Health Tip: Your Child's Runny Nose
-- A runny nose usually starts when your child's cold is on the mend, says the American Academy of Family Physicians. Mucus from a runny nose helps wash the cold virus out of the nose and sinuses. After a few days, the mucus may change to a white or... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 31, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Media Is for Nurses, Too
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - May 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Discovery may lead to natural ent-kaurane diterpenoid for NK-based tumor immunotherapy
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Research groups led by Prof. LI Yan and Prof. Puno Pematenzin from the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that ent-kaurane diterpenoids, which show a wide range of bioactivity, especially antitumor activity, are good candidates as sensitizer agents for NK cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A Wake-Up Call On Smart Beds And Sleep Apps That Collect Your Data
Your bed could be watching you. OK, so not with a camera. At least not yet. But if you have any of a variety of “smart beds,” mattress pads or sleep apps, it knows when you go to sleep. It knows when you toss and turn. It may even be able to tell when you’re having sex. Sleep Number, one company that makes beds that can track heart rate, respiration and movement, says it collects more than 8 billion biometric data points every night, gathered each second and sent via an app through the internet to the company’s servers. “This gives us the intelligence to be able to continue to feed our algori...
Source: TIME: Health - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Appleby / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized apps sleep tech Source Type: news

A Wake-Up Call On Smart Beds And Sleep Apps That Collect Your Data
Your bed could be watching you. OK, so not with a camera. At least not yet. But if you have any of a variety of “smart beds,” mattress pads or sleep apps, it knows when you go to sleep. It knows when you toss and turn. It may even be able to tell when you’re having sex. Sleep Number, one company that makes beds that can track heart rate, respiration and movement, says it collects more than 8 billion biometric data points every night, gathered each second and sent via an app through the internet to the company’s servers. “This gives us the intelligence to be able to continue to feed our algori...
Source: TIME: Health - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Appleby / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized apps sleep tech Source Type: news

Energy Drinks May Have Unintended Health Risks
(CNN) — Energy drinks may promise a boost, but experts are increasingly concerned that their cocktails of ingredients could have unintended health risks. A study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that caffeinated energy drinks altered the heart’s electrical activity and raised blood pressure. The extent of these electrical changes — which signal the heart’s chambers squeezing and relaxing — is “generally considered mild,” according to study author Sachin Shah, a professor of pharmacy at the Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Scienc...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Energy Drinks Source Type: news

Guidance Updated for Sedation in Pediatric Dental Patients
TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 -- In conjunction with the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidance for monitoring and managing pediatric dental patients during sedation; the guidelines were... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 28, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Health Tip: Treating a Dislocated Shoulder
-- Capable of turning in a variety of directions, the shoulder is among the body's most mobile joints. That makes it easy to dislocate, says the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. To treat a partially or completely dislocated shoulder, a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Researchers identified novel oncogenic function for receptor linked to Alzheimer's disease
(University of Turku) Common and rare SORLA single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. So far, SORLA has been mainly studied in neurons, but the new study focused on SORLA's role in cancer cells. Led by Academy Professor Johanna Ivaska, researchers from the University of Turku in Finland observed that SORLA was highly expressed in HER2 positive cancers. Removing SORLA from cancer cells severely impaired the oncogenic fitness of HER2 positive cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genetic engineering strategy makes human-made DNA invisible
(Forsyth Institute) In a paper published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, Dr. Christopher Johnston and his colleagues at the Forsyth Institute describe a new technique to genetically engineer bacteria by making human-made DNA invisible to a bacterium's defenses. In theory, the method can be applied to almost any type of bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bioengineers suggested ways to reduce crop losses caused by heat, cold and drought
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS), Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and National Taiwan University comprehended state of the art scientific knowledge about plants stress response activated by unfavorable environmental factors. Researchers proposed ways to improve crop plants stress resistance by developing one's heritable stress response memory which will allow preserving the stability of the yield obtained worldwide. A related review published in Trends in Plant Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Health Tip: Children and Pets
-- Teaching children how to care for an animal can be an invaluable experience, says the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Taking care of pets can help children develop social skills and learn how to treat others nicely. However,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 27, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

More fishing vessels chasing fewer fish, new study finds
(University of Tasmania) A new analysis of global fishing data has found the world's fishing fleet doubled in size over the 65-years to 2015 but for the amount of effort expended the catch fell more than 80 per cent.Published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study by researchers from the University of Tasmania and CSIRO found the global fishing fleet grew from 1.7 million vessels in 1950 to 3.7 million in 2015. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Thirty years after anorexia onset, fewer ill than healthy
(University of Gothenburg) A study that started in 1985 followed some 50 people who had become anorexic in their teens. It shows that 30 years later, the majority were healthy but some had persistent eating disorders. The study, published in The British Journal of Psychiatry, was carried out at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Epigenetic study provides new approaches to combination therapies for aggressive cancers
(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) A recent study by CeMM reveals how the interaction of the epigenetic protein BRD4 with the metabolic enzyme MTHFD1 controls gene expression and cell proliferation. The results of the study have now been published in the renowned journal Nature Genetics. They suggest novel approaches for the development of combination therapies for aggressive cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 27, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Does Your Sunscreen Work for You?
SUNDAY, May 26, 2019 -- Sunscreen is a real key to protecting your skin from the sun and preventing skin cancer, but are you using it correctly? Santa Monica-based dermatologist Dr. Tanya Kormeili thinks not. A recent American Academy of Dermatology... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Infant deaths in sitting devices - Liaw P, Moon RY, Han A, Colvin JD.
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Annually, several hundred infant deaths occur in sitting devices (eg, car safety seats [CSSs] and strollers). Although American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines discourage routine sleeping in sitting devices, little is known abou... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Consumers First Coalition Launches With AAFP on Board
The Academy this month helped launch the Consumers First Coalition, an alliance designed to examine and improve disparities in the U.S. health care system. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 25, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Plantar Fasciitis
-- Some 2 million people are treated for plantar fasciitis each year, says the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. The condition, which causes pain of the heel, occurs when tissue supporting the foot's arch becomes irritated. Often, plantar... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Report Puts Scientific Replicability and Reproducibility Under the Microscope
A National Academies report released this month delves into issues pertaining to achieving reproducibility and replicability in scientific results. While encouraging reforms to scientific practices, it stresses that scientific confidence rests less in verifying individual results than in accumulating evidence across studies. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - May 23, 2019 Category: Physics Authors: wthomas Source Type: news

New Kid on the Block: The Doctrina Academy
The Doctrina Academy is a new service, developed by Doctrina, a video e-learning platform that reaches over 1,000,000 healthcare professionals (HCPs) from around the globe, helping them to switch from volume-based to value-based continuing education. The company was founded in 2013 and has since made it easier for HCPs to decide on the right treatment and medicine for the right patient at the right time. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 23, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Industry Business and Industry Source Type: news

Wired reveals children's "food pyramid" for healthful tech diet
Doctors say American kids are spending way too much time on everything from YouTube to Instagram to Fortnite. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, technology overuse by children is linked to obesity, depression and lower school performance. Wired editor-in-chief and CBS News contributor Nick Thompson joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss Wired's "food pyramid" for a healthful tech diet. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

International Commission Launched on Heritable Human Genome Editing
An international commission has been convened by the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society of the U.K., with the participation of science and medical academies around the world, to develop a framework for scientists, clinicians, and regulatory authorities to consider when assessing potential clinical applications of human germline genome editing. The framework will identify a number of scientific, medical, and ethical requirements that should be considered, and could inform the development of a potential pathway from research to clinical use -- if society concludes ...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Strengthening fundamental research in Africa
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Researchers from Goethe University and the University of Basel are creating a postgraduate academy in Bamako (Mali). The project, entitled 'Pilot Africa Postgraduate Academy' (PAPA), has received € 973,000 from the Gerda Henkel Stiftung. The aim is to strengthen fundamental research in the humanities and social sciences in Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine announces 10 Emerging Leaders in Health and Medicine
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) today announced the 2019 Emerging Leaders in Health and Medicine Scholars. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emma Thompson Reflects on Life, Loss, and Resilience
At 60, Academy Award-winning actor and screenwriter Emma Thompson wonders what's next: "How do I feel about dying? Am I ready to look at that?" (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Academy Lauds Lawmakers as Champions of Family Medicine
During the 2019 Family Medicine Advocacy Summit in Washington, D.C., the Academy recognized Reps. Brad Schneider, D-Ill., and Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., with Congressional Primary Care Champion Awards. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 22, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Genetic discovery may improve corn quality, yields
(Rutgers University) Researchers may be able to improve corn yields and nutritional value after discovering genetic regulators that synthesize starch and protein in the widely eaten grain, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could benefit millions of people who rely on corn for nutrition in South America, Africa and elsewhere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global Sea Levels Could Rise by Much More Than Previously Predicted, According to New Study
Global sea levels could rise by over 6 feet by 2100––twice as much as had previously been predicted––threatening major cities and potentially flooding hundreds of millions of people, a study published Monday warned. The implications for coastal populations around the world could be severe if the predictions in the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences prove accurate. In the worst-case scenario, where global emissions are not curtailed and the climate warms by 5°C (9° Fahrenheit), the report authors predict sea levels could rise by as much as 7.8 feet. Large parts of ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

AAFP Warns Against Spread of Low-value Health Insurance
Responding to an HHS request for information, the Academy strenuously objected to the idea of encouraging the proliferation of health insurance plans that do not include important patient protections. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

NAS and NAM Presidents Give Commencement Addresses
NAS President Marcia McNutt delivered the commencement address to Boston University graduates on May 19, where she discussed trust in science and evidence, and the importance of making informed decisions. On May 17, NAM President Victor Dzau spoke to graduates of the Western University Schulich School of Medicine& Dentistry, urging them to keep their commitment to patients at the forefront as they embark on a career in medicine. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Children of both young and old parents share risk for certain neurodevelopment disorders
(Elsevier) Results of a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that parental age is linked to the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in children, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Tourette's disorder/chronic tic disorder (TD/CT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian scientists synthesized protein to enrich stock-raising feed
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) have developed an effective technology for the synthesis of protein from amaranth grains and mushroom mycelium to enrich a stock-raising feed. To do this, they used genetic engineering methods, inserted into the fungus strain an element of amaranth DNA containing a storage protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is vegan diet healthy for kids? Belgian doctors say no
Belgium's Royal Academy of Medicine recommended last week that children, teens, pregnant women and nursing mothers do not follow a vegan diet. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

US kids aren't eating enough seafood, study says; here's how to add more
The humble tuna sandwich, once a lunchbox staple, is making less frequent appearances in school cafeterias across the nation. American children are eating relatively little fish and shellfish in comparison to meat, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

US Kids Aren ’ t Eating Enough Seafood, Study Says
(CNN) — The humble tuna sandwich, once a lunchbox staple, is making less frequent appearances in school cafeterias across the nation. American children are eating relatively little fish and shellfish in comparison to meat, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The report, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, explores both the health benefits and the risks associated with eating what once swam in the sea while informing parents of the safest, most sustainable choices for their children. “Seafood consumption by children has declined every year since 2007 to levels not seen sinc...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Seafood Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Exploring Family Predisposition
The National Cancer Institute has opened a clinical trial using mesothelioma patients and their family members to explore predisposition to the cancer and potential solutions to negating it. The trial is a follow up to an earlier study of a genetic mutation that creates susceptibility to various cancers but a longer-than-normal survival with platinum-based chemotherapy treatment. “This is an important, long-term study that could have implications not only for a patient, but for family members, too,” Dr. Raffit Hassan, NCI senior investigator told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “Progress can be m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 20, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

San Antonio to host premier sleep research event in June
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) Don't miss the world's largest meeting devoted entirely to clinical sleep medicine and sleep and circadian research. SLEEP 2019, the 33rd annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC (APSS), will be held in San Antonio from June 9 through June 12, 2019. Leading sleep clinicians and scientists will attend this meeting in historic downtown San Antonio at the Henry B. Gonz á lez Convention Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Four Projects Aim to Shape Future of Family Medicine
The AAFP has launched new work that aims to move the needle for family medicine by focusing on administrative burden, public perception, advocacy and improving member interactions with the Academy. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 17, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

AAFP Objects to Interference With Doctor-Patient Relationship
The Academy and five peer physician organizations are strongly objecting to aggressive political interference in the physician-patient relationship that jeopardizes patients'access to lawful care. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 17, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

New Report Calls for Policies and Practices to Promote Positive Adolescent Development and Close the Opportunity Gap
The changes in brain structure and connectivity that occur between the ages of 10 and 25 present adolescents with unique opportunities for positive, life-shaping development, and for recovering from past adversity, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth provides recommendations for capitalizing on these opportunities, and for addressing inequities— in education, health care, child welfare, and the juvenile justice system— that undermine the well-being of many adolescents and leave them less able to tak...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 17, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

SIOP star shines brightly
(Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology) SIOP Fellow Michele Gelfand was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on April 17, 2019. Gelfand is a part of an illustrious group including Former First Lady Michelle Obama and more than 200 other luminaries elected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Smart’ insulin could prevent hypoglycemia during diabetes treatment
UCLA bioengineers and their colleagues have developed a new type of insulin that could help prevent hypoglycemia in people who use the drug to manage diabetes.The treatment is being evaluated for potential clinical trials and, if successful, could change diabetes care. Thestudy   was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Insulin is a hormone naturally produced in the pancreas. It helps the body regulate glucose, which is consumed through food and provides the body with energy.Diabetes occurs when a person ’s body does not naturally produce insulin (Type 1 diabetes), or does not efficie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

EngineerGirl Announces 2019 Writing Contest Winners
The National Academy of Engineering today announced the winners of its 2019 EngineerGirl writing competition. This year's contest celebrates engineering design and problem solving, asking students in grades three to 12 to write a creative story in which women and girls save the day with their wits, skill, and whatever resources they can find.  (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Organohalogen Flame Retardants Cannot Be Assessed for Hazards as a Single Class, But Can Be Assessed in
A new National Academies report offers guidance to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) on how to conduct a hazard assessment of nonpolymeric, additive organohalogen flame retardants (OFRs), which are used in some consumer products. OFRs cannot be treated as a single class for hazard assessment, the report says, but they can be divided into subclasses based on chemical structure, physical and chemical properties, and predicted biologic activity. The report identifies 14 subclasses that CPSC can use to conduct a class-based hazard assessment of OFRs. Such an approach is likely to be more efficient and less costly t...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Improving health outcomes with a little help from our friends -- and artificial intelligence
(Medical University of South Carolina) The National Academy of Medicine has called for physicians to document social isolation in the electronic health record (EHR), because it can affect health outcomes. However, social isolation cannot be entered as coded data in current EHRs but only mentioned in clinical notes, which have historically been unintelligible to computers. Medical University of South Carolina investigators have trained natural language processing software to search clinical notes and identify socially isolated patients with 90% accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Identifying the molecular structure of one of Alzheimer's stickier culprits
(University of Colorado Denver) Researchers have mapped the molecular structure and dynamics of an aggressive protein modification that spurs on Alzheimer's disease. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers greater understanding of the microscopic, toxic protein fragments, called beta amyloids (Aβ), that cause rapid acceleration of Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Academy Gives Senate Strong Prescription to Improve MACRA
In recent Senate testimony, the Academy recommended key fixes for the framework of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act, including reducing complexity. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 15, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

CVS Will Only Sell Supplements That Have Been Third-Party Tested for Safety
CVS Pharmacy announced May 15 that it will only sell vitamins and supplements that have been third-party-tested for safety and label accuracy, in an effort to bring order to the notoriously under-regulated world of health and dietary aids. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not vet the contents of vitamins and supplements. The agency primarily intervenes when problems are reported and a product needs to be removed from the market, so supplements can hit stores bearing their manufacturer’s unchecked claims. Studies have shown that many supplements for sale—particularly those intended for weight-loss&mdas...
Source: TIME: Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized CVS Diet/Nutrition Supplements Vitamins Source Type: news