Different Methods To Alleviate Joint Pain
Our body is flexible due the joints. These joints connect two bones, provide support and help in the body parts movement. Joint pain is a feeling of discomfort, aches and soreness in any of our body ’s joint. There have been lots of cases of people having aches in their joints. These joint pains are due to injuries affecting the ligaments, bursae, or tendons surrounding the joint. Pain in the joints is also due to infection and inflammation and in an extremely rare case because of cancer. It becomes extremely painful when you try to move your body parts suffering this pain.There are different conditions which are res...
Source: radRounds - September 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Benny Smith Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Trends That Will Redefine the Industry Future
The Healthcare industry has become one of the largest sectors in the world both in terms of employment and revenue. This industry has its own wings comprises of hospitals, doctors, nursing homes, laboratories, pharmacies, medical device manufacturers and patients. This market is one of the fastest growing industries in the world and it is expected to grow 5.4 percent between 2019-2022, from USD $7.724 trillion to USD $10.059 trillion. Healthcare industry has witnessed the high-speed innovative changes.Now this is the time for the Healthcare Industry to gear up with the latest technological changes and fasten the heartbeat ...
Source: radRounds - September 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Jones Brianna Source Type: blogs

Small-scale and Portable MRI Defeats Common Scanner Challenges
Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are developing a portable, helmet-shaped magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device that could eliminate the challenges typically associated with large machines imaging bedridden patients. There are structural and financial burdens that come with using a large, stationary scanner. MIT ’s low-field small-scale MRI could make it easier for physicians to image certain populations and still produce accurate and effective outcomes. The group of researchers led by Harvard University radiology professor Lawrence Wald, PhD, started investigating ways to ...
Source: radRounds - August 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Can Help Predict MS Severity
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) can be prevented by undergoing routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests, according to researchers from the Institute of Neurology in London. MS progression is difficult to predict as the disease manifests itself differently in every patient. In their study recently published in  Brain, the researchers ventured out to define the predictors of long-term disability outcomes by using clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), a first episode of neurological symptoms that can evolve into MS, as a baseline. They used MRI exams after a CIS diagnosis to anticipate the future of a patient ’s h...
Source: radRounds - August 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Smart Insulation Cuts down Copper Use in MRI By Half
Hospitals and imaging centers face spatial challenges with large and heavy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines; however, researchers from the Superconductivity Research Center at the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) are working to reduce the cumbersome size and weight of MRI equipment with smart insulation.   MRI is so heavy because the machine ’s superconducting electromagnets need to be wrapped in massive quantities of copper in order to prevent the superconducting wire from heating up and burning. The amount of copper is what makes the equipment so bulky and heavy, and it’s a...
Source: radRounds - August 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Bayer GBCA for Coronary Artery Disease
This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the green light approval to Bayer AG ’s gadobutrol (Gadavist), a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) used in cardiac MRI procedures for patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It’s the first and only approved agent for this type of procedure. “We now have an approved contrast agent for use in cardiac MRI to assess perfusion and late gadolinium enhancement in less than 1 hour, ” saidScott Flamm, MD who co-authored a statement on using the GBCA in myocardial perfusion studies. Gadavist is also used to evaluate t...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New MRI Technology Images One Atom at a Time
Researchers at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA, are using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to image individual atoms, revealing never-before-seen extraordinary detail, according to a study recently published inNature. MRI scans photograph billions upon billions of protons in order to accurately capture what ’s going on in the body. IBM nanoscience researcher Christopher Lutz, PhD, wanted to replicate that technology to see if they could image singular atoms. Dr. Lutz and his team decided to use a  cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope, a tool made with a metallic tip and ap...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

100-Hour MRI Delivers Unprecedented Detail
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital used a 7 Tesla MRI Scanner to capture the most precise and detailed 3-D photo of the brain ever taken, according to  recently published reports. The brain used belonged to a 58-year old woman who died of pneumonia and had no known neurological condition. Her brain was stored for nearly three years before researchers decided to scan it for 100 hours, producing unprecedented images that could zero-in on material that was .1 millimeters wide. The brain was held in a custom-made spheroid case made of urethane, which permitted interfering air bubbles to escape. The ca...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Magnetic Metamaterial Can Increase MRI Tesla Strength
Researchers from Boston University are using magnetic metamaterial to enhance lower strength magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, according to a  study published inCommunication Physics.With higher field scanners, MRI has a stronger signal-to-noise ratio, and images can be captured with better resolution and at faster speeds. Most facilities use machines with 1.5 or 3 Tesla, but the need for stronger imagers is growing. That ’s why professors Zin Zhang, PhD, and Stephan Anderson, PhD, decided to develop their magnetic metamaterial to enhance the imaging power of low field MRI.Their magnetic metamaterial is...
Source: radRounds - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using MRI for Prostate Cancer Detection Increases Diagnosis Rate
Using magnetic resonance imaging in tandem with the traditional ultrasound method can significantly improve prostate cancer detection, according to a  study recently published inJAMA Surgery.Prostate cancer has been traditionally diagnosed with only ultrasound. Physicians use the technique for tissue biopsy. However, this method alone can ’t detect certain tumors. Historically, MRI-based biopsy practices are practical because they can detect precise lesions on the prostate. Yet, not all tumors appear on MRI, making it difficult to identify all kinds of cancer. Researchers from the University of California Los An...
Source: radRounds - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Could Be Better than Mammography at Detecting Breast Cancer
Magnetic Resonance Imaging detects breast cancer at earlier stages than mammography, according to a  studyrecently published inOncology.Around 15 percent of women with breast cancer were diagnosed despite having no causative hereditary gene mutation but had a family history of breast cancer. To better understand diagnosis rates, researchers from Erasmus University in the Netherlands implemented a randomized controlled trial (FaMRIsc) throughout 12 hospitals in the Netherlands to compare the efficacy of MRI screening against mammography in women with a family history of breast cancer.The study took place between Januar...
Source: radRounds - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

What Does the Helium Shortage Mean for MRI?
Not only is Party City shutting down 45 stores in part because of the worldwide helium deficit, but medical imaging centers are also vulnerable to the short supply.The chemical element is a byproduct of natural gas production and the second-most common element in the universe. At one point the United States was the world ’s top helium producer, but got wrapped up in financial troubles and resorted to selling off its reserves in the late 1990s. Yet as of recently, Qatar, the world’s main producer of helium and claims 75 percentof global supply, was forced to stop exporting the gas after a handful of Middle ...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Radiology Residents Fail to Recognize Signs of Child Abuse
Radiology programs are struggling to teach residents how to accurately identify signs of child abuse in medical images, according to a  studypresented at the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) 2019 Annual Meeting earlier this month.For the study, residents analyzed one case out of 65 nonaccidental trauma cases that were processed between 2014 and 2018 on the Emergent/Critical Care Imaging SIMulation online test platform. Researchers found that there was a high instance of residents neglecting to identify child abuse in the scans. The average correctly diagnosed rates varied between 7 and 79 percent a year, and the a...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Where Are All the Late Career Radiologists?
The population of radiologists in the United States falls by more than 50 percent after around 30 years post-residency, according to a  studyrecently published inAcademic Radiology.Researchers from the New York University Langone Medical Center ’s Department of Radiology led byAndrew B. Rosenkrantz, MD, MPA, found that radiologists in a variety of specialties who were still working three or four decades past their residency were just as productive as their earlier career counterparts. A 2017 national workforce survey echoes this drastic contrast and found that 28 percent of practicing radiologists were older tha...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Checklist Effectively Determines if a Child Needs Anesthesia Before MRI
Researchers at the KK Women ’s and Children’s Hospital in Singapore have introduced a checklist to determine if a child needs general anesthesia (GA) before undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The question set can be administered by non-medical staff and only takes a few minutes.In their  studyrecently published inClinical Radiology,medical students and research assistants used the checklist questions with over 700 patients whose ages ranged from 3 to 20, and were scheduled for an MRI between September 2016 and June 2017. The average age of the patients was 11.7 years old.The checklist features fi...
Source: radRounds - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using MRI and Machine Learning to Predict Cognitive Abilities in Infants
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can now be used in conjunction with machine learning to predict cognitive development in infants,  according to a  studyrecently published inNeuroImage.White matter is intrinsic to developing brain activity, and the white matter connectome at birth can be used as a neuroimaging biomarker to calculate cognitive development. The group of researchers led by Jessica B. Girault, PhD, from the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill are searching for imaging biomarkers like white matter to determine risks for neuropsychiatric con...
Source: radRounds - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Why We Need End-to-End Encryption on PACS
Malware is being used to manipulate CT and MRI scans to create detrimental misdiagnoses, according to researchers from theBen-Gurion University Cyber Security Research Center inBeersheba,Israel. In lieu of the data breaches and cyber attacks that plagued hospitals in 2018, the researchers set out to learn how attackers use deep learning to implant fake cancerous nodules or remove real ones in medical scans without expert radiologists having the slightest idea. In a blind study, radiologists read a batch of real CT scans, 70 percent of which had been doctored by malware. For all of the scans with fake cancerous nodules, the...
Source: radRounds - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New ACR Document Questions the Ethical Use of AI in Radiology
The American College of Radiology and several other radiology organizations have released a consensus  documentanalyzing the ethical implications of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The 38-page report examines the practice of AI in radiology, and how the technology could possibly influence and change the specialty. “Most changes will be positive,” the authors write, “but some may be for the worst.”The document promotes a discussion on how to effectively use AI while implementing standards, policies, and rules of conduct for ensuring that the technology is administered ethically ...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New MRI-Based Calcium Sensor Helps Us Better Understand Neuron Activity
Researchers have created a way to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure calcium activity in order to analyze signal processing in neuron behavior in living animals, according to a study recently published inNature Communications.Calcium analysis can demonstrate critical neuron activity. However, current technology is limited, and can only enter the first few millimeters of the brain ’s surface. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed an MRI-based intracellular calcium sensor that can penetrate cell membranes. The technique identifies magnetic interactions with a manganese-bas...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

When Should You Hold Your Breath During an Abdominal MRI?
Holding one ’s breath at the end of the exhale instead of at the end of the inhale during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the liver can reduce respiratory motion artifacts, according to a studyrecently published in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenology.For the study, researchers from Stanford University collected both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images of end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-holding techniques from 47 participants undergoing axial T1-weighted liver MRI. Three radiologists evaluated the quality of the images based on a rubric of one point for motion artifact-obscured to five po...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Different Beneficial Aspects of Healthcare Technology
Healthcare and technology work mutually in this ever-changing business world. As a fact, Fitbit like healthcare devices, motion trackers and wellness& health mobile application allows us to guide which food should have, how can exercise, and other overall well-being activities.Details of our well-being have never been so easily available. With some taps, you can monitor your heartbeat rate, keep check of your footsteps count, track your taken caloric, and loT more. The most changing aspect is that you don ’t need to make appointments to go to the hospital. Healthcare mobile app development companies can...
Source: radRounds - February 26, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Ritesh Patil Source Type: blogs

How to become a radiologic technologist
Becoming a RT: from Choosing the Right School to Jump Starting Your CareerCheck out this book if you are thinking about becoming a rad tech or if you are rad tech, consider gifting this to a friend who is thinking about it!Description of the book:Have you ever thought about taking x-rays for a living but didn ’t know how to find information about how to proceed? If so, look no further. This book will explain how to select a fully accredited school of radiography while avoiding diploma mills that will not lead to full qualification. Get the facts about the current job market from an experienced radiogra pher and instr...
Source: radRounds - February 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: radRounds Radiology Network Source Type: blogs

Big Radiology Acquisition in Southern California Might Result in Massive Layoffs
RadNet Inc., a large medical imaging practice with over 340 locations in six states, has recently acquired  Kern Radiology Medical Group Inc., a radiology center with five facilities throughout theSouthern San Joaquin Valley in California. The transaction was made on January 30, according to the Bakersfield ’s The Record.Called one of the biggest outpatient medical imaging companies in the United States, Los Angeles-based RadNet Inc provides an array of imaging services. A publicly traded company, they employ 500 radiologists and have centers in New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Florida, and Califor...
Source: radRounds - February 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Funding for AI-Based Medical Imaging Systems Doubled in 2018
Companies that develop AI-driven medical imaging systems collectively received nearly $580 million in funding in 2018, according to a recent  reportfrom healthcare research firm Signify Research.AI has become a popular focus in medical imaging innovation, with over 120 start-ups adamantly working to create advancements in the field. Since 2014, investors have contributed more than $1.2 billion to these companies, and funding levels are double what was reported in 2017.According to the  report, the number of early-stage (i.e. Angel Seed and Series A) investments has dropped since 2015-2016 after the “peak of...
Source: radRounds - February 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Radiologists Are Developing a System to Detect Signs of Domestic Violence
Radiologists can identify key signs of  domestic violence in imaging examsand their findings could serve as preventative or life-saving tactics for victims of interpartner violence, according to  studyrecently published inRadiology.Study authors Bharti Khurana, MD and Elizabeth George, MD, two radiologists at the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women ’s Hospital, looked at medical records from 185 patients who were referred to the hospital’s intimate partner violence program between January 2015 to October 2016. Patient data was compared to a control group of 555 patients who had received care ...
Source: radRounds - February 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Most Radiologists Want More Direct Communication with Patients
Over half of radiologists want more patient interactions, according to a  studyrecently published in theJournal of the American College of Radiology.An international group of researchers, which mostly included physicians from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston sought out to understand radiologists ’ perspective on direct patient care. They sent out a voluntary and anonymous survey to 128 radiologists and radiology residents at a large, unnamed academic institution. Participants had between June 1 and July 31, 2016 to fill out the multiple-choice questionnaire. The results were then collecte d and ana...
Source: radRounds - February 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Kansas State University Welcomes New MRI for Large Animals
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine at Kansas State University, which took three years to install, is finally ready to scan neurological injuries in large animals.According to  KSNT, this is the Midwest ’s first MRI of its kind. Its fast imaging speed reduces the amount of time animals have to spend in the machine. According to David Biller, professor of radiology at Kansas State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, the MRI offers several advantages that conventional scanners lack. “We will be a ble to image smaller structures more rapidly,” he said. “With the greater detail or ab...
Source: radRounds - February 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New $2,000 Ultrasound Can Increase Imaging Access Around the Globe
The Butterfly iQ, a small, handheld ultrasound scanner that connects to your smartphone, is now being used by physicians to conduct obstetric, lung, and cardiac imaging procedures.There are several aspects that set the Butterfly iQ apart from traditional scanners. Instead of using piezo crystals, the material commonly used to create ultrasonic waves, the device incorporates a single silicon chip that generates ultrasound waves that flow through the body. This technology significantly reduces the price and can be purchased for  $2,000.The silicon chip was invented by  Jonathan Rothberg, PhD, who has founded multip...
Source: radRounds - February 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

RSNA and ACR Introduce RadInfo 4 Kids
In an effort to help kids understand the  daunting mechanismsof imaging machines, RadiologyInfo.org, a patient resource site sponsored and created by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) has launched RadInfo 4 Kids, an interactive site that helps children learn about medical scans.RadInfo 4 Kids has a  collectionof games, videos, stories, and activities that help kids get emotionally and mentally prepared for their scan procedure. It can be challenging for children to grasp what happens in the scanner, so to get on their level, the site directors have also p...
Source: radRounds - February 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New AI Technology Prioritizes Critical Chest Scans
A new artificial intelligence-based system out of the University of Warwick identifies time-sensitive chest scans that need to be prioritized, according to a study recently published inRadiology.Due to theradiologist shortagein the United Kingdom, hospitals are struggling with timely image readings. In emergency departments, scans can take from one hour to two business days to be processed. Chest scans account for a significant portion of a radiologist ’s workload, and according to EureakAlert, they make up 40 percentof all “diagnostic imaging worldwide.”A new AI technology aims to diminish exam back...
Source: radRounds - February 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI is a Non-Invasive Way to Detect Hypoxia in Breast Cancer Patients
Hypoxia and neovascularization in breast cancer can now be identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, according to a  studyrecently published inMolecular Imaging and Biology.Researchers from the Medical University of Vienna were intrigued by a couple of recently developed imaging methods that successfully analyzed hypoxia in patients with brain cancer and wanted to see if the same technology could be used to detect the condition in breast cancer patients. Advanced quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) imaging can evaluate tissue oxygen and measure tumor hypoxia. Vascular architectur...
Source: radRounds - February 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Radiology Services Lawsuit Settled for $10 million
Bozeman Health Deaconess Hospital has been ordered to pay $10 million in a  settlementinvolving two of the facility ’s former radiologists. Bozeman continues to deny the allegations.The  2015 lawsuitclaiming that the hospital participated in an illegal kickback scheme and raked in millions of dollars in fake claims was settled on October 31. The United States government received $7.5 million and $238,820 is set aside for the state of Montana. Twenty-eight percent is reserved for the filers of the lawsuit, radiologists Frank Rembert and Michael Paradise, and the hospital is also ordered to pay Dr. Rembert an...
Source: radRounds - January 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Unsettling Statistics About Radiologist Burnout and Depression
Burnout and depression have become dire epidemics in the medical community, and it ’s unclear if there’s a way to improve physician mental health. Among the specialists grappling with immense stress are radiologists, with 45 percent reporting feelings of burnout, according to a new report from Medscape.The  2019 National Physician Burnout, Depression& Suicide Reportsurveyed over 15,000 physicians across more than 29 specialties. The researchers found that the vast majority of depressed physicians, or over 66 percent, feel that their mental health impacts their workplace behavior. Fourteen percent of th...
Source: radRounds - January 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Could Gas-Based Contrast Agents Replace GBCAs?
Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (FMP) in Berlin and the California Institute of Technology are creatinghyperpolarized xenon gas-based contrast agents that will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a  studypublished inACS Nano.The gas-based contrast agents, or “gas vesicles”, aim to solve the problems presented by traditional gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). GBCAs lack sensitivity and often demand high quantities, which can pose health risks. They ’re generated by specific bacteria, and behave similarly to a fish&rsqu...
Source: radRounds - January 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Reading Room Coordinator Programs Makes Life Way Easier for Radiologists
Radiologists at the University of Iowa Hospitals& Clinics are saving around two and a half hours of their work day with their new reading room coordinator program, a position that eliminates rudimentary administrational tasks for radiologists.The reading room coordinator isn ’t a new concept, and other institutions have found that they’re useful in managingthe vast majority of radiology requests. The coordinator handles a variety of critical tasks including triaging calls from physicians, nurses, staff, and technologists and communicating exam results and other patient issues. They also lessen some of ...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

What Could Happen When You Don ’t Carefully Read a Radiology Report
A  lawsuitinvolving a 49-year-old male with colon cancer has demonstrated the need for physicians to thoroughly read radiology reports and for radiologists to effectively relay image interpretations.The patient had undergone a CT scan for pre-procedure workup for his extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove kidney stones. The scan showed a possible indication of colon cancer, and the radiologist had made note of those findings on the second page of the report that was sent to the urologist that same day. However, the urologist neglected to read the second page, and 19 months later, the patient was diagnosed wit...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Why You Might Need a Dose of Sugar in Your MRI
Sugar could become an effective replacement for metal in contrast agents in magnetic resonance tomography analyses, according to researchers from John Hopkins University and Lund University in Sweden.There has been heated debate over the safety of certain contrast agents, and the Food and Drug Administration has  warnedthat gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) can linger in the brain for months or years after the patient ’s procedure. Using alternatives like sugar could potentially diminish the risk of adverse side effects associated with GBCAs. Studies using animals demonstrated that D-glucose could be a po...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Radiology Partners Enters Nevada
Radiology Partners continues toexpandtheir brand across the country with their latest acquisition of Las Vegas-based, Desert Radiology, their first purchase in the state; marking the 18thstate for the country ’s largest physician-owned radiology practice.“Desert Radiology is an outstanding practice with a strong local market position, exceptional leadership, and a national reputation,” saidRich Whitney, chairman and CEO of Radiology Partners. “We are excited that they are joining our team.”  Desert Radiology has been called the “premier radiology practice of Nevada,”...
Source: radRounds - January 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

15-Minute MRI Coming Out of the University of Arizona
Researchers at the University of Arizona ’s College of Engineering are reducing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan time to 15 minutes by using multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), a technology that eliminates many of the time-consuming elements of MRI.The group of researchers led by Nan-kaei Chen, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering, were awarded a $2.1 million grant from theNational Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to create faster MRI scans that will be beneficial to patients who struggle to lay still in the machine for 40 minutes to an hour. The five- year project specifically t...
Source: radRounds - January 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Are We Ready for MRI That Can Detect the Human Soul?
What initially reeked of fake news has now been proven real: theShenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology has invested $126 million to build a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to identify the human soul.According to news sources, the scanner will produce a resolution that ’s 1,000 times more powerful than conventional MRI and will be able to image objects that are 1 millimeter wide. The researchers’ ambitions know no limits, and as one unnamed scientist said,“We may for the first time capture a full picture of human consciousness or even the essence of life itself. Then we can define them an...
Source: radRounds - January 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Siemens Releases New MAGNETOM Altea Scanner
Siemenshas added the MAGNETOM Altea, a versatile and automated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to its line of sophisticated imaging machines.Recently introduced at the latest Radiological Society of North America annual conference in Chicago, the 1.5 Tesla scanner features a wide 70-cm bore that can support larger patients. It includes Siemen ’s artificial intelligence-powered BioMatrix technology and Select&Go Interface, which can streamline and improve workflow activity. The Select&Go eliminates the need to initiate anatomical landmarking, making it easier and quicker to position the patient.To gen...
Source: radRounds - January 5, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Are 3D Imaging Systems Taking Over Radiology?
Three-dimensional imaging systems are increasingly becoming the standard in radiology departments, according to a recent  surveyfrom HIMSS Analytics, an international health information technology advisor.According to the report, more than 40 percent of hospitals in the United States — or approximately half of the country’s hospitals — have implemented 3D imaging display solution. Hospitals with 3D systems tend to be at least medium-sized, as HIMSS found that 60 percent of hospitals with 3D technology have more than 100 staffed beds. They also mentioned that hospitals who haven’t installed 3D s...
Source: radRounds - January 5, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Study Underlines the Importance of Annual Mammography
Women who undergo annual breast cancer screenings have a decreased risk of mortality and a better treatment experience upon diagnosis, according to a group of researchers lead by L ászló Tabár, MD.In their study recently published in  Cancer,Dr. Tab ár and his investigators looked at data collected by the Swedish Cancer Registry of 52,000 women who had either received mammography or had never been screened for breast cancer between 1977 and 2015, and contrasted that information with studies between 1958 and 1976, which is considered the pre-sc reening era.They evaluated breast cancer diagno...
Source: radRounds - January 5, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Using fMRI to Understand the Link Between Risk and Criminal Activity
A study published in theJournal of Experimental Psychologyis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to draw the correlation between the attraction toward risk and criminal activity.Valerie Reyna, PhD, director of both the Human Neuroscience Institute and the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Facility at Cornell University, and her colleagues relied on the theory that non-criminals tend to avoid risk when they ’re likely going to win or achieve something, and they pursue risky options when they’re probably going to lose. Yet, based on their findings, criminals demonstrate opposite behavior, and tend to take riskier cha...
Source: radRounds - December 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

How to Use MRI for Measuring Liver Fat Levels in Patients Who Have Undergone Bariatric Surgery
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an effective method for measuring liver fat levels in obese patients who undergone weight loss surgery, according to researchers from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.In their  studyrecently published inRadiology, the researchers set to out to determine how bariatric surgery influences changes in liver fat. Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy have successfully helped obese patients lose weight. However, physicians are mostly in the dark about how these surgeries lower liver fat, since it ’s challenging to quantify liver fat non-invasively, and...
Source: radRounds - December 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Meet Susan Potter: Immortal Corpse
At the age of 72, German immigrant Susan Potter was adamant about donating her body to science. Her body would be turned inside out and created into a 3D digital landscape of 6,900 photos for medical students to learn from. In 2015, her wish finally came true. In a  storyforNational Geographic, journalist Cathy Newman details Potter ’s journey from living human to “immortal corpse.”Potter ’s body was donated to the National Library of Medicine’s Visible Human Project, a program started by Vic Spitzer and David Whitlock at the University of Colorado in 1991. At the time, they received a go...
Source: radRounds - December 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

MRI Can Predict Likelihood of Developing Dementia
MRI might soon be able to predict if a patient will develop dementia up to three years before they start presenting symptoms, according to a research recently presented at the Radiological Society of North American annual meeting in Chicago.Researchers from theWashington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Francisco found that MRI scans had an accuracy rate of 89 percent at predicting a person ’s chances of developing dementia.Dementia is a condition that impairs memory, language skills, and basic comprehension. Patients with dementia symptoms have “differences on dif...
Source: radRounds - December 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Deep Learning Helps Accelerate MRI Knee Exam Interpretation
The knee is the most commonly imaged body part by MRI, and a new  studyhas found that deep learning model can accelerate MRI knee exams while also improving their accuracy.A team of researchers from the department of computer science at Stanford University set out to find if deep learning model could improve diagnostic accuracy for radiologists and orthopedic surgeons evaluating anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, meniscal tears, and general abnormalities.The model ’s analysis was presented to seven general radiologists and two orthopedic surgeons who were asked to measure the “specificity, sensitivity...
Source: radRounds - December 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Getting Rid of Annoying MRI Acoustics With Music
Researchers at Case Western University are turning the noisy and distressing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine acoustics into a lulling music box that plays Yo Yo Ma.MRI ’s continuous switching patterns create jolting vibrations, which cause anxiety, annoyance, and even hearing loss for patients inside of the machine. Instead of attempting to mask the sounds, the group of researches invented Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF), a method that converts mp3 music files to arbitrary encoding gradients.For their phantom study published recent inMagnetic Resonance in Medicine, the researchers used Yo Yo Ma &rsqu...
Source: radRounds - December 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New Technology at University of Missouri School of Medicine Makes MRI Faster and Easier for Patients
At the University of Missouri School of Medicine, patients can now undergo MRIs while being able to breathe normally thanks to the institution ’s new program Heart Speed.An MRI takes around 90 minutes to conduct and can be difficult, tiring, and tedious for patients. In order to capture a clear, single image, patients need to hold their breath consistently. For patients with lung conditions that means undergoing an MRI can be especially challenging.Created by Robert Thomen, PhD, assistant professor of radiology and bioengineering, and pediatric radiologist Talissa Altes, MD,Heart Speed is a data analysis software tha...
Source: radRounds - December 14, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs