Unvaccinated Student in Kentucky Sues After Being Barred From Playing Basketball
Jeremy Kunkel, 18, claims he shouldn ’ t be forced to be vaccinated against chickenpox. He contends that barring him from school violates his First Amendment rights. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CONCEPCI Ó N DE LE Ó N Tags: Freedom of Religion Vaccination and Immunization Kentucky Kunkel, Jerome Assumption Academy Suits and Litigation (Civil) First Amendment (US Constitution) Roman Catholic Church Source Type: news

Securing a future for humanities: the clue is in the name| Letters
Prof Joe Smith, director of the Royal Geographical Society,Prof Sir David Cannadine, president of the British Academy, andProf Norman Gowar respond to a Guardian editorialYoureditorial in defence of the humanities (13 March) is well timed and well argued. The UK needs the contribution of Stem graduates and that made by graduates with knowledge, skills and understanding gained through study of the humanities and wider social sciences. And geography, a subject that is a humanity, a social science and has part Stem designation in higher education, is well placed to make such a contribution.For example, the cabinet office &rsq...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Humanities Education Geography Science Geography and environment studies Mathematics Physics Ordnance Survey UK news Climate change Universities Higher education Fees Students Source Type: news

Giving Your Baby Peanuts Early On May Help Prevent Allergies, New Guidelines Say
Introducing peanuts early may help some babies avoid allergies, according to new guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The guidelines, published in the journal Pediatrics, update and replace the AAP’s 2008 report on preventing atopic diseases — such as asthma, skin conditions and food allergies — in children. While the science in this area is still developing, the AAP’s new report says that there is more evidence than ever to suggest that purposefully introducing some foods to children early in life may help prevent them from developing food allergies, which affect about 8% of Amer...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

There ’ s New Advice To Prevent Food Allergies In Children
This study — known as the Learning Early About Peanut or LEAP trial — showed that children at high risk of developing peanut allergies who are introduced to peanuts at 4 months to 6 months old had a significantly lower risk of developing a peanut allergy than those who waited until they were 5 years; 1.9% of the kids who had peanuts early developed an allergy, compared with 13.7% of the kids who waited. The LEAP trial formed the basis for Monday’s new recommendations, which encourage the early introduction of peanut products in infants at high risk for allergies. But most babies are not at high risk, and ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Food Allergies Source Type: news

Exposing Baby to Foods Early May Help Prevent Allergies
MONDAY, March 18, 2019 -- New parents worry about a lot of things, but the American Academy of Pediatrics says one thing they can cross off that list is concern about giving high-allergy foods too early in life. In fact, the pediatric group says... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective
(American Academy of Ophthalmology) As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters
(Michigan State University) New research conducted by Michigan State University and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that a critical piece of the butterfly's annual cycle was missing -- the fall migration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NAE Awards Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grants
Two Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grants of $30,000 each have been awarded to attendees of the National Academy of Engineering’s 2018 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium. The grants provide seed funding to enable further pursuit of important new interdisciplinary research and projects stimulated by the symposia. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Oberd launches AI-assisted tech for gathering outcome data
Patient-reported outcomes vendor Oberd said it has launched software designed to reduce a patient’s time in completing outcomes surveys for orthopedic procedures. Patient-reported outcomes can help quantify the value of a healthcare provider’s services. Columbia, Mo.-based Oberd’s computer-adaptive test (CAT) software has been developed and validated for all of the outcomes surveys approved by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). The technology, which uses artificial intelligence (AI), has been used in both test and live settings by the Geisinger Health System and will be feature...
Source: Mass Device - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News News Well Orthopedics Software / IT American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) oberd Source Type: news

AAP Now Endorses Influenza Vaccine Shot and Nasal Spray AAP Now Endorses Influenza Vaccine Shot and Nasal Spray
The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its influenza vaccination recommendations, saying both the shot and nasal spray vaccines are acceptable for the 2019-2020 season.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 15, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

10 orthopedic products from AAOS 2019 you need to know
Attendees line up to register for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons annual meeting in Las Vegas this week. More than 30,000 people were expected. (Image from AAOS) The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting in Las Vegas is abuzz about robotics, according to industry analysts from SVB Leerink. While the SVB Leerink analysts termed Stryker’s  (NYSE:SYK) Mako platform “best-in-class,” it’s an expanding category. Other major orthopedics companies are using this week’s AAOS meeting to introduce new offerings or tout updates to existing ones. Johnson...
Source: Mass Device - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Featured Implants News Well Orthopedics Surgical American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) conformis DJO Global Kyocera Orthosensor Inc. Smith & Nephew Stryker Zimmer Biomet Source Type: news

How to Protect Your Kids From Drowning
FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 -- Drowning can be swift and silent, making it a leading cause of accidental death among children. To help parents protect their kids in and around the water, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its water... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Health Tip: Eat Healthier at Work
-- Overeating on a regular basis can lead to weight gain. About 25 percent of adults eat 1,300 calories weekly from food they buy or get free at work, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says. The academy recommends limiting these workplace... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

AAP: Nasal Spray Vaccine Against Flu Acceptable in 2019 to 2020
THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) plans to advise families to vaccinate children against influenza with either the flu shot or nasal spray vaccine during the 2019 to 2020 flu season, in contrast to the academy's... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 14, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Screening for access to firearms by pediatric trainees in high-risk patients - Li CN, Sacks CA, McGregor KA, Masiakos PT, Flaherty MR.
This study investigates how ofte... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Bacteria may help frogs attract mates
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) The role played by symbiotic microorganisms isolated from the skin of anurans has been discovered by researchers in Brazil. The study is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Joint Statement on Need for International Framework on Heritable Genome Editing
In response to a commentary in Nature that calls for a moratorium on clinical uses of heritable genome editing and the establishment of an international governance framework, a statement by the presidents of the National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society says that the commentary"underscores the urgent need for an internationally accepted framework that addresses these complex scientific, ethical, and societal issues. "Toward that end, the U.S. National Academies and the Royal Society are leading an international commission to detail the scientific and the ethical issues...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

More M & amp;A During AAOS Week
Are acquisitions going to be a “thing” during this year’s American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS)? It certainly seems so. There was that huge M&A announcement from Smith & Nephew on the opening day of the conference, not to mention the London-based company also announcing it would acquire BrainLab’s orthopedic joint reconstruction business. On AAOS’s second day, Corin Group certainly seems to be in the deal-making mood by revealing it’s acquiring Omni Orthopedics. The acquisition would give the Canton,...
Source: MDDI - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Orthopedics Source Type: news

Russian and U.S. Academies Sign Agreement to Continue Cooperation
The president of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the presidents of NAS, NAE, and NAM have signed a five-year agreement to continue their cooperation on studies, workshops, and other activities in areas of mutual interest, marking 60 years of cooperation between the Russian and U.S. academies.Learn More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

CT scans may catch more low bone density sufferers before spine surgery
[Photo by Joyce McCown on Unsplash]A CT scan before spine surgery turned up a significant number of patients with previously undiagnosed low bone density, according to a new study out of Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City. The study, presented yesterday at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, suggests there may be value in prospective lumbar, or lower, spine patients first receiving a CT scan in the area. Get the full story from our sister site Medical Design & Outsourcing.    The post CT scans may catch more low bone density sufferers before spine surgery...
Source: Mass Device - March 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Imaging News Well Orthopedics Research & Development American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) CT scans Hospital for Special Surgery spine Source Type: news

Management of the Failed Arthroplasty for Humerus Fracture Management of the Failed Arthroplasty for Humerus Fracture
What are the keys for successfully managing failed shoulder arthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures?Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

AAOS: One-Third of U.S. Children Report Back Pain
WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 -- One in three children between the ages of 10 and 18 years said they had back pain in the past year, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 12... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Excess body fat improves stroke survival rates
Findings, presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting, suggest that being overweight or obese may improve survival chances after a stroke, an obesity paradox.Medical News Today (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 13, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Economist Mariana Mazzucato, winner of the 2019 Madame de Sta ë l Prize
(ALLEA) Economist Mariana Mazzucato is the recipient of the 2019 All European Academies Madame de Sta ë l Prize for Cultural Values, honouring her wide-ranging and stimulating work in the field of political economy and particularly her ground-breaking contributions to understanding the role of the state in innovation. The jury valued her outstanding efforts in shaping new narratives for Europe and its economy through her scholarly work and public engagement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest carbon dioxide sink in renewable forests
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Forests are the filters of our Earth: they clean the air, remove dust particles, and produce oxygen. So far, the rain forest in particular has been considered the 'green lung' of our planet. Yet, an international team, including researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, recently found that the world's largest carbon sinks are located in young, regrowing forests. The results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Challenges in Initiating and Conducting Long-Term Health Monitoring of Populations Following Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies in the United States: A Workshop
Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Division on Earth and Life Studies. Published: 3/13/2019. On March 12-13, 2019, the National Academies held a workshop to discuss challenges and considerations for setting up a registry for long-term health monitoring of populations following nuclear or radiological emergencies in the United States. Workshop participants discussed topics that included existing international inclusion criteria for such registries and possible alternative approaches, including a dose-tiered approach; challenges associated with communicating inclusion criteria for a registry ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

S & amp;N Expands Reach into Regenerative Medicine with M & amp;A
Smith & Nephew is taking a deeper dive into the regenerative medicine market through its $660 million acquisition of Osiris Therapeutics. The London-based company said it hopes to close the deal in 2Q19 and made the announcement of the pending merger at the American Academy of Orthopedics Annual Meeting held this week in Las Vegas. Columbia MD-based Osiris Therapeutics delivered revenue of $102 million for the nine-months ended 30 September 2018, an 18.7% increase over the comparable period in 2017. Revenue was $36.5 million for the three-month period ended 30 September 2018, a 22.4% increase year on year. Osiris is ex...
Source: MDDI - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Orthopedics Source Type: news

5.11 Launches 5.11 ABR Academy at Company-Owned Retail Stores
IRVINE, Calif. – Global leader in innovative tactical apparel, footwear and gear, 5.11 Tactical, is officially launching a program of instructional classes hosted at its 45 company-owned retail stores throughout the U.S. The 5.11 ABR (Always Be Ready) Academy events are free to the public and will be held monthly at different company-owned retail locations nationwide. The 5.11 ABR Academy shows 5.11’s commitment to the 5.11 Always Be Ready mentality extending beyond just a customer’s apparel, footwear and gear. “One of the main focuses of 5.11’s company-owned retail expansion plan is to make 5...
Source: JEMS Operations - March 12, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: 5.11 Tactical (press release) Tags: Press Releases Equipment & Gear Source Type: news

Results of early-stage liver cancer detection using liquid biopsy published in PNAS
(Genetron Health) Genetron Health Co. Ltd and National Cancer Center/ Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences published the promising results of their liver cancer early screening study using cell free DNA and protein biomarkers. This product for screening HCC in at-risk populations, will be further validated and then available for use.This methodology is expected to be applied in early screening of other cancer types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First double-blind controlled trial of TNS shows reduced symptoms in some children with ADHD
(Elsevier) Currently approved in Canada and Europe for adults with medication-resistant depression and seizures, trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has been found to be an effective and safe means of treatment for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), reports a study published in the April 2019 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Compounds in coffee found to fight off Parkinson's and Lewy body dementia
(Natural News) Good news for coffee drinkers: U.S. researchers have found two compounds in coffee — caffeine and EHT — work together to prevent Parkinson’s and Lewy body dementia. Recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the findings suggest that these compounds may potentially be used as a natural way... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Smoking During Pregnancy Doubles Risk Of Sudden Death For Baby, Study Says
(CNN) — Smoking even one cigarette a day during pregnancy can double the chance of sudden unexpected death for your baby, according to a new study analyzing over 20 million births, including over 19,000 unexpected infant deaths. The study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, analyzed data on smoking during pregnancy from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s birth/infant death data set between 2007 and 2011 and found that the risk of death rises by .07 for each additional cigarette smoked, up to 20 a day, a typical pack of cigarettes. By the time you smoke a pack a day, the study found, yo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cigarettes Pregnancy Smoking Source Type: news

Health Tip: Thumb Sprains
-- A sprained thumb occurs when ligaments stretch beyond their limits. The most common cause of a sprained thumb is falling onto an outstretched hand, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says. Depending on the sprain's severity, you may... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New study shows an eye scan can detect signs of Alzheimer's disease
(American Academy of Ophthalmology) Researchers from the Duke Eye Center have shown that a new, noninvasive imaging device can see signs of Alzheimer's disease in a matter of seconds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover new nitrogen source in Arctic
(Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences) Scientists have revealed that the partnership between an alga and bacteria is making the essential element nitrogen newly available in the Arctic Ocean. The microbial process of 'nitrogen fixation' converts the element into a form that organisms can use, and was discovered recently in the frigid polar waters. This shift may be a result of climate change and could affect global chemical cycles, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WATCH: Later start time for high school students
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended in 2014 that high school should begin no earlier than 8:30 am. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - March 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

American Academy of Dermatology, March 1 - 5
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Dermatology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Infections, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Emergency Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Conference, Source Type: news

American Academy of Dermatology, March 1-5
The American Academy of Dermatology The annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology was held from March 1 to 5 in Washington, D.C., and attracted more than 15,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NAS, NAE, and NAM Presidents Highlight Facts on Vaccine Safety in Light of Measles Outbreaks
The current measles outbreaks in the United States and elsewhere are being fueled by misinformation about the safety of vaccines. To help counter such misinformation, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine created a website that provides clear, concise, and evidence-based answers to questions about vaccine safety and other commonly asked questions about health and science. The evidence base includes a number of our studies examining vaccine access, safety, scheduling, and possible side effects. Our work has validated that the science is clear— vaccines are extremely safe. Read full message from...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 8, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Factors associated with nonaccidental trauma evaluation among patients below 36 months old presenting with femur fractures at a level-1 pediatric trauma center - Blatz AM, Gillespie CW, Katcher A, Matthews A, Oetgen ME.
BACKGROUND: In 2009, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons published clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on the treatment of pediatric diaphyseal femur fractures, which recommended a nonaccidental trauma (NAT) evaluation for all patients below 36 mon... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

AAN: No Increased MS Relapse Risk in Postpartum Period
FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 -- Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) seem not to suffer from pregnancy-related relapses in the early postpartum period, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Why you lose hearing for a while after listening to loud sounds
(Link ö ping University) When we listen to loud sounds, our hearing may become impaired for a short time. Researchers at Link ö ping University, Sweden, have discovered a mechanism that helps to explain how this happens. Their results are presented in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI Used to ID Risk of Heart Disease in Diabetes Study
Artificial intelligence is constantly being used in new and different applications in healthcare. A research team from the University of Gothenburg, is now using the power of AI in combination with conventional statistical methods in a study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes. The study’s objective was to identify the most important indicators of elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and death. "What's unique about this study is that we've included machine learning analyses - that is, algorithms for AI - to assess strength of association for cardiovascular risk factors," Aidin Rawshani, PhD, ...
Source: MDDI - March 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

WHO Chief Unveils Reforms, With More Science, Apps and an Academy WHO Chief Unveils Reforms, With More Science, Apps and an Academy
The World Health Organization unveiled a landmark reform on Wednesday that targets billions of people around the globe and puts a stress on primary care for all rather than"moonshot" projects like eradicating diseases.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news

2018 Cozzarelli Prize Recipients Announced
The Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has selected six papers published by PNAS in 2018 to receive the Cozzarelli Prize, an award that recognizes outstanding contributions to the scientific disciplines represented by the National Academy of Sciences. Papers were chosen from the more than 3,200 research articles that appeared in the journal last year. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Google Doodle Celebrates Mathematician Olga Ladyzhenskaya: ‘One of the Most Influential Thinkers of Her Generation’
Russian mathematician Olga Ladyzhenskaya overcame personal and political hurdles and had a lasting impact on a range of scientific fields, from weather forecasting to cardiovascular science and oceanography. On Thursday Google celebrated her life and achievements with a Google Doodle on what would have been her 97th birthday. Ladyzhenskaya was best known for her studies on partial differential equations. Marshall Slemrod, a mathematician with the University of Wisconsin, told the New York Times, “If you believe your weather forecasts, you have to solve the exact equations that she studied.” Google called her &...
Source: TIME: Science - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

National Academies Report Reduces Daily Sodium Limits National Academies Report Reduces Daily Sodium Limits
A new report from the National Academies for the first time ties lower daily sodium limits to a reduction in the risk for chronic disease. The report is expected to guide policy makers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - March 7, 2019 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

First-Ever Female President Will Lead Orthopedic Surgeons First-Ever Female President Will Lead Orthopedic Surgeons
Kristy Weber, MD, will become the first female orthopedic surgeon to lead the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as president in its 87-year history.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics News Source Type: news

NAS President Testifies on Capitol Hill
Marcia McNutt, president of the National Academy of Sciences, spoke to the U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology Committee about"Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Science and Technology." Committee's web page Read the formal testimony (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 6, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news