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7-year-old Indiana Girl Dies After Being Diagnosed With Flu, Scarlet Fever and Strep Throat
A first-grader from Columbus, Indiana, has died after being diagnosed with a combination of the flu, scarlet fever and step throat, according to local media reports. Savanna Jessie, a 7-year-old first grader at Columbus Signature Academy’s Lincoln Elementary School, died at Columbus Regional Hospital after being found unresponsive in her bed at home Thursday morning. She died about 6:30 a.m. The Bartholomew County coroner’s office told the Columbus Republic that she had a high fever and tested positive for the flu, strep throat and scarlet fever before she died. The coroner is awaiting the results of a toxicolo...
Source: TIME: Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alix Langone Tags: Uncategorized flu onetime Source Type: news

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel genetic variants for ADHD linked to educational attainment
(Elsevier) A study published in the February 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that five novel genetic variants associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been identified by exploiting genetic overlap between ADHD and educational attainment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aging immune system may explain age-related cancer risk increase
(University of Dundee) Study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests aging immune system plays a larger role in cancer incidence than previously thought. Findings may explain higher likelihood of men developing cancer than women. This epidemiological research could have major implications for global fight against cancer if borne out by further studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genome editing offers promising tools for environmental health science
A workshop sponsored by the National Academies explored how genome and epigenome editing might help advance environmental health research. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

NIEHS grantee Chang wins prestigious NAS award
The National Academy of Science Award in Molecular Biology recognized NIEHS grantee Howard Chang for his discovery of long noncoding RNA. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Telemedicine for Family Medicine Practice Telemedicine for Family Medicine Practice
Let AAFP help you make the leap to telemedicine.American Academy of Family Physicians (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Commentary Source Type: news

Cause of severe genetic disease identified
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Mutations in the p63 protein lead to a number of disorders, but none is as severe as the AEC syndrome. Scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt in collaboration with a research group from the University of Naples Federico II have now discovered that this syndrome resembles diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or ALS more closely than it does other p63-based syndromes. Their results were recently published in the scientific journal " Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences " (PNAS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low muscle strength identified as early risk factor for ALS
(University of Gothenburg) Low muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in the Journal of Neurology also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Open Access References: Winter ’ 18
Please alert us to open access references we can share with members.  Include a citation and/or a link that anyone can access. Patient-Centered Care In Cancer. Patient-centered care is about more than you may think! Cure. Brenda Denzler. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities. Jie Chen, C. Daniel Mullins, Priscilla Novak, Stephen B. Thomas. Health Education and Behavior, 2016. Recommended by Dave deBronkart. Designing culturally-sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients’ involvement in their treatment, and encourage p...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - February 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danny van Leeuwen Tags: Newsletter Source Type: news

New, safe zinc oxide quantum dots
(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) Zinc oxide as a heavy metals-free substituent for commonly investigated cadium-based semiconductors is one of the most versatile systems with far-reaching perspectives. Physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of ZnO nanocrystals are strongly dependent on their interface, which is largely determined by synthetic procedures. Chemists from Warsaw have shown that ZnO nanoparticles produced by a new self-supporting organometallic method are safe for human cells. Now it's only one step towards innovative applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MSU ecologist awarded Swedish professorship to further study of Africa's carnivores
(Montana State University) Scott Creel was awarded the 2018 KSLA Wallenberg Professorship from the Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry. He will spend a year in Sweden, concentrating on his research of predator-prey interactions and conservation of African carnivores. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Dean on the Opioid Crisis
Hopkins Nursing—Dean on the Opioid Crisis body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass td,.External...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 1, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

VA Provides Mental Health Care to Veterans of Recent Iraq and Afghanistan Wars of Comparable or Superior Quality to Other Providers, Yet Substantial Unmet Need Remains
While the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides mental health care of comparable or superior quality to care provided in private and non-VA public sectors, accessibility and quality of services vary across the VA health system, leaving a substantial unmet need for mental health services among veterans of the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. A survey of these veterans developed and fielded by the committee that conducted the study found that approximately half of those who may have a need for mental...
Source: News from the National Academies - January 31, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

WPI Biologist Reeta Rao elected a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Reeta Rao, a biologist at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. She studies the biology of fungal diseases, particularly those caused by Candida, a species of fungi responsible for oral thrush, ear infections, and vaginitis, but which is also the leading cause of serious illnesses among hospitalized patients. Treating these life-threatening infections, which have a 30-50 percent mortality rate, costs more than $1 billion annually. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New report evaluates the VA's mental health services, finds substantial unmet need
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) While the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides mental health care of comparable or superior quality to care provided in private and non-VA public sectors, accessibility and quality of services vary across the VA health system, leaving a substantial unmet need for mental health services among veterans of the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NETs will not compensate for inadequate climate change mitigation efforts: EASAC report
( European Academies' Science Advisory Council, Leopoldina - Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften) A new report confirms that negative emission technologies (NETs) offer only 'limited realistic potential' to remove large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and not at the scale envisaged in some climate scenarios. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FDNY EMS Graduate Reunites with EMT Who Saved His Life
An EMS graduate had more than his family cheering him recently as he joined the ranks of the FDNY.   Joseph Bitetto, who graduated from the New York City Fire Department's EMS academy Thursday, was reunited with the emergency medical technician who'd saved his life 22 years ago after he was born early in his family's Brooklyn home. In 1996, Nick and Josephine Bitetto, Joseph Bitetto's parents, had to call 9-1-1 when she went into premature labor in the bathroom. Joseph Bitetto was born at just 28 weeks old. Both mother and newborn's lives were in danger. (Read more...) (Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership)
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Enjoli Francis, Paulina Tam and Lenny Bourin, ABC News Tags: News Videos Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Doctor reveals when you should seek help for your headache
Dr Michael Munger, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians, warned that headaches - considered the worst kind of pain - can be a sign of brain tumours and aneurysms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu vaccine BOMBSHELL: 630% more "aerosolized flu virus particles" emitted by people who received flu shots... flu vaccines actually SPREAD the flu
(Natural News) A bombshell new scientific study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds that people who receive flu shots emit 630% more flu virus particles into the air, compared to non-vaccinated individuals. In effect, this finding documents evidence that flu vaccines spread the flu, and that so-called “herd immunity”... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: Encourage Your Child to be Active
-- If children adopt active lifestyles at a young age, they are less likely to become obese as adults, research shows. One in three children is overweight or obese, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. The group adds that children and teens... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Short sleep duration among middle school and high school students - United States, 2015 - Wheaton AG, Jones SE, Cooper AC, Croft JB.
Insufficient sleep among children and adolescents is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, attention and behavior problems, and poor academic performance (1-4). The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has recomm... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Is The ‘ Souping ’ Trend For You?
 By Lisa Drayer, CNN (CNN) — When I first heard of “souping,” it brought me back to my clinical days working in a hospital, where pureed soups and other easy to digest foods — also known as “full liquids” — would be prescribed for patients recovering from gastrointestinal surgery, or those who had difficulty chewing or swallowing. Then I reflected upon how much I regularly enjoy soup, especially for the comfort it provides on cold, dreary days — even though, thankfully, I have no health issues that would require such an easily digestible meal. Soup is often my go-to in t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Diets Source Type: news

Comprehensive E-cigarettes Study Offers Mixed Findings
Researchers with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine recently issued a comprehensive report on electronic cigarettes and their effects on health. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - January 26, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Health Tips: Prevent Infections During Pregnancy
-- Acquiring an infection during pregnancy is bad for both the pregnant woman and her unborn baby. The American Academy of Pediatrics stresses the importance of making healthy choices and taking extra precautions to prevent infections during... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Enhanced evolution: Scientists find genetic swap changes physical expression
(Research Organization of Information and Systems) The difference between webbed toes and distinct digits may be the result of not just genetic information, but of how the genes regulate that information. Researchers at the National Institute of Genetics, Research Organization of Information and Systems in Japan found that a small, nonspecific tweak to a mammal's DNA can potentially cause specific and significant physical changes. The scientists recently published the results of their study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel body structure likely tied to mating in new extinct insect species
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Based on 2-D and 3-D data of several morphological features, researchers scanned all specimens with differentμ-Ct devices at Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two new snout moth genera and three new species discovered in southern China
(Pensoft Publishers) New members have joined the ranks of the snout moths -- one of the largest groups within the insect order known formally as Lepidoptera, comprising all moths and butterflies. Recently, a team of four taxonomists from the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences described two genera and three species previously unknown to science. Their study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Liguori Academy Honors Stan Woodland at the 2nd Annual Boundless...
The Liguori Academy fundraising gala will this year honor CMI/Compas CEO Stan Woodland for his contributions to the community.(PRWeb January 25, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15133314.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

HealthWatch: E-Cigarettes Are Less Harmful Than Regular Cigarettes, Still May Pose Risks
BOSTON (CBS) — Many smokers turn to e-cigarettes to help them quit but just how safe are they? A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine concludes that e-cigarettes are less toxic than regular cigarettes and could be a useful tool to help smokers kick the habit. That said, e-cigarettes do emit some toxins and release nicotine which is addictive and has long-term effects, so you if you don’t smoke, certainly don’t start using e-cigarettes because you think they’re harmless. They’re not. And we know that once kids and teens start using e-cigarettes or start ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall E-Cigarette Source Type: news

Yes, They ’ ve Cloned Monkeys in China. That Doesn ’ t Mean You ’ re Next.
Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have created the first primate clones with a technique like the one used to create Dolly the sheep more than 20 years ago. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Cloning Genetics and Heredity Monkeys and Apes Genetic Engineering Cell (Journal) Chinese Academy of Sciences Shanghai (China) Source Type: news

Scientists Have Cloned Monkeys for the First Time. Are Humans Next?
(NEW YORK) — For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create two healthy monkeys, bringing science an important step closer to being able to do the same with humans. Since Dolly’s birth in 1996, scientists have cloned nearly two dozen kinds of mammals, including dogs, cats, pigs, cows and polo ponies, and have also created human embryos with this method. But until now, they have been unable to make babies this way in primates, the category that includes monkeys, apes and people. “The barrier of cloning primate species is now overcome,” declared Mu...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Malcolm Ritter / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH China cloning healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Cute monkey clones created in China in world first
Identical long-tailed macaques Zhong Zhong (pictured) and Hua Hua were born eight and six weeks ago respectively at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chinese Scientists Clone Monkeys Using Method That Created Dolly The Sheep
In a first for primates, a team of researchers has produced two macaque monkey clones using a technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer. The advance could hasten research into human diseases.(Image credit: Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences/Cell Press) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

E-Cigarettes ’ Risks and Benefits: Highlights From the Report to the F.D.A.
Vaping may help smokers quit, and are safer than conventional cigarettes, but they ’ re not risk-free, a national public health panel says. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: Smoking and Tobacco E-Cigarettes National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program Awards $5.3 Million to Enhance Environmental Restoration Outcomes and Improve Oil Spill Risk Assessment
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced grants totaling $5.3 million awarded for seven new projects. Five of the projects involve developing or testing new technologies or methods for monitoring or evaluating environmental restoration projects to improve future restoration efforts. The remaining two projects focus on improving the information available to decision-makers for evaluating public health risks resulting from oil spills. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - January 24, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

e-Cigarettes May Spark Smoking in Teens, says NAS Report e-Cigarettes May Spark Smoking in Teens, says NAS Report
e-Cigarettes are less harmful than combustible tobacco products, but they may also spur youth to go on to smoke conventional cigarettes, says a major report from the National Academies of Sciences (NAS).Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

National Academies' Gulf Research Program awards $5.3 million to enhance environmental restoration outcomes
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The Gulf Research Program (GRP) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced grant awards for seven new projects totaling $5.3 million. Five of the projects involve developing or testing new technologies or methods for monitoring or evaluating environmental restoration projects to improve future restoration efforts. Two of the projects are focused on improving the information available to decision-makers for evaluating public health risks resulting from oil spills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

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Shelly Flais, MDShelly Flais, MD was featured on today's National Public Radio ’s On Point broadcast, as one of the spokepersons featured  on the topic of this year ’s influenza season .  Dr. Flais is also a spokewoman for the American Academy of Pediatrics as well as an assistant professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University ’s Feinberg School of Medicine.   To listen to the broadcast please visit:http://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2018/01/22/flu-season-could-get-worse (Source: Pediatric Health Associates)
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - January 23, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Healthy Habits Safety Source Type: news

Nat'l Academies: E-Cigarettes Less Harmful Than Regular Cigarettes
Electronic cigarettes are a safer option than tobacco cigarettes, according to a new report on the public health effects of e-cigarettes by the National... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - January 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Vaping Is Addictive And Can Lead Teens To Smoke, Study Finds
CBS Local — A newly released report, compiled by health experts from around the country, has found that e-cigarettes can have a much more negative impact on teens than previous believed. The study claims that teens not only become addicted to vaping but are more likely to pick up smoking because of it. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine released their findings on Jan. 23, citing evidence that e-cigarettes were safer than traditional smoking products, but refused to declare vaping devices completely safe. “When it got down to answering the questions about what the impacts on health are,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Addiction Chris Melore e-cigarettes Local TV Smoking talkers vaping Source Type: news

Science Group Ranks Evidence on E-Cigarette Safety
Vaping may help smokers quit, and are safer than conventional cigarettes, but they ’ re not risk-free, a national public health panel says. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: Smoking and Tobacco E-Cigarettes National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Source Type: news

These Are the Best Foods for a Baby ’s Brain
So much is going on in the first few months of a baby’s life, it’s no surprise that what a baby eats can have an effect on how important structures and connections in the brain develop. To help parents understand what babies need, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a set of recommendations for foods that ensure healthy brain development in babies’ first 1,000 days. In the guidelines, just published in the journal Pediatrics, the AAP’s Committee on Nutrition say that certain nutrients, including protein, zinc, iron, folate, certain vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids are critical fo...
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized babies brains babies diet babies nutrition babies supplements baby diet baby food baby food diet best foods for a baby brain health breast milk breastmilk Diet/Nutrition healthytime what do babies eat what do ba Source Type: news

Vaping Can Be Addictive and May Lure Teenagers to Smoking, Science Panel Concludes
A report from the National Academy of Sciences said that e-cigarettes are safer than smoking, but not quite safe, and may cause teens to take up tobacco. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: Smoking and Tobacco Addiction (Psychology) E-Cigarettes Nicotine Food and Drug Administration National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Source Type: news

One of the Most Comprehensive Studies on Health Effects of E-Cigarettes Finds That Using E-Cigarettes May Lead Youth to Start Smoking, Adults to Stop Smoking
Evidence suggests that while e-cigarettes are not without health risks, they are likely to be far less harmful than conventional cigarettes, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. They contain fewer numbers and lower levels of toxic substances than conventional cigarettes, and using e-cigarettes may help adults who smoke conventional cigarettes quit smoking. However, their long-term health effects are not yet clear. Among youth -- who use e-cigarettes at higher rates than adults do -- there is substantial evidence that e-cigarette use increases the ris...
Source: News from the National Academies - January 23, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Comprehensive Review of Skiing and Snowboarding Injuries Comprehensive Review of Skiing and Snowboarding Injuries
A new review provides insight into the patterns and mechanisms of musculoskeletal injuries associated with skiing and snowboarding.Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

New report one of the most comprehensive studies on health effects of e-cigarettes
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine takes a comprehensive look at evidence on the human health effects of e-cigarettes. Although the research base is limited given the relatively short time e-cigarettes have been used, the committee that conducted the study identified and examined over 800 peer-reviewed scientific studies, reaching dozens of conclusions about a range of health impacts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists smash thousands of proteins to find four ‘Legos of life'
By “smashing” proteins and looking at the broken bits, scientists at Rutgers University say they’ve discovered four basic building blocks that can be stacked like Legos to build all kinds of different proteins.The resultsdescribed in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences could help... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news