVID-19 has strong-armed many sectors into converting their entire workforce into a telecommuting operation. Many healthcare facilities have followed suit by allowing radiologists to work from home, and the overwhelming sentiment is that permanent home-based imaging work could be the silver lining of this pandemic. Since the outbreak, more and more healthcare facilities have been implementing teleradiology services. Texas-based Collaborative Imaging typically had six radiologists working at each site in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, but CEO Dhruv Chopra recently decided to reallocate over 100 radiologists to their home...
Source: radRounds - April 20, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Launch of New Image Exchange Platform for COVID-19 Cases
radRounds Radiology Network and Idonia are partnering to provide a professional Image Exchange Platform to facilitate collaboration, exchange and research on COVID-19 cases.Users can upload, store, organize, review, and share DICOM Images.Idonia is a secure (HIPAA compliant) online platform for medical image exchange and delivery. The platform can serve as a repository for relevant clinical cases, which radiologists can access and visualize thanks to the DICOM viewer of the platform. This allows radiologists to create their own network to collaborate and share relevant cases with other radiologists.Idonia and radRounds hav...
Source: radRounds - March 31, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Susan Sullivan Source Type: blogs

What We Can Learn About Coronavirus from Images of SARS and MERS?
A  paperrecently published in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenologyhas found that scans of patients with COVID-19 share many similarities with imaging studies of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the  pandemichas so far (as of the date of this article) resulted in over 191,000 cases and more than 7,800 deaths. Although most of those infected only have cold-like symptoms, about 16 percent are serious cases where patients suffer from pneumonia and breathing difficulties. Coronavirusesare responsible for bo...
Source: radRounds - March 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

The ACR Encourages Limiting CT and CXR for COVID-19 Patients
The American College of Radiology (ACR) is urging radiologists to steer clear of CT scans and chest radiographs (CXR) as their first line of diagnostic defense of COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment, according to a recently issued statement. With the unpredictability of available testing kits and early reports of test sensitivity from China, health care providers are turning to imaging devices to detect infection symptoms. However, the ACR encourages healthcare providers to stick to viral testing, and explains why CT and CXR should be used at a minimum. Here are some takeaways from the official recommendation:The results from...
Source: radRounds - March 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Is Tomosynthesis Better than Mammography at Detecting Breast Cancer?
New research shows digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to be a more effective breast cancer diagnosis tool than digital mammography (DM), according to a study recently published inRadiology. DBT is a relatively new screening practice and was only approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2017. It uses an x-ray tube that glides in an arc-shape and uses low levels of radiation to image the breast from various angles. Up until now, research only showed us how effective the screening is in the first round of testing before detection rates are expected to escalate. Those early studies showed that DBT had higher detect...
Source: radRounds - March 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Enabling The Future of Imaging and Healthcare Interoperability - “Ditch the disk” - Interview with Miguel Cabrer
Miguel Cabrer is a Digital Health Entrepreneur with a special interest on transforming healthcare through real patient engagement, with some initiatives for image exchange and patient portability, and AI& Chatbots to facilitate patient interaction in clinical processes.  Miguel has been CIO of several public hospitals and health regions in Spain, global companies (BestDoctors) and founder of several initiatives (Medting).  He was member of the HIMSS EMEA Governing Council (2006-2013).Since September 2018, Miguel has been the CIO of TopDoctors leading the IT and Innovation strategy for the International expans...
Source: radRounds - March 9, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

Why We Need to Improve Interpretation Services During Imaging Exams
Imaging exam results are getting lost in translation when ordered for patients who need an interpreter, according to a new study published inAbdominal Imaging. Researchers from New York University found that non-English speaking patients who undergo MRI have lower quality images than those who speak English as a second language. Lead authorradiologist Myles Taffel, MD, and his colleagues explored these communication discrepancies by analyzing a set of abdominal MRI images from 126 patients who were divided into three groups: English speakers, English as a second language speakers, and people who need a translator duri...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Radiologists: Meet AJ Gunn, MD
AJ Gunn, M.D. graduated magna cum laude from Brigham Young University in Provo, UT, earning a BS in exercise physiology with a minor in sociology. He then returned home to South Dakota to attend medical school at the University of South Dakota. During medical school, he participated in the competitive Howard Hughes Medical Institute – National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program and was awarded the Donald L. Alcott, M.D. Award for Clinical Promise. He graduated summa cum laude in 2009. He completed his diagnostic radiology residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital of Harvard Medical School in Boston,...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Rads: Dr. Supriya Gupta MD
Dr. Supriya Gupta MD is a Radiologist at AMITA Health St. Mary ’s Hospital - Kankakee, IL Tell us about your area of clinical expertise within your practice/organization: I am responsible for pretty much all radiology studies except vascular IR, with a focus on neuroradiology and breast imaging, two image-intensive subspecialties. Along with that I look at the IT and dose sub-committee at the local site, advising solutions which benefit us and integrate the best technology with the highest benefit to cost ratio. I am also responsible for supervising quality metrics in the radiology department, with emphasis on m...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

U.S. Government Accuses Yale of Discriminating Against Older Radiologists
Yale New Haven Hospital is under fire from federal prosecutors for allegations that the prestigious medical center ’sLate Career Practitioner Policy discriminates and humiliates older physicians. This month, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed a lawsuit against the hospital accusing them of forcing radiologists to submit to neuropsychological and eye exams in order to keep their staff privileges. Physicians under 70 were not obligated to undergo these evaluations. The EEOC claimed that Yale ’s policy was enacted regardless of suspicions that doctors were experiencing neurological ...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using a Plant Virus to Create a Contrast Medium
Researchers at the University of Texas Dallas (UTD) are playing with alchemy by transforming a virus into an organic radical contrast agent (ORCA), an alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents to be used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. ORCA molecules had been previously considered too dim for scanning and were easily eradicated by vitamin C in the body. UTD researchers found that by connecting the molecules to a  tobacco mosaic virus, a virus that attacks plant cells and disrupts cell activity, they were able to eliminate those issues and make the ORCA an effective agent. Once the ORCA ...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Rad Feature: Meet AJ Gunn, MD
AJ Gunn, M.D. graduated magna cum laude from Brigham Young University in Provo, UT, earning a BS in exercise physiology with a minor in sociology. He then returned home to South Dakota to attend medical school at the University of South Dakota. During medical school, he participated in the competitive Howard Hughes Medical Institute – National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program and was awarded the Donald L. Alcott, M.D. Award for Clinical Promise. He graduated summa cum laude in 2009. He completed his diagnostic radiology residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital of Harvard Medical School in Boston,...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Rad Feature: Dr. Supriya Gupta MD
Dr. Supriya Gupta MD is a Radiologist specializing in neuroradiology at AMITA Health St. Mary ’s Hospital - Kankakee, IL Tell us about your area of clinical expertise within your practice/organization: Dr. Gupta:   I am responsible for pretty much all radiology studies except vascular IR, with a focus on neuroradiology and breast imaging, two image-intensive subspecialties. Along with that I look at the IT and dose sub-committee at the local site, advising solutions which benefit us and integrate the best technology with the highest benefit to cost ratio. I am also responsible for supervising quality m...
Source: radRounds - February 4, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

MRI Technique Predicts Future Alcohol Abuse in Teenagers
The objective of the technique is to establish a possible neural marker that could identify which teenagers would abuse alcohol when they entered adulthood and devise interventions that might delay alcohol use. The researchers used BOLD MRI on 29 participants who drank minimal alcohol between the ages of 12 and 14, and over the course of the study, 15 had evolved into binge drinkers. The BOLD inhibitory control test was used to determine blood flow changes that happened in tandem with neuron activation. In the group ’s initial imaging round at age 18, participants were asked to press a button when they saw ...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using AI and MRI to Detect ADHD
Researchers from theCincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center are utilizingmultichannel deep neural network model (mcDNN) in conjunction with MRI to predict attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to a  studyrecently published inRadiology: Artificial Intelligence. In the United States, a total of 6.1 million children have been diagnosed with ADHD. Many children with ADHD also struggle with at least one other mental, emotional, or behavioral condition, and 30 percent of youth suffer from anxiety. To lessen the symptoms, many children undergo a combination of behavioral therapy and med...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

North Carolina Imaging Center Sued for Substandard Mammograms
A group of former patients of Raleigh Radiology filed a  lawsuitthis month against the imaging center for producing substandard mammograms and not meeting American College of Radiology (ACR) standards. Lawyers of plaintiff Emily Cram, a Wake County resident, filed the December 31 suit on her behalf. Cram had undergone three mammograms at Raleigh Radiology ’s Blue Ridge location between November 7, 2017 and November 6, 2019, a period of time of which the ACR stated in a review that the clinic didn’t meet their imaging standards. After the ACR review, the center was mandated to inform all patients that mammo...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Shows Us the Neural Underworking of Depression
Two teams of researchers are using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the neural patterns associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). Both groups presented their findings at the most recent Radiological Society of North America annual meeting in Chicago. Centers for Disease Control estimates that  16 millionAmerican adults suffer from depression every year. Depression is commonly linked with anxiety, and many patients turn to therapy or medication to diminish symptoms. In an attempt to better understand how depression operates in the brain, researchers from Columbia University ’s departme...
Source: radRounds - December 23, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Is Mammography + MRI the Key for Early Detection of Breast Cancer?
Dense breast tissue not only increases a woman ’s risk of developing cancer, it also makes it more difficult for physicians to identify possible tumors. However, emerging research from University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands has found that implementing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in addition to mammography can be a more effective cancer diagnosis method in patients with dense breast tissue than mammography alone. Over the course of two years, the group of researchers led by Carla van Gils evaluated 40,000 women with immense dense breast tissue with mammography and 4,783 were designate...
Source: radRounds - December 23, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Anesthesia before MRI Results in Death of Teen
A 14-year girl in England has died due to complications of being anesthetized prior to her imaging scan.Alice Sloman ’s heart was twice the size of normal hearts, a condition that put her in danger when administered anesthesia. Before her scan, she was described as “extremely anxious” and “hypersensitive,” prompting physicians to give her a dose of general anesthesia. According to her parents, they repea tedly insisted to her doctors that she suffered from a series of symptoms including breathlessness.However, the anesthesia was a miscalculated decision, and three days later Sloman died. Coron...
Source: radRounds - December 23, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Shows How Excessive Screen Time Impacts White Matter in Young Children
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cross-sectional  studyusing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has found that young children who spend more than an hour a day in front of a screen have more disorganized and underdeveloped white matter than children with lower screen time quotas. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends an hour of daily screen time, and warns that children who spend more than two hours in front of a screen are at risk for a variety of developmental delays, such as impaired cognition, language delay, poor sleep, and decreased parent-child engagement. To understand the repercussio...
Source: radRounds - November 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Is Your Identity at Risk When You Undergo a Facial MRI?
Facial recognition software could jeopardize patient confidentiality standards when used to analyze MRI images, according to a new study conducted by the Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic researchers used  MRIscans from 84 volunteers who had undergone head scans. The volunteers were photographed from five different angles, and the researchers also generated an image of each face from the MRIs, making sure to include the outline from the skin, fat, and the skull ’s bone marrow but avoiding the bone or hair. The researchers then used Microsoft Azure facial-recognition software to see if it could identify the face...
Source: radRounds - November 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Portable MRI Could Change the Way We Approach Emergency Imaging
Jonathan Rothberg, an entrepreneur with a knack for developing creative solutions for imaging needs, is adding a portable MRI scanner about the size of a photo booth to his growinglistof accessible imaging inventions. The scanner was spun out of Rothberg ’s latest startup, Hyperfine. According to STAT News, the MRI is priced around $50,000, it ’s 20 times cheaper to build than traditional MRI, 10 times lighter, and consumes 35 percent less energy than a 1.5 Tesla MRI. It was designed for emergency situations, and can be easily wheeled around and patients don’t need to remove any metal accessorie...
Source: radRounds - November 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Are Out-of-Pocket Expenses Deterring Women from Breast Cancer Screenings?
Patients who are diagnosed with a 2 percent chance of developing breast cancer are less likely to return for the recommended 6-month scan if they have high out-of-pocket expenses, says a new  studypublished in theJournal of the American College of Radiology. Researchers from Johns Hopkins ’s Department of Radiology studied records of more than 190 women who were given the BI-RADS category 3 assessment between February 1, 2011 and June 30, 2017. They found that 57 percent went to their scheduled follow-up MRI within 10 months, 18 percent received the examination slightly after 10 mo nths, and 24 percent (or ...
Source: radRounds - October 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

What Happens When the State Won ’t Let You Purchase a Scanner
A general surgeon in North Carolina wants to buy a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine to make procedures more affordable, but the state won ’t allow him. Now he’s suing. According to the  lawsuit, Forsyth Imaging owner Gajendra Singh, MD, was concerned about the fact that many patients were struggling to afford imaging services. He wanted to offer imaging services at affordable prices, and help his patients easily determine their out-of-pocket expenses. He had built a transparent pricing model, and posted procedure rates on Forsyth ’s website. He claims that his prices are lower than o...
Source: radRounds - October 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Radiologists Identify the Relationship Between Lung Injury Patterns and Vaping
Once considered a safer alternative to cigarettes, radiologists are now drawing connections between vaping and lung injury patterns, according to a  studypublished this month in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenology. This isn ’t the first time that radiologists are voicing concerns about the adverse effects of e-cigarettes. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studypublished in August showed that a single session of vaping causes reduced blood flow and damaged vascular reactivity in the femoral artery. The researchers also found that the vaping solution consists of potentially harmful chemicals that when ...
Source: radRounds - October 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Helps Us Distinguish Benign from Malignant Meningioma
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a successful technology for understanding the severity ofmeningioma, according to a  studyrecently published inClinical Radiology. Determining if meningioma is high grade or low grade can help physicians decide how the tumor should be managed. Researchers from the American University Beirut Medical Center ventured to find out if MRI could help identify the meningioma grade before it ’s removed from the patient, making surgery easier and safer. The researchers analyzed scans of 71 patients who had undergone surgeries to remove intracranial meningiomas at America...
Source: radRounds - September 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Anti-Radiation Poison Pill Also Effective at Eliminating GBCAs from the Body
The chelator pill, a medication that was developed to rid the body of radioactive elements, has a 96 percent efficacy rate at preventinggadolinium from depositing in bodies of patients who have just undergone MRI, according to researchers from theU.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) are used in around a third of all MRI procedures. They ’ve been a controversial topic in recent years, and traces of the agent can remain in the brain for years after screenings. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has requiredhealthcare providers to issue ...
Source: radRounds - September 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

How Can We Improve Referring Physician-Patient Discussions About Breast Cancer Screenings?
Many radiologists are concerned that mammography information provided by referring physicians is confusing for patients, and they want to be more involved in screening-related discussions, according to a  studyrecently published in theJournal of Breast Imaging. The group of researchers led by Shadi Aminololama-Shakeri, MD,Chief of Breast Imaging Section at theUniversity of California Davis in Sacramento, California found thatthere is a wide variety of breast cancer screening guidelines across professional societies, and the lack of uniformity makes understanding the purpose of mammography confusing and frustratin...
Source: radRounds - September 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Different Methods To Alleviate Joint Pain
Our body is flexible due the joints. These joints connect two bones, provide support and help in the body parts movement. Joint pain is a feeling of discomfort, aches and soreness in any of our body ’s joint. There have been lots of cases of people having aches in their joints. These joint pains are due to injuries affecting the ligaments, bursae, or tendons surrounding the joint. Pain in the joints is also due to infection and inflammation and in an extremely rare case because of cancer. It becomes extremely painful when you try to move your body parts suffering this pain.There are different conditions which are res...
Source: radRounds - September 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Benny Smith Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Trends That Will Redefine the Industry Future
The Healthcare industry has become one of the largest sectors in the world both in terms of employment and revenue. This industry has its own wings comprises of hospitals, doctors, nursing homes, laboratories, pharmacies, medical device manufacturers and patients. This market is one of the fastest growing industries in the world and it is expected to grow 5.4 percent between 2019-2022, from USD $7.724 trillion to USD $10.059 trillion. Healthcare industry has witnessed the high-speed innovative changes.Now this is the time for the Healthcare Industry to gear up with the latest technological changes and fasten the heartbeat ...
Source: radRounds - September 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Jones Brianna Source Type: blogs

Small-scale and Portable MRI Defeats Common Scanner Challenges
Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are developing a portable, helmet-shaped magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device that could eliminate the challenges typically associated with large machines imaging bedridden patients. There are structural and financial burdens that come with using a large, stationary scanner. MIT ’s low-field small-scale MRI could make it easier for physicians to image certain populations and still produce accurate and effective outcomes. The group of researchers led by Harvard University radiology professor Lawrence Wald, PhD, started investigating ways to ...
Source: radRounds - August 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Can Help Predict MS Severity
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) can be prevented by undergoing routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests, according to researchers from the Institute of Neurology in London. MS progression is difficult to predict as the disease manifests itself differently in every patient. In their study recently published in  Brain, the researchers ventured out to define the predictors of long-term disability outcomes by using clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), a first episode of neurological symptoms that can evolve into MS, as a baseline. They used MRI exams after a CIS diagnosis to anticipate the future of a patient ’s h...
Source: radRounds - August 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Smart Insulation Cuts down Copper Use in MRI By Half
Hospitals and imaging centers face spatial challenges with large and heavy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines; however, researchers from the Superconductivity Research Center at the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) are working to reduce the cumbersome size and weight of MRI equipment with smart insulation.   MRI is so heavy because the machine ’s superconducting electromagnets need to be wrapped in massive quantities of copper in order to prevent the superconducting wire from heating up and burning. The amount of copper is what makes the equipment so bulky and heavy, and it’s a...
Source: radRounds - August 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Bayer GBCA for Coronary Artery Disease
This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the green light approval to Bayer AG ’s gadobutrol (Gadavist), a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) used in cardiac MRI procedures for patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It’s the first and only approved agent for this type of procedure. “We now have an approved contrast agent for use in cardiac MRI to assess perfusion and late gadolinium enhancement in less than 1 hour, ” saidScott Flamm, MD who co-authored a statement on using the GBCA in myocardial perfusion studies. Gadavist is also used to evaluate t...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New MRI Technology Images One Atom at a Time
Researchers at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA, are using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to image individual atoms, revealing never-before-seen extraordinary detail, according to a study recently published inNature. MRI scans photograph billions upon billions of protons in order to accurately capture what ’s going on in the body. IBM nanoscience researcher Christopher Lutz, PhD, wanted to replicate that technology to see if they could image singular atoms. Dr. Lutz and his team decided to use a  cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope, a tool made with a metallic tip and ap...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

100-Hour MRI Delivers Unprecedented Detail
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital used a 7 Tesla MRI Scanner to capture the most precise and detailed 3-D photo of the brain ever taken, according to  recently published reports. The brain used belonged to a 58-year old woman who died of pneumonia and had no known neurological condition. Her brain was stored for nearly three years before researchers decided to scan it for 100 hours, producing unprecedented images that could zero-in on material that was .1 millimeters wide. The brain was held in a custom-made spheroid case made of urethane, which permitted interfering air bubbles to escape. The ca...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Magnetic Metamaterial Can Increase MRI Tesla Strength
Researchers from Boston University are using magnetic metamaterial to enhance lower strength magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, according to a  study published inCommunication Physics.With higher field scanners, MRI has a stronger signal-to-noise ratio, and images can be captured with better resolution and at faster speeds. Most facilities use machines with 1.5 or 3 Tesla, but the need for stronger imagers is growing. That ’s why professors Zin Zhang, PhD, and Stephan Anderson, PhD, decided to develop their magnetic metamaterial to enhance the imaging power of low field MRI.Their magnetic metamaterial is...
Source: radRounds - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using MRI for Prostate Cancer Detection Increases Diagnosis Rate
Using magnetic resonance imaging in tandem with the traditional ultrasound method can significantly improve prostate cancer detection, according to a  study recently published inJAMA Surgery.Prostate cancer has been traditionally diagnosed with only ultrasound. Physicians use the technique for tissue biopsy. However, this method alone can ’t detect certain tumors. Historically, MRI-based biopsy practices are practical because they can detect precise lesions on the prostate. Yet, not all tumors appear on MRI, making it difficult to identify all kinds of cancer. Researchers from the University of California Los An...
Source: radRounds - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Could Be Better than Mammography at Detecting Breast Cancer
Magnetic Resonance Imaging detects breast cancer at earlier stages than mammography, according to a  studyrecently published inOncology.Around 15 percent of women with breast cancer were diagnosed despite having no causative hereditary gene mutation but had a family history of breast cancer. To better understand diagnosis rates, researchers from Erasmus University in the Netherlands implemented a randomized controlled trial (FaMRIsc) throughout 12 hospitals in the Netherlands to compare the efficacy of MRI screening against mammography in women with a family history of breast cancer.The study took place between Januar...
Source: radRounds - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

What Does the Helium Shortage Mean for MRI?
Not only is Party City shutting down 45 stores in part because of the worldwide helium deficit, but medical imaging centers are also vulnerable to the short supply.The chemical element is a byproduct of natural gas production and the second-most common element in the universe. At one point the United States was the world ’s top helium producer, but got wrapped up in financial troubles and resorted to selling off its reserves in the late 1990s. Yet as of recently, Qatar, the world’s main producer of helium and claims 75 percentof global supply, was forced to stop exporting the gas after a handful of Middle ...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Radiology Residents Fail to Recognize Signs of Child Abuse
Radiology programs are struggling to teach residents how to accurately identify signs of child abuse in medical images, according to a  studypresented at the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) 2019 Annual Meeting earlier this month.For the study, residents analyzed one case out of 65 nonaccidental trauma cases that were processed between 2014 and 2018 on the Emergent/Critical Care Imaging SIMulation online test platform. Researchers found that there was a high instance of residents neglecting to identify child abuse in the scans. The average correctly diagnosed rates varied between 7 and 79 percent a year, and the a...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Where Are All the Late Career Radiologists?
The population of radiologists in the United States falls by more than 50 percent after around 30 years post-residency, according to a  studyrecently published inAcademic Radiology.Researchers from the New York University Langone Medical Center ’s Department of Radiology led byAndrew B. Rosenkrantz, MD, MPA, found that radiologists in a variety of specialties who were still working three or four decades past their residency were just as productive as their earlier career counterparts. A 2017 national workforce survey echoes this drastic contrast and found that 28 percent of practicing radiologists were older tha...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Checklist Effectively Determines if a Child Needs Anesthesia Before MRI
Researchers at the KK Women ’s and Children’s Hospital in Singapore have introduced a checklist to determine if a child needs general anesthesia (GA) before undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The question set can be administered by non-medical staff and only takes a few minutes.In their  studyrecently published inClinical Radiology,medical students and research assistants used the checklist questions with over 700 patients whose ages ranged from 3 to 20, and were scheduled for an MRI between September 2016 and June 2017. The average age of the patients was 11.7 years old.The checklist features fi...
Source: radRounds - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using MRI and Machine Learning to Predict Cognitive Abilities in Infants
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can now be used in conjunction with machine learning to predict cognitive development in infants,  according to a  studyrecently published inNeuroImage.White matter is intrinsic to developing brain activity, and the white matter connectome at birth can be used as a neuroimaging biomarker to calculate cognitive development. The group of researchers led by Jessica B. Girault, PhD, from the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill are searching for imaging biomarkers like white matter to determine risks for neuropsychiatric con...
Source: radRounds - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Why We Need End-to-End Encryption on PACS
Malware is being used to manipulate CT and MRI scans to create detrimental misdiagnoses, according to researchers from theBen-Gurion University Cyber Security Research Center inBeersheba,Israel. In lieu of the data breaches and cyber attacks that plagued hospitals in 2018, the researchers set out to learn how attackers use deep learning to implant fake cancerous nodules or remove real ones in medical scans without expert radiologists having the slightest idea. In a blind study, radiologists read a batch of real CT scans, 70 percent of which had been doctored by malware. For all of the scans with fake cancerous nodules, the...
Source: radRounds - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New ACR Document Questions the Ethical Use of AI in Radiology
The American College of Radiology and several other radiology organizations have released a consensus  documentanalyzing the ethical implications of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The 38-page report examines the practice of AI in radiology, and how the technology could possibly influence and change the specialty. “Most changes will be positive,” the authors write, “but some may be for the worst.”The document promotes a discussion on how to effectively use AI while implementing standards, policies, and rules of conduct for ensuring that the technology is administered ethically ...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New MRI-Based Calcium Sensor Helps Us Better Understand Neuron Activity
Researchers have created a way to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure calcium activity in order to analyze signal processing in neuron behavior in living animals, according to a study recently published inNature Communications.Calcium analysis can demonstrate critical neuron activity. However, current technology is limited, and can only enter the first few millimeters of the brain ’s surface. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed an MRI-based intracellular calcium sensor that can penetrate cell membranes. The technique identifies magnetic interactions with a manganese-bas...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

When Should You Hold Your Breath During an Abdominal MRI?
Holding one ’s breath at the end of the exhale instead of at the end of the inhale during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the liver can reduce respiratory motion artifacts, according to a studyrecently published in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenology.For the study, researchers from Stanford University collected both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images of end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-holding techniques from 47 participants undergoing axial T1-weighted liver MRI. Three radiologists evaluated the quality of the images based on a rubric of one point for motion artifact-obscured to five po...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs