Integrated approaches to natural resource management key to Canada's continued prosperity
(Council of Canadian Academies) A new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) finds that conventional methods of natural resource management haven't kept pace with the scale and complexity of 21st century problems. It concludes that we know enough to act on integrated approaches to engagement, planning, and decision-making that will protect the health and competitiveness of Canada's resource industries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SwRI leaders Hamilton, Stern to be inducted into UT-Austin Academy of Distinguished Alumni
(Southwest Research Institute) Three of SwRI's finest will be inducted into the inaugural class of the Academy of Distinguished Alumni in The University of Texas at Austin's Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics on April 26. President and CEO Adam L. Hamilton, P.E., Associate Vice President Dr. Alan Stern (Space Science and Engineering Division, 15) and retired Executive Vice President Dr. Norm Abramson joined an illustrious class of 24 honorees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Same group that pushes mandatory vaccines at gunpoint now says citizens should never own guns to defend themselves
(Natural News) The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), a rabidly pro-vaccine front group working on behalf of Big Pharma, recently mailed out a deceptive survey to its members asking them to explain how they are engaging in “Firearm Injury Prevention” – as if it’s part of the normal job description of doctors and pediatricians to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

EMS Physicians Address Ongoing Critical Drug Shortages in DC Hill Day
Washington (April 23, 2019) – National Association of EMS Physicians® (NAEMSP®) members joined other EMS professionals on Capitol Hill last week to advocate for issues affecting quality prehospital patient care. Drug shortages again emerged as a top concern, as emergency medical facilities across the country are forced to severely restrict use of certain IV fluids, anti-nausea medications, airway management medications and other essential emergency medications (EEMs), many of which have no suitable substitute. Of the 176 EMS physician medical directors who responded to a survey NAEMSP conducted ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

World Health Organization Issues First-Ever Screen Time Guidelines for Young Kids. Here ’s What to Know
(LONDON) — The World Health Organization has issued its first-ever guidance for how much screen time children under 5 should get: not very much, and none at all for those under 1. The U.N. health agency said Wednesday that kids under 5 should not spend more than one hour watching screens every day — and that less is better. The guidelines are somewhat similar to advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics. That group recommends children younger than 18 months should avoid screens other than video chats. It says parents of young children under two should choose “high-quality programming” with educ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Children onetime Screen Time Source Type: news

AAP Updates Guidance for Care in Neurofibromatosis Type 1
WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 -- Guidance has been updated for the health supervision of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), according to a clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online April 22 in Pediatrics. David... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

In Remembrance of David A. Hamburg, Former Institute of Medicine President
The National Academies note with great sadness the passing of David A. Hamburg on April 21, 2019. Hamburg served as president of the Institute of Medicine from 1975 to 1980. As president during its first decade of operation, Hamburg was instrumental in clarifying the role and focus areas of the IOM and laid the groundwork for productive relationships with Congress and federal agencies that remain fruitful to this day. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Liquid crystals in nanopores produce a surprisingly large negative pressure
(The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences) Negative pressure governs not only the Universe or the quantum vacuum. This phenomenon, although of a different nature, appears also in liquid crystals confined in nanopores. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, a method has been presented that for the first time makes it possible to estimate the amount of negative pressure in spatially limited liquid crystal systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Joining the company of Albert Einstein and Michelle Obama
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Professor Ivan Dikic, Director of the Institute of Biochemistry II, has been elected to the venerable American Academy of Arts and Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Effect of NSAIDs on Bone Healing Rates: A Meta-analysis Effect of NSAIDs on Bone Healing Rates: A Meta-analysis
NSAIDs are effective pain relievers, but might their use lead to delayed bone fracture healing?Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely
(Karolinska Institutet) Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely. The risk increases as blood sugar levels rise, however women who maintain the recommended levels also risk giving birth prematurely. These are the findings from researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden, published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women underreport prevalence and intensity of their own snoring
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) A new study of adults who were referred for evaluation of a suspected sleep disorder suggests that women tend to underreport snoring and underestimate its loudness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate Change Has Already Increased Global Inequality. It Will Only Get Worse
Scientists have long predicted that warmer temperatures caused by climate change will have the biggest impact on the world’s poorest, most vulnerable people. New research now indicates that’s already happened over the last several decades. A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science found that in most poor countries, higher temperatures are more than 90% likely to have resulted in decreased economic output, compared to a world without global warming. Meanwhile, the effect has been less dramatic in wealthier nations—with some even potentially benefiting from higher temper...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Strict Blood Pressure Limits for Kids Tied to Heart Health Later
MONDAY, April 22, 2019 -- Tighter high blood pressure guidelines for children might better spot those at risk for heart disease in adulthood, a new study suggests. Compared to 2004 guidelines, the updated 2017 guidelines from the American Academy... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New pediatric blood pressure guidelines identify more kids at higher risk of premature heart disease
(American Heart Association) Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows zoos and aquariums increase species knowledge index 800 percent
(Species360) Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: When researchers look at what we know about fertility and survival rates for major classes of species, 98 percent of the page remains blank. That changes dramatically with untapped data from nearly 1,200 zoos and aquariums in 96 countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microglia, immune cells of the central nervous system, shown to regulate neuroinflammation
(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) A research team at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has shown that microglia, the immune cells of the central nervous system -- including the retina -- serve as 'gatekeepers' of neuroinflammation. Uveitis is one of the leading causes of blindness.In the study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers describe for the first time a role for microglia in directing the initiation of autoimmune uveitis by orchestrating the inflammatory response within the retina. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacteria use their enemy -- phage -- for 'self-recognition'
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Scientists discovered that cells can distinguish themselves from closely related competitors through the use of a virus, and the harboring of phage in bacterial genomes benefits host cells when facing competitors in the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Public Health Leadership and Implementation Academy for Noncommunicable Diseases
(Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease)
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A team of scientists led by Prof. FU Chunxiang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology completed the identification of bm5 mutant. This was the first time that the locus of maize bm5 mutant had been identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Does Sugar Make Kids Hyper? That ’ s Largely A Myth
(CNN) — Does sugar make kids hyper? Maybe. “If you look at the peer-reviewed evidence, we cannot say sugar absolutely makes kids hyper; however, you can’t discount that sugar may have a slight effect” on behavior, said Kristi L. King, senior pediatric dietitian at Texas Children’s Hospital and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In the mid-1990s, a meta-analysis reviewed 16 studies on sugar’s effects in children. The research, published in the medical journal JAMA, concluded that sugar does not affect behavior or cognitive performance in children. “However, a sm...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: News Health CNN Sugar Source Type: news

Health Tip: Choosing a Car Seat
-- Thousands of young children face injury or death in car accidents each year. Proper use of car seats can keep children safe in the event of a crash, says American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The AAP provides these guidelines for choosing car... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

In distinguished company
(University of California - Santa Barbara) UC Santa Barbara professors Alison Butler, Jos é Cabez ó n, Brenda Major and Rachel Segalman have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. They join 210 other new fellows and international members of the prestigious organization. Their selection brings to 41 the number of UC Santa Barbara faculty members who have been named fellows of the academy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NAM Announces Collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Innovation in the Healthy Longevity Global Grand Challenge
The National Academy of Medicine announced yesterday a first-of-its-kind collaboration with Johnson& Johnson Innovation as the principal corporate partner of the Healthy Longevity Catalyst Awards in the United States. The Catalyst Awards are part of the Academy's Healthy Longevity Global Grand Challenge, which aims to create a worldwide movement to improve physical, mental, and social well-being for people as they age.NAM President Victor J. Dzau and Johnson& Johnson's Global Head of External Innovation William N. Hait formally signed the agreement during a ceremony held April 16, 2019, at the National Academy of S...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Academy Calls for Drug Pricing Transparency, Action
In separate letters to lawmakers this month, the Academy expressed support for new drug pricing legislation and ongoing insulin price investigation. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - April 17, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Two academics honoured with Royal Society Fellows
Two University of Bristol academics, Professors George Davey Smith and Michael Kendall, have achieved the rare distinction of being elected Fellows of the world's most eminent scientific academy, the Royal Society, for their exceptional contributions to science. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards, International, Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Rel Source Type: news

Health Tip: Antidepressant Precautions
-- Before taking an antidepressant, it's important to take a few factors into consideration, says the American Academy of Family Physicians. The academy suggests: Talk to your doctor about different antidepressant options. Inform your doctor of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Synergy of anthropogenic emissions and atmospheric processes may cause severe haze in northern China
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A study led by AN Zhisheng from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE), Chinese Academy of Sciences, reviews and synthesizes recent advances in the causes and formation mechanisms of severe haze pollution in northern China. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Columbia aids scientist elected to royal society
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) South African AIDS researcher and scientist, Salim Abdool Karim, Ph.D., CAPRISA Professor of Global Health at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, has been elected a fellow of the prestigious Royal Society, the world's oldest science academy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NYC health officials shutter a daycare center in Brooklyn for refusing to provide vaccine records
United Talmudical Academy, which has around 250 kids aged three to five years old and 10 teachers, is in Williamsburg, one of the areas hardest-hit by the current measles outbreak. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Barriers to Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Should Be Addressed
TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 -- Barriers to accessing treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) need to be addressed to help curb the epidemic, according to a report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Alan I.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 16, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Radiology publishes roadmap for AI in medical imaging
(Radiological Society of North America) In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The workshop was co-sponsored by NIH, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and The Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research (The Academy). The organizers aimed to foster collaboration in applications for diagnostic medical imaging, identify knowledge gaps and develop a roadmap to prioritize research needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lawmakers Introduce Bill to Address Sexual Harassment in Science
Democratic Senators have introduced a bill to address sexual harassment in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. On April 4, 2019, Senators Kamala Harris (D-CA), Jacky Rosen (D-NV), and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), introduced the Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019, which would authorize $17.4 million per year in funding to address the causes and consequences of sexual harassment in STEM. The bill comes in response to a National Academies’ study published in 2018 that found that 58 percent of women in STEM fields say they have been sexually harassed. A companion measure was introduced...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Skin Diseases Appear to Be Underdiagnosed
MONDAY, April 15, 2019 -- Skin diseases might be more common than previously thought, with a majority of individuals unaware of their condition, according to a study published online March 19 in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 15, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Health Tip: Living With Animal Allergies
-- Over half of U.S. households have pets, but unfortunately millions of Americans are allergic to animals. The best way to manage symptoms of pet allergies is to avoid pets, says the American Academy of Asthma and Immunology. Other ways to minimize... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Climate change could undermine children's education and development in the tropics
(National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center) A new study by a University of Maryland researcher published in the April 15, 2019, issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that exposure to extreme heat and precipitation in prenatal and early childhood years in countries of the global tropics could make it harder for children to attain secondary school education, even for better-off households. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Google searches reveal popular bird species
(Cornell University) Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have just been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New report examines the safety of using dispersants in oil spill clean ups
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) A multi-disciplinary team of scientists has issued a series of findings and recommendations on the safety of using dispersal agents in oil spill clean-up efforts in a report published this month by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Consultation on the academy for advancing practice
Health Education England is consulting on different standards for the establishment of its new academy for advancing practice. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - April 15, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Co-Chairs of Forensic Science Report Honored by Innocence Network
Harry T. Edwards and Constantine Gatsonis, co-chairs of the committee that authored the National Academies' 2009 report Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward, have been awarded the Innocence Network's 2018 Champion of Justice Award. Judge Edwards accepted the award at the annual conference of the Innocence Network. The award"was created to honor individuals who go above and beyond in supporting and championing efforts that free the wrongfully convicted, and/or reform the criminal justice system to prevent wrongful convictions. Their work strengthens the integrity of the justice system, is...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cherry Murray and Peggy Hamburg Elected Co-Chairs of IAP
Cherry Murray, a member of NAS and NAE, and Peggy Hamburg, NAM member and foreign secretary, have been elected as co-chairs of the InterAcademy Partnership (IAP) at the IAP General Assembly in Songdo, South Korea. IAP is the global network of over 140 science, engineering, and medical academies working together to provide independent, expert advice on scientific, technological, and health issues. Over the course of her career in physics, Murray has held prominent appointments in industry, academia, and the public sector, while Hamburg is a distinguished physician and public health administrator as well as president of the ...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Children Are Swallowing Foreign Objects More Frequently, Study Finds
According to a new study in the journal Pediatrics, the rate of foreign-body ingestions among children under age 6 nearly doubled in the two decades after 1995. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CHRISTINA CARON Tags: American Academy of Pediatrics Danielle Orsagh-Yentis Pediatrics (Journal) Emergency Medical Treatment Digestive Tract Children and Childhood Batteries Toys Source Type: news

Pediatrician Group Urges Recall of Baby Rocker Linked to Infant Deaths Pediatrician Group Urges Recall of Baby Rocker Linked to Infant Deaths
The American Academy of Pediatrics called on the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) on Tuesday to issue a full recall of the"Fisher-Price Rock'n Play Sleeper" infant rocker, which has been linked to 32 infant deaths, it said on its website.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

The Risks of Getting a Tattoo Are Rare, But Real. Here ’s What to Know
Nearly three in 10 Americans have a tattoo, yet ink is still somewhat stigmatized. Many job seekers and office workers hide their body art rather than risk disapproval from higher-ups. Research also finds that tattoo stigma is widespread. A recent study, published in the journal Stigma and Health, found that when hypothetical patients with HIV or lung cancer had tattoos, others were more likely to blame them for their high health care costs compared to tattoo-free folks with the same illnesses. The study provides “initial evidence that tattooed individuals face health disparities,” the study authors write. Ta...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Grandfathering Extension Could Harm Patients, AAFP Warns HHS
Responding to a multi-agency request for information, the Academy told HHS that extending plans that were in place before March 2010 could harm vulnerable patients. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - April 12, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Scientists develop artificial chemical receptor to assist viral transduction for T cell engineering
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research team, led by Prof. CAI Lintao at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and other collaborators developed a 'safe, efficient and universal' technique based on bioorthogonal chemistry and glycol-metabolic labeling for viral-mediated engineered T cell manufacturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The criminogenic and psychological effects of police stops on adolescent black and Latino boys - Del Toro J, Lloyd T, Buchanan KS, Robins SJ, Bencharit LZ, Smiedt MG, Reddy KS, Pouget ER, Kerrison EM, Goff PA.
Proactive policing, the strategic targeting of people or places to prevent crimes, is a well-studied tactic that is ubiquitous in modern law enforcement. A 2017 National Academies of Sciences report reviewed existing literature, entrenched in deterrence th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Adiposity may reduce acne in young adults
Being overweight or obese as a teenager, and having metabolically active fat cells as a result, may be prevent acne, according to a study published in theJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology.Healio (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 11, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Texts like networks: How many words are sufficient to recognize the author?
(The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences) We are more original than we think -- this is what is being suggested by literary text analysis carried out by a new method of stylometry proposed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences. The author's individuality can already be seen in connections between no more than a dozen of words in English text. It turns out that in Slavic languages authorship identification requires even fewer words and is more certain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NAS Honors 10 U.S. Nobel and Kavli Prize Laureates
From revolutionizing cancer care to modeling the economic impact of climate change, recent winners of Nobel and Kavli Prizes have explored virtually every angle of science. On Tuesday afternoon and evening, the National Academy of Sciences honored 10 of these esteemed individuals at events on Capitol Hill and at the NAS building. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news