Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as driving force in coronary heart disease?

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as an imperative public health problem worldwide. NAFLD is now the most common chronic liver disease in high-income countries, and is estimated to affect at least 25%–30% of the general population.1 NAFLD typically exists in a ‘milieu’ of altered metabolism, including abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, dysglycaemia and atherogenic dyslipidaemia.1 Cumulatively, these aetiological factors increase the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and so it is, perhaps, not surprising that CVD is the leading cause of mortality in patients with NAFLD. The challenge over the past decade has been to tease apart the complex inter-relationships between NAFLD and these aetiological factors, to establish whether NAFLD per se increases the risk of developing CVD. The validation of NAFLD as an independent risk factor would have direct relevance for primary preventative strategies against CVD. A prior narrative review published in 2010 by...
Source: Gut - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

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In conclusion, TSF improved lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis by inducing the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway-mediated autophagy. Introduction Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a worldwide health concern due to the increased incidence of obesity and diabetes. In addition, NAFLD is closely associated with the risk factors of coronary heart disease, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia, which are considered to be the leading causes of death (Wiest et al., 2017). Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD has significantly improved, there is still no effective medica...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
In conclusion, FGF21 belongs to a promising class of cytokines that are induced in response to stress and that can be used as a drug, drug target, or through a biomarker, depending on the physio-pathological context. All these findings will become clear when FGF21 will be used as a therapeutic molecule, exploiting the beneficial effects of FGF21 for treating metabolic disease or when it will be blocked to ameliorate disease progression and the onset of disease. Author Contributions CT and MS wrote the manuscript. VR contributed to the discussion. Funding This work was supported from the AFM-Telethon (19524), Italian Mi...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: The lipidome is altered in ART-treated HIV infection, and may contribute to inflammation and CVD progression. Detailed lipidomic analyses may better assess CVD risk in both HIV+ and HIV– individuals than does traditional lipid profiling. Introduction Both HIV infection and the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) contribute to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) (1, 2). Dyslipidemia is observed in HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals, and is associated with reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and elevated total (TC) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) chole...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The obesity-related SNP rs545854 was correlated with the serum uric acid level and risk of hyperuricemia in a male Chinese population. Therefore, men carrying this SNP could benefit from limiting their meat consumption to prevent hyperuricemia. These findings suggest an underlying genetic link between obesity and hyperuricemia worthy of further exploration. Introduction Serum uric acid (SUA) is a final product of the metabolic breakdown of purine oxidation (1). Since humans lack the gene for uricase that converts uric acid into a soluble form, the human uric acid level tends to be higher than that of othe...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In this study, we explore shared epigenetic mechanisms of the association between mtDNA content and insulin levels, supporting the developmental origins of this link. First, the association between cord blood insulin and mtDNA content in 882 newborns of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort was assessed. Cord blood mtDNA content was established via qPCR, while cord blood levels of insulin were determined using electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Then the cord blood DNA methylome and transcriptome were determined in 179 newborns, using the human 450K methylation Illumina and Agilent Whole Human Genome 8 × 60 K microarrays, r...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news
Publication date: September 2018Source: Clinica Chimica Acta, Volume 484Author(s): Gjin NdrepepaAbstractUric acid (UA) is an end product of purine metabolism in humans and great apes. UA acts as an antioxidant and it accounts for 50% of the total antioxidant capacity of biological fluids in humans. When present in cytoplasm of the cells or in acidic/hydrophobic milieu in atherosclerotic plaques, UA converts into a pro-oxidant agent and promotes oxidative stress and through this mechanism participates in the pathophysiology of human disease including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most epidemiological studies but not all of ...
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Uric acid (UA) is an end product of purine metabolism in humans and great apes. UA acts as an antioxidant and it accounts for 50% of the total antioxidant capacity of biological fluids in humans. When present in cytoplasm of the cells or in acidic/hydrophobic milieu in atherosclerotic plaques, UA converts into a pro-oxidant agent and promotes oxidative stress and through this mechanism participates in the pathophysiology of human disease including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most epidemiological studies but not all of them suggested the existence of an association between elevated serum UA level and CVD...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Clin Chim Acta Source Type: research
The high prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States negatively affects the health of the population. Obesity increases the risk of various diseases, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary heart disease, sleep apnea, stroke, gatroesophageal reflux disease, gall bladder disease, certain types of malignancy, and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases.1,2 Reducing obesity in the United States has become a public health priority.1,2 Current approaches to therapeutic weight loss include dietary approaches, lifestyle intervention, pharmacology, and surgery.
Source: Journal of the American Dietetic Association - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: From the Academy Source Type: research
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