Legionella bacteria in municipal water systems has killed or sickened thousands – is anything being done to address the problem?
(Natural News) As Legionnaires’ disease continues to claim hundreds of lives and thousands of victims, the prestigious National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine assembled an investigatory team who will look into the best ways to keep the lethal Legionella bacteria out of vulnerable plumbing systems, water works and lungs, reported a Circle of Blue... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists found a way to postpone cell death
(Lomonosov Moscow State University) A team of MSU-scientists and the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics of Russian Academy of Sciences studied the mechanisms of interaction between the Fas-ligand protein that causes cell death and a respective membrane receptor. It turned out that to initiate the deadly scenario, the ligand needs to contact with a specific protein component of the cell -- caveolin. If the caveolin-binding domain is removed from the molecule of Fas-ligand, cell death may be prevented. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Report Examines Factors Used in Social Security's Process for Determining Disability in Adults
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine examines to what extent and in which ways health care utilization -- such as in-patient hospitalizations, emergency department use, and hospital readmission -- reflects disease severity, disability, and ability to perform gainful activity. The committee that conducted the study was unable to find an association between health care utilization and disease severity as it relates to the Social Security Administration's determination of severe impairment -- an impairment or combination of impairments severe enough to prevent a person from performin...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 2, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vertical measurements of air pollutants in urban Beijing
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) Scientists from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics use vertically resolved observation system based on the Beijing 325m Meteorological Tower to gain an in-depth understanding of the vertical evolution characteristics of air pollutants within urban boundary layer.They find that that the temperature inversion coupled by the interactions of different air masses elucidated the 'blue sky -- haze' co-existent phenomenon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Do racial and gender disparities exist in newer glaucoma treatments?
(American Academy of Ophthalmology) The American Glaucoma Society today announced that it has awarded a grant to Mildred MG Olivier, MD, to study how often minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices and procedures are used in black and Latino glaucoma patients and whether these devices perform similarly across races, ethnicities, genders, ages, and regions. The goal of Dr. Olivier's research is to increase quality care for glaucoma patients in all demographic groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More People Requesting Nose Jobs To Make Selfies Look Better
CBS Local — A picture may be worth a thousand words, but according to a new report a selfie is worth thousands of dollars in plastic surgery to a growing number of patients. A study published in the journal JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery found that selfies make a person’s nose appear to be 30 percent larger than it actually is. “Despite the ease with which selfies are taken, the short distance from the camera causes a distortion of the face owing to projection, most notably an increase in nasal dimensions,” researchers wrote. The study adds that selfies are typically taken about 12 inches away from the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Chris Melore Local TV nose job Plastic Surgery selfies Smartphones talkers Source Type: news

Doctors Rule Menstrual Cramps Can Be As Painful As Heart Attacks
CBS Local — After years of debate, doctors are publicly acknowledging the severity of pain linked to some women’s periods. With physicians admitting the pain can rival that of a heart attack, some are now questioning why more research hasn’t been done to stop the menstrual agony. Dysmenorrhea, better known as cramps, is a painful menstruation that can be severe enough to interrupt the daily routine of one in five women, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. “Men don’t get it and it hasn’t been given the centrality it should have. I do believe it’s someth...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Chris Melore Doctors Heart Attack Local TV Menstrual Cramps talkers Women Source Type: news

Review of Report and Approach to Evaluating Long-Term Health Effects in Army Test Subjects: Interim Report (2018)
National Academies Press. 02/2018 This 16-page report is from a committee that was tasked with examining the Assessment of Potential Long-Term Health Effects on Army Human Test Subjects of Relevant Biological and Chemical Agents, Drugs, Medications and Substances: Literature Review and Analysis. It evaluated if the assessment appropriately identified potential long-term health effects from exposure to the test agents, and whether an adequate weight-of-evidence approach was used to characterize the strength of the associations between the agents and their potential health effects. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guid...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Meaningful Metrics: How Do We Measure Quality in EMS?
How should we measure what we do? Our profession has long been plagued with the task of proving that what we do matters. Though very few studies exist that definitively justify the expense of our advanced EMS systems around the country, two important and comprehensive analyses were completed in 2009 and 2014 that addressed the issue of effectiveness. The first study made the case that EMS unquestionably improve patient outcomes and health.1 The second declared that EMS was an essential public health service that results in economic good for society.2 The reports were profound, exhaustively researched, and firmly anchored i...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - March 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vincent D. Robbins, FACPE, FACHE Tags: Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New guidelines help doctors tackle teen depression
This month, the American Academy of Pediatrics release an update to teen mental health guidelines. They hope to catch and address depression earlier. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

New report examines Social Security's process for determining disability in adults
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine examines to what extent and in which ways health care utilization -- such as in-patient hospitalizations, emergency department use, and hospital readmission -- reflects disease severity, disability, and ability to perform gainful activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Misuse of Opioids, Biologics Emphasized at AAOS 2018 Misuse of Opioids, Biologics Emphasized at AAOS 2018
The surgeon's role in the opioid crisis and the use and abuse of biologics will be accentuated at the upcoming American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) meeting.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics News Source Type: news

Richmond Ambulance Authority Awarded Reaccreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS)
Richmond, Va.  - The Richmond Ambulance Authority has been awarded reaccreditation by CAAS, the Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services, which was established to encourage and promote quality patient care in our country's medical transportation systems. Based initially on the efforts of the American Ambulance Association, the independent Commission established a comprehensive series of standards for the ambulance service industry. RAA was awarded reaccreditation for three years; the maximum extension allowed by CAAS, which included completion of a comprehensive application and onsite review by national exper...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 28, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Richmond Ambulance Authority Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Industry News Source Type: news

Richmond Ambulance Authority Awarded Reaccreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS)
Richmond, Va.  - The Richmond Ambulance Authority has been awarded reaccreditation by CAAS, the Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services, which was established to encourage and promote quality patient care in our country's medical transportation systems. Based initially on the efforts of the American Ambulance Association, the independent Commission established a comprehensive series of standards for the ambulance service industry. RAA was awarded reaccreditation for three years; the maximum extension allowed by CAAS, which included completion of a comprehensive application and onsite review by national exper...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 28, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Richmond Ambulance Authority Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Industry News Source Type: news

The elite player performance plan: the impact of a new national youth development strategy on injury characteristics in a premier league football academy - Tears C, Chesterton P, Wijnbergen M.
The objective of this study was to investigate the injury incidence and patterns in elite youth football (soccer) at a category 1 Premier League Academy before and after the introduction of a new development strategy, the Elite Player Performance Plan (EPP... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

NuSmile Launches I Love My NuSmile Program
Program will educate parents and generate new patients for NuSmile customers HOUSTON, TEXAS, February 21, 2018 —NuSmile Ltd., the worldwide leader in pediatric esthetic restorative dentistry, announced today the launch of itsI Love My NuSmileprogram. The centerpiece of the program is the newI Love My NuSmilewebsite that not only helps parents understand the best restorative dental options available for their children, but also provides a locator feature that makes it easy to find expert providers with nearby dental practices that offer NuSmile ’s market-leading esthetic pediatric crowns. Dentists will be a...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 28, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

PLOS Collaborates on Recommendations to Improve Transparency for Author Contributions
In a new report, a group convened by the US National Academy of Sciences and including a dozen journal editors reflects on authorship guidelines and recommends new ways to make author contributions more transparent. What does it mean to be author number seven on a twenty-five–author article? Establishing transparency for each author’s role in a research study is one of the recommendations in a report (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/02/26/1715374115) published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by a group led by Marcia McNutt, President of the National Academy of Sciences. The recomm...
Source: News from STM - February 28, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

RNA-based therapy cures lung cancer in mouse models
(University of Gothenburg) By turning down the activity of a specific RNA molecule researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden, have cured lung tumors in mice by 40-50 percent. The results, published in Nature Communications, represent the tip of the iceberg in an extensive research project in which 633 new biomarkers for 14 types of cancer have been identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Is Your Teenager Depressed? Important Annual Screening Tool Identified
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) yesterday endorsed updated guidelines that will assist pediatricians and other primary care providers in providing better care for teens at risk for depression. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD, Contributor Source Type: news

Niacin, vitamin B3, may improve cognitive and physical function by preventing neurological damage
(Natural News) Vitamin B3 derivative called nicotinamide riboside may protect against neurological damage and enhance both cognitive and physical function, a study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) showed. The study focused on the effect of nicotinamide riboside on Alzheimer’s-related brain damage in mouse models. Nicotinamide riboside is naturally... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NAS President Co-Authors PNAS Perspective
Read a new Perspective on promoting transparency in scientific authorship co-authored by NAS President Marcia McNutt. Appearing in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the piece offers suggestions for improving how author contributions are attributed in scientific publications. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - February 27, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lack of important content in sickness certificates
(University of Gothenburg) About half of the medical certificates for sick leave in Sweden are deficient, according to research at Sahlgrenska Academy. Quality of the certificates was poorest in the case of symptom diagnosis, where the sickness itself had not been identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insight on the formation of East Asian flora
(Science China Press) The East Asian flora (EAF) is a key biodiversity hotspot for understanding the origin and evolution of Northern Hemisphere floras. The research from Prof. Sun Hang's Group from Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (KIB/CAS) suggest that the East Asian might be relatively young, with most of its clades originating since the Miocene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New guidelines for pediatricians aim to combat teen depression
The American Academy of Pediatrics issued new guidelines for pediatricians to help identify and treat depression in teens. As many as one in five teens may experience depression at one point. CBS News medical contributor Dr. Tara Narula sits down with "CBS Evening News" anchor Jeff Glor to explain how these guidelines can help. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Annual Depression Screening Recommended For Children 12 And Older
BOSTON (CBS) – As many as 1 in 5 teenagers suffers from depression but only about half of them are diagnosed before adulthood. For the first time in 10 years, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its guidelines for diagnosing and treating depression in teens. The AAP now recommends annual screening for depression in children ages 12 and older. Many teens may not want to answer questions face to face but pediatricians can use a written or digital questionnaire to teens about their feelings. For example, have you recently been feeling down or depressed? Have you lost interest in things you once found pl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Depression Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

AAP: Screen All Adolescents for Depression
(MedPage Today) -- American Academy of Pediatrics updates assessment and treatment guidelines (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - February 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

New guidelines recommend depression screening for all teens
The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued updated guidelines that call for yearly depression screening for depression for all teens. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diet shown to reduce stroke risk may also reduce risk of depression
(American Academy of Neurology) MINNEAPOLIS - People who eat vegetables, fruit and whole grains may have lower rates of depression over time, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health Tip: Make Sure Babies Eat Right
-- A baby's nutritional balance during the first 1,000 days of life is critical to lifelong mental health and development, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. Sufficient amounts of key minerals, vitamins, proteins and certain fats during the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Short Takes
The InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), a global network of academies of sciences and medicine, has released a summary of the workshop on "Assessing the Security Implications of Genome Editing Technology" that was held in Germany in October 2017 and convened by the IAP, US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the European Academies Science Advisory Council, and the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. The international workshop brought together global experts in genetic engineering, security studies, and public policy to discuss strategies to mitigate potential security concerns posed...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Financial Structure of Early Childhood Education Requires Overhaul to Make It Accessible and Affordable for All Families and to Strengthen the Workforce in This Field
High-quality early care and education (ECE) is critical to positive child development and has the potential to generate economic returns, but the current financing structure of ECE leaves many children without access to high-quality services and does little to strengthen the ECE workforce, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Transforming the accessibility, affordability, and quality of ECE provided outside the child's home will require phased implementation, amounting to at least an estimated $140 billion annually from the public and private (philanthropy, employers, and fa...
Source: News from the National Academies - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator
(University of Turku) Academy Professor Riitta Lahesmaa's research group from Turku Centre for Biotechnology of the University of Turku and Å bo Akademi University, Finland, has discovered a new regulator of the immune system, a key factor that controls development of regulatory T cells. The discovery provides basis for new strategies for the treatment of both cancer and immune-mediated diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Financial structure of early childhood edu. Requires overhaul to make it accessible and affordable
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) High-quality early care and education (ECE) is critical to positive child development and has the potential to generate economic returns, but the current financing structure of ECE leaves many children without access to high-quality services and does little to strengthen the ECE workforce, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New analytical method provides an insight into additional chromosomes
(AKSON Russian Science Communication Association) A new technique promises to identify additional chromosomes involved in carcinogenesis. A method for analyzing additional chromosomes was proposed by a team of scientists at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Institute of Cytology and Genetics (Siberian branch of Russian Academy of Sciences), NSU Laboratory of Structural, Functional and Comparative Genomics and the University of Belgrade (Serbia) and published in the journal Chromosoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Academy of Laser Dentistry ’s Upcoming Annual Meeting Features an Abundance of Dental Team Training
Discussion:“Straight Talk on Diode Lasers: Scientific and Practical Rationale for Clinical Dentistry” moderated by Georgios Romanos, PhD, DDS. Periodontology, Stony Brook University“The more the dental team knows about laser technology and the business of dentistry, the better the health of your patients and practice, explains Siminovsky, “The ALD supports our valuable auxiliary team members with outstanding presenters and topics.”·      Lecture:“What to Say to Get the Pay- Coding, Billing, Scripting,” presented by Karen S. Parker, RDH, BSDH&mid...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 20, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Greg Laurie Talks Steve McQueen, Faith and Mesothelioma
“Steve McQueen: American Icon” — a feature documentary about the life, faith and cancer battle of the legendary actor — arrives on DVD and digital HD release Tuesday. Nicknamed “The King of Cool,” McQueen is known for his tough guy roles and action-packed sequences in films such as “Bullitt,” “The Great Escape” and “The Towering Inferno.” He received an Academy Award nomination in 1967 for his leading role in “The Sand Pebbles” and became the highest-paid movie star in the world in 1974. Shortly after, McQueen disconnected from Hollywood in...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 20, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Tags: “Steve McQueen American Icon Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Barbara Minty McQueen Greg Laurie Harvest Christian Fellowship Jon Erwin Leonard DeWitt pleural mesothelioma Sammy Mason The King of Cool Source Type: news

Blood-Loss Management in Spine Surgery Blood-Loss Management in Spine Surgery
Which strategies may help minimize the incidence of perioperative blood loss during spine surgical procedures?Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Alexa, how do word senses evolve?
(Lehigh University) A paper called 'Algorithms in the historical emergence of word senses'--that appears online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)--is the first to look at 1,000 years of English development and detect the kinds of algorithms that human minds have used to extend existing words to new senses of meaning. This kind of 'reverse engineering' of how human language has developed could have implications for natural language processing by machines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows that parental care is associated with mate value in adult offspring
(Academy of Finland) Adults, who report having received higher levels of parental care in childhood, perceive themselves as more attractive mates. In particular, maternal care is associated with experienced mate value in adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Geffen School Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Healthiest Office Snacks, As Chosen By Nutritionists
(CNN) — When your stomach starts grumbling during a midmorning meeting or when you’re stuck at your desk without a break in sight, what is the most satisfying and healthy snack to grab? To answer this question, I asked 10 nutritionists what their favorite go-to nosh is during a busy workday. Below, their responses. ALMONDS “Almonds are my number one go-to snack when hunger hits between meals. In a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1.5 ounces of almonds (about 35 nuts) consumed as a snack daily for four weeks helped to suppress hunger between meals. How? Because the fiber, prot...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local TV Snacks Source Type: news

Restoration Robotics & #226; & quot; & #162; to Participate in the Annual Meeting of ...
Company to Feature Presentations Highlighting the ARTAS™ Robotic Hair Restoration System SAN JOSE, Calif., Feb. 15, 2018 - Restoration Robotics, Inc. (NASDAQ:HAIR) announced today that the Company will showcase the ARTAS™ Robotic Hair Restoration System (the“ARTAS System”) at The Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) February 15-18 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA. At the meeting, Restoration Robotics will host in-booth...This story is related to the following:Health, Medical,& Dental Supplies and EquipmentSearch for suppliers of:Robotic S...
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

CBS Local Interview: Filmmaker Matthew Heineman
Matthew Heineman thought he was going to be a teacher. After getting denied by Teach for America, Heineman and his friends traveled around the country to create a documentary about their generation. Today, the 34-year-old is an award-winning filmmaker and Academy-Award nominee. Heineman stopped by the CBS Local Studio to discuss the beginning of his film career and the best piece of advice he ever received. Heineman also discussed his new docuseries on Showtime called “The Trade.” This series tells the story of the opiod crisis in America from the perspective of users, law enforcement and drug lords. The Dartm...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Only CBS Entertainment Matthew Heineman Showtime Source Type: news

How Exercise May Help Protect Your Brain From Cognitive Decline and Dementia
Older adults with poor fitness levels have more deterioration of white matter in their brains, according to a new study, compared with their fitter peers. White matter deterioration was also linked with a decline in decision-making brain function among adults with early signs of memory loss, suggesting that regular exercise may slow cognitive decline and perhaps even dementia, say the study authors. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, is not the first to suggest that exercise may help keep the brain healthy in old age. But while previous research has asked adults to self-report their fitness l...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news