10 Global Health Issues to Watch in the 2020s
By Margarite Nathe, Principal Editor/Writer, IntraHealth International Midwives and nurses —like Sellyvine (left) at the women's hospital in Nakuru, Kenya —make up 50% of the health workforce worldwide. They're in the spotlight during 2020 and will play a crucial role in whether their countries can achieve their most ambitious health targets by 2030. Photo by Georgina Goodwin for IntraHealth International.February 14, 2020Every year, we look at the top global health issues coming our way in the next 12 months. But global health is a long game and it’s a brand-new decade, so this year, we’re look...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Family Planning & Reproductive Health HIV AIDS Infectious Diseases Maternal, Newborn, Child Health Mental Health Noncommunicable Diseases Digital Health Policy Advocacy Gender Equality Nursing Midwifery Youth Midwives N Source Type: news

What ’s in a Name? Why WHO’s Formal Name for the New Coronavirus Disease Matters
On Tuesday, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared an official name for the new coronavirus disease: COVID-19 — making sure not to reference Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the virus originated. COVID-19 stands for Corona Virus Disease 19. “Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” said Director-General of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.” The WHO referenced guidelines set in 2015 that ensure the name does not refer to a geographical location, ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sanya Mansoor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

Why We Are So Ill-Prepared for A Possible Pandemic Like Coronavirus
We were surprised in 2002 when a new coronavirus called SARS emerged from southern China and spread to 17 countries, causing more than 8,000 disease cases and nearly 800 deaths. We were surprised in 2009 when a new H1N1 influenza strain emerged in Mexico and caused worldwide panic. We were surprised in 2014 when Ebola virus broke out in three West African countries, with nearly 30,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. And here we are now, facing the 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak, on the verge of becoming a worldwide pandemic, wthin China reporting over 20,000 cases and nearly 500 deaths. Three years ago in a book, Deadl...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

Xenophobia ‘Is A Pre-Existing Condition.’ How Harmful Stereotypes and Racism are Spreading Around the Coronavirus
As 10-year-old Connor and a friend played one recent day at recess, they were approached by a group of boys wanting to play a game — testing the boys for coronavirus. Connor, who is half-Chinese, and his friend, also Chinese, played along at first, but Connor’s mother Nadia Alam tells TIME that they quickly became uncomfortable and that the other boys wouldn’t stop, she says. “In this instance, I honestly don’t think the kids who targeted my son acted out of malice,” Alam said in an emailed statement to TIME. “They were acting out the fear and ignorance around them. My son was upse...
Source: TIME: Health - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV onetime Source Type: news

Viral Outbreaks Are Here to Stay. This is How Humans Will Fight Back
The year of the rat is off to an ominous start. “We just stay home and don’t go out,” says Mr. Dong. The 33-year-old researcher, who provided only one name, has no other options. He, his wife and their 3-month-old daughter live in Wuhan, the epicenter of an unfolding global health crisis. They’re treating the forced time at home as a holiday, though he says, “this is different than any of them before.” Families like his huddle in their homes, fearful that if they venture out, they will get sick. Since the first cases of a previously unknown pneumonia-like illness emerged in December, Wuh...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park and Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Why the Coronavirus Should Worry Us All
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of MERS virus particles (yellow) both budding and attached to the surface of infected VERO E6 cells (blue). Credit: NIAIDBy Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jan 21 2020 (IPS) The coronavirus outbreak — which began in Wuhan, China, and causes a pneumonia-like illness — is raging across Asia, infecting close to 300 people and killing four. It was initially known to be transmitted from animals to human, and was just confirmed to be transmitted from human to human. The rapid nature of its origin and speed in transmission reminds us that national security is threatened when ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

Cells to Society: "Gold Standard" Chicago Parent Program / Research News
This study was conducted to enhance the rate of advance care planning conversations and documentation by improving knowledge, attitudes, and skills of caregivers.      Read more   Violence and Trauma ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - October 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Are you ready for the next big pandemic? International watchdog organization warns it could claim 80 million lives
(Natural News) Just over 100 years ago, in 1918, 500 million people across the globe contracted the Spanish flu in the deadliest pandemic in recorded history. Between 20 and 50 million of those infected died, including around 675,000 Americans. After first appearing in the United States, Europe and Asia, the disease spread like wildfire, eventually... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In 1918, a parade sparked a killer flu outbreak in Philadelphia. This Saturday, another parade pays homage to those victims.
The event kicks off “Spit Spreads Death,” an exhibition about this city’s health disaster and the worldwide influenza pandemic nearly a hundred years ago. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Blakemore Source Type: news

A New World? Are the Americas Returning to Old Problems?
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Sep 12 2019 (IPS) When I in 1980 first arrived in America it was a new world to me. I went from New York to Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic and like so many visitors and migrants before me I was overwhelmed by both familiar and strange impressions. Familiar due to books I had read and movies I had seen, strange since I encountered unexpected things and new because both I and several of those I met compared themselves to the “old world”, i.e. Euroasia and parts of Africa. A sense of uniqueness, admiration for an assumed freshness and difference, can be discerned in the wri...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Ebola, H.I.V., Spanish Flu, SARS — the 20th Century’s Deadliest Hits
In “The Pandemic Century” Mark Honigsbaum covers nine outbreaks that shaped how we think and respond to diseases. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Books and Literature The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria, and Hubris (Book) Mark Honigsbaum Epidemics Influenza SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Ebola Virus Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Source Type: news

Doctors dismissed Spanish flu as being a 'minor infection' before the 1918 pandemic
Research from Queen Mary University in London found doctors were seeing Spanish flu for years before it exploded into a pandemic which infected a third of the world's population. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Spanish flu may have lingered two years before 1918 outbreak and vaccine could have treated it
(Taylor& Francis Group) The most severe pandemic in recent history, killing some 50 million people worldwide, the Spanish influenza, may have emerged up to two years earlier than previously believed. And, according to a new and influential study, its early manifestation was ignored at the time as a 'minor infection.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could CRISPR Diagnostics Provide a Valuable Weapon in the Fight against Pandemic Flu?
The flu season is up and running in the Northern Hemisphere, and early signs in both the United States and Europe are that the effects might not be quite as severe as the brutal 2017/18 season. The United States is predominantly seeing H1N1 circulating, while monitoring in Europe has identified co-circulation of H1N1 and H3N2—both varieties of Influenza A that should be covered by the seasonable vaccine. What if they weren’t though? Influenza A can be found in both human and animal populations, and it evolves rapidly through genetic mutation. Each year many humans rely on their country&a...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Wilkins Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Demystifying Medicine 2019: The Next Influenza Pandemic, and Ending the HIV/AIDS Pandemic; Follow the Science
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published: 1/8/2019. This one-hour, 48-minute lecture on Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases: A Perpetual Challenge and The Next Influenza Pandemic includes two topics. Part one begins nine minutes in, with a presentation by Dr. Taubenberger, on The Next Influenza Pandemic: Remembering the Past and Planning for the Future, which describes previous influenza pandemics in history, the mortality impact of influenza pandemics, and if next influenza pandemic can be predicted. It discusses how the influenza A virus host range is quite diverse, how the virus can switch hosts,...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Century After the 1918 Flu Pandemic: Why Are We Still Concerned Today?
Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division (HMD). Published: 11/26/2018. A century after the 1918 flu pandemic wiped out more than 50 million people worldwide, this event from the National Academy of Medicine and the Forum on Microbial Threats discusses how to prepare for the next flu pandemic and prevent a global catastrophe. Speakers highlight progress in science, public health, global governance, and cross-sectoral alliances for pandemic flu preparedness. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Readiness for Microbial Threats 2030: Exploring Lessons Learned Since the 1918 Influenza Pandemic - A Workshop
Discussions also touched on recent progress in global, regional, and national governance and public health capacities; challenges and opportunities with medical countermeasures; and tools to enhance detection, laboratory confirmation, and public communication in major diseas e outbreaks. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Century After the 1918 Flu Pandemic
Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division (HMD). Published: 11/26/2018. A century after the 1918 flu pandemic wiped out more than 50 million people worldwide, this event from the National Academy of Medicine and the Forum on Microbial Threats discusses how to prepare for the next flu pandemic and prevent a global catastrophe. Speakers highlight progress in science, public health, global governance, and cross-sectoral alliances for pandemic flu preparedness. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

100 years ago, a train carrying Spanish flu pulled into Calgary. Within weeks, Alberta was in crisis
While those in the prime of their life were victims of both the war and the flu, the war took young men. Women (mainly volunteer nurses and expecting mothers), Indigenous people, and members of the working class were hardest hit by the influenza. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - December 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Calgary Source Type: news

Readiness for a Severe Pandemic 100 Years After 1918 Readiness for a Severe Pandemic 100 Years After 1918
Are we sufficiently prepared to respond to the next influenza pandemic? While much has improved over the past century, this commentary suggests that significant gaps remain in preparedness.American Journal of Epidemiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

Pennsylvanians can Receive Naloxone for Free on Thursday
From the Pennsylvania Press Room: The Wolf Administration will provide naloxone for free to any Pennsylvanian who wants it at nearly 80 locations across the state, primarily at state health centers and county/municipal health departments, on Thursday, December 13 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., as part of the administration’s ongoing effort to reduce the number of opioid overdoses and get residents into treatment. “The life-saving medication naloxone is essential for all of us to have on hand, particularly if you have a loved one suffering from opioid-use disorder,” Governor Tom Wolf said. “We want to ensur...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - December 11, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Health Professionals In the Region K-12 Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing Pandemics and Bioterrorism: Past, Present, and Future
Source: George Mason University (GMU). Published: 12/4/2018. This one-hour presentation discusses lessons learned for pandemic preparedness since the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic, plans for implementing the new National Biodefense Strategy, and the importance of education for the future of biodefense. It reviews definitions of biodefense and bioincidents, the challenge of catastrophic bioterrorism, and the BioDefense Strategic Framework. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing Pandemics and Bioterrorism
Source: George Mason University (GMU). Published: 12/4/2018. This one-hour presentation discusses lessons learned for pandemic preparedness since the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic, plans for implementing the new National Biodefense Strategy, and the importance of education for the future of biodefense. It reviews definitions of biodefense and bioincidents, the challenge of catastrophic bioterrorism, and the BioDefense Strategic Framework. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US life expectancy falls for third year in a row - Dyer O.
Life expectancy at birth in the United States fell again in 2017 for the third year running, the longest sustained decline since 1915-18, when the first world war and the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic were among the causes of death. A continued inc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Health authorities warn next superbug pandemic will kill "millions" ... and nations aren't doing anything to stop it
(Natural News) When you think of a pandemic, global disease outbreaks like the Spanish flu that killed 50 million in the early 1900s or the more recent HIV/AIDS pandemic are what usually come to mind. However, some experts are warning that the next pandemic will come from an unexpected source – and it’s something that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

100 Years of Pandemic Influenza Preparedness 100 Years of Pandemic Influenza Preparedness
This paper highlights advances in medical care and progress in preparedness and countermeasures since the 1918 influenza pandemic. What remains to be done to improve readiness for the next pandemic?American Journal of Public Health (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

The Critical Role EMS Plays in Fighting the Flu
Influenza has been impacting public health on a global scale since the beginning of recorded history. Influenza, also known as the “flu,” has numerous organizations committed to public health research, developing vaccines, and educating on best practices to prepare for the upcoming flu season. By gaining an understanding of the flu through history, virology, and how it impacts our society, we can have a better appreciation for the commitment that’s involved with combating the flu. What Is Influenza (and What’s Not)? The eyes of an epidemiologist can twitch for a variety of reasons, one of them being...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Morgan K. Anderson, MPH Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news

The frontlines of influenza research
(Human Vaccines Project) On the centennial of the 1918 influenza pandemic, join us for a scientific summit on cutting-edge influenza and human immune system research. Held Nov. 15-16 in Nashville, TN, the summit will include a special press briefing, featuring some of the latest work on universal flu vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How you can prepare for a pandemic flu TODAY
(Natural News) A century ago, a pandemic flu swept across the globe, infecting over 500 million people and claiming the lives of 50 million. Researchers believe it is only a matter of time before a pandemic like the 1918 Spanish flu threatens the world once again. Today, a pandemic flu would spread more rapidly, taking... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC director on threat of flu pandemic, spike in acute flaccid myelitis
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed 10 new cases of acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM. Seventy-two people, mostly children, have now been diagnosed in 24 states. The CDC is also keeping a close watch on the flu after the highest number of deaths from the virus last year since modern tracking began. In an interview with "CBS This Morning" co-host John Dickerson, CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield said he fears the flu could become a pandemic like the 1918 Spanish flu, which killed as many as 50 million people worldwide. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Public Health Priorities 100 Years After the Spanish Flu Public Health Priorities 100 Years After the Spanish Flu
It's been 100 years since the deadly Spanish flu pandemic--are we adequately prepared for another? The author of this commentary argues that current public health defenses are dangerously inadequate.American Journal of Public Health (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

The Checkup: A Centennial of Death: The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918
To pay proper respect to the influenza of 100 years ago, get this year ’ s flu shot and make sure your children do, too. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PERRI KLASS, M.D. Tags: Influenza Epidemics Vaccination and Immunization Children and Childhood Source Type: news

Pandemic worse than the Spanish Flu may be coming, study warns
Researchers at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Australia said if a similar pandemic were to occur today, it could kill as many as 147 million people. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lessons from the 1918 flu pandemic, 100 years on
(Frontiers) With flu season nearly upon us, a new study looks at the factors behind the extremely high mortality of the 1918 flu pandemic and how to prepare for future outbreaks. The authors warn that while the world is better prepared than 100 years ago, new challenges will affect the impact of the next influenza virus pandemic -- including changing population demographics, antibiotic resistance and climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vulnerability to Pandemic Flu Could Be Greater Today Than a Century Ago
This article is a conversion with Dr Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, who discusses the global impact of another 1918-like flu pandemic. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Spanish flu: the killer that still stalks us, 100 years on
The pandemic wiped out up to 100 million lives, but scientists still struggle to explain what caused it. The answers could ensure that it never strikes againOne hundred years ago this month, just as the first world war was drawing to a fitful close,an influenza virus unlike any before or since swept across the British Isles, felling soldiers and civilians alike. One of the first casualties was the British prime minister and war leader, David Lloyd George.On 11 September 1918, Lloyd George, riding high on news of recent Allied successes, arrived in Manchester to be presented with the keys to the city. Female munitions worke...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Flu pandemic First world war Health Epidemics Death and dying Society World news UK news Science Medical research Immunology Source Type: news

Readiness for Responding to a Severe Pandemic 100 Years After 1918
Article assesses public health and health care readiness for the 1918 influenza outbreak and looks at developments in the last 100 years that have improved readiness for a pandemic. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIAID scientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles
Details could advance vaccine development for several human diseases. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - July 11, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIAID dcientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, could benefit VLP vaccine projects, targeting a range of viruses from HIV to Ebola and SARS coronavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A century on, why are we forgetting the deaths of 100 million? | Martin Kettle
The 1918 Spanish flu outbreak killed more people than both world wars. Don ’t imagine such a thing could never happen againThis year marks a century since somewomen got the vote; a century since theend of the first world war; 50 years since the1968 revolts; 70 since the founding ofIsrael andthe NHS. All have been well marked. So it is striking that the centenary of one of the most devastating events in human history has been allowed to pass thus far with almost no public reflection of any kind.This year is the 100th anniversary of the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. Estimates about its impact vary. But when you read th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Martin Kettle Tags: Flu pandemic Infectious diseases Ebola Health Society Medical research UK news World news Source Type: news

Pepe's story: How I survived Spanish flu
José Ameal is believed to be the oldest Spanish survivor of the pandemic which followed World War I. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 1918 Flu Pandemic: Why It Matters 100 Years Later
Here are 5 things you should know about the 1918 pandemic and why it matters 100 years later. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

100 Years of Influenza Pandemics and Practice: 1918-2018
Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health. 05/07/2018 This video is Part 1 of a one-day symposium sponsored by the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the context of the centenary of the 1918 influenza pandemic, experts from academia and government convened to discuss and debate current pandemic influenza threats, and the future of pandemic preparedness and influenza prevention and control. Topics include 2018 Threats: The Challenge of H3N2, and Impact of Epidemic on Health Systems; and Current Gaps: United States and Local Public Health Pandemi...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Mother (of all Pandemics) and Her Naughty Children: 100 Years of Behaving Badly
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [National Institutes of Health]. 04/10/2018 This one-hour, two-minute lecture discusses the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and what scientists still can learn from it. The speaker describes how research on 1918 flu virus and the pandemic it caused is informing current efforts to understand how and why new flu viruses with pandemic potential emerge. He also discusses investigations aimed at developing new and better flu vaccines, a major focus of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases research going into the second century of the 1918 pandemic era. (Video or Mu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

1918 Pandemic Flu Symposium Registration
May 7, 2018; Atlanta, GA or via webcast. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Mother (of all Pandemics) and Her Naughty Children: 100 Years of Behaving Badly
April 10, 2018 3:00pm ET. Webinar will provide an overview of the 1918 flu epidemic. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - April 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in American and World History
July 9-27, 2018; Blacksburg Virginia and Washington DC. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - March 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news