Phylogenetic analysis of HA and NA genes of influenza H1N1 viruses from 1918 to 2017.

Phylogenetic analysis of HA and NA genes of influenza H1N1 viruses from 1918 to 2017. Acta Virol. 2019;63(2):195-202 Authors: Yan HX, Xu HF, He WJ, Xie Y, Dong GY Abstract The 1918 "Spanish" pandemic is the earliest known influenza H1N1 virus. Since then H1N1 viruses circulated between humans and animals continuously. With the increased amount of samples of H1N1 viruses and technology development, researchers have been studying how the viruses evolved. Here, we analyzed HA and NA genes of H1N1 viruses from three aspects: host distribution, geographical distribution and phylogenetic analysis. The data showed hosts were predominantly human, swine and poultry, and other hosts were mainly cat, ferret, wild bear, canine, cheetah and seal. In terms of geographical distribution, the North America and Eurasia were the main H1N1 influenza pandemic areas. Of them, the United States, China, Japan, Canada, the United Kingdom, India and Singapore were the most affected. The phylogenetic analysis of surface genes of influenza H1N1 viruses from 1918 to 2017 worldwide revealed the distribution of all avian influenza viruses (AIVs) showed a clear geographical difference, mainly concentrated in Eurasia and America. American and Eurasian swine viruses might be the ancestors of the 2009 pandemic virus' HA and NA genes. Swine influenza viruses played an important role in the spread of influenza viruses across species. To our knowledge, this is the first large-scale...
Source: Acta Virologica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Virol Source Type: research

Related Links:

In conclusion, the reported results highlight the importance of AIV attachment to trachea in many avian species. Finally, the importance of chickens and mallards in AIVs dynamics was illustrated by the abundant AIV attachment observed. Introduction Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are pathogens of global concern in both human and veterinary medicine (Webster et al., 1992; Stöhr, 2002; Olsen et al., 2006; Wiethoelter et al., 2015). Wild birds are well-described hosts of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and longitudinal surveillance studies have demonstrated a plethora of low pathogenic AIVs (LPAIVs) circulating in wild...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
María Maximina B. Moreno-Altamirano1*, Simon E. Kolstoe2 and Francisco Javier Sánchez-García1* 1Laboratorio de Inmunorregulación, Departamento de Inmunología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico 2School of Health Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom Over the last decade, there has been significant advances in the understanding of the cross-talk between metabolism and immune responses. It is now evident that immune cell effector function strongly depends on the metabolic pathway in w...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Jennifer M. Rudd1, Sivasami Pulavendran1, Harshini K. Ashar1, Jerry W. Ritchey1, Timothy A. Snider1, Jerry R. Malayer1, Montelongo Marie1, Vincent T. K. Chow2 and Teluguakula Narasaraju1* 1Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, United States2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore Exaggerated host innate immune responses have been implicated in severe influenza pneumonia. We have previously demonstrated that excessive neutrophils recruited during in...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Baik Seong Glycosylation of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of the influenza provides crucial means for immune evasion and viral fitness in a host population. However, the time-dependent dynamics of each glycosylation sites have not been addressed. We monitored the potential N-linked glycosylation (NLG) sites of over 10,000 HA and NA of H1N1 subtype isolated from human, avian, and swine species over the past century. The results show a shift in glycosylation sites as a hallmark of 1918 and 2009 pandemics, and also for the 1976 “abortive pandemic”. Co-segregation of particular glycosylation si...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
In this study, we rescued the H1N1 wild-type (WT) classical swine influenza virus (A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (H1N1)) and H1N1 PA-X deficient virus containing mutations at the frameshift motif, and compared their replication properties and pathogenicity of swine influenza virus in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that the expression of PA-X inhibits virus replication and polymerase activity in cultured cells and decreases virulence in mouse models. Therefore, our study demonstrates that PA-X protein acts as a negative virulence regulator for classical H1N1 swine influenza virus and decreases virulence by inhibiting viral ...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
AbstractIn recent years multiple novel influenza A strains have emerged in humans. We reviewed publically available data to summarise epidemiological characteristics of distinct avian influenza viruses known to cause human infection and describe changes over time. Most recently identified zoonotic strains have emerged in China (H7N9, H5N6, H10N8) – these strains have occurred mostly in association with visiting a live bird market. Most zoonotic AIVs and swine influenza variants typically cause mild infections in humans however severe illness and fatalities are associated with zoonotic H5N6, H10N8, H7N9 and H5N1 serot...
Source: Archives of Public Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news
Discussion Through new surveillance efforts and phylogenetic analysis of IAV-S in Mexico and Chile, we have expanded our understanding of the extensive IAV-S diversity that circulates in swine in Latin America. Most notably, we have identified multiple novel clades of H3N2 and H1N1 viruses of human origin in Mexico and Chile that have not been identified in swine previously, highlighting the importance of the human-swine interface in the evolution of IAV-S diversity in Latin America. The presence of two different IAV-S lineages in Mexico that are related to North American IAV-S (classical H1N1 and H3-cluster IV) also demon...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Influenza virus neuramindase (NA) protein is a surface protein that plays an essential role in virus replication. Drugs and antibodies that block NA function can reduce both the symptoms and the length of illness; however, variants of influenza virus are resistant to NA inhibitors. The neuramindase 1 (N1) subtype of NA is important because it is found in the two pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains (1918 Spanish flu and 2009 swine flu) and the H5N1 avian influenza virus. Anti-neuramindase antibody CD6 is a novel antibody that spans a conserved 30 amino acid epitope across the lateral face of a neuramindase (NA) dimer. The...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 March 2015 Source:Antiviral Research Author(s): A. Sally Davis , Jeffery K. Taubenberger , Mike Bray Attempts to reproduce the features of human influenza in laboratory animals date from the early 1890s, when Richard Pfeiffer inoculated apes with bacteria recovered from influenza patients and produced a mild respiratory illness. Numerous studies employing nonhuman primates (NHPs) were performed during the 1918 pandemic and the following decade. Most used bacterial preparations to infect animals, but some sought a filterable agent for the disease. Since the viral etiology of influenza ...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
More News: 1918 Spanish Flu | Bird Flu | Canada Health | China Health | Flu Pandemic | Genetics | H1N1 | India Health | Infectious Diseases | Influenza | Japan Health | Pandemics | Singapore Health | Spain Health | Swine Flu | UK Health | USA Health | Virology