NIAID scientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles
Details could advance vaccine development for several human diseases. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - July 11, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIAID dcientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, could benefit VLP vaccine projects, targeting a range of viruses from HIV to Ebola and SARS coronavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A century on, why are we forgetting the deaths of 100 million? | Martin Kettle
The 1918 Spanish flu outbreak killed more people than both world wars. Don ’t imagine such a thing could never happen againThis year marks a century since somewomen got the vote; a century since theend of the first world war; 50 years since the1968 revolts; 70 since the founding ofIsrael andthe NHS. All have been well marked. So it is striking that the centenary of one of the most devastating events in human history has been allowed to pass thus far with almost no public reflection of any kind.This year is the 100th anniversary of the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. Estimates about its impact vary. But when you read th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Martin Kettle Tags: Flu pandemic Infectious diseases Ebola Health Society Medical research UK news World news Source Type: news

Pepe's story: How I survived Spanish flu
José Ameal is believed to be the oldest Spanish survivor of the pandemic which followed World War I. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - May 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 1918 Flu Pandemic: Why It Matters 100 Years Later
Here are 5 things you should know about the 1918 pandemic and why it matters 100 years later. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

100 Years of Influenza Pandemics and Practice: 1918-2018
Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health. 05/07/2018 This video is Part 1 of a one-day symposium sponsored by the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the context of the centenary of the 1918 influenza pandemic, experts from academia and government convened to discuss and debate current pandemic influenza threats, and the future of pandemic preparedness and influenza prevention and control. Topics include 2018 Threats: The Challenge of H3N2, and Impact of Epidemic on Health Systems; and Current Gaps: United States and Local Public Health Pandemi...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Mother (of all Pandemics) and Her Naughty Children: 100 Years of Behaving Badly
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [National Institutes of Health]. 04/10/2018 This one-hour, two-minute lecture discusses the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and what scientists still can learn from it. The speaker describes how research on 1918 flu virus and the pandemic it caused is informing current efforts to understand how and why new flu viruses with pandemic potential emerge. He also discusses investigations aimed at developing new and better flu vaccines, a major focus of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases research going into the second century of the 1918 pandemic era. (Video or Mu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

1918 Pandemic Flu Symposium Registration
May 7, 2018; Atlanta, GA or via webcast. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Mother (of all Pandemics) and Her Naughty Children: 100 Years of Behaving Badly
April 10, 2018 3:00pm ET. Webinar will provide an overview of the 1918 flu epidemic. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - April 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in American and World History
July 9-27, 2018; Blacksburg Virginia and Washington DC. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - March 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NLM Joins National Capital Area Institutions to Host " Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in American and World History, " a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 Teachers
During the week of July 16, 2018, NLM will join the Library of Congress, the National Archives and Records Administration, and The Catholic University of America, to host Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in American and World History, a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Seminar for K-12 Teachers, organized by Virginia Tech through an NEH grant to that institution. (Source: News from the National Library of Medicine)
Source: News from the National Library of Medicine - March 20, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

NLM Joins National Capital Area Institutions to Host
During the week of July 16, 2018, NLM will join the Library of Congress, the National Archives and Records Administration, and The Catholic University of America, to host Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in American and World History, a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Seminar for K-12 Teachers, organized by Virginia Tech through an NEH grant to that institution. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - March 20, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Viewpoint: Influenza ’s wild origins in the animals around us
In the early 20th century, the leading cause of death was infectious disease. Epidemics erupted with little warning, seemingly out of the blue. When the “Great Influenza” struck in 1918, it killed thousands of people a week in American cities and spread like wildfire around the globe. My great aunt, still a teenager, and living in the San Francisco area, was one of its estimated 50 to 100 million victims worldwide. Neither public health authori ties nor medical researchers understood that it… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 11, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jonathan Runstadler Source Type: news

Viewpoint: Influenza ’s wild origins in the animals around us
In the early 20th century, the leading cause of death was infectious disease. Epidemics erupted with little warning, seemingly out of the blue. When the “Great Influenza” struck in 1918, it killed thousands of people a week in American cities and spread like wildfire around the globe. My great aunt, still a teenager, and living in the San Francisco area, was one of its estimated 50 to 100 million victims worldwide. Neither public health authori ties nor medical researchers understood that it… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jonathan Runstadler Source Type: news

ECMC ’s Beginnings: Buffalo City Hospital – 1918-1939
The roots of the hospital that became ECMC can be traced back to the early 20th century and the Municipal Hospital on East Ferry Street, which was designed for the care of smallpox patients. Although compulsory smallpox vaccination had been proven effective for more than a century, the disease had not been completely wiped out and there were still isolated cases in Buffalo. Then in 1909, a scarlet fever epidemic struck 3,000 Buffalo residents and a vacant schoolhouse was requisitioned as a contagious … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 6, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Supplied by ECMC Source Type: news

PrepTalks: The Next Pandemic - Lessons from History
January 2018 PREPTalk " The Next Pandemic: Lessons From History, " offers lessons learned from the 1918 and 2009 influenza pandemics. Speaker provides guidance on what emergency managers can do to work with public health and elected officials to implement measures that can save lives. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prep Talks: The Next Pandemic; Lessons from History
Federal Emergency Management Agency [Department of Homeland Security]. 02/20/2018 This 19-minute presentation offers lessons learned from the 1918 and 2009 influenza pandemics. It provides guidance on what emergency managers can do to work with public health and elected officials to implement measures that can save lives and, as importantly, avoid ineffective measures that can lose community trust. It details how responding to an influenza pandemic will require coordination and communication with the whole community. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Next Pandemic: Lessons from History
Federal Emergency Management Agency [Department of Homeland Security]. 02/20/2018 This 19-minute presentation offers lessons learned from the 1918 and 2009 influenza pandemics. It provides guidance on what emergency managers can do to work with public health and elected officials to implement measures that can save lives and, as importantly, avoid ineffective measures that can lose community trust. It details how responding to an influenza pandemic will require coordination and communication with the whole community. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Could the Deadly 1918 Flu Pandemic Happen Again?
It's "100 percent" certain that another global flu crisis will happen, said Dr. Greg Poland, a virologist and vaccine researcher with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It's a Century Since the 1918 Flu Pandemic - Could It Happen Again?
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 -- One hundred years ago, the deadliest influenza pandemic of all time made a ravaging march across the globe. The " Spanish " flu of 1918-19 infected an estimated one-third of the world's population and killed between 50... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

What we can learn from the 1918 flu pandemic
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world's population. Half a billion people were infected. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

100 years on: What we can learn from the 1918 flu pandemic
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world's population. Half a billion people were infected. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu Deaths May Be Less Likely With Annual Vaccination Flu Deaths May Be Less Likely With Annual Vaccination
Seniors who get a flu shot every year are less likely to be hospitalized with severe influenza infections or to die from them than those who get vaccinated only sporadically, a Spanish study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

The Worst Flu Pandemic of the 20th Century Has an Urgent Lesson for Today
If you’ve been reading about how bad the flu is this year, it’s hard not to worry, and with good reason. The 2018 influenza season has hit hard in the U.S. and elsewhere, spreading far and wide and leading to the deaths of at least 30 children. But when Laura Spinney hears the news about this flu season, she has an extra layer of context. Spinney’s recent book Pale Rider explores the legacy of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, a devastating episode 100 years ago that killed perhaps as many as 100 million people across the globe. “Although this does seem to be a particularly bad flu, it is still season...
Source: TIME: Health - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime Source Type: news

Flu deaths may be less likely with annual vaccination
(Reuters Health) - Seniors who get a flu shot every year are less likely to be hospitalized with severe influenza infections or to die from them than those who get vaccinated only sporadically, a Spanish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight All NNLM MAR funding opportunities are currently closed. In February, we will announce opportunities to apply for projects starting May 15, 2018. Now is the perfect time to start meeting with potential partners and consulting with NNLM MAR staff on health information outreach ideas. Contact us to set up a consultation. National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® begins on Monday! If your organization is getting involved with busting myths about drug use or addiction, tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - January 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Scientists seek super-shot for flu 100 years after pandemic
A century after one of history's most catastrophic disease outbreaks, scientists are rethinking how to guard against another super-flu like the 1918 influenza that killed tens of millions as it swept the globe. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Aussie flu: Deadly infection to be worse than Spanish flu that killed about 50 million?
AUSSIE flu has spread across the UK from Australia, and has now been spotted in the US. Could the deadly virus become as widespread as the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which infected about 500 million people globally? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

San Diego's Hepatitis A Outbreak Spreads to Utah, Officials Say
SPANISH FORK, Utah (AP) — Thousands of people may have been exposed to hepatitis A in Utah amid a widening outbreak that originally spread from a large epidemic in San Diego, health officials said Wednesday. Infected workers may have exposed customers at two Salt Lake City area restaurants and a convenience store, authorities said. All three locations were linked to a Utah outbreak that began in August among Salt Lake City's homeless population and illicit drug users. Tests connected it to an outbreak in San Diego that killed 20 people and sickened hundreds more, said Salt Lake County Health Department spokesman Nich...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsay Whitehurst, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

San Diego's Hepatitis A Outbreak Spreads to Utah, Officials Say
SPANISH FORK, Utah (AP) — Thousands of people may have been exposed to hepatitis A in Utah amid a widening outbreak that originally spread from a large epidemic in San Diego, health officials said Wednesday. Infected workers may have exposed customers at two Salt Lake City area restaurants and a convenience store, authorities said. All three locations were linked to a Utah outbreak that began in August among Salt Lake City's homeless population and illicit drug users. Tests connected it to an outbreak in San Diego that killed 20 people and sickened hundreds more, said Salt Lake County Health Department spokesman Nich...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsay Whitehurst, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Judge urges action on '100 percent manmade' opioid crisis
A federal judge has likened the nation's opioid epidemic to the deadly 1918 flu pandemic while noting the drug crisis is "100 percent manmade." (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Why the flu vaccine will never work: Experts reveal how the virus “mutates annually” into something new
(Natural News) The deadliest pandemic in recorded history was known as the Spanish flu, and took place between 1918 and 1919. About 500 million people – a third of the Earth’s population at the time – were infected with the disease, and it proved fatal for between 20 and 50 million of them. The outbreak... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Next Pandemic: Are We Prepared?
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health. 11/13/2017 This two-hour, 25-minute event, co-hosted with Smithsonian magazine and the National Museum of Natural History, focuses on how the world prepares for the next global pandemic, raises public awareness, and explores potential responses and solutions. Speakers discuss the influenza dangers faced today; a historical overview of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic; and information on the latest flu research and pandemic preparedness. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Pandemic Preparedness: Lessons Learned 100 Years After the Spanish Flu Outbreak
Council on Foreign Relations. 12/05/2017 This 58-minute panel discussion explores the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic as it nears its centennial, and how this historic outbreak informs responses to global health emergencies today. Speakers discuss the many additional tools that are now available, why they are imperfect tools, and how there is a lot more work to do to improve them. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Pandemic Preparedness: Lessons Learned 100 Years After the Spanish Flu Outbreak
Panel from December 2017 discusses the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic as we near its centennial and how this historic outbreak informs our responses to global health emergencies today.(Council on Foreign Relations) (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Going Viral: Impact and Implications of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic
April 4-8, 2018; Chapel Hill, NC. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - October 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘What Gets Remembered’: How Visiting a Cemetery Can Teach You About History
When planning vacation itineraries, graveyard visits may not be top of mind. But Loren Rhoads, author of the new book 199 Cemeteries to See Before You Die, makes the case for going out of your way to see burial grounds. “I think it adds a depth to travel that you can’t find anywhere else,” Rhoads tells TIME. “I see cemeteries as kind of open air museums full of art and history and stories and nature and wildlife, gardening… When you go to a graveyard, you see what’s important to a society, what gets remembered.” Rhoads’ book features cemeteries large (like Père Lachai...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight New Membership certificates have arrived! If you have completed the renewal process before Friday, July 21, you can expect to receive your certificate by the end of August. If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, check out our Membership renewal flyer for more information. The Summer 2017 edition of NIH MedlinePlus Magazine is now available! In this issue, Access Hollywood host Liz Hernandez talks about her hopes to make Alzheimer’s a thing of the past. Other features include ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - July 28, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Resources from the National Library of Medicine and Connected Sites
Drug and Addiction Information and Tools for Patrons and Healthcare Providers Opioid Abuse and Addiction – Contains links to the following Current News, Diagnosis and Tests, Prevention and Risk Factors, Treatments and Therapies, Clinical Trials, Journal Articles, Find an Expert, Statistics, and Research, NIH MedlinePlus Magazines MedlinePlus links to health information from the National Institutes of Health and other federal government agencies. MedlinePlus also links to health information from non-government Web sites. See MedlinePlus.gov disclaimer and quality guidelines National Library of Medicine Drug Informatio...
Source: The Cornflower - May 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Resource Sharing opioid epidemic opioid resources Source Type: news

Resources Focusing on the Opioid Epidemic
The following is news from the NIH/NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have declared opioid abuse an epidemic, calling it a serious public health issue. Two states, Florida and Maryland, have recently declared states of emergency in response to the opioid crisis. NIH MedlinePlus magazine has an overview to help readers understand the opioid overdose epidemic, and the statistics are staggering: an estimated 1.9 million people in the US have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. In 2014 alone, more than 28,0...
Source: Dragonfly - May 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Emergency Preparedness Health Literacy/Consumer Health News from NLM Public Health Source Type: news

Nurses on the Front Line —Again
May 11, 2017If a new flu pandemic strikes, nurses are likely to be our first —and best—line of defense.Nurses constitute the largest proportion of the health workforce globally —by a large margin—and in many communities, they are the only health care providers available.In some places, nurses are also anaesthetists, or perform surgery, or head up entire clinics or hospitals, taking on these advanced roles to fill in the missing pieces of care in their communities. The boundaries of practice get pushed in response to need, often without formal recognition.  And yet there is a global shortage of ...
Source: IntraHealth International - May 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Resources for the Opioid Abuse Epidemic
This from the Disaster Information Management Research Center Division of Specialized Information Services. Thanks, Robin! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have declared opioid abuse an epidemic, calling it a serious public health issue. Two states, Florida and Maryland, have recently declared states of emergency in response to the opioid crisis. NIH MedlinePlus magazine has an overview to help readers understand the opioid overdose epidemic, and the statistics are staggering: an estimated 1.9 million people in the US have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use d...
Source: The Cornflower - May 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Jacqueline Leskovec Tags: News from NIH/NLM Public Health Source Type: news

NLM Resources on Opioid Abuse
From the Outreach and Special Populations Branch: An estimated 1.9 million people in the US have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder.  The NIH MedlinePlus Magazine gives an overview to help readers understand the opioid overdose epidemic, and the statistics are staggering.  In 2014 alone, more than 28,000 people died from an opioid overdose.  How can public health professionals address this growing epidemic? The National Library of Medicine provides resources for both the general public and health professionals to learn about opioid abuse and overdose preventi...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - May 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Education Health Professionals News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

The World Is Not Ready for the Next Pandemic
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news

Frog slime could protect us against future flu epidemic
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

First time flu infection may affect lifetime immunity
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

Zika's Rapid Rise and the Limp Global Response Reveal Dire Global Health Challenges
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news