Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

‘What Gets Remembered’: How Visiting a Cemetery Can Teach You About History
When planning vacation itineraries, graveyard visits may not be top of mind. But Loren Rhoads, author of the new book 199 Cemeteries to See Before You Die, makes the case for going out of your way to see burial grounds. “I think it adds a depth to travel that you can’t find anywhere else,” Rhoads tells TIME. “I see cemeteries as kind of open air museums full of art and history and stories and nature and wildlife, gardening… When you go to a graveyard, you see what’s important to a society, what gets remembered.” Rhoads’ book features cemeteries large (like Père Lachai...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight New Membership certificates have arrived! If you have completed the renewal process before Friday, July 21, you can expect to receive your certificate by the end of August. If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, check out our Membership renewal flyer for more information. The Summer 2017 edition of NIH MedlinePlus Magazine is now available! In this issue, Access Hollywood host Liz Hernandez talks about her hopes to make Alzheimer’s a thing of the past. Other features include ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - July 28, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Resources from the National Library of Medicine and Connected Sites
Drug and Addiction Information and Tools for Patrons and Healthcare Providers Opioid Abuse and Addiction – Contains links to the following Current News, Diagnosis and Tests, Prevention and Risk Factors, Treatments and Therapies, Clinical Trials, Journal Articles, Find an Expert, Statistics, and Research, NIH MedlinePlus Magazines MedlinePlus links to health information from the National Institutes of Health and other federal government agencies. MedlinePlus also links to health information from non-government Web sites. See MedlinePlus.gov disclaimer and quality guidelines National Library of Medicine Drug Informatio...
Source: The Cornflower - May 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Resource Sharing opioid epidemic opioid resources Source Type: news

Resources Focusing on the Opioid Epidemic
The following is news from the NIH/NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have declared opioid abuse an epidemic, calling it a serious public health issue. Two states, Florida and Maryland, have recently declared states of emergency in response to the opioid crisis. NIH MedlinePlus magazine has an overview to help readers understand the opioid overdose epidemic, and the statistics are staggering: an estimated 1.9 million people in the US have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. In 2014 alone, more than 28,0...
Source: Dragonfly - May 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Emergency Preparedness Health Literacy/Consumer Health News from NLM Public Health Source Type: news

Nurses on the Front Line —Again
May 11, 2017If a new flu pandemic strikes, nurses are likely to be our first —and best—line of defense.Nurses constitute the largest proportion of the health workforce globally —by a large margin—and in many communities, they are the only health care providers available.In some places, nurses are also anaesthetists, or perform surgery, or head up entire clinics or hospitals, taking on these advanced roles to fill in the missing pieces of care in their communities. The boundaries of practice get pushed in response to need, often without formal recognition.  And yet there is a global shortage of ...
Source: IntraHealth International - May 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Resources for the Opioid Abuse Epidemic
This from the Disaster Information Management Research Center Division of Specialized Information Services. Thanks, Robin! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have declared opioid abuse an epidemic, calling it a serious public health issue. Two states, Florida and Maryland, have recently declared states of emergency in response to the opioid crisis. NIH MedlinePlus magazine has an overview to help readers understand the opioid overdose epidemic, and the statistics are staggering: an estimated 1.9 million people in the US have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use d...
Source: The Cornflower - May 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Jacqueline Leskovec Tags: News from NIH/NLM Public Health Source Type: news

NLM Resources on Opioid Abuse
From the Outreach and Special Populations Branch: An estimated 1.9 million people in the US have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder.  The NIH MedlinePlus Magazine gives an overview to help readers understand the opioid overdose epidemic, and the statistics are staggering.  In 2014 alone, more than 28,000 people died from an opioid overdose.  How can public health professionals address this growing epidemic? The National Library of Medicine provides resources for both the general public and health professionals to learn about opioid abuse and overdose preventi...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - May 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Education Health Professionals News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

The World Is Not Ready for the Next Pandemic
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news

Frog slime could protect us against future flu epidemic
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

First time flu infection may affect lifetime immunity
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

Zika's Rapid Rise and the Limp Global Response Reveal Dire Global Health Challenges
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Insect Resilience and Climate Change
Ecosystem tipping points and climate change warning signs are making headlines. Yesterday I read record breaking heat is melting roads in some of India's busiest cities. Scientists predicted a rise in temperature would lead to an increase in the number of insects worldwide, ushering dire consequences to the farming community. Warnings unheeded to our own detriment as now one of Africa's staple crops, cassava, is reeling from super bug infestation. In short climate change has already altered earth's ecological footprint with unstable fluctuating seasons. A longer season means insects have a higher metabolic rate, quicke...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zika Virus Health Information Resources from NLM’s Outreach and Specific Populations Branch
We have all been hearing more about the mosquito-borne flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, Zika Virus. The National Library of Medicine has gathered together these resources to assist public health departments, health care providers, librarians, and others seeking authoritative information on the virus. General Information Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Zika Virus – http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html World Health Organization (WHO) Zika virus disease – http://www.who.int/csr/disease/zika/en/ Zika Virus Fact sheet...
Source: Dragonfly - January 27, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Emily Glenn Tags: News from NLM Public Health Source Type: news

High prevalence of multiple syndemic conditions associated with sexual risk behavior and hiv infection among a large sample of Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking men who have sex with men in Latin America - Mimiaga MJ, Biello KB, Robertson AM, Oldenburg CE, Rosenberger JG, O'Cleirigh C, Novak DS, Mayer KH, Safren SA.
The HIV epidemic in Latin America is highly concentrated in men who have sex with men (MSM). In the United States, multiple co-occurring psychosocial conditions have been shown to act as intertwined epidemics to potentiate HIV transmission among MSM. To da... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - December 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Possible contributor to the virulence of the 1918 flu pandemic discovered
A novel mechanism for one 1918 flu virus protein has been discovered that may help explain the virulence of that unusually deadly pandemic. That outbreak killed 50 million to 100 million people. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

From the Archives – Walt Disney, World War I Driver
From 1914 to 1918, Europe endured the horrors of The Great War, later known as World War I. In recognition of the 100th anniversary, “From the Archives” will feature a series of articles describing Red Cross involvement in the war. When the United States entered the war in 1917, Walt Disney’s older brothers enlisted, but 16-year-old Walt was denied enlistment because of his age. Disney was determined to do his part. When a friend learned that the Red Cross Ambulance Corps would accept volunteers as young as 17, Disney used his artistic skills to alter the birth date on his passport applic...
Source: Red Cross Chat - September 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Nicholas Lemesh Tags: Archives Celebrity History Volunteers Walt Disney world war I Source Type: news

Warnings of a dementia epidemic may be unfounded
This study adjusted the results to take age, sex and social deprivation into account. This comparison study from the UK was the largest, with the others ranging from 707 to 7,528 people. The Spanish research compared cohort studies that were conducted with the shortest time gap between them – just seven years – whereas others, such as the Gothenburg study, spanned three decades. The age range for the studies was 55-70 at the start of the cohorts.  What were the results? The overall prevalence of dementia measured in the UK from 2008-11 was nearly a fifth (22%) lower than the prevalence from...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Older people Source Type: news

Global Health: Starvation Timetable in a Pandemic
Researchers at EcoHealth Alliance used mathematical models to gauge the effects of an outbreak on the distribution of food. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - June 19, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Famine Epidemics Food Influenza Spanish flu Ebola Virus pandemic starvation Source Type: news

Global Health: Starvation Timetable in a Pandemic
Researchers at EcoHealth Alliance used mathematical models to gauge the effects of an outbreak on the distribution of food. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Famine Epidemics Food Influenza Spanish flu Ebola Virus pandemic starvation Source Type: news

First Case of Diphtheria in Spain Since 1986 After Parents Shun Vaccination
In Spain’s first recorded case of diphtheria since 1986, a six-year-old boy from the Catalan city of Olot was placed in intensive care Wednesday. Authorities confirm that despite free, widely available immunization services, the boy’s parents had opted not to vaccinate him against the bacterial infection. The child is currently being treated with an anti-toxin in Barcelona, but the drug was not easy to find, El País reports. The country’s Health Ministry appealed to the World Health Organization and authorities in the U.S. before finally locating a dose in Russia. “The problem is that these d...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: alissagreenberg Tags: Uncategorized anti-vaccination anti-vaxxer Catalonia diphtheria epidemic Infectious Disease russia Spain Source Type: news

Pro-vaccine fanatic, Bill Gates, funds predictive model showing 33 million people dead from Spanish flu pandemic
(NaturalNews) One of the world's richest men, who spoke in 2010 about how vaccines (which he heavily pushes throughout the world) are helping to cull the world's population, is now predicting that as many as 33 million people could soon die from a modern-day pandemic similar to the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scarily Plausible Doomsday Scenarios For Dystopian Fans
The following is an excerpt from Are You Sh*tting Me?: 1,004 Facts That Will Scare the Crap Out of You: There's no nice way to say it: we're screwed. One way or another, we'll all be obliterated someday, and that day is sooner than you think. You know that TV show called "1000 Ways to Die"? That's how I felt when I was researching this chapter. We are screwed ten times over and ten more times after that. If a supervolcano doesn't get us, an asteroid will. If the asteroid doesn't get us, a comet will. If a comet doesn't wipe us out, it will be a global pandemic or a gamma-ray burst or a black hole or a nuclear ho...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Worry, Don't Be Happy: How We Decide What's Dangerous
Over the course of the next year an American is more likely to die from a car accident (1 in 9,100), a shark attack (1 in 3.7 million), a bee sting (1 in 5.2 million), a lightning strike (1 in 9.6 million) or a plane crash (1 in 11 million) than from Ebola (1 in 13.3 million). Why do we continue to experience such an exaggerated fear of Ebola here in the United States? Why do many support measures that could worsen the problem, such as closing our borders or imposing quarantines on returning health care workers? Why, despite constant media coverage, do so many people seem not to understand the key facts about Ebola tra...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paul Stoffels on Ebola
Stepping Up Our Response to Ebola Less than 100 years ago, little could be done to combat global epidemics. In 1917, Spanish influenza swept the world quickly and 50 million people died. Science and medicine significantly lagged behind medical need. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other global health authorities weren’t yet formed to help coordinate a response. And governments were without options. Since then, innovation in R&D has significantly advanced vaccine research and production. Today, we are faced with the threat of a new global epidemic—the Ebola virus. The global health community must wor...
Source: PHRMA - October 30, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Emily Source Type: news

Lessons from 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later
Just in time for flu season, a new study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases. Researchers studied the evolution of the 1918 influenza pandemic, aka the "Spanish flu." In 1918, the virus killed 50 million people worldwide, 10 to 20 million of whom were in India. In the United States alone, the Spanish flu claimed 675,000 lives in nine months. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later
(Michigan State University) Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 22, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

National Latino AIDS Awareness Day
October 15 is National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘To End AIDS, Commit to Act‘ – ‘Para Acabar con el SIDA, Comprometete a Actuar.‘ Established in 2003, the National Latino AIDS Awareness Day campaign works annually at building capacity for non-profit organizations and health departments in order to reach Latino communities, promote HIV testing, and provide HIV prevention information and access to care. The Latino Commission on AIDS (LCOA), the Hispanic Federation and many other organizations organize this day. The National HIV/AIDS Strategy, which now guides all...
Source: Dragonfly - October 14, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Emily Glenn Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

All countries likely to see Ebola cases by year's end
The US and Spanish cases are just the start. As long as the epidemic continues unabated, the risk to countries in Europe and elsewhere will keep rising (Source: New Scientist - Epidemics and Pandemics)
Source: New Scientist - Epidemics and Pandemics - October 8, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spanish nurse becomes first person to contract ebola outside Africa
A nurse in Spain has contracted ebola, becoming the first person known to have caught the disease outside the outbreak zone in West Africa during the current epidemic. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - October 7, 2014 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Nurse diagnosed with Ebola in Madrid
Bloomberg's Charles Penty reports on the first case of a person becoming infected with the Ebola virus outside of Africa as a Spanish Nurse is diagnosed with the disease at a hospital in Madrid (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - October 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Charles Penty Spain Liberia Ebola priest Spanish nurse epidemic Sierra Leone Madrid West Africa Source Type: news

Immune response may explain worse flu symptoms among pregnant women
Women who get the flu while pregnant have a much higher risk of hospitalization and death and are four times more likely to deliver a premature baby. During the 1918 epidemic, in fact, the death rate among pregnant women was at least 28 times that of the general population. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

US ready for a pandemic? Investigation says no
A federal investigation has found that the DHS is totally "ill-prepared" for something like the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic -- or something worse, such as a global Ebola outbreak or the 1918 flu pandemic that killed an estimated 21.5 million people, according to a report released by the Office of the Inspector General on Monday. (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - September 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Epidemic: Top 10 Outbreaks In U.S. History
Throughout the years, epidemics and plagues have shaken up societies and cultures around the world. The latest outbreak that Americans seem to be concerned about is the Ebola epidemic occurring in the African countries of Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.  With experts and doctors saying that the outbreak has the potential to become a full-blown pandemic that will become increasingly more difficult to control, the general public is scared. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continuously keep an eye on public health and any immediate health dangers, the American public still worries about how...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: cbskapost Tags: Health Africa avian flu Ebola Guinea Health Scare History Measles Nigeria Source Type: news

Influenza: How the Great War helped create the greatest pandemic ever known
The Great War helped create the influenza pandemic of 1918, which eventually brought an early end to the Great War Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 30, 2014 Category: Science Authors: GrrlScientist Tags: Science History Biology Flu pandemic Viruses Medicine Evolution Health Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news

Flu virus recreated in a lab could unleash new deadly pandemic rivaling 1918 Spanish flu
(NaturalNews) There is a famous picture from 1918, during which time the U.S. (and the world) was under assault from a flu pandemic. It shows row after row of bedridden soldiers, and it resembles an optical illusion, like a double-mirror effect. It is a stirring image to accompany... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

American scientists controversially recreate deadly Spanish Flu virus
The extinct influenza virus that caused the worst flu pandemic in history has been recreated from fragments of avian flu found in wild ducks in a controversial experiment to show how easy it would be for the deadly flu strain to reemerge today. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - June 11, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Scientists condemn 'crazy, dangerous' creation of deadly airborne flu virus
Researchers say recreation of Spanish flu strain highlights risk of pandemic, but critics say work puts global population at risk Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 11, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample, science editor Tags: Infectious diseases Medical research Science Ethics Flu pandemic World news Microbiology Source Type: news

Genes found in nature yield 1918-like virus with pandemic potential
An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Genes found in nature yield 1918-like virus with pandemic potential
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spanish flu-like virus with pandemic potential could emerge in bird populations
(Cell Press) Emerging bird flu viruses continually threaten to cause pandemics, underscoring the need for better ways to predict potential outbreaks. A new study shows that circulating bird flu viruses are very similar to the flu virus that caused the 1918 pandemic -- the most devastating disease outbreak ever recorded. Only a few amino acids separate viral proteins currently found in bird populations from proteins in the 1918 virus, suggesting that a similar deadly virus may emerge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Understanding 1918 flu pandemic can aid in better infectious disease response
The 1918 Flu Pandemic infected over 500 million people, killing at least 50 million. Now, a researcher has analyzed the pandemic in two remote regions of North America, finding that despite their geographical divide, both regions had environmental, nutritional and economic factors that influenced morbidity during the pandemic. Findings from the research could help improve current health policies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 14, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Understanding the 1918 flu pandemic can aid in better infectious disease response
(University of Missouri-Columbia) The 1918 Flu Pandemic infected over 500 million people, killing at least 50 million. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has analyzed the pandemic in two remote regions of North America, finding that despite their geographical divide, both regions had environmental, nutritional and economic factors that influenced morbidity during the pandemic. Findings from the research could help improve current health policies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 13, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Solving the Mystery Flu That Killed 50 Million People
MoreCalifornia Bill Banning ‘Affluenza’ Defense Is Nixed7 Ebola Patients in Guinea Fight Off the Disease4 Diseases Making a Comeback Thanks to Anti-VaxxersYears ago the environmental historian Alfred Crosby was at Washington State University, where he was teaching at the time, when on a whim he decided to pick up an old almanac from 1917. (This is apparently the kind of thing historians like to do in their spare time.) He looked up the U.S. life expectancy in that year—it was about 51 years. He turned to the 1919 almanac, and found about the same figure. Then Crosby picked up the almanac from 1918. The U....
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 29, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized 1918 pandemic avian flu bird flu death rates H1N1 H5N1 H7N9 health immune system influenza Spanish flu Source Type: news

Mystery of the pandemic flu virus of 1918 solved by University of Arizona researchers
(University of Arizona) UA researchers have solved the mystery of the origin of the 1918 pandemic flu virus and found compelling evidence that its severity resulted from a mismatch between its surface proteins and prior immunity in certain age groups, which could inform future vaccine design and pandemic prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 28, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Influenza, bacterial superinfections reviewed in journal
An expert has analyzed the epidemiology and microbiology of co-infections during the 1918, 1957 and 1968 pandemics, as well as more recent 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic, and published a review on this analysis. Specifically, the co-pathogenesis reviewed is characterized by complex interactions between co-infecting pathogens and the host, leading to the disruption of physical barriers, dysregulation of immune responses and delays in a return to homeostasis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

McCullers reviews influenza, bacterial superinfections in Nature Reviews Microbiology
(Le Bonheur Children's Hospital) Le Bonheur Children's Hospital Pediatrician-in-Chief Jon McCullers, M.D., was recently invited to submit a review in the April issue of Nature Reviews Microbiology, one of the world's foremost scientific publications. Dr. McCullers, a world-renowned infectious disease specialist, and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, analyzed the epidemiology and microbiology of co-infections during the 1918, 1957 and 1968 pandemics, as well as more recent 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study on flu evolution may change textbooks, history books
A new study reconstructing the evolutionary tree of flu viruses challenges conventional wisdom and solves some of the mysteries surrounding flu outbreaks of historical significance. The study challenges several tenets of conventional wisdom -- for example, the notion that the virus moves largely unidirectionally from wild birds to domestic birds rather than with spillover in the other direction. It also helps resolve the origin of the virus that caused the unprecedentedly severe influenza pandemic of 1918. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 16, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study on flu evolution may change textbooks, history books
(University of Arizona) A new study reconstructing the evolutionary tree of flu viruses challenges conventional wisdom and solves some of the mysteries surrounding flu outbreaks of historical significance. The study challenges several tenets of conventional wisdom, for example the notion that the virus moves largely unidirectionally from wild birds to domestic birds rather than with spillover in the other direction. It also helps resolve the origin of the virus that caused the unprecedentedly severe influenza pandemic of 1918. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 16, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news