Rising temperatures: How to avoid heat-related illnesses and deaths

In Boston, we believe warmer is better. Our cravings for warmth are formed in the cold, dark winter nights when the prospect of summer seems impossibly remote. But with July temperatures reaching near 100° F, our winter dreams are becoming a summertime nightmare. Dangerous heat exposures in Boston and other cities across the US aren’t felt equally. Urban areas with less green space and more pavement can be up to 15 degrees hotter than other, greener places. These urban heat islands are much more likely to be poor, minority neighborhoods, and their origins can be traced straight back to redlining that began in the 1930s. This summer, the disparate heat risk these communities face has piled onto the outsized harm that COVID-19 has already wrought upon them. The good news is that we can take actions that protect our most vulnerable urban neighbors and ourselves from COVID-19 and extreme heat. What is heat-related illness? Our ability to cool off has limits. When the heat is too strong, our bodies overheat. When that happens, we can get headaches and muscle cramps, and vomit. Severe overheating, when body temperature reaches 104° F or higher, can lead to heatstroke that can damage kidneys, brains, and muscles. Even for people who are healthy, heat can be dangerous and cause heat-related illness. Outdoor workers, athletes (especially football players and young athletes), and women who are pregnant should be especially careful when it’s hot outside. Who is at gr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Asthma Children's Health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Emergency Planning Environmental health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Source: BMJ News - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 23 September 2020Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Yan Wang, Haiyan Hao, Lisa Sundahl Platt
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research
AbstractMyocardial infarction is a frequent complication of cardiovascular disease leading to high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after myocardial infarction are associated with heart failure and poor prognosis. Cardiomyocyte microvesicles (CMV) are released during hypoxic conditions and can act as mediators of intercellular communication. MicroRNA (miRNA) are short non-coding RNA which can alter cellular mRNA-translation. Microvesicles (MV) have been shown to contain distinct patterns of miRNA from their parent cells which can affect protein expression in target cells. We hypot...
Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The development of a full triad and additional symptomatology suggests a late recognition of signs and symptoms of WE in schizophrenia. Prophylactic thiamine checks and treatment in patients with schizophrenia are relevant, and if WE is suspected adequate parenteral thiamine supplementation is necessary. Key points Only few cases of schizophrenia-related WE have been published in the literature, though challenges in diagnosing and recognising WE suggest that the vast majority of cases go undetected. Acute thiamine deficiency leads to Wernicke's Encephalopathy. Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia are at risk ...
Source: International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 September 2020Source: The Lancet Diabetes &EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Srikanth Bellary, Abd A Tahrani, Anthony H Barnett
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 September 2020Source: The Lancet Diabetes &EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Johannes F E Mann, Thomas Hansen, Thomas Idorn, Lawrence A Leiter, Steven P Marso, Peter Rossing, Jochen Seufert, Sayeh Tadayon, Tina Vilsbøll
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: IJC Heart &Vasculature, Volume 30Author(s): Aquino Bruno Heberto, Plata Corona Juan Carlos, Castro Rubio José Antonio, Pulido Pérez Patricia, Torres Rasgado Enrique, Morales Portano Julieta Danira, Gómez Álvarez Enrique Benito, Merino Rajme José Alfredo
Source: IJC Heart and Vasculature - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 September 2020Source: IJC Heart &VasculatureAuthor(s): Dominik Linz, Rachel MJ van der Velden, Monika Gawalko, Astrid NL Hermans, Nikki AHA Pluymaekers, Jeroen M Hendriks
Source: IJC Heart and Vasculature - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Topical Review Source Type: research
In clinical trials of treatments for chronic pain, the percentage of participants who withdraw early can be as high as 50%. Major reasons for early withdrawal in these studies include perceived lack of efficacy and adverse events. Commonly used strategies for accommodating missing data include last observation carried forward, baseline observation carried forward, and more principled methods such as mixed-model repeated-measures and multiple imputation. All these methods require strong and untestable assumptions concerning the conditional distribution of outcomes after dropout, given the observed data. We review recent dev...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
More News: Alcoholism | Asthma | Blogging | Brain | Caffeine | Cardiology | Children | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Diabetes | Emergency Medicine | Endocrinology | Environmental Health | Harvard | Headache | Health | Heart | Heart Failure | Heatstroke | Nightmares | Pandemics | Pregnancy | Urology & Nephrology | USA Health | Warnings | Websites | Women