Medical News Today: Green tea compound could help treat Down syndrome
Researchers suggest a compound in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate may improve cognitive function for people with Down syndrome. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Clinical trial opens new avenues for pharmacological therapy in Down's syndrome
The results of the phase 2 study suggest that participants who had received the treatment had better scores in the visual memory recognition and inhibition tasks, and improvement in adaptive behavior than those in the control group. Though not a cure, this is the first time that a treatment has shown some effectiveness in this syndrome, and it opens the door to new research geared towards treating what was believed to be orphan of treatment. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Those with Down's syndrome could benefit from drinking GREEN TEA
A chemical in green tea alters the way brain cells connect with one another, researchers found. The positive impact lasted for six months, experts writing in The Lancet Neurology said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gorgeous Photo Series Celebrates The Beauty Of Kids With Down Syndrome
A New Jersey photographer and mom of three is celebrating the beauty in kids with Down syndrome through her beautiful portraits. Back in October, Julie Willson gathered together 11 children with Down syndrome and captured their spirits in a series of photos. Their families had responded to the photographer's call for kids with Down syndrome ages 0 to 5, and some traveled as long as three or four hours to participate. Willson drew inspiration for the photo series from her sister Dina. "Dina was born in 1975 with Down syndrome and was the absolute light of our family," she told The Huffington Post, adding tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Awareness of parents on sexual abuse among Down syndrome children - Lavanya K.
It is highly recommended that age-appropriate education in protective behavior begin in childhood and be reinforced throughout the life of the person with Down syndrome. Individual with Down syndrome must be taught the boundaries of normal Physical interac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Unraveling the monoaminergic pathogenesis of dementia
in the general population and Down Syndrome (Source: Institute of Psychiatry | Events)
Source: Institute of Psychiatry | Events - May 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Dad's age, diet and lifestyle may cause birth defects
Conclusion This narrative review summarises past research on DNA changes that may occur as a result of a father's age and exposures that could be passed on to his children. In particular, the review discusses animal and human studies that have linked changes in offspring with increasing paternal age, stress and substance use.   But this review must largely be considered to only be an opinion piece. We don't know how the researchers identified, appraised and selected the studies they discussed. As such, there is a strong possibility that not all animal and human research relevant to the issue of paternal epigen...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Down Syndrome
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - May 10, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

When Just a Little Is Too Much: The Risks of Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy
One of my challenges in working with patients suffering from addictive illnesses is to help increase their motivation to stick with a long-term recovery plan. This is a significant challenge for many reasons, especially because the disease of addiction affects the brain's ability to value long term recovery. The one exception to this difficulty, in many cases, is when a female patient gets pregnant. I have witnessed women who struggled for years with an addictive illness discover they are pregnant and, when the pregnancy is wanted, are able to make incredible strides in their recovery. They are often able to maintain sobri...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DOMINIC LAWSON likens new test for Down's syndrome to State-sponsored eugenics 
The Department of Health is about to approve a scheme designed to bring about a world in which people like my youngest daughter will cease to exist, writes DOMINIC LAWSON. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down's neonatal screening contract renewed
(University of Plymouth) Public Health England (PHE) has renewed its contract with Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (PUPSMD) to provide the Down's syndrome screening Quality Assurance Support Service (DQASS) for its Down's, Edwards' and Patau's syndromes antenatal screening programme in England. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 9, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clinical trial underway for treatment of sleep apnea in adolescents with Down syndrome
(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) An FDA-approved clinical trial is underway at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Massachusetts General Hospital for Children to evaluate the use of a hypoglossal nerve stimulator -- a technology currently available to adults with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that stimulates the upper airway to facilitate breathing during sleep -- in a select group of adolescent patients with Down syndrome and OSA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[Editors' Choice] Myelination defects in Down syndrome
Author: Pamela J. Hines (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Pamela J. Hines Tags: Neurodevelopment Source Type: news

High Risk of Arthritis in Down's Syndrome (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Diagnosis and treatment often delayed, leading to early damage (Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage)
Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage - May 2, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

High blood pressure: Why me?
“I go to the gym, and I never add salt. So why do I have high blood pressure?” Despite its astonishing prevalence of one in three Americans, many people struggle with the diagnosis of high blood pressure, or hypertension. It’s worth exploring why, because being an active participant in your care is crucial for optimal blood pressure control. Certain features make any diagnosis easier to accept: First, people are more likely to accept a diagnosis if they have symptoms. A person with cough and fever will believe a diagnosis of pneumonia. But someone who feels fine would not. Next, people more readily accep...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - May 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Health care Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Prevention Screening high blood pressure Source Type: news

Risk of arthritis in children with Down syndrome higher than previously reported
GLASGOW – Children with Down syndrome are at increased risk for arthritis that often goes unrecognized and leads to treatment delays and potential chronic disability. Research presented at the... (Source: Pediatric News)
Source: Pediatric News - April 30, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Playing Ping Pong with Disability
Table tennis players train at Majd Sports. Majd Sports is a recreational centre catering for people with disabilities in Ramallah, occupied West Bank. Credit: Silvia Boarini/IPSBy Silvia BoariniRAMALLAH, Occupied West Bank, Apr 28 2016 (IPS)Despite formally adopting progressive laws, such as Law Number 4, and ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disability, Palestinian authorities still struggle to get beyond rhetoric when it comes to supporting the 7 to 11 per cent of the population that is affected by disability. As the ongoing Israeli military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza continues to block t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Silvia Boarini Tags: Active Citizens Armed Conflicts Civil Society Featured Global Geopolitics Headlines Health Human Rights Middle East & North Africa Population Source Type: news

Study estimates number of births, terminations with Down syndrome in Massachusetts
A multi-institutional research team has estimated for the first time the number of children born with Down syndrome each year in Massachusetts over the past century, along with the numbers of pregnancies of a child with Down syndrome lost to either termination or miscarriage. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dysfunctional endosomes are early sign of neurodegeneration
Abnormalities in a protein that helps transport and sort materials inside cells are linked to axonal dysfunction and degeneration of neurons in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome, report investigators. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dysfunctional endosomes are early sign of neurodegeneration
(University of California - San Diego) Writing in the April 11 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say abnormalities in a protein that helps transport and sort materials inside cells are linked to axonal dysfunction and degeneration of neurons in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Focus on training: Treating patients with intellectual disabilities
Seeing patients with intellectual disabilities can raise significant ethical questions for physicians. Learn how early training for providing compassionate care to patients with disabilities can result in more ethically informed medical decisions. The April issue of the AMA Journal of Ethics explores key ethical concepts regarding how medical professionals treat patients with intellectual disabilities. Articles featured in this issue include: “An open letter to medical students: Down syndrome, paradox and medicine.” Clinical encounters involving people with intellectual disabilities can be both charged a...
Source: AMA Wire - April 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Rhythm of oscillations in cerebral cortex, key to understanding Down syndrome
A first-ever identification has been made of the alterations in the neuronal circuit that impact cerebral cortex physiology, and that could be the cause of cognitive deficits in Down Syndrome. The study explains how a gene linked to Down Syndrome is associated with altered oscillations in the cerebral cortex, the region responsible for our capacity for reasoning, language and social behavior. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rhythm of oscillations in cerebral cortex, key to understanding Down syndrome
(Center for Genomic Regulation) Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation and August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute in Barcelona, Spain, have made a first-ever identification of the alterations in the neuronal circuit that impact cerebral cortex physiology, and that could be the cause of cognitive deficits in Down syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

4 Advances That Make In Vitro Fertilization More Successful Than Ever
Tanmoy Mukherjee, MD Associate Director, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Mount Sinai Health System; Co-Director, Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York; Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai When prospective parents who are unable to conceive a child on their own consult me for assistance, I am excited to help them build their families. But for them, dealing with the challenges of infertility can be as stressful as having cancer. Fortunately, the latest advances in in vitro fertilization (IVF) are giving them a ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Well: My Banished Brother
My family sent him away because he had Down syndrome, but he created another family for himself in his group home. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - April 1, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: LISA RESWICK Tags: Family Group Homes and Supportive Housing Down Syndrome Families and Family Life Featured Children and Childhood Ties Source Type: news

This Mom Is Changing The Conversation About Autism In Communities Of Color
Camille Proctor began noticing changes in her son, Ari, around his second birthday. His communication skills regressed and he grew fascinated with their home ceiling fan, flicking the light switches on and off. That same year, Ari was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It's a disorder that affects 1 in 68 children but often goes unidentified in communities of color. The challenges Proctor faced in the aftermath of her son's diagnosis prompted her to create The Color of Autism, a nonprofit organization aimed at providing support and spreading ASD awareness to communities of color. Though she's man...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Well: My Banished Brother
My family sent him away because he had Down syndrome, but he created another family for himself in his group home. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LISA RESWICK Tags: Family Group Homes and Supportive Housing Down Syndrome Families and Family Life Featured Children and Childhood Ties Source Type: news

Well: My Banished Brother
My family sent him away because he had Down syndrome, but he created another family for himself in his group home. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - April 1, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: LISA RESWICK Tags: Family Group Homes and Supportive Housing Down Syndrome Families and Family Life Featured Children and Childhood Ties Source Type: news

Are tests for Down’s syndrome needlessly alarming women into abortions?
Cambridge scientists found abnormal cells in embryos - which can cause disorders such as Down's syndrome - have an 'amazing' ability to correct and repair themselves. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discover a child's medical destiny before they're born
DNA hiding in a mother's bloodstream could reveal all about her baby's health, including genetic conditions such as Down's syndrome, providing a non-invasive alternative to current testing methods. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Embryos with defective cells 'can still develop healthily'
Conclusion This mouse study helps to advance scientific understanding of how some embryos containing a mix of euploid and aneuploid cells develop normally and others do not. This looks to be related to the proportion of euploid and aneuploid cells early on in the cells' development, and their specific location. However, though the researchers saw clear implications for the assessment of embryo vitality in human fertility clinics, this research is at too early a stage to be able to accurately predict outcomes for human foetal development. Follow-up studies in people are needed to test whether this mice observation happens ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

Embryos with abnormalities in early stages of pregnancy 'may develop into healthy babies'
Cambridge scientists found abnormal cells in embryos - which can cause birth defects such as Down's syndrome - have an 'amazing' ability to correct and repair themselves. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early-stage embryos with abnormalities may still develop into healthy babies, study shows
Abnormal cells in the early embryo are not necessarily a sign that a baby will be born with a birth defect such as Down's syndrome, suggests new research carried out in mice. Scientists show that abnormal cells are eliminated and replaced by healthy cells, repairing -- and in many cases completely fixing -- the embryo. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Embryos with abnormalities in the early stages of pregnancy 'may still develop into healthy babies' - so should we be destroying them?
Cambridge scientists found abnormal cells in embryos - which can cause birth defects such as Down's syndrome - have an 'amazing' ability to correct and repair themselves. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early-stage embryos with abnormalities may still develop into healthy babies, study shows
(University of Cambridge) Abnormal cells in the early embryo are not necessarily a sign that a baby will be born with a birth defect such as Down's syndrome, suggests new research carried out in mice at the University of Cambridge. In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, scientists show that abnormal cells are eliminated and replaced by healthy cells, repairing -- and in many cases completely fixing -- the embryo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Disclosing Down Syndrome: Must You Give an Upside?Disclosing Down Syndrome: Must You Give an Upside?
With the high rates of abortion after a positive screen for Down syndrome, should mothers be forced to listen to an upbeat message about the baby's future life? Medscape Business of Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Commentary Source Type: news

Indiana likely to ban abortions based on fetal disabilities
(Reuters) - Indiana is likely to become the second U.S. state to prohibit abortions based on the diagnosis of the fetus with a disability such as Down syndrome. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Discover a child's medical destiny before they're born
DNA hiding in a mother's bloodstream could reveal all about her baby's health, including genetic conditions such as Down's syndrome, providing a non-invasive alternative to current testing methods. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eritrea: Training On Psychological Treatment of the Disabled
[Shabait] Asmara -The National Association of Mentally Impaired provided training for 42 psychologists, neurologists and parents on the treatment of victims of Down syndrome and Autism. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 24, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Most families cherish a child with Down syndrome
Researchers say the information could help expectant parents who learn their child has the genetic condition (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why We Should All Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day
March 21st is internationally recognized as World Down Syndrome Day. Just like typical people, individuals with Down syndrome have two copies of each of their 23 chromosomes but they have third copy of chromosome 21, a genetic condition known as trisomy 21, hence the celebration on March 21st or 3-21. While it is important to celebrate all the things that people with Down syndrome can do and how similar they are to others, I would argue it is equally important to acknowledge the ongoing fight against discrimination that their differences evoke. If we consider that discrimination leveled against women or African Americans ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Most Families Cherish a Child With Down Syndrome, Survey Finds
Only younger siblings struggled in some cases, which researchers said wasn't surprising (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - March 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Physiotherapy, Psychiatry, News, Source Type: news

Down Syndrome Doesn't Mean Doom and Gloom for Families
Study released on World Down Syndrome Day shows the disease is not viewed as a curse.  (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - March 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Most Families Cherish a Child with Down Syndrome, Survey Finds
Only younger siblings struggled in some cases, which researchers said wasn't surprising Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Down Syndrome, Family Issues (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Joe Sanderson the world's oldest man with Down's Syndrome?
Joe Sanderson was not expected to live beyond the age of 21. He marked the milestone of his 80th birthday with family and staff at his care home in Saltburn, North Yorkshire. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Most Families Cherish a Child With Down Syndrome, Survey Finds
MONDAY, March 21, 2016 -- Families of children with Down syndrome face challenges, but by and large their experiences are positive ones, a new study suggests. Researchers found that in 87 percent of families they surveyed, everyone -- parents and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 21, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Most Families Cherish a Child With Down Syndrome, Survey Finds
Title: Most Families Cherish a Child With Down Syndrome, Survey FindsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/21/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/21/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - March 21, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Marking the World Day, Ban celebrates potential of people with Down syndrome
The autonomy and independence of people with Down syndrome and other disabilities should be supported, so that they can be empowered to contribute to our common future, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today said marking World Down Syndrome Day. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - March 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

When I Picture Myself Being Included, I Don't See Myself Without My Disabilities
I want to live in a world where my existence is just accepted. I don't want to have to undergo drastic physical or neurological changes to be perceived as a normal part the world. When I imagine myself in an inclusive and accepting world, I see myself as me unchanged, still disabled but simply in a world where that does not matter. And yet this is not what people think I should see. This is evidenced by this video, produced for World Down Syndrome Day (March 21). In the video, a narrator talks about her life aspirations and goals while the actor Olivia Wilde lives them out. The implication is that the narrator cannot do t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news