Inside Schizophrenia: Childhood Schizophrenia
 In this episode of Inside Schizophrenia, our hosts tackle the topic of early onset – or childhood – schizophrenia. Host Rachel Star discusses her personal experiences with schizophrenia symptoms as an adolescent and Dr. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich from Harvard Medical School discusses some of the latest research. Listen in now! About Our Guest Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD is Director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. He did his undergraduate and medical school at Johns Hopkins, his residency t...
Source: World of Psychology - July 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Disorders Inside Schizophrenia Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

When Viral Videos Fuel Parent Expectations
I’ll never forget the session. She said, “Look at this,” as she pulled out her phone and opened her Facebook app. My client’s mom reached over her toddler to show me a video. “Look at this man,” she said as the video began to play. “He has Down syndrome, too. Look at how he’s talking.” On plays a viral video of a gentleman with Down syndrome speaking before Congress. We watched it briefly in the middle of our speech session, with her little one seated between us. She looked at her child then up at me, her eyes filled with both hope and despair. She put her hand on her k...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - July 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Danielle Newcombe Tags: Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Advocacy Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills Source Type: blogs

Chromosomally speaking, what do you know about sex? Take a quiz to find out.
Women have two X chromosomes (XX) and men have one X and one Y (XY), right? Not always, as you’ll learn from the quiz below. Men can be XX and women can be XY. And many other combinations of X and Y are possible. NIGMS Director’sEarly-Career Investigator LectureSex-Biased Genome Evolution Melissa A. Wilson, Ph.D.Arizona State University Wednesday, April 10, 201910:00-11:30 a.m. ET Lecture followed by Q&A sessionInfo on the ECI Lecture webpage You can learn more by listening to the live stream of a talk, titled “Sex-Biased Genome Evolution,” at 10 a.m. ET on April 10. The speaker,...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - April 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Matt Mills Tags: Being a Scientist Genes Chromosomes Genetics Genome Genomics Source Type: blogs

2019 Health Law Professors Conference
Conclusion (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Noninvasive prenatal testing and sex-selection abortion
By Steve Phillips The National Health Service in Great Britain has decided to implement the use of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and that has raised some concerns. It would seem natural for there to be concern about this test used to detect prenatal genetic conditions such as Down syndrome, which commonly leads to the choice … Continue reading "Noninvasive prenatal testing and sex-selection abortion" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 28, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care abortion bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability Health Care Practice human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Harken to Fintan O'Toole
Can it happen here? It already is. You have to read the whole thing but I will offer the money shot. Like hounds, people have to be blooded. They have to be given the taste for savagery. Fascism does this by building up the sense of threat from a despised out-group. This allows the members of that group to be dehumanised. Once that has been achieved, you can gradually up the ante, working through the stages from breaking windows to extermination. . . .[I]t has been trialled by Trump: let ’s see how my fans feel about crying babies in cages.   . . . the trial has been a huge success. Trump ’s claim las...
Source: Stayin' Alive - July 1, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Notice of Funding Opportunity: Bioethics and Disability
This report would examine developments at the state and federal-level, court cases, and current views from stakeholders. Policy Questions Which states have PAS laws and what do those laws provide? What protections against abuse of PAS?What have the Supreme Court and lower courts held regarding individuals’ rights under PAS laws? The laws themselves?Is there evidence that persons with disabilities are being denied treatment by insurance companies but offered PAS instead, as NCD predicted?How is PAS viewed by disability organizations? Has this evolved in the past 13 years? If so why? If not, why?Are persons with disabi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Child I Want
I appreciate the honesty of Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus. Watching various states attempt to enact more and more restrictions on abortion, she wrote of her strong personal feelings regarding the importance of keeping abortion legal. The headline certainly grabs our attention: “I would’ve aborted a fetus with Down syndrome. Women need that right.” Noting how cute the new “Gerber Baby” is, Marcus reminds her... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care abortion human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Prenatal Blood Tests – What to Expect
Navigating through the many different pre-natal blood tests can be confusing. Names like Sequential Screening, NIPT, and Carrier Screening meant nothing to me before being pregnant. As my doctor explained the different blood tests, I found myself being even more confused. I just wanted to know which blood test was the best option for my baby and me. As you enter your second trimester and prepare to take multiple blood tests, it’s best to do your research beforehand. This way you’ll know what to expect and won’t be overwhelmed by the different options. Here is a breakdown of the different blood tests: Sequ...
Source: Cord Blood News - December 18, 2017 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: pregnancy Source Type: blogs

Down Syndrome Disappearing in Iceland; Similar Events Will Become More Common
We are now living in an era when infants born with genetic disorders such asDown Syndrome will disappear in some societies (see:"What kind of society do you want to live in?": Inside the country where Down syndrome is disappearing). Below is an excerpt from this article explaining this process. Read the whole article if you are so motivated. With the rise of prenatal screening tests across Europe and the United States, the number of babies born with Down syndrome has significantly decreased, but few countries have come as close to eradicating Down syndrome births as Iceland. Since prenatal screening tests we...
Source: Lab Soft News - November 14, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Testing Lab Industry Trends Medical Ethics Medical Research Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Test 5
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information This test series requires login for attempting. You can login easily with your Facebook account (Use the CONNECT WITH icon on the upper part of right sidebar displaying t...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 22, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Immune Cell Telomere Length Correlates with a Blended DNA Methylation and Immune System Biomarker of Aging
Epigenetic clocks based on the measurement of changing patterns of DNA methylation are perhaps the most promising approach to the production of a biomarker of aging - a way to quickly assess an individual's biological age, allowing assessment of the effectiveness of potential rejuvenation therapies in a rapid, low-cost manner. They are certainly far more accurate and useful on an individual basis than is the case for telomere length measured in the immune cells called leukocytes taken from a blood sample. The latter metric is really only reliable over large populations of individuals, and even then there are studies that f...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Down syndrome traits -- many also true of non-Down low IQ adult
Recently I had the privilege of taking about  smartphone support for special needs adults for the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota. As a speaker I could attend the conference for free, including a talk by a psychologist,Dennis McGuire.I don ’t have a child with Down Syndrome (John Langdon Down ’s syndrome has become Down Syndrome) but #1 ’s IQ is in the typical Down Syndrome range. So I was curious how much of Dr McGuire’s talk applied to my son. I decided about 80% or so — even though #1’s temperament is very different from the Down Syndrome athletes I know from Special Olymp...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - September 11, 2017 Category: Disability Tags: adolescence adult behavioral therapy cognitive impairment support Source Type: blogs

MinnesotaCare Buy-In: Maybe Not A Long Shot
States are developing creative policy options to address the high cost of premiums for those purchasing coverage in the individual market. Given the inaction and lack of leadership at the federal level, states need to continue to move forward. Minnesota, of course, is leading the way. Under a proposal introduced in the Minnesota state legislature earlier this year, Minnesotans shopping for health insurance on the individual market would have been able to purchase public coverage through MinnesotaCare, Minnesota’s Basic Health Plan (BHP). The public buy-in was supported by the Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) Party Gover...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 2, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Lynn Blewett Tags: Featured Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP Minnesota MinnesotaCare Section 1332 waivers State Innovation Waivers Source Type: blogs

Driving and Memory Loss: Tips to Help Compromised Elders Give Up Driving
For many of us, a car is a sign of independence. But this emotional connection to our automobiles is part of what makes convincing a person that he or she is no longer capable of driving such a volatile battle. The longer adult children or others wait to discuss driving issues with a loved one, the harder it can be. Occasionally, people in the earlier stages of cognitive or physical decline will recognize the signs of that decline when they have a close call while driving and scare themselves into giving up their right to drive. More frequently, if the person has developed Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia, and...
Source: Minding Our Elders - July 22, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Stress and Alzheimer's: More Evidence Strengthens the Link
Stress has long been considered a major risk for developing Alzheimer’s, but there hasn’t been any real understanding as to why this is so. Now, researchers at the Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Disease at the University of Florida think that they’ve come closer to discovering the connection. Read full article on HealthCentral about stress and Alzheimer's and need to take care of ourselves: Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol Related articles Shadowing in Alzheimer's Sign of Fea...
Source: Minding Our Elders - July 1, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Researchers are figuring out how sense of self develops differently in autistic teens
By guest blogger Dan Carney Our autobiographical memory is fundamental to the development of our sense of self. However, according to past research, it may be compromised in autism, together with other skills that are also vital for self understanding, such as introspection and the ability to attribute mental states to others (known as mentalising). For example, experiments involving autistic children have highlighted retrieval difficulties, “impoverished narratives”, and a greater need for prompting, while also suggesting that semantic recall (facts from the past) may be impaired in younger individuals. Now a ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Autism guest blogger Memory Thought Source Type: blogs

Caffeine May Lower Risk for Cognitive Decline
Throughout the last several decades, caffeine has been alternately touted as hero or villain. For a time, caffeine was blamed for birth defects in children, and healthy eating, in general, meant eliminating food or beverages containing caffeine. Still, one of the most explosive new trends Throughout the last several decades, caffeine has been alternately touted as hero or villain. For a time, caffeine was blamed for birth defects in children, and healthy eating, in general, meant eliminating food or beverages containing caffeine. Still, one of the most explosive new trends we’ve seen over the last dozen years has bee...
Source: Minding Our Elders - June 19, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

6 Ways to Stop Stressing about Potential Disease
Many people are genetically predisposed to developing certain diseases, among them diabetes, cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s. It’s natural to worry if you’ve watched family members endure the illnesses. However, the cortisol released in your body by chronic stress, which can be caused by worry, could increase your susceptibility. The fix? Be proactive. Limiting stress may not completely protect you from the disease that you dread, but it can help your overall health and, for some diseases, this could help you avoid a trigger. Where do you start? View slide show on HealthCentral about how to stop str...
Source: Minding Our Elders - June 15, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Loving Daughter Views Disease Through a Different Lens Than Nursing Home Staff
Dear Carol: I’m watching my mom decline from Parkinson’s disease complicated by Lewy body dementia (LBD). She has good medical care and lives in a nursing home that has been a blessing to us all. I try to imitate the way that the staff works with her because they seem well trained. The problem is Mom is not just another patient to me. She is my mother. I want to fight what this disease is doing, and sometimes that makes me forget how I should work with Mom’s disease, especially when it comes to her LBD. I just can’t accept what’s happening. I know that my feelings are irrational...
Source: Minding Our Elders - June 4, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Another Example of a Human Genetic Variant that Lowers Blood Lipids and thus Reduces Heart Disease Risk
In recent years researchers have discovered a couple of human gene variants that dramatically reduce blood lipid levels, in ANGPTL4 and ASGR1, which in turn reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by slowing the development of atherosclerosis. The atherosclerotic lesions that form in blood vessel walls are seeded by oxidatively damaged blood lipids, and so lower lipid levels mean less seeding, all other things being equal. The research here presents another such gene variant, though by the sound of it one that has a lesser effect and isn't as widespread across populations. A genetic variant that protects the he...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Memory Books and Photos Great for Communication When Visiting Elders
Since elders by definition have many decades of life to their credit, they will likely enjoy looking back on the past. This is especially important when people have Alzheimer’s disease because their disease prevents them from forming new memories. Nearly everyone enjoys reminiscing to some degree. To help you kick off a nice visit with the elder you intend to spend time with try bringing some props. Physical reminders should help your visit go more smoothly. Image: Thinkstock Read full article on HealthCentral about how memories can aid in visiting elders: Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 23, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer ’s Risk Higher for Women: Why?
It’s been known for years that women are more at risk for Alzheimer’s disease than men.  Now, there’s even more evidence of gender differences. A new study has found that among those who've been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), women show a much faster rate of memory loss than men. The 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference took place recently in Washington, D.C. While many topics were covered, including some drugs that are showing promise, this study about women has attracted its share of attention. Earlier studies showing that more women developed ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 17, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Nighttime Snacks Stop Some Alzheimer's Wandering
Elderly people often eat more food when they are on a program of frequent, smaller meals than the standard three larger meals a day. Available snacks can also help people with Alzheimer’s who tend to wander. An informal experiment at the Parker Jewish Institute in New Hyde Park, N.Y. found that if they provided people with dementia who became anxious and agitated at night with a snack, they would often calm down and return to bed. Aura Gordon, an RN manager, told one story last month at the Aging in America conference in Chicago. “A patient, ‘a lovely man,’ got out of bed around 2 a.m., as was ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 5, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's: What Is Really in Your Control?
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, of the more than five million Americans with Alzheimer’s, approximately 200,000 individuals develop the disease before age 65 (younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease or YOAD). Additionally, barring a cure or some type of prevention, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds. What do we do, just give up and give in? Or do we look for ways that may give us a better chance to get through our last years without signs and symptoms of this devastating disease? I say let’s fight.  Image: Thinkstock Read full article on He...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 4, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

All We Need is (Unconditional) Love
On March 24, 2017, Joe Gibes posted an entry on this blog, entitled “A ‘disabled’ person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination.”[1] That post featured links to several stories about Kathleen Humberstone, a young woman with Down Syndrome who spoke at a recent UN event commemorating World Down Syndrome Day, which was observed on March 21. After reading through Joe’s post and the... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 27, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Chris Ralston Tags: Genetics Health Care abortion bioethics biotechnology Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability Down syndrome eugenics Health Care Practice human dignity reproduction screening syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Children of Medicaid
This article was originally published on Complex Child.  Compiled by Susan Agrawal I’ve been continually surprised by how many people think Medicaid is just for poor families on welfare. Those of us who parent children with complex medical needs know that Medicaid is so much more than that. After all, 72% of Medicaid enrollees are children, people with disabilities, and the elderly, and these groups account for 84% of spending. Medicaid provides vital services for children, including home nursing care and therapies, that are not otherwise covered. In this article, we will share just a few of the children with me...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 10th 2017
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 9, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Optimistic Thinking May Help Preserve Memory and Judgement
It should come as no surprise that optimistic thinking is, for the most part, better for one’s health than negative thinking. In fact, negative thinking has been connected to poor health for some time. A recent study confirms what was previously suspected, linking optimistic thinking to the preservation of memory and good judgement. Both of those traits bode well for staving off, if not preventing, Alzheimer’s disease. Research conducted by the University of Michigan has linked an optimistic outlook to taking better care of ourselves overall, which may explain the effect that optimism has on Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 9, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Long-term Testing May Speed Early Treatment of Alzheimer ’s Disease
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems have found evidence that long-term testing starting well before any signs of Alzheimer’s symptoms are evident could be a valuable tool in detecting which people will need intervention with therapeutic drugs that are now in clinical trials. This type of intervention could possibly halt or even reverse cognitive damage while the patient is still symptom-free. The long-term testing would be done in conjunction with brain scans. Read full article on HealthCentral about the value of long-term testing: Support a caregiver or jump star...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 7, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

A Mechanism to Explain Age-Related Loss in Female Fertility
Here, researchers identify a form of cellular damage that appears to be a proximate cause of the loss of female fertility with advancing age. But what causes this damage? Tying their observations to other, earlier forms of damage and dysfunction in aged tissues will no doubt be a great deal of work if pursued through purely investigative methods. The fastest approach to such a situation tends to be to fix the damage and see what happens as a result, but the lack of readily available repair therapies has hampered this approach in the past. Now that the first of these treatments are emerging, such as senescent cell clearance...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 5, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

“The Inheritance” Follows ND Family as Genetic Alzheimer’s becomes Legacy
Dear Readers: For most people, finding out that they have received an inheritance is a positive experience. Not so when that inheritance is early onset familial Alzheimer’s disease (eFAD). This type of inheritance involves a gene which each family member has a 50 percent chance of inheriting. For those who inherit this gene, their chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease by middle age, if not younger, is 100 percent. In her engrossing new book “The Inheritance,” Niki Kapsambelis presents the story of a North Dakota family facing such a reality. Read full review of "The Inheritance" on...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 2, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

MIND Diet Recommended for Alzheimer's Prevention
Part of a healthy lifestyle, one that may prevent heart disease, Alzheimer’s and other diseases, involves consuming a nourishing diet. According to a recent study, one way to obtain these nutrients is through the MIND diet. This berry-heavy diet, which was created by nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris, PhD and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, is a tweaked combination of the Mediterranean and the DASH diets. The acronym MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay. Read full article on HealthCentral about how our diets might improve our chances of ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - March 30, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

A “disabled” person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination
Amidst lots of dark and tragic stories, a bright ray on the BBC website this week: Kathleen Humberstone, a 17 year-old English girl with Down syndrome, addressed the UN in Geneva to mark World Down Syndrome Day. Rather than reading anything I have to say, a far better use of your time would be to read what Ms. Humberstone said. You can find the full text here; if you scroll down... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Joe Gibes Tags: Genetics Health Care abortion bioethics biotechnology Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability eugenics prenatal genetic testing syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Root of Alzheimer's: Could Infection and Inflammation be Part of the Equation?
When it comes to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of researchers think that it’s time to reconsider the idea of infection as a root cause. Scientists are now pointing to studies that reveal the presence of a microbe as a possible trigger for the disease. The theory is that microbes "find their way into the brain via the bloodstream and lie dormant until triggered by aging, immune system decline or by different types of stress…once they are activated, the microbes then damage brain cells - either directly or via inflammation.” Read full article on HealthCentral about new thoughts on the root ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - March 24, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The Root of Alzheimer's: Could Infection and Inflammation be Part of the Equation?
When it comes to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of researchers think that it’s time to reconsider the idea of infection as a root cause. Scientists are now pointing to studies that reveal the presence of a microbe as a possible trigger for the disease. The theory is that microbes "find their way into the brain via the bloodstream and lie dormant until triggered by aging, immune system decline or by different types of stress…once they are activated, the microbes then damage brain cells - either directly or via inflammation.” Read full article on HealthCentral about a new look at the root of...
Source: Minding Our Elders - March 10, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Heart and Brain Health Closely Related
For years the Alzheimer's Association has made good use of the catch phrase "what's good for the heart is good for the brain." As additional research is conducted in both areas, that simple phrase is proving to be solid thinking. The startling admission of notable researchers who attended the 2014 Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Copenhagen that a healthy lifestyle is, at this point, the best hope we have to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s symptoms underscores this concept. Not surprisingly, the lifestyle recommended for preventing Alzheimer’s disease is also the lifestyle that is reco...
Source: Minding Our Elders - March 9, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Apathy Preventable with Stimulation
Lack of enjoyable, stimulating activity can lead to apathy for anyone but particularly those with Alzheimer’s disease. According to a 2013 report by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), apathy is one of the most common neurobehavioral symptoms in dementia. Strong, focused stimulation can help people with Alzheimer's disease overcome apathy. People with mild dementia will decline more quickly into severe dementia if they also suffer from apathy, therefore engaging, stimulating activities are especially vital to this group. Read full article on HealthCentral about how apathy in people with AD may be preventable: Supp...
Source: Minding Our Elders - March 4, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Disease Impairs Insulin Signaling, May Increase Diabetes Risk
According to the latest research, the long-held theory that diabetes may cause Alzheimer’s could prove to be the reverse, at least in some cases. In the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published study results suggesting that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) impairs insulin signaling in the area of the brain that is responsible for regulating metabolism. The study finds this impaired signaling makes a person with Alzheimer’s disease more susceptible to diabetes. Read complete article on HealthCentral about how AD impairs insulin: Purchase Min...
Source: Minding Our Elders - February 20, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Coping With an Alzheimer ’s Diagnosis
You’re 76 and are having memory problems beyond the occasional slip. Last month, you drove in circles for an hour because you forgot how to get home from the same grocery store where you’ve shopped for three decades...You’re 57 and still rising in your career. At least you were rising up until the last six months when you were told that you are upsetting clients because you’ve become short tempered. Read full article on Kindly Care about coping with an Alzheimer's diagnosis:  Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook “I hold onto your ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - January 31, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Insulin Resistance Puts Women More at Risk of Alzheimer's Than Men
For many reasons, some identified and others still a mystery, women seem to be more at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than men are. A recent study, led by Dr. Laura Ekblad at Finland's University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, has discovered one physical issue that could be added to the list of Alzheimer's risks for women: insulin resistance. Insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, was shown in tests to influence verbal fluency in women more than men. Photo credit: Think Stock  Read on HealthCentral the full article on the influence of insulin resistance on women: Purchase Mi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - January 16, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Convincing People Living with Dementia To Take Pills
Dementia care demands incredible creativity. The ever changing needs of the person who has dementia challenges family caregivers and professionals alike. One particular frustration is getting important medications into their loved ones who either can’t or won’t cooperate when it comes to taking pills. As Alzheimer’s spreads throughout the brain, logic departs. The ability to understand one’s world disappears, understandably being replaced by fear and suspicion. These emotions are often blamed by caregivers when the person that they love refuses to take needed medications. Read more on HealthCen...
Source: Minding Our Elders - November 2, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Thoughts on A World Without Down ’s Syndrome?
We watched the documentary prenatal screening and the reduction in people being born with Down Syndrome presented by Sally Phillips.It's on BBC iplayerhere and below is a short clip.The best article on this that I have read is byFrancis Ryan in the Guardian.I have however some points that I want to make about the programme. I tweeted these this morning and am bringing those thoughts together now.First principle is that individual women must have full bodily autonomy. Nothing in #worldwithoutdowns negates the need to legalise safe, free abortion in Ireland/elsewhere. It is still essential that Irish people #repealthe8t...
Source: The Voyage - October 6, 2016 Category: Child Development Source Type: blogs

The cost-effectiveness of prenatal screening for Down syndrome
Because the British National Health Service is a governmental single-payer system decisions about what is covered in that system involve public discussion. That leads to public discussion of ethical issues that frequently manage to avoid the public eye in the US. A recent article in the Daily Mail talks about an issue that is being debated by the British NHS. They are currently deciding whether... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 28, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability end of life Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

October Health Awareness Month
In addition to Health Literacy Month, October is also Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Eye Injury Prevention Month, Home Eye Safety Month, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, National Bullying Prevention Month, National Dental Hygiene Month, National Down Syndrome Awareness Month, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Awareness Month, National Physical Therapy Month, and of course, National Medical Librarians Month. To help you with planning, Healthfinder.gov puts together the National Health Observances 2016 at a Glance. https://nnlm.gov/bhic/n4gt (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - September 22, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kay Deeney Tags: General Websites Source Type: blogs

The Reason Why the Poverty Rate Fell
The massive decline in the U.S. poverty rate reported today by the Census (it fell from 14.8% of all families below to the poverty line to just 13.5%, the largest drop since the 1960s) may have come as a surprise to many economists and political commentators but it should not have. The one thing we have learned from the last three business cycles is that the poor benefit greatly from sustained economic growth.When a recession occurs the unemployment rate can fall quickly, but it usually takes a long time before it returns to its previous pre-recession levels. no matter how aggressive our infrastructure spending may be. Wha...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 13, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Ike Brannon Source Type: blogs

Misuse of blood tests for female feticide
ThePCPNDT Actwas passed in India in 1994 and amended in 2002 with good intentions. It was framed in order to prevent gender selection, control female feticide and balance the sex ratio. Since ultrasound scanning was being misused to determine fetal gender , the Govt of India started insisting that all ultrasound scanners be registered, and ultrasound scans were closely monitored.However, medical technology has moved on , and it has become possible to determine the sex of the fetus by testing only the mother's blood. This means that ultrasound scans are no longer needed for sex selection !This new blood test is called NIPT ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - September 12, 2016 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs