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New study identifies stem cells that can help repair knee joints
A new study has identified stem cells that could be used to help repair damage to the knee joints associated with conditions such asarthritis. The research - which was funded by Arthritis Research UK, the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust and Tenovus Scotland - has opened the door for future treatments that can help to prevent the worst damage caused by arthritis before it occurs. How these cells affect the health of the knee joint A University of Aberdeen team were able to identify the stem cells in the synovium - the connective tissue that surrounds the joints - that have the capacity to reform and repair cart...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Osteoarthritis 'can be prevented by improving diet and exercise'
Improving dietary intake and getting moreexercise can make a difference to a person's risk of developingosteoarthritis, according to new research. Scientists from the University of Surrey have conducted an expert review that has identified a crucial link between metabolism and osteoarthritis, suggesting that basic lifestyle changes can be effective in delaying or preventing the onset of the condition. The link between osteoarthritis and metabolism The study examined existing research evidence to assess the role that metabolic changes caused by a poordiet and a sedentary lifestyle have on triggering the genetic repr...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Conference report: British Pain Society and British Society for Rheumatology
We recently attended the British Society for Rheumatology (BSR) and the British Pain Society (BPS) conferences in April and May 2017, respectively.British Society for Rheumatology Annual Conference       The BSR annual conference took place on the 25-27 April 2017. This three day conference was attended by our research, and strategic development (providing information and support for healthcare professionals and patients) directorates. This was extremely beneficial as it gave us the opportunity to tell the attendees about the important work being carried out across the charity, and n...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 15, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New study highlights role of common gene variations in ankylosing spondylitis
New research has revealed an insight into the genetic underpinnings ofankylosing spondylitis that could aid the future treatment of the disease. Led by the University of Oxford and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study has indicated that the specific genetic variants associated with the onset of the condition may be more common than previously thought. The true genetic origin of ankylosing spondylitis For this study, data on 213 ankylosing spondylitis patients and 46 people with rheumatoidarthritis was analysed in order to examine the common scientific assumption that ankylosing spondy...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 15, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New study aims to improve analysis of physical activity in osteoarthritis patients
The scientific assessment of physical activity trends in people withosteoarthritis could be enhanced thanks to a new study funded byArthritis Research UK. Led by the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Sport,Exercise and Osteoarthritis at the University of Oxford, the study looked at reporting methods of physical activity across a number of international studies, before making a series of recommendations about how these methods could be made more consistent. Forming a clearer consensus Researchers are becoming increasingly aware that physical activity needs to be considered an important factor when studying osteoarthritis, bu...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 15, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Knee surgery 'should not be used to treat degenerative knee disease'
Knee arthroscopy should not be considered a suitable treatment option for the vast majority of patients with degenerative knee disease, according to experts. An international panel, led by Reed Siemieniuk at McMaster University in Canada, has reviewed the available evidence and come to a firm conclusion that surgery does not offer any substantial benefits for these patients, despite most guidance suggesting otherwise. Why knee surgery may be unsuitable Part of the British Medical Journal's Rapid Recommendations initiative, which aims to quickly generate trustworthy guidance for doctors based on the latest evidence,...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 10, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Provost ’s Award for Public Engagement
Earlier this year, University College London announced the winners of the2017 Provost’s Awards for Public Engagement. The winner of the Early Career Researcher Award was Hema Chaplin, Research Facilitator at theArthritis Research UK Centre for Adolescent Rheumatology.In her first two years at the Centre for Adolescent Rheumatology, Hema and the team have transformed the way that patients and the public are actively involved in research activities. By working closely with the Centre researchers, as well as encouraging community activities, they ensure that research activities follow one rule: they do what young people...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 8, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Noisy knee joints 'may be a sign of osteoarthritis'
This study suggests that if these people have noisy knees, they are at higher risk for developingpain within the next year, compared with the people who do not have noisy knees. "Future studies that target people who have X-ray signs of osteoarthritis, who do not complain of pain but do report noisy knees hold the promise of identifying interventions that can prevent knee pain." Arthritis Research UK's view Natalie Carter, head of research liaison and evaluation at Arthritis Research UK, said:"Osteoarthritis of the knee affects more than four million people in the UK and can cause daily pain and fati...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Common rheumatoid arthritis risk factors 'also affect those of African descent'
Genetic and environmental factors associated with rheumatoidarthritis in people from European and Asian backgrounds also apply to people of African ancestry. This is according to a new Arthritis Research UK-funded study led by King's College London, which offers evidence of a shared genetic and environmental underpinning for the disease that is consistent across European, Asian and African ancestry populations. Assessing risk factors among a black British population The study, published in the medical journal Rheumatology, looked at data from 197 people withrheumatoid arthritis and 868 controls in south London, all...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 4, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Researchfish deadline approaching
Award-holders who are due to report in May must have updatedResearchfish by 31st May 2017.The majority of our awardsreport through Researchfishin either May or December. If you're due to report in May, you should have received an email to let you know. We recognise that new awards may have little to report, but please complete your update as fully as you can.In particular we ask that you:Only report outputs arising from work funded by the specific grant that we have asked you to report on.Review all sections inResearchfish and complete all those for which you have outputs to report. Remember to update the‘Furthe...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 3, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Ali Mobasheri becomes OARSI President-Elect
We are delighted to announce that Professor Ali Mobasheri (University of Surrey) was inaugurated as President-Elect of theOsteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) in April 2017 at the society’s annual world congress in Las Vegas.OARSI is the leading medical society for advancing the understanding, early detection, treatment and prevention of osteoarthritis through its exclusive dedication to research. Professor Mobasheri will serve as President-Elect alongside existing President-Elect Dr Jeffrey Katz from Harvard University.Professor Mobasheri works very closely with the charity, he is part of the Arthri...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 1, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

TfL launches badge to recognise customers with invisible impairments
(Source: TfL)Transport for London (TfL) has launched a‘Please offer me a seat’ badge to recognise customers with invisible impairments.The‘Please Offer Me a Seat’ badge and card was created following requests from customers, particularly those with invisible impairments, conditions and illnesses, who struggle to get a seat as their need for one isn’t immediately obvious.A six-week trial with 1,200 users was held in autumn last year to test if the badge and card would help people getting a seat. Over the course of the trial, participants’ confidence in using the network increased. More th...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Women of South Asian descent 'may be at greater risk of osteoporosis'
This study focused on trends in bone resorption, the process by which bone tissue is broken down by osteoclast cells to enable the transfer of calcium from bone tissue into the bloodstream. This is an essential function that help to body adapt to change and repair damage, but when it becomes excessive and unbalanced, it can be detrimental to bone health. Researchers examined 370 pre and postmenopausal South Asian and white Caucasian women in the UK over a 12-month period by measuring levels of N terminal telopeptide, a byproduct of bone resorption found in urine. It was found that premenopausal South Asian women had higher...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 26, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Clinical trial discovers a new way to prevent children with arthritis and eye disease losing their sight
This study demonstrates the benefit of adalimumab in children with uveitis. This is the first randomised trial of its kind worldwide and the results will have a major impact in children with uveitis all around the world."Finding the best way of caring for children with arthritis and uveitisProfessor Beresford from University of Liverpool and Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust said: "This landmark trial has demonstrated the commitment and leadership of colleagues across the UK in working closely with patients and parents in tackling a key priority of finding the very best way of caring for children wi...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 26, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Rheumatoid arthritis patients 'at an increased risk of atherosclerosis'
This study confirms increased prevalence of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis and provides data to support the hypothesis that patients have a high-risk plaque phenotype." Arthritis Research UK's view Dr Natalie Carter, head of research liaison and evaluation at Arthritis Research UK, said:"Rheumatoid arthritis is an incredibly debilitating condition that affects more than 400,000 people within the UK. The condition can not only limit a person's ability to live their everyday life to the full, but it can also put them at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. "This study not only reinfo...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 24, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Diets high in fat and carbohydrates 'may lead to osteoarthritis'
This study supports our advice that a diet that is low in saturated fats can help the ten million people in the UK who have arthritis. We also know that vitamins and minerals such as calcium, vitamin D and iron are important for maintaining healthy joints and bones. "Being overweight puts more strain on joints, which can affect the likelihood of developing arthritis. Losing weight may mean a person doesn't have to takepainkillers so often." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

2017 Annual Fellows' Meeting Report
The 2017 Annual Fellows' Meeting was held on 30th-31st March, and highlighted the prominent and innovative research currently ongoing by our fellows and PhD students.Day 1Jane Worthington, Chair of the newly established Fellowship Expert Group, opened the meeting with an enthusiastic introduction to the packed agenda for the two days, highlighting the opportunity for networking, the two keynote speakers and chance to hear the excellent research endeavours of the current cadre Arthritis Research UK fellows.The floor was then open for our fellows to present their research, with the first series of research presentations gene...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Workshop on patient involvement and communication
Our strategic focus to 2020 is to put people with arthritis at the heart of everything we do. This includes listening to, and involving, them in all aspects of our work. As such, the perspectives and insights of people with arthritis are essential in the review of funding applications. People with arthritis ensure that the research we fund is the most relevant to them.We advocate this same approach to our funded researchers and those applying to us for funding. We ask all applicants to demonstrate how they have engaged and/or involved people with arthritis in the development of their proposal and how they will do so if awa...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 20, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Rheumatoid arthritis patients 'have experienced progress in recent decades'
This study confirms how important early diagnosis and the commencement of treatment is. It is also encouraging to hear about the progress that has been made over the last 20 years. "Now the scientific community must continue to build on this, so that together we can continue to harness the power of exceptional science and make everyday life better for all people with arthritis." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 18, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

3D-bioprinted cartilage cells successfully implanted in groundbreaking study
This study expands our understanding in using stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis. We welcome any research that brings us closer to finding a treatment for osteoarthritis, and that will help people to break free from the limits of their condition. "As a charity, we are committed to funding exceptional science, finding the breakthroughs that help people push back the limits of arthritis. Work at the Arthritis Research UK Tissue Engineering Centre brings together doctors and scientists from the fields of engineering, biology and material science with the aim of regenerating bone and cartilage by using the pat...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 17, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

NHS hospitals 'misusing pain scoring tools to restrict access to joint surgery'
NHS patients in England may be being inappropriately denied access to hip and knee surgery due to the use ofpain scoring tools as a means of determining eligibility for treatment. New data, shared with the Health Service Journal by the UK Orthopaedics Industry Group, has indicated that at least ten per cent of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) across England are using unproven scoring tools to restrict access to orthopaedic surgery, despite a lack of regulatory authorisation to do so. Inappropriate use of pain scoring tools Pain scoring tools such as the Oxford hip and knee scoring system and the New Zealand scoring sys...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 10, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

British Society of Rheumatology Prizes - Congratulations!
Michael Mason PrizeWe would like to say congratulations to Dr Francesca Barone (University of Birmingham) for being awarded theMichael Mason Prize by the British Society of Rheumatology. This prize is awarded by the Herberden Committee for excellence in clinical or scientific research in the field of rheumatology.Dr Francesca Barone holds anArthritis Research UK senior research fellowship. She is working to improve understanding of Sjögren’s syndrome, by looking at tertiary lymphoid organs that reside in the salivary glands. As well as answering why these structures are present, and whether removal of these stru...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - April 3, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Moderate drinking 'does not risk liver damage for methotrexate users'
People receiving the common rheumatoidarthritis therapymethotrexate can safely drink moderate amounts of alcohol without running the risk of liver damage. This is according to a new study from the University of Manchester, funded by Arthritis Research UK, which shows that drinking 14 units of alcohol or fewer per week is not likely to cause any liver health issues. Sticking to modest levels of drinking'likely to be safe' Methotrexate is often taken over extended periods of time to limit or prevent joint damage and disability associated withrheumatoid arthritis. Generally, those receiving the drug are advise...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 28, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New study identifies targets for blocking cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis
Scientists have made a potentially important discovery about the way that cartilage damage occurs in people withosteoarthritis, potentially opening the door for new treatments to be developed. Funded byArthritis Research UK and led by Oxford University's Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, the study identified enzymes that play a key role in joint destruction, which could be targeted by future therapies.  How these molecules contribute to osteoarthritis Published in the medical journal Arthritis& Rheumatology, the research offers an important insight into how cartilage cells called chondrocytes are interrup...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New biomarker 'could aid prediction of rheumatoid arthritis outcomes'
A new biomarker has been discovered that could make it easier to predict which rheumatoidarthritis patients are most likely to experience a positive prognosis. Researchers at Uppsala University have carried out a study showing that antibodies against the cartilage protein collagen II are associated with better outcomes, and could be helpful in determining the best treatment to use for each patient. A link between collagen antibodies and disease development For this study, a large group ofrheumatoid arthritis patients were followed over five years to establish a possible correlation between collagen antibody levels and dise...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Modified red blood cells 'could alleviate autoimmune diseases'
This study is interesting and has the potential to be a tool used to both treat and prevent rheumatoid arthritis. It is promising to see that autoimmunity could be treated in mice, but people with arthritis need to be aware that this research is in its very early stages. "More research is needed to determine how the results can be translated into a benefit for people living inpain now, and for those who may develop arthritis in the future." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 17, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Research into movement in elite sports could help to prevent and treat osteoarthritis
The way we move our bodies during everyday life, including how we walk, sit, run and play sports, has an impact on our joints and muscles throughout our lives. That’s why Arthritis Research UK is funding innovative research to build understanding of the way athletes and professional sportspeople move and the stresses those movements place on their joints.This insight will then be used to develop new approaches to treat the pain ofosteoarthritis and to help people to exercise safely, reducing their risk of injury and of developing arthritis in the future.Leading researchers from all over the country have been brought ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Is running good or bad for your joints? Study searches for a definitive answer
The evidence that exercise can help to reduce the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis is overwhelming. This evidence isn't only gathered from robust scientific studies, but also directly from people of all ages who tell us howstaying active has helped them to live well with arthritis.However, the idea that certain types of exercise can be damaging to our joints, doing more harm than good, persists. This is particularly the case with running which, despite being a hugely popular pastime in the UK, continues to be the subject of conflicting reports in the media about its health benefits and risks. Thousands of people of v...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Giving people with arthritis a voice to explain why work matters
In autumn 2016 we told you about the launch of our Work Matters to Me campaign, arguing for greater support for people with arthritis to return to, and remain in, work. Thanks to your active support the first stage of the campaign has ensured people with arthritis have been given an opportunity to explain to policymakers why work matters to them.More than 260 people responded to our campaign call to share their views and experiences about work and arthritis. This fantastic response meant your stories featured heavily in the evidence submitted in the Arthritis Research UK response to the Government’s Disability Employ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Everyday exercises for everyday life
We know joint pain can limit your ability to live life to the full and stop you doing things that are important to you. And exercise may be one of the first things to fall off the to do list.Arthritis Research UK recently asked nearly a thousand people who've had or do have joint pain about their attitudes to doing at least 20 minutes of exercise, such as walking, stretching, running or yoga. We found that half of them (51%) said having joint pain had put them off doing exercise. This finding is worrying, as research shows keeping active is one of the best things you can do both manage and reduce the pain and stiffness whi...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Could better information and support before and after surgery transform joint replacement results?
Joint replacements improve the quality of life of thousands of people with arthritis in the UK each year. More than 104,000 knee replacements and 98,000 hip replacements were performed during 2015 alone.We know many of you have already benefited from this surgery, telling us how a new hip or knee has got you moving again, cut down on your pain and helped you to get the most out of life. However, there's still vital work to be done to help even more people to experience positive outcomes after joint replacement surgery, which is why Arthritis Research UK is funding extensive research in this area.Recently published results ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Too many Brits are putting off exercise
Results of our survey have revealed that only half of people in the UK (53%) exercise more than once a week.Over 2,000 people were questioned about their attitudes to doing exercise, such as walking, stretching, running or cycling, for at least 20 minutes. Results showed that:There's a clear intention gap– 75% said that they wished they exercised more than once per week, but just 53% of people do.18% said that they do some form of exercise every day.17% admitted that they never do any form of exercise. This is despite Government guidelines recommending that adults should aim for 30 minutes of exercise five days ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 15, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Research explores link between a baby ’s movement in the womb and increased risk of osteoarthritis
(Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 14, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Providing physical activity interventions for people with musculoskeletal conditions
We're pleased to be launching our new report,‘Providing physical activity interventions for people with musculoskeletal conditions’ at the annual LGA/ADPH annual conference today (9 March).Physical activity is a key part of a public health approach to musculoskeletal conditions and it has a range of benefits for people with musculoskeletal conditions in terms of improving quality of life and supporting people to be independent. It can reduce joint and back pain by 25% while also improving sleep, managing stress and reducing depression, anxiety and dementia and is therefore beneficial for people who have a muscu...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 9, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Immune homeostasis partnership with Cancer Research UK
In February 2017 we made a commitment withCancer Research UK to explore ways we could work together to maximise progress in our shared strategic priorities spanning both cancer and arthritis or related musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders.The immune system continues to intrigue us; as we get closer to finding ways of using or moderating immune responses, new and unexpected challenges present themselves, often testing even our most fundamental understanding. Cancer Research UK and Arthritis Research UK have come together to ask you to help us rise to the specific challenge of understanding immune homeostasis in different disease...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Partnership funding call with MQ: Transforming Mental Health
We're pleased to announce that for the second year, we're partnering with mental health research charity MQ: Transforming Mental Health to co-fund one early career researcher in their2017 Fellows Award programme. MQ is a new charity funding much needed scientific research to transform the lives of everyone affected by mental illness. Together, we recognise the significant mental health burden that musculoskeletal disease can bring, in particular as a result of chronic pain, and the impact that this can have on quality of life.For this award we invite applications which examine mental health conditions associated with muscu...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 6, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Joint funded Clinical Scientist Fellowship
Applications are open for the Medical Research Council Clinical Scientist Fellowship (CSF) with a deadline of 4pm, Wednesday 5 April 2017. We are pleased to support these awards as a partner funder.The CSF develops talented medically, and other clinically qualified professionals, who have gained a higher research degree, to lead their own research plans and establish their own research team to make the transition to independent investigator. Applications are invited for the standard CSF, the Tenure Track CSF, or the jointly funded CSF, all of which are considered in open competition.The CSF provides four years' support. Pa...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 3, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Arthritis Research UK welcomes Rodger McMillan as the new Chair of the Board of Trustees
Arthritis Research UK is pleased to announce the appointment of our new Chair, Rodger McMillan. At the same time, we say a fond farewell to Charles Maisey.Rodger, who has been a member of the Board for the past three years, was selected after a rigorous, externally-led selection process. As a scientist, and later as a Senior Vice President of Research and Development at AstraZeneca, Rodger brings his extensive experience in life sciences and healthcare to this role.He spent his distinguished 30-year career in the pharmaceutical industry involved in the discovery and development of new medicines in rheumatology and other in...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 2, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Health services research awards announced
This study is led by Dr Kathryn Martin at the University of Aberdeen. It aims to determine how walk with ease will need to be modified before it could be implemented in the UK, and to gauge the possibility of conducting a trial to evaluate the programme’s effectiveness.Joint funded by Arthritis Research UK, Pfizer and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Charitable Trust:Aiming for patient centred treatment through use of the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) The Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) is a short questionnaire that allows people with mus...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 1, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Men 'face unique challenges when coping with rheumatoid arthritis'
Men with rheumatoidarthritis are often struggling to cope with their condition due to unique challenges created by their identities and self-perception, according to a new study. Research carried out by the University of West England and funded by Arthritis Research UK has indicated that men face specific problems when dealing mentally withrheumatoid arthritis that women do not share - and that tailored channels of support may be needed to help them cope. The unique struggles faced by men The study centred on a series of interviews carried out among six focus groups comprising 22 men, who were asked about their experiences...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 28, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

MRC Investment in human tissue banking and linked data – discussion session
Message from Dr Stephen Simpson, Director of Research& ProgrammesThe Medical Research Council (MRC) has recently put out a call, titled,‘Capital investment in human tissue banking and linked data, in partnership with charities.’ Through this call, the MRC will support the establishment of a focussed number of world-class human tissue banks and associated linked-data repositories, which will work in close partnership with research charities to enable new avenues of research into disease mechanism, diagnosis and treatment.If you are interested in applying for the above call, we would like to suggest that you ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Masonic Charitable Foundation awards grant to microbiome research
The Masonic Charitable Foundation has awarded£90,000 over three years to Arthritis Research UK, to support research into the role of the microbiome in rheumatoid arthritis.The grant will support Dr Frances Williams at King’s College London, to explore whether the mix of bacteria in and on our bodies (known as the microbiome) drives rheumatoid arthritis, or whether changes in these bacteria are a consequence of the disease or the drugs used to treat it.The researchAround 400,000 people in the UK have rheumatoid arthritis but the best drugs available do not work for everyone. We know that the microbiome in people...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Binding immunoglobulin protein therapy shows promise for rheumatoid arthritis
A promising new approach to treating rheumatoidarthritis using binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) therapy has shown its potential in a new clinical study. Carried out by King's College London and Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, the research has indicated that BiP-based treatment could represent a useful intervention for patients who have failed to respond to conventional disease-modifying antirheumaticdrugs (DMARDs). How it works BiP belongs to a class of compounds known as human endoplasmic reticulum-resident stress proteins, and has been shown in preclinical studies to offer anti-infl...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New early arthritis treatment technique used by UK hospital
A new surgical technique has been utilised by surgeons in Southampton as a means of treating early-stage kneearthritis. The method, known as intramedullary high tibial osteotomy, has been performed by consultant knee and limb reconstruction surgeon Amir Ali Qureshi on three patients at Southampton General Hospital, and could represent a promising new option for those whose conditions have not yet advanced. How the procedure works The technique involves inserting a nail or rod into the tibia and lengthening it externally with a remote-controlled magnet to relieve pressure on the damaged side of the knee, delaying the need f...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 22, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Innovate UK-MoST funding for treatment of early osteoarthritis
An award that we funded as part of our medical technologies proof of concept funding round in 2015 in collaboration with the Innovation Knowledge Centre (University of Leeds), has recently been awarded a£2m Innovate UK-MoST grant, under UK-China Research and Innovation Bridges Competition 2015 scheme. This grant was awarded to continue the development of novel osteochondral scaffold technology for early intervention of osteoarthritis. We would like to congratulate the researchers, led by Dr Chaozong Liu (University College London) on this exciting news and look forward to seeing how the project develops. Os...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 15, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Starter grants for clinical lecturers
Applications are open for the Academy of Medical Sciences starter grants for clinical lecturers scheme with a deadline of 5pm, Wednesday 8 March 2017. Arthritis Research UK is pleased to support these awards as a partner funder.  The grants provide modest‘starter’ funds of up to£30,000 to enable research active Clinical Lecturers to pursue their research work. Clinical Lecturer posts provide a salary but often do not come with the funding to support the costs of the research. This scheme was designed to help bridge this gap by providing Clinical Lecturers with access to modest research funds for up t...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 14, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

NSAID therapy 'may offer little actual benefit for back pain'
A study from the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, Australia has indicated that commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatorydrugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and aspirin have little effect on remedying people's pain, while potentially putting them at risk of debilitating side effects. Doing more harm than good? Published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, the new study examined data from 35 existing trials, involving more than 6,000 people in total. It aimed to build on previous research showing that paracetamol is ineffective and opioids provide minimal benefit forback pain. Most clinical guideli...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 6, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Research programme manager job opportunity
We’re looking for a highly skilled research programme manager to join our clinical studies and experimental medicine team based within the research directorate. Our team of research programme managers are responsible for the effective delivery of our varied research funding schemes and management of the current£100m research investment, which includes reporting research outputs and achievements that are vital to our continued success and growth.As research programme manager, you’ll:keep abreast of developments in clinical research and other assigned areas to help shape our future research funding activiti...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - February 1, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Priorities in Clinical Research – Call for Applications
Clinical research delivers healthcare science that develops and evaluates the safety, efficacy and effectiveness of medications, devices, diagnostic products and treatment regimens intended for human use. These may be used for prevention, treatment, diagnosis or for relieving symptoms of a disease.Call for applications We are now inviting applications for clinical research funding in the areas highlighted in the current clinical studies group strategies. We aim to fund innovative research that seeks to address key clinical research priorities that will change practice and impact on quality of life, utilising novel tri...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 30, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Eligibility for hip and knee replacement 'could become more restricted'
People with joint conditions in three regions could soon find it more difficult to get access to knee andhip replacement surgery, due to planned changes in eligibility criteria. The choice by three clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to explore the idea has attracted criticism, as some believe this may suggest that CCGs are looking to change the scoring system used to decide which patients are suitable for these operations. As reported by the Health Service Journal, the Redditch and Bromsgrove, South Worcestershire, and Wyre Forest CCGs - all based in the West Midlands - are planning a reduction in the Oxford hip and knee...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news