Defining Moments in Pediatric Bioethics: Future Insights From Past Controversies
Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, has a special August 2020 issue on "Defining Moments in Pediatric Bioethics: Future Insights From Past Controversies." This is a terrific collection by some of the best pediatric bioethicists. Introduction: Defining Cases in Pediatric BioethicsAaron Wightman, Douglas Diekema The Hopkins Mongol Case": The Dawn of the Bioethics MovementNorman Fost Who Is the Next “Baby Doe?” From Trisomy 21 to Trisomy 13 and 18 and BeyondJennifer C. Kett Uncertainty: An Uncomfortable Companion to Decision-making for InfantsJeanne A. Krick, Jaco...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

How To Get The Most Out Of Virtual Learning
By Emily Reynolds  When the coronavirus hit, many of us had to quickly adapt to remote working — and even post-pandemic, many of us are likely to continue at least some of these tasks online. Demands for more flexible working practices continue to grow, and for good reason — it can make life easier for employees with parenting or caring responsibilities, health problems or disabilities, and some argue it can also increase productivity. Online webinars and conferences also allow continued professional development without workers ever having to leave their home office. Things are no different in the wor...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Coronavirus Educational Feature Memory Source Type: blogs

I can ’t tolerate CPAP, what can I do?
Continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, is the most common treatment prescribed for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). CPAP involves wearing a mask that fits into the nostrils, underneath or over the nose, or over the nose and mouth, through which pressurized air is delivered via tubing from a machine to keep the upper airway open during sleep. CPAP is recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) as the initial treatment for moderate or severe OSA, and in mild cases of OSA when associated with insomnia, disrupted sleep, or excessive daytime sleepiness. When used consistently, and when treatment is effecti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melanie Pogach, MD Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Sleep Source Type: blogs

Impassable Scientific, Ethical and Legal Barriers to Body ‐To‐Head Transplantation
This article consists of four parts. In the first part it briefly describes the history of body‐to‐head transplantation... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 24, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Post #50 School Reopening during the COVID-19 Pandemic
There is probably a no more emotionally charged topic of discussion currently than that of school reopening this fall. And for good reason - nearly everyone has a stake in it.Society is concerned because of the real risk of increased community spread.Teachers are concerned because of the COVID-19 risk to themselves and how the logistics of school will directly affect their livelihood and stress level as they have to constantly adjust to the barrage of changes and duties. Families are concerned because of the COVID-19 risk to their children and to those living at home. Not to mention, many depend on school to allow for...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - July 23, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Access to Lifesaving Medical Resources for African Countries: COVID-19 Testing and Response, Ethics, and Politics
Matthew Kavanagh (Georgetown University), Ngozi A. Erondu (Chatham House), Oyewale Tomori (Nigeria Academy of Sciences), Victor Dzau (National Academy of Medicine), Emelda A. Okiro, Allan A. Maleche (Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network), Ifeyinwa C. Aniebo (Health Strategy and Delivery... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Suicide Loss: The Double-Edged Sword of Blame and Shame
After spending over a decade listening to the pain of those who have lost loved ones to suicide, I have felt, vicariously, the two sides of that double-edged sword thousands of times. Blame and shame are two of the words that describe what makes suicide loss so different. They are connected and can come from words someone says to the bereaved or — worse — from inside a survivor’s own heart following a death which is still, in most places, a societal taboo. What these words carry forward are speech and actions that make the aftermath of this kind of loss infinitely more difficult. Ironically, both are und...
Source: World of Psychology - July 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Grief and Loss Self-Help Suicide Bereavement grieving Shame Survivor Guilt Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 22nd July 2020
Some recent things you might like to know (two weeks'worth)In the newsHundreds more potentially avoidable baby deaths found at Telford and Shropshire NHS Trust (Guardian)COVID-19Pregnancy and COVID-19: a systematic review of maternal, obstetric and neonatal outcomes Vertical transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester: a systematic scoping review Postpartum ischaemia and haemorrhageA systematic review of diagnosis and treatment of acute limb ischemia during pregnancy and postpartum periodMechanical and surgical interventions for treating primary postpartum haemorrhageCaesarean deliverySk...
Source: Browsing - July 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: COVID-19 midwifery Source Type: blogs

The New Deal and Recovery, Part 5: The Banking Crisis
George SelginToday, when we speak of ways to fight recessions, two options inevitably take pride of place: expansionary Fed policy (meaning lower interest rates or more asset purchases or both) and expansionary fiscal policy (more government spending or lower taxes or both).But if you've been keeping up withthis series, you'll know that, although the U.S. economy rebounded between March 1933 and early 1937, neither expansionaryfiscal policy norFed actions of the sort we count on today deserve much credit for that rebound. Instead, the Treasury and the Fed played only bit parts, while the spotlight shone on FDR and his virt...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 20, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Everyone has a role to play: Reducing your child ’s risk of developing food allergies
By RUCHI GUPTA, MD, MPH The average American elementary school class includes two students living with one or multiple food allergies. That’s nearly six million children in the United States alone. And these numbers are climbing. There was a staggering 377 percent increase in medical claims with diagnoses of anaphylactic food reactions between 2007 and 2016, two-thirds of these were children. As parents, we want the absolute best for our children. For many years, guidance around food introduction was unclear. Parents were told that babies, and especially those considered at risk for food allergies, should a...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Public Health allergies Food Allergies Pediatrics Ruchi Gupta Source Type: blogs

American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying – Videos
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying has completed the accreditation process for CME and CE credits for online learning, for physicians, nurses, and social workers.If you were unable to attend the National Clinici... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patients to Draw Their Own Biomedical Sensors Using Pencil and Paper
Wearable bioelectronic devices that stick to the skin and measure things such as temperature, heart rhythms, and other vitals are typically complex devices that use modern materials to do their job. They tend to be difficult to manufacture, expensive, and fragile, and so are still not widely available. Incredibly, researchers at the University of Missouri have now come up with a way of using nothing but graphite pencils and office paper to create highly functional bioelectronic devices. They report their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. To show the vast swath of what is possible, the team...
Source: Medgadget - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Informatics Materials Medicine Pediatrics Public Health Sports Medicine Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Preparing for a challenging winter 2020/21
This report states that the UK must prepare now for a potential new wave of coronavirus infections this winter that could be more serious than the first. It stresses that ‘intense preparation’ is urgently needed throughout the rest of July and August to reduce the risk of the health service being overwhelmed and to save lives this winter. The accompanying People's perspective report calls for these actions to be developed through engagement with patients, carers and the public to ensure services, guidelines and communications work for people, rather than focusing plans on individual medical condit...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 14, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Patient involvement, experience and feedback Source Type: blogs

Determining America ’s “Dependence” on China for Essential Medical Goods
Scott LincicomeThe unfortunate onset of COVID-19 has caused many politicians and pundits to proclaim that the United States is distressinglydependent on China for essential medical goods, and to ask whether this “dependence” demands new government programs—in particular, protectionism, subsidies and “Buy American” procurement mandates—to fix the alleged problem.A  little‐​noticedreport from United States International Trade Commission (ITC) begins to provide the answer to that question,  though probably not the answer those same politicians and pundits were expecting.The Ju...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 13, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Scott Lincicome Source Type: blogs

Micro-LEDs and Solar Panels Wirelessly Power Medical Implants
Researchers at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea have developed a method to wirelessly power implanted devices using light. The technique involves a micro-LED patch to transmit light through the skin and a photovoltaic system on implanted devices that can turn this light into electricity. This technology could help researchers to develop devices that do not need batteries, avoiding the need to remove and replace them when the batteries are depleted. Implantable electronic medical devices have had a significant impact on healthcare, particularly on the long-term management of chronic conditio...
Source: Medgadget - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Study: Across all ideological groups, higher cognitive ability and intellectual humility predicts support for free speech
Freedom of Speech: A Right for Everybody, or Only for Like-Minded People? (Heterodox Academy): Freedom of speech is often considered key to a well-functional democracy. In many countries, freedom of speech is considered a more important democratic value than regular elections. But do people genuinely believe in the virtues of open debates by supporting freedom of speech for every social group? Or do they support free speech only for their own groups? In a recently published paper in Social Psychological and Personality Science, we aimed to answer these questions, and we sought to explore whether higher cognitive ability wa...
Source: SharpBrains - July 7, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning brain riddles Brain Teasers cognitive-abilities cognitive-ability cognitive-performance freedom of speech intellectual humility intergroup attitudes prejudice Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Strikes Down Montana Blaine Amendment Barring State Aid to Religious Schools
Ilya SominThis morning, the Supreme Court issued its decision inEspinoza v. Montana, striking down Montana ’s state constitutional Blaine Amendment, which forbids state aid to “any church, school, academy, seminary, college, university, or other literary or scientific institution, controlled in whole or in part by any church, sect, or denomination.” The decision overrules a Montana Supreme Court decision striking down a state school choice program that had provided tax credits on an equal basis to students attending both religious and secular private schools. The ruling is an important victory f...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 30, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Somin Source Type: blogs

How to help your young child cope with the pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful for all of us, and this includes our youngest children. It’s easy, and tempting, to think that infants, toddlers, and preschoolers aren’t affected by the pandemic. The truth is, though, that that life has changed for them, too — and for some of them it has changed dramatically. Even if the change is mostly positive for them — such as having their parents home all the time — it’s still a change that can be confusing and unsettling. Young children are less able to understand the nuances of all of this; for them, the world truly is all about them. An...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Help Us Strengthen Rigor of Animal Research: Public Feedback Requested
Ever figured out a clever solution to a vexing challenge that affected the rigor of your work with laboratory animals, and then thought that those solutions could improve the quality and transparency of animal research supported across NIH? Recently found yourself at virtual lab meetings brainstorming ways to facilitate translating the findings from your animal study to human biology and disease? Questioned the status quo on how the research culture drives the choice of animal models and the design of experiments? Well, we want to know more. We recently released a Request for Information (RFI) aimed at enhancing rigor, ...
Source: NIH Extramural Nexus: Rock Talk Blog - June 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Mike Lauer Tags: blog Open Mike Animal Welfare Request For Information (RFI) Source Type: blogs

President Trump ’s Cancellation of Many Work Visas Will Hurt the American Economy
Alex NowrastehThe Trump Administration has just issued anproclamation that will restrict the issuance of many temporary economic migrant work visas. The proclamation will go into effect on June 24 at 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time. The visas affected are the H-1B visa for skilled temporary migrant workers, theH-2B visa for temporary lower ‐​skilled non‐​agricultural employment, mostJ visas, andL visas for intracompany transfers.Trump ’s proclamation justifies the restriction on new visas by citing the recession caused by COVID-19 and the government’s response to it so far. Like most of the o...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 23, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Long-Term Telehealth Expansion Should Be Planned Intelligently
By KEN TERRY Telehealth has been a lifeline for many doctors and patients during the pandemic, and the decisions of CMS and many private payers to cover telehealth visits—in some cases, at full parity with in-person visits–has helped physician practices stave off bankruptcy. Assuming that these policies remain in effect after the pandemic, I agree with the commentators who assert that telemedicine will become a much larger part of healthcare. Nevertheless, what that means is still far from clear. To begin with, telehealth visits may be adequate for some purposes but not for others. Historically, the techn...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech Health Technology Ken Terry Telehealth telehealth expansion virtual care Source Type: blogs

What the Police Could Learn from Psychologists
If we are to end systemic, institutionalized racism in America and the racist attitudes that too many police officers hold toward the citizens they have sworn to protect and to serve, perhaps it would be wise to better understand how much of good policing really is just simple human psychology. If we want police officers to set a better example in their behavior and attitudes, I think no better place to start is with a police officer is trained — the police academy. And while I’m sure academies teach a lot of people skills, I think they’re missing an opportunity. Maybe police academies could learn more f...
Source: World of Psychology - June 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Psychology Racism Black Lives Matter George Floyd Police brutality Prejudice Source Type: blogs

The Facts About H-4 Visas for Spouses of H-1B Workers
ConclusionH-4 EAD holders are highly educated contributors to the U.S. economy in their own right, but they are also important draws for keeping their talented spouses here as well. The National Science Foundation found that family motivated a quarter of foreign scientists and engineers who came between the ages of 18 and 34 to relocate to the United States.[55] Denying their family the right to work for many years could motivate just as many to leave the United States. The purpose of the H-4 EAD rule was the prevent this outcome. It was the right goal in 2015, and it is just as important a goal in 2020.[1]Stuart Anderson,...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 16, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

Your Smartphone As The Swiss Knife Of Digital Health
7:39 a.m. That’s the time that your smartphone’s sonar deems as optimal for you to wake up today. With its gentle vibration from your bedside table, you pick it up to turn off the smart alarm. As you do so, your phone asks for your permission to use the built-in sensors and camera to run your routine morning scan. It analyzes your voice; evaluates your stress level based on a facial scan; checks your vital signs; and notifies you to take a picture of that mole on your forearm in order to detect any anomalies.  Thereafter, it outputs a comprehensible report with recommendations which you can send over to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 16, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence E-Patients Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones stress health trackers Huntington's Alzheimer's disease covid19 camera apple health google fit WHO hemoglobin SpO2 Samsung oximetry F Source Type: blogs

Treating mild sleep apnea: Should you consider a CPAP device?
This study supports a comprehensive approach to evaluation and treatment of mild OSA. While all people with mild OSA may not need to be treated with CPAP, there are patients who can greatly benefit from it. Treatments may be trial and error until you and your doctor get it right When sleep apnea is mild, treatment recommendations are less clear-cut, and should be determined based on the severity of your symptoms, your preferences, and other co-occurring health problems. Working in conjunction with your doctor, you can try a stepwise approach — if one treatment doesn’t work, you can stop that and try an alternat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melanie Pogach, MD Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Sleep Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Dancing with Prognostic Dilemmas
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying has released the third in its series of video interviews on topics of interest to aid-in-dying clinicians. This interview focuses on the common dilemma of difficult prognoses when evaluating pati... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Are You Seeking the Approval of Your Limiting Beliefs?
You don’t have to overcome limiting beliefs in order to take action. Thinking that you need to get all your beliefs in order is really just a delay tactic, isn’t it? Fixing your beliefs is an unnecessary prerequisite for action. Thinking that you need to fix your beliefs first is akin to convincing a doubtful parent that you’re gonna go out and succeed. Nothing you say will convince them. Even if you go out and succeed, they probably still won’t be convinced. If you tell people you’re going to be an entrepreneur, for instance, and they laugh at you, do you need to convince them first? Do...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - June 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Emotions Source Type: blogs

Explore The State of Noninvasive Neurotechnology in 37 minutes and 1 image
? Heads-up: The recordings for the webinar on The State of Noninvasive Neurotechnology, held on May 19th, are already available on YouTube. Dr. Ricardo Gil-da-Costa (above) and Alvaro Fernandez (below) gave an outlook on the brain tech industry, with a deep look into apps and wearables and the capabilities that human brain could achieve. We hope you enjoy the discussion! For 19 years, Dr. Ricardo Gil-da-Costa’s pursuit of how the mind and brain work led him to behavioral field studies in Africa and Central America and neurophysiology laboratory research from Harvard University to the U.S. National Institutes of Healt...
Source: SharpBrains - June 11, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Peak Performance Technology apps Fundación Innovación Bankinter human-brain Neurotechnology noninvasive neurotechnology wearables Source Type: blogs

We Can Teach Children Not to Hate
“You’ve got to be taught… Before you are six Or seven Or eight To hate all the people Your relatives hate You’ve got to be Carefully Taught” These words are from a song in the Rogers and Hammerstein musical, South Pacific, written in 1949. In 1952, Oscar Hammerstein introduced the song during The National Conference of Christians and Jews Brotherhood Week. Here’s a clip from CriticalPast, an archive of historic footage. That was 70 years ago!  They were right then. Their words are right now. Children are not born hating other children. Toddlers on a playground approach any other to...
Source: World of Psychology - June 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Parenting Racism anti-racism Prejudice racial bias racial justice Stereotype Source Type: blogs

How to calculate the reproductive number, R0
This epidemiological concept is often mentioned in the general media and is discussedin this article in the Guardian, and we know that if it goes above one, that is a bad thing.  But what is R0 and how do you calculate it?  Here are some things that might help.Health Knowledge  - this piece from their public health textbook discusses the concept in general, and other related concepts.  The site was originally designed for people undertaking specialist public health training as public health specialist registrars.Public Health England -this blog post from May 2020 discusses how R numbers a...
Source: Browsing - June 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: epidemiology Source Type: blogs

The Itchy, Bumpy Blues: How to Treat and Prevent Mosquito Bites and Related Conditions
Mosquito bites may be a nuisance, but fortunately, in the U.S., they tend to amount to nothing more than that. Upon being bitten, most Americans experience a bit of swelling and itchiness, and nothing more. However, there are exceptions to this, including stronger allergic reactions to bites and cases of mosquito-borne illness.  Insect and arachnid bites, including ticks, account for approximately 2,000 cases of malaria and 30,000 cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. annually. In addition, millions of people worldwide die of malaria each year. It is helpful to protect yourself against insect bites, not only to avoid pesk...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - June 7, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Environmental Health Insect Bites & Stings Insects & Animals Outdoor Safety Source Type: blogs

The way we approach Mental Health today is broken beyond repair. The question is, what comes next, and how fast can we get there?
The hidden links between mental disorders (Nature): In 2018, psychiatrist Oleguer Plana-Ripoll was wrestling with a puzzling fact about mental disorders. He knew that many individuals have multiple conditions — anxiety and depression, say, or schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. He wanted to know how common it was to have more than one diagnosis, so he got his hands on a database containing the medical details of around 5.9 million Danish citizens. He was taken aback by what he found. Every single mental disorder predisposed the patient to every other mental disorder — no matter how distinct the symptoms. &ldquo...
Source: SharpBrains - June 3, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology anxiety biological bipolar-disorder depression Genetics JAMA Psychiatry mental illness mental-disorders National-Institute-of-Mental-Health neuroanatomy psychopathology Resear Source Type: blogs

Primary Care Practices Need Help to Survive the COVID-19 Pandemic
Ken Terry Paul Grundy By PAUL GRUNDY, MD and KEN TERRY Date: June 20, 2022. The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History has reported its biggest number of visitors in more than 2 ½ years. There’s a string of new Broadway musicals that are well-attended every night. It’s safe to shop in malls, eat out in restaurants and go to movie theaters again. Of course, this has all been made possible by an effective vaccine against COVID-19 that was widely administered in the fall of 2021. Vaccinated citizens of the world are now confident that it’s safe to go out in public, albeit with a...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Primary Care Ken Terry Paul Grundy Source Type: blogs

Chemicals and Pregnant Women: Taking Care of Your Unborn Baby
This study is not a warning of a scary new epidemic of problems arriving with next year’s babies. Instead, it’s a peak behind the curtain at what might be the hidden story behind the marvelous kids we already see on today’s playgrounds across the country. Most are very healthy – among the healthiest kids in history. Yes, too many are overweight. Too many have asthma. Too many have allergies. Too many have learning problems. Too many start puberty early. More than half have some chronic illness. But this isn’t slowing kids down as much as the devastating infectious diseases of the past. It is a...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 25, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Reflections on: “Dealing with Cyberattacks”
James KnuppEditor ’s note: In 2014, Cato releasedA Dangerous World? Threat Perception and U.S. National Security an edited volume of papers originally presented ata Cato conference the previous year. In each chapter, experts assessed and put in context the supposed dangers to American security, from nuclear proliferation and a rising China to terrorism and climate change.As part of ourProject on Threat Inflation, Cato is republishing each chapter in an easily readable online format. Even six years after its publication, much of the book remains relevant. Policymakers and influencers continue to to...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 20, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: James Knupp Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: The Role Nurses Play in Schizophrenia Treatment
Some of the professionals that work most with helping people with schizophrenia are nurses. There are so many types with different skill sets. Host Rachel Star Withers and Co-host Gabe Howards learn who these often overlooked healthcare workers are. Dr. Tari Dilks, Professor and President of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, joins with insight on what goes into being a psychiatric nurse.  Highlights in “The Role Nurses Play in Schizophrenia Treatment” Episode [01:14] Doctor sidekicks? [04:00] The types of nurses [06:40] Nurse Practitioners [11:00] Nurses specialties [13:00] Psychiatric Nursin...
Source: World of Psychology - May 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Mental Disorder Mental Illness Nurses Nursing Psychiatric Nurse Psychotherapy Treatment For Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Devil ’s Advocate: How to Use Social Media to Learn, Move & Grow
Social media gets a bad wrap.  It’s bad for your brain. It makes you anxious.  It takes you out of the present moment.  Valid points, sure. But there are positive ways to use social media. You can use it to be more productive, connect with others, and maybe learn something about yourself.  The Effects Of Social Media People often talk about the negative effects of social media, and there’s a space for that.  The American Academy of Pediatrics talks about the negative effects of social media in kids and teenagers, even using the phrase “Facebook depression.&rdq...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brooklin Nash Tags: featured internet culture productivity tips psychology pickthebrain social media Source Type: blogs

Well-Being and the Learning Environment: Systems-Level Changes to Reduce Burnout and Depression in Learners
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and assistant editor for trainee engagement Dr. Jesse Burk Rafel (@jbrafel) and guest Dr. Lotte Dyrbye (@dyrbye) discuss burnout in medical students and residents, including new recommendations from the National Academies about systems-level changes to foster well-being in learners.  This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read Dr. Dyrbye’s commentary, “Redesigning the Learning Environment to Promote Learner Well-Being and Professional Development,” discussed in ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 19, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective burnout learning environment medical students residents well-being Source Type: blogs

Don ’t Ban H-1B Workers: They are Worth Their Weight in Innovation
Alex NowrastehThe Trump Administration is reportedly working on anexecutive order to ban the issuance of new H-1B visas. His order is expected to be issued before the end of this month. His order would be quite a negative blow to the U.S. economy and hit American economic innovation the hardest. The H-1B visa system has problems: It ’s unreasonably costly to change firms, workers are restrained from starting their own firms, and the wait times to adjust their status to a green card are absurdly long. Complete H-1B worker portability between firms, allowing workers to sponsor themselves if they start a ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 14, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Free webinar next Tuesday, May 19th, on neurotech and wearables for brain health
Heads-up about an online event next week that may well interest some of you. What: Alvaro Fernandez and Ricardo Gil da Costa will give an outlook on the brain devices industry and hardware technologies, with a deep look into this kind of wearables and the capabilities that human brain could achieve. When: Tuesday, May 19th, 2020. 7am San Francisco/ 10am Miami/ 4pm Madrid How: You can register Here (free). The Speakers: For 19 years, Dr. Ricardo Gil-da-Costa’s pursuit of how the mind and brain work led him to behavioral field studies in Africa and Central America and neurophysiology laboratory research from Harvard U...
Source: SharpBrains - May 13, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology brain devices brain devices industry brain health human-brain neurotech Neurotechnology wearables webinar Source Type: blogs

12 New Immigration Ideas for the 21st Century
Alex Nowrasteh andDavid J. BierToday, Cato released a new white paper entitled “12 New Immigration Ideas for the 21st Century. ” Edited by myself and my colleague David J. Bier, the essays in this white paper are written by academics, policy analysts, advocates, and smart people from outside of the Beltway who each propose a new and innovative way to reform the U.S. immigration system. Most of the essay contributors participated in a workshop where their ideas were analyzed by other experts, immigration attorneys, and people who have worked on immigration reform on Capitol Hill. Our intent from t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 13, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

Caring for Babies and Small Children During COVID-19
The good news is emerging evidence shows that coronavirus affects children and babies the least out of all age groups. While there have been a small number of newborns who have contracted the disease, it is extremely rare. In these cases, it’s impossible to tell, as yet, if the virus was contracted in utero, or shortly after birth. Babies and COVID: The Breastfeeding Question Many mothers are wondering if they should continue breastfeeding if they are showing symptoms of illness. Traditionally, in cases of common influenza, encouraging a baby to breastfeed even when the mother is sick has the effect of increasing imm...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 11, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog COVID COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying by Telehealth
As with many other types of health care services, medical aid in dying has been increasingly offered through telehealth over the past several weeks. The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying issued a policy statement in March. Many Canadian provincial medical boards have issued similar guidance. While written before the COVID-19 pandemic, Konstantin Tretyakov has just published "Medical Aid in Dying by Telehealth" in Health Matrix. He explains that his article "explores the possibility of facilitating access to medical aid in dying via telehealth—a method of providing health care rem...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

DM Cardiology seats from MCI website 2020
This list is based on the site accessed on 1st May 2020. Please check MCI site from the link above for the up to date information. The information given here is only for general guidance of the potential DM Cardiology aspirants. Total DM Cardiology seats : 406 Total number of colleges offering DM Cardiology course : 104 Institutions having more than 10 seats of DM Cardiology are the following: AIIMS New Delhi: 25, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiology, Bangalore: 21, PGI Chandigarh: 16, Madras Medical College, Chennai: 14, B J Medical College, Ahmedabad: 12, SMS Medical College, Jaipur: 12 Full list of colleges and number ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 1, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Bilingual Logic
 Monolinguists (people who speak only one language) often give different answers to the same question, depending on how the problem (say, responding to a pestilence) is framed. Frame a choice one way,--e.g., as lives saved--you get one answer. Frame it differently —as lives lost--you get a different response. That’s not terribly surprising, but now look at bilinguists  (people who speak two languages). Pose the choices in their dominant language and the frame matters, but if they hear the question in their second language, the framing bias goes out the w indow. Now they answer the question the same wa...
Source: Babel's Dawn - May 1, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Blair Source Type: blogs

3D Face Scans Accurately Screen for Sleep Apnea
Researchers at the University of Western Australia have demonstrated that facial features captured from 3D photographs may be useful as a screening tool for sleep apnea. 400 individuals participated in the study, and the researchers found that they could predict which patients would have sleep apnea with up to 91% accuracy. 300 individuals with sleep apnea and 100 individuals without sleep apnea were enrolled in the study, which involved overnight sleep studies and 3D photography with a craniofacial scanner. The 3D photos were analyzed to resolve 24 anatomical landmarks and linear measurements, such as the shortest dist...
Source: Medgadget - April 29, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Informatics Medicine Source Type: blogs

Open peer-review: time for a closer look
We have all experienced unfair or sometimes even hostile peer reviews. Papers which later proved to be a turning point in research have been rejected based on bad or politically motivated reviews. Also, the idea that reviewers never know who the authors of a manuscript are, and will therefore review unbiased, is an illusion, especially in small scientific communities. Via the trial registration, the references and meeting presentation, it is easy to identify the authors. Peer review is for many scientists like a corvée or an obligation which serves their cv. There are excellent reviewers, but there are also those th...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - April 29, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jim Reekers Tags: Uncategorized open peer review Source Type: blogs