New Down's Syndrome blood test to go on trial
A new non-invasive blood test for Down's Syndrome in unborn babies will be offered for free at two hospitals next month following a successful trial on patients.     (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early Down's test 'more sensitive'
A DNA blood test for Down's syndrome could be given earlier in pregnancy than current checks, research suggests. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Non-invasive first trimester blood test reliably detects Down's syndrome
(Wiley) New research has found that routine screening using a non-invasive test that analyzes fetal DNA in a pregnant woman's blood can accurately detect Down's syndrome and other genetic fetal abnormalities in the first trimester. Published early online in Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, the results suggest that the test is superior to currently available screening strategies and could reshape standards in prenatal testing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Fay Bleasdale describes how she fell into a black hole when her son was diagnosed with Down's Syndrome
Faith Bleasdale said 'terror pulsed' through her veins when she was told her son Xavier (now four) had Down's Syndrome. The diagnosis left her feeling desperate and deflated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down Syndrome Neurons Grown From Stem Cells Show Signature Problems
Down syndrome, the most common genetic form of intellectual disability, results from an extra copy of one chromosome. Although people with Down syndrome experience intellectual difficulties and other problems, scientists have had trouble identifying why that extra chromosome causes such widespread effects. In new research published this week, Anita Bhattacharyya, a neuroscientist at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports on brain cells that were grown from skin cells of individuals with Down syndrome... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stem Cell Research Source Type: news

Neurons Grown From Stem Cells Show Signature Problems In Down Syndrome
Down syndrome, the most common genetic form of intellectual disability, results from an extra copy of one chromosome. Although people with Down syndrome experience intellectual difficulties and other problems, scientists have had trouble identifying why that extra chromosome causes such widespread effects. In new research published this week, Anita Bhattacharyya, a neuroscientist at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports on brain cells that were grown from skin cells of individuals with Down syndrome... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Brain cells give insight into Down's
Brain cells grown from the stem cells of adults with Down's syndrome give clues to brain development in the condition. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - May 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down syndrome neurons grown from stem cells show signature problems
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In new research published this week, Anita Bhattacharyya, a neuroscientist at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports on brain cells that were grown from skin cells of individuals with Down syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How'd that work: Do pesticides cause birth defects?
The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released a policy statement that outlines the harmful effects of pesticides on early fetal development. In 2009, Paul Winchester, M.D., released a study that looked at 30 million Indiana births from 1996 to 2002. According to Dr. Winchester, babies conceived in April, May and June have higher rates of birth defects such as Down syndrome, cleft palate and.... (Source: Sound Medicine)
Source: Sound Medicine - May 11, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Sound Medicine Source Type: news

Yoga With Down Syndrome: Sarah Shaffer's Story
The stretching from yoga helps this high school student run and relax. (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - May 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parents Help Detect Sleep Problems In Children With Down Syndrome
A recent study has found that parents play an important part in screening for sleep problems in children with Down syndrome. These children often suffer from obstructive sleep apnoea, a condition which affects their breathing during sleep. Health professionals rely on parents' reports about their child's sleep, including restlessness, snoring and other forms of noisy breathing, when screening for the condition. In the past, there has been some uncertainty among health professionals about the accuracy of these reports... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Why All The Buzz About Gluten-Free
Today, gluten-free products and diets are all the rage. In fact, a recent study finds as many as 1.6 million Americans avoid gluten, even though they haven’t been diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Although there is no harm in eliminating gluten from your diet, doctors say there is no reason to avoid it—unless you’re one of the two million people who cannot tolerate the proteins. “Gluten is bad for some people, but certainly not all,” explains Michelle Nacouzi, MD, a primary care physician at Duke Primary Care Brier Creek. “So unless you’ve been diagnosed with ce...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 4, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Self-advocate helps all
By Olivia Lepore Nate at work Learning that your child has been diagnosed with Down syndrome can be a challenging experience for many parents. At Boston Children’s Hospital, the Down Syndrome Program has found a way to give hope to both parents and children who come to the clinic—his name is Nate Simons. Simons is a valued 24-year-old member of the program’s staff, and like the children he interacts with at the clinic, he has Down syndrome. Simons—who joined the team last fall—is the program’s second self-advocate, a two-year position funded by a generous gift to the hospital from a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 30, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: All posts Down syndrome GQ mocks people with Down Syndrome what are the job opportunities for people with down syndrome? working with Down syndrome? Source Type: news

The Damaging Effect Of Cholesterol On The Brain And On Blood Vessels
Researchers at the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the University of Colorado School of Medicine have found that a single mechanism may underlie the damaging effect of cholesterol on the brain and on blood vessels. High levels of blood cholesterol increase the risk of both Alzheimer's disease and heart disease, but it has been unclear exactly how cholesterol damages the brain to promote Alzheimer's disease and blood vessels to promote atherosclerosis... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cholesterol Source Type: news

Cholesterol increases risk of Alzheimer's and heart disease
(University of Colorado Denver) Using insights gained from studying two much rarer disorders, Down Syndrome and Niemann Pick-C disease, researchers at the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Department of Neurology of the University of Colorado School of Medicine found that cholesterol wreaks havoc on the orderly process of cell division, leading to defective daughter cells throughout the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Observatory: Protein in Alzheimer’s Linked to Down Syndrome
Scientists investigating Alzheimer’s found that mice lacking the protein SNX27 had the same learning and memory defects as mice with Down syndrome. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By DOUGLAS QUENQUA Tags: Genetics and Heredity Research Down Syndrome Source Type: news

New Questions on Cutting-Edge Prenatal Tests
New prenatal blood tests for genetic abnormalities such as Down syndrome are reshaping care for expectant mothers, but their rapid rollout has raised fears that poorly understood results could lead to confusion among patients and doctors. (Source: WSJ.com: Health)
Source: WSJ.com: Health - April 4, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: FREE Source Type: news

Teen with Down syndrome climbs Everest
First person with Down syndrome reaches Mount Everest's base camp in March (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down Syndrome Trial May Hold Key To Learning
An ingredient used for decades in cough syrup, and to treat a variety of conditions, could hold the key to improving memory, language, and learning in people with Down syndrome. In the first trial of its kind targeting cognitive impairment in people with Down syndrome, researchers at Monash University are currently investigating the effectiveness of the ingredient, known as BTD-001, and its potential to significantly improve the quality of life of people with Down syndrome - the most common genetic form of intellectual disability affecting 6 million people worldwide... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Down Syndrome kids' dreams
Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day with nine amazing stories of joy, success and love. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Molecular Roots Of Down Syndrome Unraveled
What is it about the extra chromosome inherited in Down syndrome - chromosome 21 - that alters brain and body development? Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) have new evidence that points to a protein called sorting nexin 27, or SNX27. SNX27 production is inhibited by a molecule encoded on chromosome 21. The study, published in Nature Medicine, shows that SNX27 is reduced in human Down syndrome brains. The extra copy of chromosome 21 means a person with Down syndrome produces less SNX27 protein, which in turn disrupts brain function... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Down's syndrome brain protein loss
The lack of a protein in Down's syndrome brains could be the cause of learning and memory problems, says a US study. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sanford-Burnham researchers unravel molecular roots of Down syndrome
(Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute) What is it about the extra chromosome inherited in Down syndrome -- chromosome 21 -- that alters brain and body development? Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have new evidence that points to the protein SNX27. SNX27 is inhibited by a molecule encoded on chromosome 21. The study, published March 24 in Nature Medicine, shows that SNX27 is reduced in human Down syndrome brains. Restoring SNX27 in Down syndrome mice improves cognitive function and behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 24, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Celebrate Down Syndrome Day!
Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day with nine amazing stories of joy, success and love. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down Syndrome doesn't change dreams
Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day with nine amazing stories of joy, success and love. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood Protein Could Detect Cardiovascular Events
(Ivanhoe Newswire) --A pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) is usually used to screen for Down syndrome in pregnant women, but now new research suggests that it could also be used as a marker of unstable plaque in coronary arteries. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - March 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood Protein Able To Detect Higher Risk Of Cardiovascular Events In People With Chest Pain Originating From Heart Disease
Higher levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) were associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people with cardiac chest pain that developed as a result of heart disease/coronary artery disease, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). PAPP-A, used to screen for Down syndrome in pregnant women, has been suggested as a marker of unstable plaque in coronary arteries. The study was conducted in 2568 patients in Tübingen, Germany, to determine if the presence of PAPP-A could help predict cardiovascular events... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Down Syndrome: Screening For Breathing Problems To Stop Unnecessary Suffering
Researchers at the University of Southampton are planning to investigate tests for a breathing disorder that affects babies and children who have Down syndrome while they sleep. They aim to provide the missing evidence so that doctors can introduce affordable and simple routine screening. The project, led by sleep specialist Dr Catherine Hill, is funded by children's charity Action Medical Research. It is hoped that screening will improve diagnosis so more children can benefit from early treatment for the condition that can have serious consequences... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Helping Speech and Stuttering in Children with Down syndrome
Giving a voice to kids with Down syndrome - Researchers from the University of Alberta are helping children with Down syndrome who stutter find their voice and speak with ease. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - March 1, 2013 Category: Disability Tags: Alberta Source Type: news

Go For The Glory Quiz: Down Syndrome Complications, Infant Shock, Stroke Survivors, Doxycycline Adverse Events
Go For The Glory Quiz: Test your skills in this week's 5-question quiz. (Source: Consultant Live)
Source: Consultant Live - February 28, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Addressing Stuttering In Down Syndrome
Researchers from the University of Alberta are helping children with Down syndrome who stutter find their voice and speak with ease. Stuttering is a common problem that affects almost half of all children with Down syndrome, yet despite the scope of the problem, little research exists about preferred treatment options - or even whether to treat at all. Researchers with the U of A's Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research (ISTAR) point to a new case study that shows fluency shaping can indeed improve a child's speech... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

26-year-old with Down Syndrome asphyxiated while resisting cops over movie ticket
To say he was killed over a movie ticket is startling enough, but when you know 26-year-old Robert Ethan Saylor, who suffered from Down Syndrome, likely died at the hands of police is, frankly, disheartening. According to reports, Saylor, of New Market, MD., died... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Giving a voice to kids with Down syndrome
(University of Alberta) University of Alberta case study shows children with Down syndrome can benefit from conventional stuttering treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Home Education and Children with Down Syndrome. The Primary Years
Children with Down syndrome face etiology-specific (specific to Down syndrome) learning challenges. Research has given us a picture of the specific strengths and weaknesses of children with Down syndrome - different from other causes of mental retardation. Educational plans need to reflect these strengths and weaknesses and teaching needs to target the way they learn to improve outcome. Home education can meet the needs of children with Down syndrome more effectively than the public or special education systems and maximize the child's potential globally and make the most of their abilities. (Source: Riverbend Down Syndrom...
Source: Riverbend Down Syndrome Parent Support Group - February 25, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

What Causes Constipation?
Discussion Constipation generally is defined as infrequent or painful defecation. Constipation can be very disturbing to the patient and family who believe the stools are too infrequent, too hard or too difficult to pass. Most children develop constipation after the child begins to associate pain (e.g. a hard bowel movement) with defecation. The child then begins to withhold the stools trying to decrease the defecation discomfort. As stool withholding continues, the rectum dilates and gradually accommodates with the normal defecation urge disappearing. Passing large hard stools infrequently reinforces the defecation pain. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 25, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D. Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Neurologic Complications of Down Syndrome
(Source: Consultant Live)
Source: Consultant Live - February 7, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Our patients’ stories: Treating Haven’s pulmonary atresia
By Scott Howe Haven When Molly Foley was first pregnant, she admits she knew very little about congenital heart defects, or how they could affect her unborn daughter, Haven. But, around 20 weeks into her pregnancy, Molly discovered that heart defects were very real—and very scary—when an ultrasound revealed that Haven had pulmonary atresia. Also known as “blue baby syndrome,” pulmonary atresia is a condition in which the heart’s pulmonary valve is abnormal and doesn’t open. “It never occurs to most people that their baby could have a heart defect,” Molly says, noting tha...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 4, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: All posts Heart conditions Our patients’ stories Children's Hospital Boston Fetal Cardiology Program; Pentalogy of Cantrell; Hypoplastic left heart syndrome; congenital heart disease Heart Week treating congenital heart defects Source Type: news

The Significance Of Second Trimester Markers For Down's Syndrome
A new analysis has found that some second trimester markers for Down's syndrome that are detected by ultrasound are more telling than others. Published early online in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the study's results will help adjust pregnant women's risks for having a child with the condition. Screening for Down's syndrome is offered to all pregnant women, who start out with a background risk based on their age... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

New Down Syndrome DNA Test Effective and EconomicalNew Down Syndrome DNA Test Effective and Economical
Noninvasive prenatal testing for Down's syndrome is effective and economical, according to results from a new study. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Certain Markers For Down's Syndrome More Significant
Certain second trimester markers for Down's syndrome that are identified in an ultrasound are more significant than others. The finding came from new research published in the journal Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology. The results of this investigation will help modify pregnant women's risks for having a baby with the chromosomal disorder. Every pregnant woman is asked whether she would like screening for Down's syndrome, who begin with a background risk based on how old they are... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Significance of second trimester markers for Down's syndrome revealed
A new analysis has found that some second trimester markers for Down's syndrome that are detected by ultrasound are more telling than others. The study's results will help adjust pregnant women's risks for having a child with the condition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 30, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study reveals significance of second trimester markers for Down's syndrome
(Wiley) A new analysis has found that some second trimester markers for Down's syndrome that are detected by ultrasound are more telling than others. Published early online in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the study's results will help adjust pregnant women's risks for having a child with the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Down syndrome raises risk of dementia
IRVINE, Calif., Jan. 27 (UPI) -- People with Down syndrome have higher susceptibility to other conditions such as dementia, researchers in the United States and Argentina found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Down Syndrome Increases Susceptibility To Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes And Autistic Spectrum Disorders
A study led by UC Irvine researchers has revealed some of the underlying neural factors that explain why people with Down syndrome are more susceptible to Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and autistic spectrum disorders. Jorge Busciglio, associate professor of neurobiology & behavior, and colleagues analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in Down syndrome individuals. They found that this breakdown in energy metabolism within brain cells contributes to the higher probability of these other conditions... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Why Down syndrome boosts susceptibility to other conditions
A new study has revealed some of the underlying neural factors that explain why people with Down syndrome are more susceptible to Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and autistic spectrum disorders. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 11, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

UCI study reveals why Down syndrome boosts susceptibility to other conditions
(University of California - Irvine) A study led by UC Irvine researchers has revealed some of the underlying neural factors that explain why people with Down syndrome are more susceptible to Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and autistic spectrum disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 10, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

DealBook: Illumina Buys Maker of Down Syndrome Test
Amid a report that Roche was no longer interested in a takeover, Illumina made a deal of its own in a sign that DNA sequencing is now moving toward being used for medical diagnosis. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By ANDREW POLLACK Tags: Genetics and Heredity Verinata Health Inc DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Illumina Inc ILMN NASDAQ Roche Holding A G RHHBY Other OTC Down Syndrome Healthcare Mergers & Acquisitions Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures Tests (Medical) Source Type: news

Three’s a Crowd: Extra Chromosome Removed From Down Syndrome Cell Line
In Down syndrome, the body's cells contain three copies of chromosome 21. This extra copy results in serious medical problems, including heart defects, intellectual disabilities, premature aging and certain forms of leukemia. Now, researchers have a new tool to use in studying--and possibly addressing--some of these conditions. They developed a technique to remove the extra chromosome from a Down syndrome cell line, resulting in cells with the normal chromosome number. The technique may help scientists study the mechanisms by which the extra chromosome causes problems in different organ systems and it might lead to therapi...
Source: NIGMS Biomedical Beat - December 20, 2012 Category: Research Source Type: news

March 21 is World Down Syndrome Day. Take the pledge!
March 21 of every year is World Down Syndrome Day. 03/21 is the numerical representation of the genetic composition of Down syndrome. This year, we would like to invite you to take the pledge and to invite your friends to do so as well....Read Full Post (Source: About.com Down Syndrome)
Source: About.com Down Syndrome - March 12, 2012 Category: Disability Source Type: news

Clinical review: Down's syndrome
The aetiology of Down's syndrome, the screening process and management of comorbidities in childhood and adulthood. (Source: GP Online Education)
Source: GP Online Education - November 10, 2011 Category: Primary Care Tags: 14 Care of People with Learning Disabilities Source Type: news