The importance of speciation analysis in neurodegeneration research

Publication date: July 2018Source: TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry, Volume 104Author(s): Bernhard Michalke, Desiree Willkommen, Evgenii Drobyshev, Nikolay SolovyevAbstractElement speciation offers deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of disease by determining element species pattern. Thus, having great potential for investigating neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and mild cognitive impairment, speciation is increasingly considered in epidemiological or clinical neurological studies. This review analyses recent speciation findings in neurodegeneration research, concentrating on measurements in cerebrospinal fluid and brain. Elements considered are aluminum, arsenic, copper, iron, mercury, manganese, selenium and zinc. Also interactions of trace element species are discussed briefly. Typically, hyphenated techniques are used in neurodegeneration speciation studies. The results allow sorting-out less important species from compounds significant for the disease, with subsequent use of molecular biology methods to uncover the exact mechanisms. This review indicates the trend of combining speciation and neuroscience and provides a sketch about data and outcomes. For brain research, we recommend using modern, powerful techniques throughout which provide advanced validity and information in a chemical sense.Graphical abstract
Source: TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research

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This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of the National Animal Care and Use Committee of the University of Buenos Aires (CICUAL). The protocol was approved by the CICUAL. Mice were kept under a 12-h light/dark cycle, with controlled temperature (23 ± 2°C) and humidity (40–60%) and had ad libitum access to food and water. To produce hTDP-43 transgenic lines, as described previously (Igaz et al., 2011), pronucleus of fertilized eggs from C57BL/6J × C3HeJ F1 matings were injected with a vector containing hTDP-43-WT cDNA. Monogenic tetO-TDP-WT12 mice wer...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Molecular Basis of Disease - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
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Source: Stem Cells - Category: Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Embryonic Stem Cells/Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Source Type: research
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