Certain painkillers 'could increase risk of heart failure'

Arthritis patients who take common painkillers such as ibuprofen could be at a greater risk of heart failure, according to a new large-scale study.The research, led by the University of Milano-Bicocca in Italy and utilising data from more than eight million patients, has offered evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may lead to an elevated risk of a person being hospitalised with heart problems, meaning caution may need to be employed when using them.The heart health risks of NSAIDsPublished in the British Medical Journal, the study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs and to estimate the risk of hospital admission for heart failure with use of individual NSAIDs.Assessing population-based healthcare databases from the Netherlands, Italy, Germany and the UK, a total of 92,163 hospital admissions for heart failure were identified and matched with 8.2 million healthy controls.It was shown that use of any NSAID within the preceding 14 days was associated with a 19 per cent increase of risk of hospital admission for heart failure, when compared with those who had not used NSAIDs for more than 183 days.This risk was specifically associated with ibuprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, ketorolac, naproxen, nimesulide, piroxicam, etoricoxib and rofecoxib, with the chances of heart failure doubling among those taking diclofenac, etoricoxib, indomethacin, piroxicam and rofecoxib at very high doses. Even medium doses of indomethacin and etoric...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) are a statistical construct used in epidemiology to assess the harms caused by disease, particularly the chronic diseases of aging, as these are by far the greatest burden of disease that is inflicted upon the population as a whole. The costs of aging are huge, however they are measured. It is the greatest single cause of human suffering and death, and the economic effects of this constant destruction of human lives and capabilities are sized to match. The greatest good any of us can do in the world as it stands today is to work towards bringing aging under medical control. D...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This study had a large sample size and obtained positive findings in both patients’ subjective ratings and in inflammatory marker levels. It demonstrates the benefits of adding Tai Chi to an antidepressant regimen but does not examine the specific effect of Tai Chi on depression.Field et al. (16) investigated the effects of combined Tai Chi/yoga in 92 prenatally depressed pregnant women. They found that women practicing Tai Chi/yoga (20 min per week for 12 weeks) had lower depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance scores compared to a waitlist control group (Table 1). This study had a large sample size and provided ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In a blog post last week, I shared an excerpt from the new book that Paul Cerrato and I just completed,The Transformative Power of Mobile Medicine. Here is a second excerpt from Chapter 3,  “Exploring the Strengths and Weaknesses of Mobile Health Apps.”Even patients who are fully engaged in their own care still need access to medical apps they can trust. The IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science has performed a detailed analysis of the clinical evidence supporting mobile health apps, rating their maturity and relative quality. Its rating scale places a single observational study near the bottom of th...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are one of the most common medications used to treat pain and inflammation. Ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and other NSAIDs are effective across a variety of common conditions, from acute musculoskeletal pain to chronic arthritis. They work by blocking specific proteins, called COX enzymes. This results in the reduction of prostaglandins, which play a key role in pain and inflammation. There are two types of NSAIDs: nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 selective NSAIDs (these are sometimes referred to as “coxibs”). There has been a growing body ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include best treatment for atrial fibrillation in people with heart failure, the consequences of penalties for hospital readmission, pain relief for those with knee osteoarthritis, and comprehensive care for dementia patients.
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news
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Source: EMR and HIPAA - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: #HITsm Digital Health Healthcare HealthCare IT #HITsm Topics Chronic Care Management Chronic Disease Management Colton Ortolf tech prescribed Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Egyptian Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
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