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Beta-blockers and Exercise Testing in Advanced Liver Disease Beta-blockers and Exercise Testing in Advanced Liver Disease
Might beta-blockers alter prognostically relevant measures of cardiopulmonary performance during exercise testing in patients with advanced liver disease?Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Exploring the History & Treatment of PTSD: An Interview with Dr. Paula P. Schnurr
As we celebrate Veterans Day (and Remembrance Day in Canada) and honoring military veterans, many of us think back to World War I but also many other wars throughout history. I recalled the 1980s, when Iran was engaged in an almost decade-long war with Iraq, and millions were killed or injured on both sides. In the West, the older generations may recall World War II and the Vietnam War, while the younger ones remember the more recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We think of the millions who have fought, who have come back with injuries, and those who died serving their countries. But the numbers we rarely think about: How...
Source: Psych Central - November 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Arash Emamzadeh Tags: Interview Medications PTSD Trauma Treatment Combat Trauma Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PSTD Traumatic Experiences veterans Veterans day Source Type: news

De-stressing cancer with {beta}-blockers
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nusinovich, Y. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Chronic stress hormones may promote resistance to EGFR inhibitors in lung cancer patients
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Elevated levels of chronic stress hormones, such as those produced by psychological distress, may promote resistance to drugs commonly used to treat lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Retrospective analysis of clinical patient data suggests that beta blocker drugs may slow or prevent the development of resistance to EGFR inhibitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study Shows How Nerves Drive Prostate Cancer
October 19, 2017—(Bronx, NY)—In a study in today’s issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part ofMontefiore, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels to proliferate. Their earlier research—which first implicated nerves in fueling prostate cancer—has prompted Montefiore-Einstein to conduct a pilot study testing whether beta blockers (commonly used for treating hypertension) can kill cancer cells in tumors of men diagnosed with prostate cancer. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - October 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fake high blood pressure news
Mainstream doctors are quick to prescribe drugs to bring high blood pressure down.  They may put you on one, two or even three of Big Pharma’s drugs. They include diuretics, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers.   These drugs have serious side effects. I’m talking about things like edema, dizziness, nose bleeds, rash and hearing loss. They can lead to cardiac failure, heart attack, depression, colitis, and arthritis pain.  It’s bad enough risking those side effects if you have to. But your doctor may be giving you these pills for NO good reason. You mi...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels to proliferate. Their earlier research -- which first implicated nerves in fueling prostate cancer -- has prompted Montefiore-Einstein to conduct a pilot study testing whether beta blockers (commonly used for treating hypertension) can kill cancer cells in tumors of men diagnosed with prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Drugs, money and your heart
I was really excited to see a recent headline that said heart doctors should discuss herbal medicines with their patients. The recommendation came from a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.1 I thought this was a real breakthrough. I thought it meant cardiologists had finally seen the light… Boy, was I wrong… The article said doctors should learn about herbal medicines so they could STOP their patients from using them. You see, supplement use is at an all-time high. About 70% of Americans take them. That’s a lot of people. And Big Pharma would love to capture that market. So they...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

“Quackery” that saves lives
I’m used to being a target of mainstream medicine. I can’t even count the number of times I’ve been called a “quack.”  Let me give you just one example… For decades I’ve been treating my patients with a proven therapy. The FDA approved it way back in 1953. I use it to help my patients detox from mercury, lead, cadmium and other heavy metals. In fact, more than 100,000 people get this therapy every year in the U.S. But mainstream doctors still laugh at the idea of this treatment and think it’s pure bunk. I’m talking about intravenous (IV) chelation. Even though I...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Anti-Aging Health Heart Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: news

The cancer-stress connection
It’s no secret that stress can be deadly. It weakens your immune system… It increases your risk of heart disease… But new research shows that stress can be particularly deadly for people with cancer. A recent study in Australia found that stress allows cancer to spread six times faster. Aussie researchers tracked breast cancer cells in mice. They tagged the cancer cells with a fluorescent marker. Then they used state-of-the-art imaging to see tumor cells that had spread into the lymph system.1 What they saw was remarkable… The images showed that stress increases the number and size of lymph ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Cancer Health heart disease immune system stress Source Type: news

Beta blockers not needed after heart attack if other medications taken
A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds beta blockers are not needed after a heart attack if heart-attack survivors are taking ACE inhibitors and statins. The study is the first to challenge the current clinical guideline that heart-attack survivors should take all three drugs - beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins - for the rest of their lives. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

With ACEi/ARB Tx Plus Statins, Dropping Beta-Blockers OK Post-MI (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Beta-blockers of no added benefit when patients already adhere to other two meds (Source: MedPage Today Geriatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Geriatrics - September 18, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

Beta blockers not needed after heart attack if other medications taken
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds beta blockers are not needed after a heart attack if heart-attack survivors are taking ACE inhibitors and statins. The study is the first to challenge the current clinical guideline that heart-attack survivors should take all three drugs -- beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins -- for the rest of their lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart disease treatment: Beta blockers could be used to cure THIS other deadly condition
HEART disease patients are often given beta blockers for severe symptoms, but the drugs could also be used to treat a type of lung disease too. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers find beta blockers have positive effect in pulmonary arterial hypertension
(Cleveland Clinic) A team of Cleveland Clinic researchers found that a common heart disease medication, beta blockers, may help treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a debilitating lung disease.Caused by high blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, PAH is a progressive disease which usually leads to right-sided heart failure and death within five to seven years of diagnosis. In fact, right-sided heart failure is the leading cause of death in PAH patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beta Blockers May Hold Key to Unleashing Potential of Checkpoint...
In new research published in the journal Cancer Research, team shows that "beta blocker" drugs appear to be an effective means of reducing beta-2 receptor signaling and, in the process, may...(PRWeb August 30, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/09/prweb14648000.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Papers of note in Nature 548 (7668)
This week’s articles describe how the stroma promotes tissue regeneration in the stomach; show how mitosis, the DNA sensor cGAS, and CDK inhibitors contribute to antitumor immunity; and describe the mechanism of action of an allosteric beta blocker. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Spontaneous Coronary Dissection Often Followed By MACE Long Term
(MedPage Today) -- But beta blockers were tied to less recurrence in single-center study (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - August 22, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Study Supports Higher BP Target for Frail Elderly
PHOENIX — Recent hypertension research has provided few takeaways for the functionally impaired elderly — with the exception of the longitudinal Predictive Values of Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness in Institutionalized Very Aged Population (PARTAGE) study and a propensity study of beta-blockers af ter acute myocardial infarction, said Barbara J. Messinger-Rapport, MD, CMD, at the AMDA – the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s Annual Conference. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - July 28, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Christine Kilgore Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Beta-blockers may reverse genetic changes from heart disease
Researchers find that potentially damaging genetic changes linked to heart disease may be reversed with beta-blockers, a widely used class of heart drug. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Temple researchers identify novel mechanism underlying efficacy of common heart failure drug
(Temple University Health System) Beta-blocker drugs serve a key role in the treatment of heart failure, preventing bombardment of the heart by catecholamines -- substances like epinephrine and norepinephrine -- which overexcite and stress the heart. But not all HF patients respond to beta-blockers, for reasons that are unclear. Now, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University show that dysfunction of beta-adrenergic receptor 3 (β3AR) and consequent decreases in a critical cardioprotective phospholipid may be to blame. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Popular class of drugs reverse potentially harmful genetic changes from heart disease
(York University) Beta blockers are commonly used world-wide to treat a variety of cardiovascular conditions, such as arrhythmias and heart failure. Scientists have known for decades that the medications work by slowing the heart rate and reducing the force of contraction -- lessening the burden of work carried out by the heart. However, new research out of York University has now shown that these drugs also reverse a number of potentially detrimental genetic changes associated with heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Optimal Beta-blockers May Avert Post-ICD Shock HF Decompensation Optimal Beta-blockers May Avert Post-ICD Shock HF Decompensation
A spike in sympathetic activation after shocks, whether appropriate or not, may raise the risk of heart-failure decompensation within a few months, but maybe less so if beta-blockers are on board.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Managing Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Stable Angina Managing Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Stable Angina
This article reviews the pharmacotherapeutic options for stable ischemic heart disease, including beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, nitrates, ACE inhibitors, statins, and antiplatelet agents.U.S. Pharmacist (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pharmacist Journal Article Source Type: news

Therapeutic effect of beta-blocker in patients with traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis - Chen Z, Tang L, Xu X, Wei X, Wen L, Xie Q.
OBJECTIVE: β-Blocker exposure has been shown to reduce mortality in traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the efficacy of β-blockers remains inconclusive. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted in this paper to evaluate the safety and efficacy of β-b... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Beta - Blockers Cut Mortality for Patients in Sinus Rhythm
Drop in mortality for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction regardless of heart rate (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - June 13, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Beta-blocker use and fall risk in older individuals; original results from two studies with meta-analysis - Ham AC, van Dijk SC, Swart KMA, Enneman AW, van der Zwaluw NL, Brouwer-Brolsma EM, van Schoor NM, Carola Zillikens M, Lips P, de Groot LCPGM, Hofman A, Witkamp RF, Uitterlinden AG, Stricker BH, van der Velde N.
AIMS: To investigate the association between use of beta-blockers and beta-blocker characteristics - selectivity, lipid solubility, intrinsic sympathetic activity (ISA), and CYP2D6 enzyme metabolism - and fall risk. METHODS: Data from two prospecti... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Beta-Blocker Side Effects and Brain Trickery Reconsidered Beta-Blocker Side Effects and Brain Trickery Reconsidered
Drs Messerli and Bangalore respectfully disagree with Dr John Mandrola's recent commentary on the role of the nocebo effect in patient perceptions of drug side effects.Letters to the Editor (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Letter Source Type: news

Non-selective beta-blockers may increase risk of falling
Taking certain types of beta-blocker drug could increase older patients ’ risk of falling, according to researchers who say their findings have important implications for prescribers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - June 7, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Certain cardiovascular medications may increase risk of falling
(Wiley) A new analysis suggests that among older adults who take cardiovascular medications, those using non-selective beta-blockers may be at an increased of falling compared with those using selective beta-blockers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Toxicology Rounds: Will This Dog(ma) Hunt? Beta Blockers for Cocaine Toxicity
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - June 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Toxicology Rounds Source Type: news

Beta-blockers 'useless' for many heart attack patients, study reports
Conclusion This study aimed to see whether beta blockers reduce mortality in people who've had a heart attack but who don't have heart failure or systolic dysfunction. It found no difference between those who were and those who were not given beta-blockers on discharge from hospital. The authors say this adds to the evidence that routine prescription of beta blockers might not be needed for patients without heart failure following a heart attack. Current UK guidelines recommend all people who have had a heart attack take beta blockers for at least one year to reduce risk of recurrent events. Only people with heart failure ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Blanket use of beta-blockers in MI patients questioned
The established practice that all heart attack patients should routinely receive beta-blockers has been challenged by UK researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - May 30, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Beta-Blockers Might Not Improve Survival in Some Heart Attack Patients (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH Use of beta-blockers after myocardial infarction might not improve 1-year survival in patients who don't have heart failure or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, suggests an observational study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. U.S. guidelines currently recommend … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 30, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Beta blockers may not help many heart attack victims, research claims
Study finds 95% of patients who had heart attack but not heart failure saw no benefit, suggesting drugs are overprescribedMany patients given beta blockers after aheart attack may not benefit from being on the drugs, suggesting they may be being overprescribed, researchers have said.UK medical guidelines recommend all people who have had a heart attack should be put on beta blockers, medicines that reduce the activity of the heart and lower blood pressure.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Heart attack Medical research Health Society UK news Science Source Type: news

Heart attack patients 'may not benefit from beta blockers'
MANY patients given beta blockers after a heart attack may not benefit from being on the drugs, suggesting they may be being over-prescribed, researchers said. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart attack sufferers wrongly being given beta-blockers
Leeds University researchers found no difference in death rates between patients given beta-blockers and those who weren't in the 12 months after they suffered a heart attack. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart attack symptoms: Current standard treatment won’t boost survival
HEART attacks kill 200 people of working age each week, and there are 950,000 people in the UK who have survived one, according to the British Heart Foundation. However, new research suggests some of them are being given beta blockers unnecessarily. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Some heart attack patients may not benefit from beta blockers
New research challenges established medical practice that all heart attack patients should be on beta blockers. The study - by a research team at the University of Leeds - looked at patients who had a heart attack but did not suffer heart failure - a complication of a heart attack where the heart muscle is damaged and ceases to function properly. It found that heart attack patients who did not have heart failure did not live any longer after being given beta blockers - yet around 95% of patients who fall into this category end up on the medication. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Some heart attack patients may not benefit from beta blockers
(University of Leeds) New research challenges established medical practice that all heart attack patients should be on beta blockers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AstraZeneca sells Seloken European rights for $300m
Anglo-Swedish group to make and supply beta-blocker to Italian drugmaker Recordati (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - May 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Beta Blocker Side Effects (Adverse Effects)
Title: Beta Blocker Side Effects (Adverse Effects)Category: MedicationsCreated: 5/17/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/17/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - May 17, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

HRS 2017: First ever nasal spray used to treat rapid heart rate condition
Data from a 100-patient clinical trial showed that a fast-acting nasal spray therapy, etripamil, was effective at stopping a common rapid heart rate condition, researchers said today at the annual Heart Rhythm Society conference in Chicago. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is traditionally treated with adenosine, calcium channel blockers or beta blockers, which is administered using an IV in a clinical setting. There are no available treatments that can be administered by a patient at home. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post HRS 2017: First ever nasal spray used to trea...
Source: Mass Device - May 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations milestonepharmaceutical Source Type: news

The Power of Suggestion: Statin and Beta-blocker Side Effects The Power of Suggestion: Statin and Beta-blocker Side Effects
A recent analysis highlights the nocebo effect in patients experiencing muscle symptoms with statin therapy. Dr Mandrola sees this brain trickery at work in patients on beta-blockers and those with atrial fibrillation.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology Expert Column Source Type: news

How Metoprolol Reduces Infarct Size: Simply'Stunning'How Metoprolol Reduces Infarct Size: Simply'Stunning '
The beta-blocker, given early after MI onset, is cardioprotective at least partly due to an anti-inflammatory neutrophil-stunning effect, say researchers; implications may go beyond acute MI therapy.Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Apr 28 Cardiology News Apr 28 Cardiology News
His-bundle pacing, diet soft drinks, beta-blockers, chest-pain evaluation, and the LDL hypothesis are discussed in this week's podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 28, 2017 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Beta blocker shows cancer-fighting properties
A new study finds that carvedilol, a drug typically used to treat high blood pressure, can protect against the sun-induced cell damage that leads to skin cancer. The research could lead better ways to protect our skin from the sun. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Beta blocker shows cancer-fighting properties
(Experimental Biology 2017) A new study finds that carvedilol, a drug typically used to treat high blood pressure, can protect against the sun-induced cell damage that leads to skin cancer. The research could lead better ways to protect our skin from the sun. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Beta-blockers in Pregnancy Don't Cause Fetal Heart Defects: Study Beta-blockers in Pregnancy Don't Cause Fetal Heart Defects: Study
Reports linking beta-blockers to fetal heart defects may have been muddied by confounding; these new findings"provide reassurance" for using these drugs to treat heart disease in pregnancy, say study authors.Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 20, 2017 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

No Fetal Heart Risk from Mom's Beta-Blocker Use (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- More complete data point finger at maternal confounders (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - April 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news