Can controlling blood pressure later in life reduce risk of dementia?

This study was so successful at reducing the risk of mild cognitive impairment by lowering high blood pressure that it ended early, because the data and safety monitoring board felt that it was unethical to continue the control group. However, the dementia endpoint had not yet reached statistical significance — likely because of this early termination. Thus, while the study succeeded in one sense, it ultimately concluded that treating systolic blood pressure to below 120 mmHg (versus lower than 140 mmHg) did not reduce risk of dementia. A new analysis of many studies Because SPRINT-MIND and many other prior studies have not clearly shown whether lowering our high blood pressure can reduce our risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, meta-analyses are needed to answer this question. Researchers in Ireland looked at data from 14 studies comprising almost 100,000 participants, followed over an average of more than four years. They found that older individuals (average age 69) who lowered their blood pressure are slightly less likely to develop dementia or cognitive impairment (7.0% versus 7.5%). Thus, the answer is: Yes! Lowering high blood pressure will lower our risk of dementia and cognitive impairment. The relationship between high blood pressure and dementia So, how does lowering high blood pressure reduce our risk of cognitive impairment and dementia? Most people who have dementia don’t have just a single cause. Two or even three different problems in the bra...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Healthy Aging Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

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Drinking alcohol causes damage to your health in both the short term and long term, even for moderate drinkers. For individuals who suffer from addiction to alcohol and frequently drink in excess, these risks become higher. Knowing the risks of drinking alcohol is important to help avoid drinking to excess and reduce the likelihood of these risks. Short-Term Risks of Drinking Alcohol There are many short-term risks that occur when drinking alcohol. These risks can happen to anyone, including individuals suffering from alcohol use disorder, or individuals who are drinking for the very first time. Injuries When you drink al...
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We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
You're reading 5 Quick Tips for Maintaining a Healthy Brain as you Age, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. As we know, the brain plays a vital role in the body as it controls or has a role in basically every physiological process. If our brains begin to fail,  it affects our whole body. Though aging is an inevitable process, this does not mean that you have to experience cognitive decline or any real loss of brain power. This because, fortunately, there are lifestyle factors which could enable one to d...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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This study shows that some genetic changes linked to cancer are present in surprisingly large numbers of normal cells. We still have a long way to go to fully understand the implications of these new findings, but as cancer researchers, we can't underestimate the importance of studying healthy tissue." Early Onset of Menopause Correlates with Shorter Life Expectancy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/10/early-onset-of-menopause-correlates-with-shorter-life-expectancy/ Aging is a phenomenon affecting all organs and systems throughout the body, driven by rising levels of molecular damage. The v...
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Conclusion Acute delirium is commonly underdiagnosed, and can be masked by chronic alterations in cognition and mentation. Delirium has many causes, and can be assessed using the acronym DELIRIUM. The most common presentations suggesting delirium over dementia are short-term memory loss, rapid fluctuation in condition, acute alteration, and a condition present that may be responsible for delirium. Management includes searching for causes of acute alteration in mental status, negating environmental factors of delirium, and—only when necessary—reducing the patient’s threat to themselves or providers by usin...
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Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Most people are familiar with the steps they can take to lower their risk of heart disease and cancer. Choosing your diet carefully, exercising and quitting smoking have all been shown to lower the risk of these diseases. But when it comes to dementia — including dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease — scientists haven’t found many actionable steps that people can take to lower their risk. Genes play a prominent role in who develops dementia, especially Alzheimer’s, and age is also a dominant factor in the degenerative brain disorder, but neither are under human control. Now, in a presentati...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news
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