Suboptimal cardiovascular risk management in rheumatoid arthritis patients despite an explicit cardiovascular risk screening programme.

Conclusion: Despite clear guidelines to improve CV risk, the results of a programme comprising active screening, targeted advice, and referral to the general practitioner or internist prove that primary prevention remains a major challenge in high-risk RA patients. PMID: 31210083 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Scand J Rheumatol Source Type: research

Related Links:

By KEN TERRY (This is the eighth and final installment in a series of excerpts from Terry’s new book, Physician-Led Healthcare Reform: a New Approach to Medicare for All, published by the American Association for Physician Leadership.) Medical technologies include drugs, devices, tests, and procedures. Considered as a whole, these technologies are the key driver of growth in health costs, according to Georgetown University professor Gregg Bloche and his associates. Bloche, et al., view insurance coverage as the chief enabler of these technological innovations. In a 2017 Health Affairs Blog post, they sai...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Ken Terry Source Type: blogs
Transcript [00:00:00] Joe Graedon: I’m Joe Graedon. [00:00:01] Terry Graedon: And I’m Terry Graedon. Welcome to this podcast of the People’s Pharmacy. [00:00:06] Joe Graedon: You can find previous podcasts and more information on a range of health topics at PeoplesPharmacy.com.  [00:00:14] How’s your family holding up during the coronavirus pandemic? Isolation can be especially challenging for children. [00:00:22] This is the People’s Pharmacy with Terry and Joe Graedon. [00:00:33] Terry Graedon:  Children appear less susceptible than older adults to serious complications of COVID-19...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog COVID COVID-19 Viral Infection Source Type: blogs
Giuseppe Ristagno1*, Francesca Fumagalli1, Barbara Bottazzi2, Alberto Mantovani2,3,4, Davide Olivari1, Deborah Novelli1 and Roberto Latini1 1Department of Cardiovascular Research, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research IRCCS, Milan, Italy 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center-IRCCS, Milan, Italy 3Humanitas University, Milan, Italy 4The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom The long pentraxin PTX3 is a member of the pentraxin family produced locally by stromal and myeloid cells in response to proinflammatory signals and microbial moieties. The p...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Influence of Habitual Physical Behavior – Sleeping, Sedentarism, Physical Activity – On Bone Health in Community-Dwelling Older People Gladys Onambele-Pearson1*, Jorgen Wullems1,2, Conor Doody1, Declan Ryan1,3, Christopher Morse1 and Hans Degens4,5,6 1Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom 2Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 3Faculty of Health and Society, University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom 4School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom 5In...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study indicates that frailty and other age-related diseases could be prevented and significantly reduced in older adults. Getting our heart risk factors under control could lead to much healthier old ages. Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction, however our study underlines how even small reductions in risk are worthwhile." The study analysed data from more than 421,000 people aged 60-69 in both GP medical records and in the UK Biobank research study. Participants were followed up over ten years. The researchers analysed six factors that could impa...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractThe coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression may be useful noninvasive predictor of future cardiovascular events (CVE). The progression rate of CAC in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is poorly understood. To assess the dynamic of CAC scores in early RA patients for 18  months, 74 RA adult patients (ACR/EULAR criteria, 2010, duration ≤ 12 months, with moderate/high RA activity, without prior administration of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or glucocorticoids) were enrolled within the framework of the observational study: women 73%, median age 56 year s, median RA dura...
Source: Rheumatology International - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
In conclusion, in the Framingham Heart Study population, in the last 30 years, disease duration in persons with dementia has decreased. However, age-adjusted mortality risk has slightly decreased after 1977-1983. Consequences of such trends on dementia prevalence should be investigated. Recent Research on the Benefits of Exercise in Later Life https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/04/recent-research-on-the-benefits-of-exercise-in-later-life/ A sizable body of work points to the ability of older individuals to continue to obtain benefits through regular physical activity, and particularly in the case ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Patients with AS and without other CVD risk factors have increased arterial wall inflammation, which decreases upon statin therapy. These subjects are not identified as being at risk in current cardiovascular prevention guidelines. Our data support the need to revise CV disease management in AS, with perhaps a role for early statin therapy.
Source: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Immunology (including allergy), Inflammation, Radiology, Ankylosing spondylitis, Connective tissue disease, Degenerative joint disease, Musculoskeletal syndromes, Rheumatoid arthritis, Clinical diagnostic tests, Radiology (diagnostics), Calcium and bone Source Type: research
Debbie posted this comment on the Wheat Belly Facebook page: “I posted a few weeks back about our scare from our primary care doctor. My husband had a calcium score of 1200. We panicked! Messaged Dr. Davis and went the next day to a cardio doctor and had a stress test, ultrasound, and blood test (inflammatory markers). Got him on recommended supplements per Dr Davis. “Latest update: Cardio doctor says, being as you started ‘Wheat Belly’ back in October, 2014, your score could have been higher and already started to improve, we don’t know. What we DO know is, because of this new way of eating,...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle calcium score cholesterol fish oil gluten grains heart disease iodine Thyroid vitamin D Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
More News: Arthritis | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Cholesterol | Diets | Heart | Netherlands Health | Nutrition | PET Scan | Primary Care | Rheumatoid Arthritis | Rheumatology | Sports Medicine | Statin Therapy | Weight Loss