Dana Wins AAO Senior Achievement Award
Reza Dana, MD, MSc, MPH, director of the Cornea Service in Department of Ophthalmology and the Claes H. Dohlman Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School (HMS), received the 2017 Senior Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophtha (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - October 11, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Youngest children in school year 'more likely' to get ADHD diagnosis
Conclusion Previous studies have provided mixed findings on whether age in the school year is linked with ADHD. This new study benefits from its use of a large quantity of data. It found some interesting trends, and suggests younger children in any given school year are more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD. This finding seems plausible. You can imagine that younger children may find it harder to keep up in a class with those almost a year older than themselves and may therefore get distracted more easily. However, it is unclear how well these trends apply to the UK population for several reasons: In Finland the school yea...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health
The National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health (NLAPH) began in 2011 to provide training to four-person multi-sector teams from across the country to advance their leadership skills and achieve health equity in their community. The one-year program uses an experiential learning process including webinars, a multi-day retreat, coaching support, peer networking, and an applied population health project. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Report Offers Ethical, Regulatory, and Policy Framework for Research to Increase Quantity & Quality of Organs For Transplantation, Save Lives
The number of patients in the U.S. awaiting organ transplantation outpaces the amount of transplants performed in the U.S., and many donated organs are not transplanted each year due to several factors, such as poor organ function, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Increasing the quality and quantity of organs that can be recovered from deceased donors and successfully transplanted requires organ donor intervention research, which is conducted on donated organs prior to their transplantation. This research tests and assesses clinical interventions -- for example, medicati...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Microbiology of the Built Environment (MoBE) symposium highlights growing field
(Alfred P. Sloan Foundation) A Washington, D.C. symposium highlighting research in an expanding field of science - the Microbiology of the Built Environment (MoBE) - is bringing together leading scientists from around the globe. Co-hosted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, this event features the current state-of-the-science about the formation and function of microbial communities in built environments, their impacts on human health, and how human occupants shape complex indoor microbiomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Teens and opioids: Time for an open conversation
National surveys have found that teens today are much less likely to use alcohol and drugs compared to their parents’ generation. In fact, the proportion of high school seniors who chose not to use alcohol, tobacco, marijuana or other drugs has increased from 3 percent to 25 percent in the last thirty years. This remarkable good news is overshadowed by the growing number of teens who are daily marijuana users and the recent increase in opioid-related deaths among young people. It is important to understand the roots of this discrepancy in order to address it. Statistics show that between 2014 and 2015, the rates of d...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 9, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nicholas Chadi Tags: Ask the Expert Parenting Teen Health Adolescent Substance Abuse Program Source Type: news

Health Tip: Children and Screen Use
-- The prevalence of TV, computer and smartphone use among children and teens requires some restrictions, experts say. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests creating a media plan for your family: Set limits on screen use. Encourage playtime... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

National Academy of Engineering Annual Meeting Begins
NAE members will gather in Washington, D.C., to congratulate new members and welcome distinguished speakers who will discuss this year's annual meeting theme, Autonomous Systems. Learn More | Agenda | Webcasts (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academy of Engineering Announces Winners of 2017 Founders and Bueche Awards
On Sunday, Oct. 8, during its 2017 annual meeting, the National Academy of Engineering will present two awards for extraordinary impact on the engineering profession. The Simon Ramo Founders Award will be presented to John E. Hopcroft for his research contributions and leadership in engineering. The Arthur M. Bueche Award will be given to Louis J. Lanzerotti for his contributions to technology research, policy, and national and international cooperation. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Volcanic activity in Antarctica responsible for changes in climate in the region; not global warming
(Natural News) According to new findings that were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a series of volcanic eruptions are responsible for the rapid climate change that took place in the Southern Hemisphere at the end of the most recent ice age. The researchers from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) say... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beyond the Basics: The Impact of Zika Virus on Vision and Hearing
American Academy of Pediatrics. 09/05/2017 This 58-minute webinar describes the vision and hearing findings seen in infants born with congenital Zika virus syndrome, and discusses the landscape of research on the impact of the Zika virus on vision and hearing. Speakers discuss what guidance for evaluation, treatment, and long-term care a pediatrician can use when seeing a patient with possible or confirmed Zika virus syndrome. The webinar is part of the American Academy of Pediatrics Webinar Series on Zika Virus Syndrome. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Canada's Royal West Academy: Watching sports affects heart
A new study by the Royal West Academy in Canada has found that watching intense sporting matches can have the same effect on your heart as a vigorous workout. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Watching a game can tire your heart as much as exercise
A new study by the Royal West Academy in Canada has found that watching intense sporting matches can have the same effect on your heart as a vigorous workout. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Unified Performance Improvement Credit Process Up and Running
Thanks to a collaborative effort by the AAFP and the American Board of Family Medicine, Academy members can now benefit from a streamlined credit-reporting process for their performance improvement activities. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - October 5, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Materials Research Decadal Survey Still Seeking Input as It Moves Toward Its Conclusion
A National Academies study committee is currently conducting a decadal survey for materials research at the request of the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The committee is seeking broad input from materials science and engineering stakeholders as it prepares a final report for completion  in early 2018. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - October 5, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: mambrose Source Type: news

Department of Transportation Testing for Electronically Controlled Pneumatic Brakes on Trains
The Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act requires the U.S. Department of Transportation to reconsider the suitability of electronically controlled pneumatic brakes for trains carrying crude oil or ethanol to determine whether such brakes would reduce the incidence of train derailments and the associated safety risks, relative to other braking systems. A new report from the National Academies finds it is unable to make a conclusive statement about the emergency performance of ECP brakes, based on the results of the testing and analysis provided by DOT. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Choosing Wisely: Limit Endocrine Tests in Kids, AAP Says Choosing Wisely: Limit Endocrine Tests in Kids, AAP Says
The American Academy of Pediatrics added five endocrine tests to the Choosing Wisely list of tests that may be overused among healthy patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Kazuo Ishiguro Wins the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature
British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, known for his spare prose style and books rich in repressed emotion, has won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature. Ishiguro, 62, author of The Remains of the Day, has “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world,” the Swedish Academy said in the announcement Thursday morning. BREAKING NEWS The 2017 #NobelPrize in Literature is awarded to the English author Kazuo Ishiguro pic.twitter.com/j9kYaeMZH6 — The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) October 5, 2017 The prize, which comes with a cash award of 9 million Swedish Krona ($1.1 million), is awarded...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized Kazuo Ishiguro nobel prize nobel prize for literature onetime World Source Type: news

Allergy Relief Do's and Don'ts
THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 -- As the seasons change, more and more people are sneezing because of allergies. And the numbers are rising, with those in urban areas particularly affected, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 5, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

First, Do No Harm: Marshaling Clinician Leadership to Counter the Opioid Epidemic
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division. 09/21/2017 This 39-page report briefly describe the opioid crisis, its nature and sources, and its consequences for individuals, families, and communities across the nation. It reflects on the many potential drivers, including the real need to provide relief to those suffering from severe pain, effective strategies for pain management, and the work of various organizations to provide leadership to address the crisis. It is the product of a group of experts and field leaders convened to explore clinicians'roles in addressing opioid misu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Optometry Meeting Spotlights Ocular Surface Disease Optometry Meeting Spotlights Ocular Surface Disease
The role of the retina in neurological diseases and new concepts in ocular surface disease will headline special symposia at the American Academy of Optometry's annual conference.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology News Source Type: news

American Academy of Optometry (AAOpt) 2017 American Academy of Optometry (AAOpt) 2017
Read clinically focused news coverage of key developments from AAOpt 2017.Medscape Ophthalmology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Conference Coverage Source Type: news

NAS Member, Foreign Associate Share 2017 Nobel in Chemistry
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to NAS member Joachim Frank, NAS foreign associate Richard Henderson, and Jacques Dubochet for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nobel prize in chemistry awarded for method to visualise biomolecules
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson receive £825,000 prize for developing method for generating 3D images of life-building structuresThe Nobel prize in chemistry has been awarded to three scientists for developing a technique to produce images of the molecules of life frozen in time.Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson will receive equal shares of the 9m Swedish kronor ( £825,000) prize, whichwas announced by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm on Wednesday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis Tags: Nobel prizes Chemistry Science People in science Science prizes World news Source Type: news

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry Has Been Awarded to Three Scientists For Developments in Electron Microscopy
Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York’s Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. The Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences said Wednesday their method, called cryo-electron microscopy, allows researchers to “freeze biomolecules” mid-movement and visualize processes they have never previously seen.” The development, it...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Chemistry nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

Nobel Prize In Chemistry Honors Views Of Human Cells Working At The Atomic Level
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson worked to develop cryo-electron microscopy, which the Royal Swedish Academy says "both simplifies and improves the imaging of biomolecules."(Image credit: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

Science news presents The SN 10: Scientists to Watch
(Society for Science and the Public) Today, Science News is unveiling the SN 10: Scientists to Watch -- highlighting 10 early- and mid-career scientists on their way to widespread acclaim. Each scientist included in the SN 10 was nominated by a Nobel laureate or recently elected member of the National Academy of Sciences. All are age 40 or under, and were selected for their potential to shape the science of the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Choosing Wisely: 5 Pediatric Endocrinology Tests to Avoid (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM The endocrinology section of the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a list … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - October 4, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Nobel prize in physics awarded for discovery of gravitational waves
£825,000 prize awarded to Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne for their work on Ligo experiment which was able to detect ripples in the fabric of spacetimeLive reaction to the scientists from Ligo winning the physics NobelThree American physicists have won the Nobel prize in physics for the first observations of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime that were anticipated byAlbert Einstein a century ago.Rainer Weiss has been awarded one half of the 9m Swedish kronor ( £825,000) prize, announced by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm on Tuesday. Kip Thorne and Barry Barish w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and Ian Sample Tags: Nobel prizes Science prizes Physics People in science World news Source Type: news

NAS Members Receive 2017 Nobel in Physics
This year's Nobel Prize in Physics was divided among three NAS members, one half awarded to Rainer Weiss and the other half jointly to Barry Barish and Kip Thorne,"for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves." (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nobel Physics Prize Goes to Trio Who Led Breakthrough in Gravitational Waves
The Nobel Physics Prize 2017 has been awarded to three scientists for their discoveries in gravitational waves. Sweden’s Royal Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday that the winners are Rainer Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Barry Barish and Kip Thorne of the California Institute of Technology. The three were key to the first observation of gravitational waves in September 2015. When the discovery was announced several months later, it was a sensation not only among scientists but the general public. Gravitational waves are extremely faint ripples in the fabric of space and time, generated by s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized nobel prizes onetime Physics Source Type: news

The 2017 Nobel prize in physics - live
Join us for all the news and reaction around this year ’s prize, which will be announced from 10.45am UK time at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences10.11amBSTLast year, the physics Nobel went tothree Brits. David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz won for their work on exotic states of matter. Their work helps explain why some materials have unexpected electrical properties such as superconductivity, and in future could pave the way for quantum computers.The Edinburgh-based physicist, Peter Higgs, won the physics prize in 2013 along with Francois Englert for work on what became known as the Higgs boson...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Nobel prizes Science prizes People in science Physics Source Type: news

Health Tip: Talking To Your Kids About Tattoos
-- Although most states require parental consent for tattoos, it's still important to discuss the issue with your child. TheAmerican Academy of Pediatrics says many people are unaware of these potential risks: Infections -- Used needles and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 3, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Enhance Your Scientific Skills: Register for AIBS Professional Development Program on Interdisciplinary and Team Science
Reports abound from professional societies, the Academies, government agencies, and researchers calling attention to the fact that science is increasingly an inter-disciplinary, transdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international endeavor. In short, science has become a “team sport.” There is a real and present need to better prepare scientists for success in this new collaborative environment. The American Institute of Biological Sciences is responding to this call with a new program for scientists, educators, and individuals who work with or participate in scientific teams. Team science is increasingl...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 3, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Report Offers Guidance to Federal Government on Creating a New Statistics Entity to Combine Data From Multiple Sources While Protecting Privacy
A new report from the National Academies offers detailed recommendations to guide federal statistical agencies in creating a new entity to enable them to combine data from multiple sources in order to provide more relevant, timely, and detailed statistics– for example, on the unemployment rate or the rate of violent crime. The report reviews options for structuring the new entity, identifies approaches for protecting individuals' privacy while linking multiple sources of information, and identifies areas where staff training is needed. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS Members Receive 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
NAS members Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young have won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

3 Americans Win Nobel Prize for Circadian Rhythm Research
STOCKHOLM — The Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to three Americans on Monday for discoveries about the body’s daily rhythms. The laureates are Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michal W. Young. Rosbash is on the faculty at Brandeis University, Young at Rockefeller University and Hall is at the University of Maine. The citation for the 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize says the researchers isolated a gene that controls the normal daily biological rhythm. They “were able to peek inside our biological clock and elucidate its inner workings.” Circadian rhythms adapt the workings of the body ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

Five Reasons Why Retail Clinics Are a “Game-Changing” Threat to Traditional Healthcare Providers That Could Strain Clinical Laboratories and Pathologists
Research conducted by Kalorama suggests the popularity of retail clinics represents a trend towards newer healthcare models that challenge existing models of care, and which could severely impact hospitals, clinical laboratories, and pathology groups In recent years, pathologists and medical laboratory managers have watched as retail clinics housed in drug and grocery stores became a […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - October 2, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations AAFP AMA AMA House of Delegates AMA Wire american academy Source Type: news

Men can boost brain health and enhance performance with ginkgo
(Natural News) Young, active men may greatly benefit from taking extracts from Ginkgo biloba leaves, according to a study published online in Nutrients. To carry out the study, Polish researchers at the Jerzy Kukucza Academy of Physical Education and the Poznan University of Physical Education examined 18 young active men who were instructed to take either... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A new model of treatment for youth with anxiety
(Elsevier) A stepped care model of treatment for youth with anxiety can be effectively delivered using at least 14 percent less therapist time than traditional treatment service, reports a study published in the October 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Air Force Academy Placed on Lockdown After Reports of Possible Shooter
(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) — Law enforcement officers say they found no evidence of an active shooter and no injuries in their search of a dormitory at the Air Force Academy late Friday night. Authorities say the academy in Colorado was placed on lockdown at around 10 p.m. MDT, and that text messages were sent to airmen warning them of a possible shooter. The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office said military personnel and law enforcement officers cleared dormitories and knocked on doors but found that there were no injuries or shots fired. The Gazette in Colorado Springs reported that security forces said they belie...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized Air Force onetime Source Type: news

Beijing and Vienna have a quantum conversation
Academy presidents chat securely over QKD-protected satellite link (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - September 29, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: Hamish Johnston Source Type: news

How Private Flights Tripped Up President Trump
The Trump Administration finds itself increasingly on the defensive over private travel by Cabinet officials. The revelation that Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price took more than a dozen flights on privately chartered jets put his job in jeopardy and his boss into damage control mode. But Price is not the only member of president’s team in hot water, and the Cabinet’s high-flying ways point to a culture of extravagance at the highest levels of the Trump Administration—often racked up on the people’s credit card. Trump is upset with Price and may fire him for the offense, officials said. ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zeke J Miller Tags: Uncategorized Morning Must Reads Source Type: news

A Model Almost Lost Her Eye After Getting a Sclera Tattoo. Here ’s Why She Did It
A Canadian woman nearly lost her eye after undergoing a dangerous and increasingly popular procedure to permanently color in the whites of her eyes. Catt Gallinger, a 24-year-old model, had sought out a “sclera tattoo” — a relatively new trend in which people get ink injected into their eyeball to turn the sclera, or the white part of the eyeball, into a different color. Gallinger’s procedure last month went wrong and left purple ink oozing out of her eye, which quickly became swollen, infected and painful. “It hurt. It burned,” Gallinger told TIME on Friday. “At its worst, it&rsq...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

Air Force Academy to Cadets: ‘You Should Be Outraged’ by Racial Slurs
The superintendent of the United States Air Force Academy addressed racism and told cadets to “get out” if they aren’t respectful, after racial slurs were found written on prep school message boards. “If you’re outraged by those words, then you’re in the right place,” Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria said Thursday at the Air Force prep academy in Colorado. “You should be outraged not only as an airman, but as a human being.” On Monday, racial slurs were found written on the dormitory message boards of five African-American cadets at the Preparatory School, according to the Academ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tessa Berenson Tags: Uncategorized Air Force Military onetime Source Type: news

The Geek perspective: answering the call for advanced technology in research inquiry related to pediatric brain injury and motor disability - Wininger M, Pidcoe P.
The Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy Research Summit IV issued a Call to Action for community-wide intensification of a research enterprise in inquiries related to pediatric brain injury and motor disability by way of technological integration. But th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Health Tip: Help Prevent Sports Injuries
-- There's no surefire way to prevent sports injuries. But there are things you can do to reduce the risk, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. Many sports-related injuries are related to overuse of certain joints and muscles, the academy says.... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Of Course Tiffany & Co Dropped a Bunch of Money on the Original Breakfast at Tiffany ’s Script
Setting a new auction record, Tiffany & Co. bought the original 1961 working script of Audrey Hepburn’s classic film Breakfast at Tiffany’s for nearly $1 million this week. With a sale price of $846,619. It’s the most expensive film script ever bought at auction, Christie’s noted. Hepburn received an Academy Award nomination for her role as the capricious, complicated Holly Golightly with a thing for the high-end jewelry store in the film adaption of Truman Capote’s novel. Her copy of the script, which even has deleted scenes and margin notes in Hepburn’s own handwriting, was the top...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raisa Bruner Tags: Uncategorized Auctions audrey hepburn Breakfast at Tiffany's fashion movies Source Type: news

Hugh Hefner: A Look Inside the Wild Life of Playboy ‘s Founder
Hugh Hefner, founder of the iconic Playboy men’s magazine, died of natural causes Wednesday inside his famous Playboy Mansion home in Los Angeles, according to Playboy Enterprises. He was 91. The magazine mogul made a name for himself six decades ago when he published the first issue of Playboy, which had pages of photos of naked women, including Marilyn Monroe. Hefner shattered the taboos surrounding sex and nudity at the time, his son, Cooper Hefner, Playboy’s chief creative officer, said in a statement. Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone/Getty ImagesHugh Hefner pictured surrounded by 50 Bunnies on June 27, 1966...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized onetime photography remembrance Source Type: news

Community Perspectives Aired at National Academies Open Science Symposium
The National Academies committee tasked with exploring how to move toward an open science enterprise held a symposium on Sept. 18 where a range of stakeholders discussed how to expand open access to scholarly publications, improve standards and best practices for sharing data, and better manage data repositories. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - September 28, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: awolfe Source Type: news