Experimental Compound Reverses Down Syndrome-Like Learning Deficits in Mice - 9/4/13
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and the National Institutes of Health have identified a compound that dramatically bolsters learning and memory when given to mice with a Down syndrome-like condition on the day of birth. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - September 4, 2013 Category: Research Source Type: news

Special Olympics: How I become a ‘believer’ over this very special summer
By Marc Bernard Ackerman, DMD, MBA, FADPD, FACD, Director of Orthodontics, Boston Children’s Hospital Marc Ackerman Every September, I’m taken back to the fourth grade when Mrs. Henderson passed out black and white marble-colored journals to our class. She explained that over the course of the year we were going to keep a record of all our important fourth grade memories. Our first assignment was to answer the question: what was the most meaningful thing you did this summer? All these years later, I can’t remember what I wrote, but I do remember Mrs. Henderson being underwhelmed by the responses she ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 28, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: All posts Down syndrome Societal Issues Sports & exercise children with special health care needs dental health dental helath for kids with special needs marc Ackerman Orthodontics Source Type: news

Salivary Glands Often Missing in Down SyndromeSalivary Glands Often Missing in Down Syndrome
A small study of children with Down syndrome found a high rate of missing salivary glands, Israeli researchers say. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Down Syndrome Symptoms
Title: Down Syndrome SymptomsCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 8/14/2013 3:44:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 8/14/2013 3:44:50 PM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - August 14, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

New Study Finds Infertility Could Be Linked To Chemical In Plastic
BOSTON (CBS) — A troubling new study could explain why some couples have trouble conceiving. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital found infertility could be directly linked to a chemical found in plastic. One in six couples are infertile in America, according to doctors at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Bisphenol-A, or BPA, is an environmental toxin that disrupts the endocrine system. In other words, it disrupts the hormone system in the body.Dr. Catherine Racowsky has been part of a 2-year-study.In the study, human eggs were exposed to BPA in a controlled environment. “Any disruption in t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen BPA Brigham And Womens CBS Boston Michelle Roberts Source Type: news

Meet Today's Designer Baby
The first baby has been born following “next generation genetic sequencing” of IVF embryos. What are the implications?read more (Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center)
Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center - July 31, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jessica Cussins Tags: Child Development Ethics and Morality Health Parenting babies baby Connor bioethics biotechnology chromosomal abnormalities designer babies down syndrome embryo embryo selection eugenics fertility fertility experts fertilit Source Type: news

Today's Healthy Baby, Tomorrow's Designer Baby?
The first baby has been born following “next generation genetic sequencing” of IVF embryos. What are the implications?read more (Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center)
Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center - July 31, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jessica Cussins Tags: Child Development Ethics and Morality Health Parenting babies baby Connor bioethics biotechnology chromosomal abnormalities designer babies down syndrome embryo embryo selection eugenics fertility fertility experts fertilit Source Type: news

Women & Infants receives industry grant
(Women & Infants Hospital) Researchers at Women & Infants have received an industry grant from Natera, Inc. to determine the level of information and education needed to offer a DNA-based prenatal blood test to all pregnant women to screen for Down syndrome and similar chromosome abnormalities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Podcast: Britain invests in spaceplanes
The Sabre engine is being developed by UK firm Reaction Engines and could herald a new era of space flight, opening up access to space as never before and slashing long-haul flight times. Sabre will make it possible to build a "single-stage-to-orbit" spaceplane because it can operate both as an air-breathing jet engine and a rocket engine. Reaction Engines calls its spaceplane Skylon.Alok Jha meets Stuart Clark – the astronomy journalist and writer behind the Guardian's Across The Universe blog – to discuss the revolutionary technology and the implications of the UK government's £60m investment ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Alok Jha, Ian Sample, Robin McKie, Natalie Starkey, Jason Phipps, Stuart Clark Tags: Curiosity rover Aeronautics guardian.co.uk Mars Editorial Science Space Source Type: news

Lab Notes: Down Syndrome Takedown
(MedPage Today) -- A method to silence the surplus chromosome responsible for Down syndrome may finally demystify the clinical condition's origins. Also this week: a thrombolysis theory is overturned. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - July 20, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

UMass Researchers Make Down Syndrome Breakthrough
BOSTON (CBS) — Scientists may–one day–eliminate Down Syndrome. Researchers have been able to silence the extra chromosome that causes the genetic condition. Susanna Peyton’s son Graham has Down Syndrome. Now 26 years old and the oldest of four children. Susanna is hopeful this new research may someday address diseases often connected with the syndrome like heart disease and Alzheimer’s. “The health side of the page would be a benefit, a huge benefit.” UMass Medical School Doctor Jeanne Lawrence has come up with a way to shut off or silence the extra chromosome which is responsible ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen CBS Boston Joe Shortsleeve Source Type: news

Scientists figure out how to turn off Down syndrome in laboratory
Genetic therapy for Down syndrome may be able to help researchers study condition and develop treatments (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists 'switch off' the extra chromosome that causes Down's Syndrome
Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have managed to prevent the condition in human cells grown in a laboratory. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lab work raises potential for gene therapy breakthrough in Down syndrome
A first step toward chromosome treatment for Down sydrome, also known as trisomy 21, was revealed this week when a Nature study published online Wednesday described how a US team used a naturally occurring genetic technique to silence the extra chromosome responsible for the genetic disorder. Down syndrome occurs when instead of having 23 pairs of chromosomes, including a pair of sex chromosomes, the affected individual has three copies of chromosome 21... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Scientists find way to ‘switch off’ chromosome that causes Down syndrome
Researchers hope discovery could pave the way for new form of ‘chromosomal therapy’     (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists close to 'switching off' Down's syndrome gene
Scientists believe they are a step closer to "switching off" a chromosome that causes Down's syndrome.     (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Turn Off Down Syndrome Genes
The insertion of one gene can muzzle the extra copy of chromosome 21 that causes Down’s syndrome, according to a study published today in Nature . The method could help researchers to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research)
Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research - July 18, 2013 Category: Stem Cells Tags: Health,More Science,Health,Biology Source Type: news

Genetic advance in Down's syndrome
US scientists say they have moved a step closer to being able to treat disorders such as Down's syndrome caused by extra chromosomes. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down's syndrome cells 'fixed' in first step towards chromosome therapy
Researchers shut down the extra chromosome responsible for Down's syndrome, paving the way for future treatmentsScientists have corrected the genetic fault that causes Down's syndrome – albeit in isolated cells – raising the prospect of a radical therapy for the disorder.In an elegant series of experiments, US researchers took cells from people with DS and silenced the extra chromosome that causes the condition. A treatment based on the work remains a distant hope, but scientists in the field said the feat was the first major step towards a "chromosome therapy" for Down's syndrome."This is a real...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: The Guardian Genetics Biology World news Health Medical research Human biology Society UK news Down's syndrome Science Source Type: news

Switching Off The Extra Chromosome That Causes Down's Syndrome
The third copy of chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome has been silenced in a cell culture model of the disorder, a Nature paper reports this week. The research marks a step towards 'whole chromosome therapy' for disorders such as Down's, and should aid research into the basic biology underlying these disorders. Jeanne Lawrence and colleagues used an enzyme to introduce an RNA gene, called XIST, into cultured stem cells derived from Down's syndrome patients. XIST RNA coated the extra third copy of chromosome 21, silencing the genes on it... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Scientists switch off chromosome for first time, raising hope for possible Down's treatment
The first steps towards genetic therapy for Down's syndrome children have been taken in a study showing that it is possible to turn off the entire extra chromosome in the cells of people suffering from the condition, scientists said.     (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - July 17, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

UMMS scientists show proof-of-principal for silencing extra chromosome responsible for Down syndrome
(University of Massachusetts Medical School) Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School are the first to establish that a naturally occurring X chromosome "off switch" can be rerouted to neutralize the extra chromosome responsible for trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by cognitive impairment. The discovery provides the first evidence that the underlying genetic defect responsible for Down syndrome can be suppressed in cells in culture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The future of fertility: is it really too late for a baby?
For decades women have been told that their fertility falls dramatically through their 30s – knowledge that affects their choice of career and relationship. But the biological clock doesn't run as fast as we've been toldIn the tentative, post-9/11 spring of 2002, I was, at 30, in the midst of extricating myself from my first marriage. My husband and I had met at university but couldn't find two academic jobs in the same place, so we spent the three years of our marriage living in different states. After I accepted a tenure-track position in California and he turned down a postdoctoral research position nearby &n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Fertility problems Medical research Society Women Features Life and style Childbirth The Observer Science Source Type: news

Facebook plea inspires avalanche of adoption offers
A Catholic parish posted a Facebook message from its priest about a couple pregnant with a child diagnosed with Down syndrome. If they didn't find a couple willing to adopt the unborn child by the end of day, they would abort it, according to the priest. Within hours, hundreds had contacted the church. (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Florbetaben-PET detects amyloid in people with Down syndrome
A new study using PET with a florbetaben radiopharmaceutical shows how people (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 11, 2013 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Improved Pregnancy Test Exposes Birth Defect Much Earlier
An improved pre-natal test has been developed in Europe, which can detect fetal abnormalities such as down syndrome in high-risk pregnancies from the ninth week. PrenaTest® is a non-invasive molecular genetic blood test that can detect fetal trisomies 13 (patau syndrome), 18 (edwards syndrome) and 21 (down syndrome) in the blood. A trisomy refers to the presence of three chromosomes instead of two, which can lead to certain genetic conditions... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

40,000 hugs served here
For more than 10 years, Tim Harris had a dream to own his own business. He's here to tell you that dreams do come true -- even if you're born with Down Syndrome. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Serving breakfast, lunch and hugs
Tim Harris was born with Down syndrome, but that hasn't stopped him from accomplishing his dream of owning his own business. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breakfast, lunch and hugs at Tim's Place
Tim Harris was born with Down syndrome, but that hasn't stopped him from accomplishing his dream of owning his own business. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breakfast and hugs at Tim's Place
For more than 10 years, Tim Harris had a dream to own his own business. He's here to tell you that dreams do come true -- even if you're born with Down Syndrome. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lab Notes: LABAs May Help in Down Syndrome
(MedPage Today) -- A drug currently used to treat asthma and COPD improved cognitive abilities in mice with a model form of Down syndrome. Also this week: preventing post-infection cancer metastasis. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - July 6, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

In Mouse Model Of Down Syndrome, Formoterol Improves Cognitive Function
An existing FDA-approved drug improves cognitive function in a mouse model of Down syndrome, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The drug, an asthma medication called formoterol, strengthened nerve connections in the hippocampus, a brain center used for spatial navigation, paying attention and forming new memories, the study said. It also improved contextual learning, in which the brain integrates spatial and sensory information... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Largest Study Of Its Kind Finds Both Cousin Marriage And Older Mothers Double Risk Of Birth Defects
Marriage between first cousins can more than double the risk of giving birth to a baby with a congenital anomaly (eg, heart and lung defects, Down syndrome), although the absolute risk is low, according to a multiethnic study of more than 11300 babies from the city of Bradford in the UK, published in The Lancet. The high level of consanguineous marriage (marriage between blood relatives) within the large Pakistani community in the study* accounted for nearly a third (31%) of birth defects in babies of Pakistani origin... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Drug improves cognitive function in mouse model of Down syndrome, Stanford study says
(Stanford University Medical Center) An existing FDA-approved drug improves cognitive function in a mouse model of Down syndrome, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 2, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Sorting Out Cognitive Deficits in Down SyndromeSorting Out Cognitive Deficits in Down Syndrome
Dr. Huaxi Xu from Sanford-Burnham and Dr. William Mobley from UC San Diego discuss their collaborative efforts in exploring the molecular roots of impaired memory in Down syndrome. Developments to Watch (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry Expert Interview Source Type: news

Identification Of Important Genomic Variations Will Likely Impact Down Syndrome
Down syndrome, more commonly known as "trisomy 21" is very often accompanied by pathologies found in the general population: Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, or cardiac deficiency. In a study conducted by Professor Stylianos Antonarakis' group from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva (UNIGE), researchers have identified the genomic variations associated with trisomy 21, determining the risk of congenital heart disease in people with Down syndrome... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Complex genetic architectures: Some common symptoms of trisomy 21
(Université de Genève) In a study conducted by Professor Stylianos Antonarakis' group from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva, researchers have identified the genomic variations associated with trisomy 21, determining the risk of congenital heart disease in people with Down syndrome. These result add to other research conducted by the same team about chronic myeloid leukemia, a severe form of leukemia that often affects people with Down syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What Causes Lymphocytosis?
Discussion Lymphocytes are an important part of the cellular and humoral immunity. Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) is usually used to determine ranges of normal for lymphocytes. The ALC is higher in neonates and young children (up to 8000 cells/microL) but in those> 12 years of age is normally> 4000 cells/microL. Lymphopenia is usually defined as
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 24, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D. Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Learning From Our Children
Skip the beach read and dig into memoirs about parenting exceptional children. Marianne Leone, Emily Rapp, Priscilla Gilman and George Estreich have so much to teach you about wholehearted living. And each poignant memoir will show you what you have to learn from your children too.read more (Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center)
Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center - June 21, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lynne Griffin, R.N., M.Ed. Tags: Child Development Health Parenting Relationships appropriate education cerebral palsy down syndrome downs syndrome early childhood education education students exceptional children family relationships first years gilman leone Source Type: news

The Heroic Father
The power of even a mythological, fictional, and ironclad character such as Superman provides one central and realistic truth: Fearlessly embracing the responsibilities fathers have been given, regardless of past mistakes, will leave a strong legacy for generations to come. read more (Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center)
Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center - June 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Brian A. Kinnaird Tags: Parenting Spirituality adulthood boy with down syndrome Carl Jung changing jobs church schooling correlates father image fathers finishing school good over evil Heroes man of steel merriam webster dictionary military police Source Type: news

Non-invasive blood test can detect Down's syndrome
LONDON, June 9 (UPI) -- A blood test can accurately detect Down's syndrome and other genetic fetal abnormalities in the first trimester, British researchers say. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Down Syndrome Test Is More Reliable, Say Researchers
A new study reported this week shows UK researchers have developed a more reliable non-invasive test for Down syndrome during the first three months of pregnancy. Writing in the 7 June online issue of Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kypros Nicolaides of King's College London, and colleagues, suggest the test, which analyzes the baby's DNA in the expectant mother's blood, is superior to currently available non-invasive ways of screening for Down syndrome. In the UK every year, around 750 babies are born with Down syndrome... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Blood Test Works for Detecting Down Syndrome (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Blood screening that accurately detected Down syndrome and other genetic fetal abnormalities in the first trimester could reduce the need for invasive testing with amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN)
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - June 7, 2013 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

VIDEO: New Down's syndrome screening developed
A new method of screening for Down's syndrome has been developed which trials suggest is over 99% accurate. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Down's syndrome blood test may be less-invasive option
Current definitive tests for Down's syndrome are invasive, and require needles inserted into womb (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Down's Syndrome Testing Can Be Earlier And More Reliable Say Researchers
A new study reported this week shows UK researchers have developed a more reliable non-invasive test for Down's syndrome during the first three months of pregnancy. Writing in the 7 June online issue of Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kypros Nicolaides of King's College London, and colleagues, suggest the test, which analyzes the baby's DNA in the expectant mother's blood, is superior to currently available non-invasive ways of screening for Down's syndrome. In the UK every year, around 750 babies are born with Down's syndrome... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Down's syndrome blood test that can reliably detect if an unborn baby has condition to go on trial
The test, which analyses a baby's DNA present in its mother's blood, could be an improvement on current screening methods, according to researchers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Down’s syndrome blood test 'more reliable'
Conclusion The current study suggests that screening for trisomies 13, 18, and 21 using a DNA based maternal blood test may identify similar numbers of affected foetuses to the current screening test. However, the new screening test appears to be better at ruling out the condition in women with normal pregnancies, this means that fewer women would be offered unnecessary invasive diagnostic testing. There are a few important points to note: Not all women in this study had given birth when the study was published, and these babies will need to be assessed to make sure that no cases of trisomy were missed. If this test ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Researchers Target An Aspect Of Down Syndrome
University of Michigan researchers have determined how a gene that is known to be defective in Down syndrome is regulated and how its dysregulation may lead to neurological defects, providing insights into potential therapeutic approaches to an aspect of the syndrome. Normally, nerve cells called neurons undergo an intense period of extending and branching of neuronal protrusions around the time of birth. During this period, the neurons produce the proteins of the gene called Down syndrome cell-adhesion molecule, or Dscam, at high levels... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

New Down's syndrome blood test more reliable, say researchers
Non-invasive blood test using DNA from pregnant woman's blood may be more reliable than current procedures     (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 7, 2013 Category: Science Tags: News Health guardian.co.uk Medical research UK news Down's syndrome Society Source Type: news