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Age at menopause and hormone replacement therapy as risk factors for head and neck and oesophageal cancer  (Review).

Age at menopause and hormone replacement therapy as risk factors for head and neck and oesophageal cancer (Review). Oncol Rep. 2017 Aug 01;: Authors: McCarthy CE, Field JK, Marcus MW Abstract There were ~986,000 cases of head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophageal cancer diagnosed worldwide in 2012. The incidence of these types of cancer is much higher in males than females, although this disparity decreases in the elderly population, suggesting a role for hormones as a risk factor. This systematic review investigates the potential role of female hormones [age at menopause and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT)] as risk factors for HNC/oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The electronic databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane were searched. Only studies with at least 50 cases of HNC/oesophageal SCC, with data on age at menopause, smoking, alcohol, age and socioeconomic status or educational attainment, were included. The Newcastle Ottawa Scale was used for assessing risk of bias. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria (5 oesophageal SCC, 2 HNC and 1 combined oesophageal SCC and HNC). HRT was shown to reduce the risk of HNC (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.61-0.99) in one study. Our results showed that earlier age at menopause is a risk factor for oesophageal SCC, with women entering menopause at 50 years. Similar, but less striking, results were observed for HNC. HRT was found to reduce the...
Source: Oncology Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Rep Source Type: research

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In this issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics, Escande et al (1) report a phenomenal single-institution experience with interstitial 192Ir low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the glans penis. Their experience, which spans 45 years and involves more than 200 patients with a med ian follow-up of more than 10 years, indisputably establishes interstitial brachytherapy as an effective penile-sparing modality for squamous cell carcinoma of the glans.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
The breadth of a health insurance plan's network typically dictates the level of access that a consumer will have to primary care physicians, specialists, and other types of health care providers. Thus, the comprehensiveness of plan networks —including whether consumers have access to in-network cancer centers—is a critical component of quality health insurance. In response to increased health care costs and pressure to keep premiums down, health plans have begun to adopt “narrow network” plans. A narrow network plan has been ty pically defined as a plan with a more limited number of providers as co...
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: The Profession Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Comment Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Feature Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Two Perspectives on the ProtecT Trial in Localized Prostate Cancer Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Two Perspectives on the ProtecT Trial in Localized Prostate Cancer Source Type: research
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Source: Mindfulness - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
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Source: Progres en Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Prog Urol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Based on new imaging and biopsy, ablative therapies will probably increased its role in the future in management of localize prostate cancer. The multiple ongoing trials will certainly be helpful to better define their indications and limits. PMID: 28918871 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Progres en Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Prog Urol Source Type: research
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