NUS SINAPSE Director Professor Dean Ho elected as Fellow of National Academy of Inventors
(National University of Singapore) Professor Dean Ho, Director of the Singapore Institute for Neurotechnology at the National University of Singapore, has been elected as a Fellow of the United States National Academy of Inventors, the highest professional accolade for academic inventors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UH Professor named Fellow of National Academy of Inventors
(University of Houston) A University of Houston College of Pharmacy scientist has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors in recognition of his work in drug discovery and development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale chemists find a new tool for understanding enzymes -- Google
(Yale University) In a new study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, chemistry professor Victor Batista and his colleagues used the Google algorithm PageRank to identify key amino acids in the regulation of a bacterial enzyme essential for most microorganisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Enhance your Interdisciplinary and Team Science Skills
Reports abound from professional societies, the Academies, government agencies, and researchers calling attention to the fact that science is increasingly an inter-disciplinary, transdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international endeavor. In short, science has become a “team sport.” There is a real and present need to better prepare scientists for success in this new collaborative environment. The American Institute of Biological Sciences is responding to this call with a new program for scientists, educators, and individuals who work with or participate in scientific teams. Team science is increasingl...
Source: Public Policy Reports - December 11, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Early Results From Landmark Study Show Heavy Screen Time Changes Kids ’ Brains
BOSTON (CBS) – Kids are using electronic devices at a rapidly increasing pace, but at what cost?  The National Institutes of Health is embarking on the most ambitious study to examine the screen time behaviors and outcomes of 11,000 9 and 10-year olds over the next 10 years, and some early results are already in. Researchers have found that kids who spend more than two hours a day on screens scored lower on thought and language tests than those who spent less time on smartphones and other electronic devices. They also found significant physical changes in the brains of those who spend more than seven hours ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated Local Tech Source Type: news

PM2.5 Exposure Linked to Asthma Rescue Medication Use
MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 -- For individuals with asthma, increased fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure is associated with increased weekly rescue inhaler use, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Eczema
-- If your child has eczema, anything that aggravates the child's skin can worsen symptoms, the American Academy of Dermatology says. While everyone's triggers may be different, common ones include dry air, sweat and stress. As a child grows older,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Small and isolated habitat patches crucial to species survival
(Point Blue Conservation Science) Small, local patches of habitat could be playing a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity than you think, according to new research. The global study just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (see article here) looked at the conservation values of vegetation patches in 27 countries on four continents, and considered their size and distance to other habitat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder: Proceedings of a Workshop –In Brief
Source: National Academies Press (NAP). Published: 11/2018. This 10-page report summarizes a workshop held on October 30-31, 2018, when participants reviewed the current knowledge and gaps in understanding regarding the effectiveness of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for treating opioid use disorder. They examined the available evidence on the range of parameters and circumstances in which MAT can be effectively delivered (e.g., duration of treatment, populations, settings, and interventions to address social determinants of health as a component of MAT), and identified challenges in implementation and additional res...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder
Source: National Academies Press (NAP). Published: 11/2018. This 10-page report summarizes a workshop held on October 30-31, 2018, when participants reviewed the current knowledge and gaps in understanding regarding the effectiveness of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for treating opioid use disorder. They examined the available evidence on the range of parameters and circumstances in which MAT can be effectively delivered (e.g., duration of treatment, populations, settings, and interventions to address social determinants of health as a component of MAT), and identified challenges in implementation and additional res...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Astro2020 Decadal Survey Shifts into Gear
The National Academies has issued a statement of task and selected the leaders for the next decadal survey in astronomy and astrophysics. Meanwhile, proponents of large projects are preparing their submissions for  the survey. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - December 7, 2018 Category: Physics Authors: wthomas Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Bottlemouth Syndrome
-- Bottlemouth syndrome is a form of tooth decay that affects babies and young children. It is caused by prolonged drinking of sugary liquids from a bottle. The American Academy of Pediatrics says children are at greater risk of bottlemouth if they... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Exclusive: Further details revealed about ACP 'academy' plans
Creating national standards for advanced nursing will put an end to the “devaluing” of staff and ensure their skills are recognised equally by all employers, those behind the work have told Nursing Times. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - December 7, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Academy Objects to Harmful'Public Charge' Rule Change
In a Dec. 3 letter, the AAFP signaled its strong opposition to a proposed change to the so-called public charge rule, which it said would endanger public health. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - December 6, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Most Alternative Technologies to Open Burning and Open Detonation of Conventional Waste Munitions Are Mature, Says New Report
Most of the alternative technologies to open burning and open detonation (OB/OD) of conventional munitions designated for disposal are mature, including contained burn and contained detonation chambers with pollution control equipment, and many are permitted to replace OB/OD of waste munitions, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Read More  (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

U.S. Interstate Highways Need Overhaul
The future of the U.S. Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change. Unless a commitment is made to remedy the system's deficiencies and prepare for these oncoming challenges, there is a real risk that the nation's interstates will become increasingly unreliable and congested, far more costly to maintain, less safe, incompatible with evolving technology, and vulnerable to the effects of extreme we...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Reusable Respirators Could Help Protect Health Care Personnel During Routine Work and Public Health Emergency Response, Says New Report
Half-facepiece reusable elastomeric respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care workers from exposure to airborne transmissible contaminants or infectious agents— for example, influenza virus— during day-to-day work or with a sudden or rapid influx of patients, such as during a public health emergency, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Implementation challenges need to be addressed, including storage, disinfection, and maintenance; training and education; user comfort and tolerability; and supply logistics and emergency stockpilin...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Food system organizations must strengthen their operations to safeguard against potential threats
(Elsevier) Food systems face growing threats as extreme weather events become more common and more extreme due to climate change. A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, highlights characteristics of organizations involved in the food system that may lead them to be more prepared to respond to such disasters, and opportunities for local, state, and federal organizations to improve resilience across the urban food system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eliminating the latent reservoir of HIV
(University of Illinois at Chicago) A new study suggests that a genetic switch that causes latent HIV inside cells to begin to replicate can be manipulated to completely eradicate the virus from the human body. Cells harboring latent HIV are 'invisible' to the natural defenses of the immune system.The findings, which suggest a cure for HIV may be possible, are reported in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reusable respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care personnel
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) Half-facepiece reusable elastomeric respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care workers from exposure to airborne transmissible contaminants or infectious agents -- for example, influenza virus -- during day-to-day work or with a sudden or rapid influx of patients, such as during a public health emergency, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US interstate highways need overhaul, says new report
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The future of the US Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dietary Supplements Don't Prevent Chronic Disease Dietary Supplements Don't Prevent Chronic Disease
While deficient diets may warrant micronutrient supplements, their indiscriminate use poses health risks, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics warns.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hospital Medicine News Source Type: news

PEMM Student Arielle Baker Receives Prestigious National Fellowship
Arielle Baker, Guarini ‘19, a PhD candidate in the neuroscience track of the Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine (PEMM), has received a Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship. She will be working with the Committee on Women at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) to advocate for the participation and retention of women in these disciplines. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - December 5, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Susan Green Tags: Education Insider News Research award fellowship grad student Guarini School public policy Source Type: news

Lauren Alexander Augustine Appointed to Lead Gulf Research Program
Lauren Alexander Augustine has been appointed executive director of the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The Gulf Research Program was established in 2013 as part of the settlement of criminal charges against two companies involved in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The federal government entrusted the National Academies with $500 million to enhance human health, environmental resources, and the safety of offshore energy systems in the Gulf of Mexico region. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 5, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Predicting Adverse Outcomes After Total Hip Arthroplasty Predicting Adverse Outcomes After Total Hip Arthroplasty
Which of these comorbidity indices most accurately predicts postoperative adverse outcomes among patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty?Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

229 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2018
(California Academy of Sciences) In 2018, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 229 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 120 wasps, 34 sea slugs, 28 ants, 19 fish, seven flowering plants, seven spiders, four eels, three sharks, two water bears, one frog, one snake, one seahorse, one moss, and one liverwort plant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Cryptography Must Be Developed and Deployed Now, Even Though a Quantum Computer That Could Compromise Today's Cryptography Is Likely at Least a Decade Away, Says New Report
Given the current state of quantum computing and the significant challenges that still need to be overcome, it is highly unlikely that a quantum computer that can compromise public-key cryptography– a basis for the security of most of today's computers and networks– will be built within the next decade, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. However, because replacing an established Internet protocol generally takes over a decade, work to develop and deploy algorithms that are resilient against an attack by a quantum computer is critical now. Read More (Source: News ...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 4, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

AAP Updates Screening Policy for ROP AAP Updates Screening Policy for ROP
A policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics provides updated guidelines for screening and treating retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Health Tip: If You Feel Faint
-- Typical symptoms of feeling faint include feeling lightheaded, dizzy, weak, nauseated and sweaty, the American Academy of Family Physicians says. Fainting can be triggered by standing up too quickly, working or playing too hard in hot weather,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Governance of Dual Use Research in the Life Sciences Advancing Global Consensus on Research Oversight: Proceedings of a Workshop
Source: National Academies Press (NAP). Published: 12/2018. This 198-page report summarizes a workshop held on June 10-13, 2018, about governance questions related to the rapid developments in the life sciences that offer the promise of providing tools to meet global challenges in health, agriculture, the environment, and economic development. It discussed continuing concerns that the knowledge, tools, and techniques resulting from life sciences dual use research could also enable the development of bioweapons or facilitate bioterrorism. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leadership in integrated care systems
The NHS Leadership Academy commissioned the Social Care Institute of Excellence (SCIE) to undertake research to increase understanding of leadership of integrated care systems. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - December 4, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program Now Accepting Applications for 2019 Early-Career Research and Science Policy Fellowships
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is now accepting applications for its Early-Career Research Fellowships and Science Policy Fellowships for 2019. Both fellowship programs are designed to help early-career scientists hone their skills while working on issues at the intersections of human health, environmental resources, and offshore energy safety. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Blocks, Boxes Better Than High-Tech Toys For Young Kids, Report Says
Skip the costly electronic games and flashy digital gizmos. Pediatricians say the best toys for tots are old-fashioned hands-on playthings that young children can enjoy with parents — things like blocks, puzzles — even throwaway cardboard boxes — that spark imagination and creativity. “A cardboard box can be used to draw on, or made into a house,” said Dr. Alan Mendelsohn, co-author of a new report on selecting toys for young children, up to around age 5. (Photo credit PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images) Many parents feel pressured by ads promoting tablet-based toys and games as educational and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Cardboard Boxes Toys Source Type: news

Old-Fashioned Play Beats Digital Toys for Kids, Pediatricians Say
MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 -- If you're shopping for toys this holiday season, make sure some simple, old-fashioned items are on your list, pediatricians say. In a new report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is making recommendations on the best... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Curbing Climate Change and Sustainably Supplying Food, Water, and Energy Among Top Challenges Environmental Engineering Can Help Address, New Report Says
Over the next several decades as the global population grows, society will be faced with pressing challenges such as providing reliable supplies of food and water, diminishing climate change and adapting to its impacts, and building healthy, resilient cities. These challenges call for new and expanded roles for environmental engineers, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. To address the challenges, the report recommends that the environmental engineering field evolve its education, research, and practice to advance practical, impactful solutions for society’s multifacete...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Peter Jonas receives Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Peter Jonas, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), receives the Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize 2018 goes in equal parts to Peter Jonas and Elly Tanaka, biochemist at the IMP. Jonas is honored for his outstanding research achievements in the field of neuroscience, in particular for his significant contribution to the understanding of synaptic signal processing at the molecular and cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

To detect new odors, fruit fly brains improve on a well-known computer algorithm
(Salk Institute) It might seem like fruit flies would have nothing in common with computers, but new research from the Salk Institute reveals that the two identify novel information in similar ways. The work, which appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on December 3, 2018, not only sheds light on an important neurobiological problem--how organisms detect new odors--but could also improve algorithms for novelty detection in computer science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gulf War and Health: Volume 11: Generational Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War
Source: National Academies Press (NAP). Published: 11/2018. This 498-page report evaluates the scientific and medical literature on reproductive and developmental effects and health outcomes associated with Gulf War and Post-9/11 exposures, including from biological, chemical, and radiological agents. Veterans ’ concerns regarding the impacts of deployment-related exposures on their health have grown to include potential adverse effects on the health of their children and grandchildren. The report designates research areas requiring further scientific study on potential health effects in the descendants of veterans ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Independent Reviews, Environmental Assessments Needed to Build Trust and Inform DOE NNSA's Plans if it Proceeds with the Dilution and Disposal Process of Surplus Plutonium
If the dilute and dispose approach for disposing of the surplus plutonium in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is fully implemented, the U.S. Department of Energy should use two independent review teams to develop public trust in and improve its decisions, says a new interim report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The first team is a re-initiation of an independent review organization representing the concerns of the state of New Mexico, where WIPP is located, and the second is a separate independent team that would review the classified aspects of DOE's conceptual plan as they are dev...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Remember, remember, glorious Grovember
After the union was officially recognised as the UK’s biggest (have we mentioned that already?), November – or Grovember, as we renamed it – saw everyone at UNISON energised around boosting membership to make us “stronger together”. Activists everywhere hit the floor running, signing up new members around the regions. Stalls were staged, floors walked and dogs nominated as Grovember mascots – well, one called Oscar (pictured above) was – and all in all, it was a rip-roaring success. LGBT conference met in Harrogate, where delegates unanimously backed a call to change the group name...
Source: UNISON Health care news - November 30, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News 2018 LGBT Conference grovember Our Health Heroes Awards show racism the red card stars in our schools Source Type: news

Researchers alleviate Schizophrenia symptoms in new mouse models
(Case Western Reserve University) In a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lin Mei, MD, PhD, asked, does all the tinkering in young mice hamper their brain development, causing schizophrenia-like symptoms? Or, do their brain cells develop normally, but in adulthood struggle to communicate? Researchers need to know whether to focus their efforts on brain cell development or communication, or both, because the answer to these questions implies different therapeutic approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tracing iron in the North Pacific
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) A new Chinese project (2018--2022) will explore the sources and transport of biologically available Fe in the high-nutrient and low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The results can give scientific advice to stakeholders on the feasibility of conducting ocean Fe fertilization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Light pollution may cause insomnia in older adults
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) A new study is the first population-based investigation to report a significant association between artificial, outdoor light exposure at night and insomnia, as indicated by older adults' use of hypnotic drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘They Will Be Studied for the Rest of Their Lives.’ How China’s Gene-Edited Twins Could Be Forever Changed By Controversial CRISPR Work
For now, they’re known as Lulu and Nana, pseudonyms that are meant to give them some amount of anonymity amid the international uproar over their birth. As the first babies born after their genomes were edited (while they were embryos, by the genetics tool CRISPR) the twin girls, born in Shenzhen, China are the subject of scientific and public scrutiny that will only escalate as they get older. He Jiankui, a professor at the Southern University of Science and Technology, stunned the world when he claimed, both in a video posted by his lab and in an interview with a journalist, that he used CRISPR to disable a gene in...
Source: TIME: Health - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Nurse Practitioner Katie Parker reminds us how to keep little ones safe during winter driving.
Katie Parker, CPNPThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that bulky winter clothing, such as winter coats and snowsuits, are not worn underneath the harness of a car seat.  In the event of a car accident, fluffy padding flattens from the force which leaves extra space under the harness.  This puts the child at risk of slipping through the straps and being thrown from the seat.  Below are some tips to help keep your child safe and warm while traveling during the winter season.-Store the carrier portion of infant seats inside when not in use.  Keeping the seat at room temperature will re...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - November 29, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Healthy Habits Source Type: news

China Halts Work By Researchers Creating Gene-Edited Babies
HONG KONG — China’s government ordered a halt Thursday to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies, as a group of leading scientists declared that it’s still too soon to try to make permanent changes to DNA that can be inherited by future generations. Chinese Vice Minister of Science and Technology Xu Nanping told state broadcaster CCTV that his ministry is strongly opposed to the efforts that reportedly produced twin girls born earlier this month. Xu called the team’s actions illegal and unacceptable and said an investigation had been ordere...
Source: TIME: Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China Genetics onetime Source Type: news

U.S. NAS and NAM Presidents Issue Statement on Summit
Marcia McNutt, president of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and Victor Dzau, president of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, have issued a statement on the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing. Read the statement (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Health Tip: Safe Tips For Antibiotic Use
-- Antibiotics are frequently prescribed to fight bacterial infections. But if used improperly, the bacteria they are meant to kill can become resistant. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these guidelines for safe antibiotic use: Use the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Organizing Committee Issues Statement on Human Genome Editing
The organizing committee for the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing has issued a statement on human genome editing research and its potential applications, including heritable genome editing. Read the statement (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing Dean on Nurses in Policy
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 29, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news