Comparing pharmacotherapy in MINOCA versus medically managed obstructive acute coronary syndrome

This study uniquely compares the management and outcomes of MINOCA patients with a medically managed obstructive ACS (M-ACS) population. We retrospectively analysed registry data for consecutive patients admitted to the Gold Coast University Hospital with ACS requiring coronary angiography and identified patients with MINOCA and M-ACS. Baseline characteristics, pharmacological therapy and in-hospital outcomes were compared. In hospital outcomes were composite NACE, heart failure, stroke and major bleeding. Multivariate regression analysis was also performed to identify independent predictors of MINOCA. Multivariate regression analysis was also performed to identify independent predictors of MINOCA. We identified 139 patients with MINOCA and 142 patients with medically managed obstructive ACS (M-ACS). Multivariate regression analysis also identified female sex and cancer as independent predictors of MINOCA with odds ratios of 5.57 and 3.01, respectively. MINOCA patients were significantly less likely to receive cardioprotective medications at admission and discharge, specifically aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE-I and statins, compared to those with M-ACS. While mortality was higher among M-ACS patients (0.0% vs. 3.6%;p = 0.03), no significant differences were noted for composite NACE, heart failure, stroke and major bleeding. MINOCA patients have similar outcomes to M-ACS. Despite this, we noted a discrepancy in the use of cardioprotective medications. We also identi...
Source: Heart and Vessels - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Discussion The hands are one of the most important parts of the body for interacting with the world. They are remarkably adapted having sensitive sensory receptors as well as feedback receptors for grasping, holding, and manipulating objects. Hands, especially with an opposable thumb, multiple joints within the hand, along with the wrist and elbow, allow the hand to move in multiple positions to manipulate the world. Hands also symbolize an emotional caring and sharing between individuals as hands are used to provide a true “human touch” in personal and social situations. Due to their important interactions in ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
European Journal of Human Genetics, Published online: 06 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41431-021-01011-830 year experience of index case identification and outcomes of cascade testing in high-risk breast and colorectal cancer predisposition genes
Source: European Journal of Human Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
STATINS are a commonly prescribed medication for people at risk of heart attacks or who have had heart attacks previously. Serious side effects are exceedingly rare.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Update In March 2019, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) released new guidelines that suggest that most adults without a history of heart disease should not take low-dose daily aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. Based on the ASPREE, ARRIVE, and ASCEND trials, the ACC/AHA guidelines concluded that the risk of side effects from aspirin, particularly bleeding, outweighed the potential benefit. The new guidelines do not pertain to people with established cardiovascular disease, in whom the benefits of daily aspirin have been found to outweigh the risks. ___________...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Heart Health Prevention Source Type: blogs
Taking a low-dose aspirin every day has long been known to cut the chances of another heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in people who already have had one, but the risks don’t outweigh the benefits for most other folks, major new research finds. Although it’s been used for more than a century, aspirin’s value in many situations is still unclear. The latest studies are some of the largest and longest to test this pennies-a-day blood thinner in people who don’t yet have heart disease or a blood vessel-related problem. One found that aspirin did not help prevent first strokes or heart attacks...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch aspirin Source Type: news
The European Cardiology Congress, ESC as it is called, has grown into the largest medical meeting in the world. This year, about 38,000 attendees came to Barcelona. I was busy. Here is an update of the big stories: Inflammation:  Experts agree that inflammation associates with heart disease. One of the keys to showing inflammation causes heart disease would be to show a reduction of cardiac events with a drug that blocks inflammation. The CANTOS trial tested the ability of a drug called canukinumab, which is already approved for rare causes of inflammatory diseases, to reduce cardiac events. Canukinumab exerts its ant...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This study paints a more complicated picture than the "Pint a day keeps the doctor away" story proffered by The Sun. It seems to confirm the findings of other studies, which have shown that non-drinkers tend to have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than people who drink moderately. It suggests that some cardiovascular diseases (mainly those directly affecting the heart) seem to have a stronger link to a possible protective effect from alcohol than other vascular diseases, such as mini-strokes and bleeding in the brain. However, this can't be concluded with certainty due to the study design. We ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news
If you’ve been diagnosed with heart disease, the chances are you’ve been told to take low-dose aspirin every day as a preventative measure against heart attack and stroke. It’s most commonly prescribed for patients with congestive heart failure. This is the inability of your heart to pump as much blood as your body needs. And this is a big worry to me, because there is very little evidence that aspirin helps. In fact, regular use of aspirin — even baby aspirin — can do you more harm than good. Common Aspirin Beliefs The idea is that aspirin thins the blood, making it easier to pump.  It i...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Heart Health Source Type: news
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