Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Osteoarthritis 'could be re-categorised as two distinct groups of disease'
Osteoarthritis could be treated more effectively in the future by dividing patients into two distinct disease groups, according to new research. TheArthritis Research UK-funded study, carried out by the University of Manchester, has discovered that the current definition of osteoarthritis may actually encompass two separate groups with different disease activity patterns, and that developing new treatments for both versions may be more effective than the current one-size-fits-all approach. Two different patterns of disease activity Published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, the research involved a mathematical anal...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 17, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Screening for osteoporosis 'can be effective in preventing hip fractures'
Providing women with opportunities to attend community screening forosteoporosis could significantly reduce the number of hip fractures they suffer. This is the conclusion of a new study led by the University of East Anglia, with funding by the Medical Research Council andArthritis Research UK, which has suggested that screening could catch as many as one-quarter of all hip fractures before they happen. How the screening works The study brought together researchers from universities across the country, with a total of 12,483 women aged 70 to 85 recruited from 100 GP practices in seven regions - Birmingham, Bristol, Manches...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 11, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Every £1 invested in medical research delivers a return equivalent to 25p every year, forever
This study shows that funding research into these conditions not only delivers direct health benefits to patients, it is also hugely beneficial to the UK economy, helping to lay the foundations for a healthier, wealthier future.“This report supports previous findings that investing in biomedical research delivers an annual return of about 25 pence per pound in perpetuity, offering an indisputable economic benefit. This new figure ably illustrates why scientific research has earnt its place at the heart of a modern industrial strategy.”Dr Louise Wood, Director of Science, Research and Evidence, Department of Hea...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 10, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Overweight rheumatoid arthritis patients 'less likely to achieve remission'
This study may point to other factors such as weight, also playing a role in the effectiveness of early treatment. "We advise that people with arthritis speak to their GP about theirdiet and we have lots of information on our website about diet andexercise to help people maintain a healthy weight." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - December 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Influencing for people with arthritis in 2017
We know that arthritis can impact on all parts of a person’s life, and as a result our policy, campaigns and public affairs team have had a busy year. Working across health, work, benefits, social care, and many more areas, there have been lots of positive developments to reflect on in 2017, but there are also some big challenges ahead.A huge thanks to everyone who has supported our work across 2017. Your emails to decision makers, survey responses, petition signatures and the stories you’ve shared with us, have made our work hugely powerful and helped us create an impact.Here’s a rundown of our top 5 hig...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - December 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Raising awareness of arthritis in Scotland
On Tuesday 5th December, Arthritis Research UK held our first Scottish parliamentary reception in Holyrood as a newly merged charity to highlight the prevalence and impact of arthritis in Scotland. Kindly sponsored by Rona MacKay MSP, the event was attended by 8 of Members of Scottish Parliament (MSPs) who came to find out about how arthritis can affect people with musculoskeletal conditions.MSPs spoke to people living with arthritis, tried our gloves which simulate the mobility restrictions arthritis can cause, as well as received exclusive data on how many people in their local area may have certain forms of arthritis.Ca...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - December 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Government announces response on the Work, Health and Disability Green Paper
On 30 November 2017 the Government announced its plans to support people with disability and long term health conditions to be in work. It pledged to see 1 million more disabled people in work over the next ten years. Proposals for change focused on three key areas: the welfare system; workplaces and the healthcare system.We know that work matters to many people with arthritis, helping them remain independent, giving a sense of control, and improving quality of life.This time last year, the Government acknowledged that things needed to improve. To start this process they said they wanted to hear opinions on how people with...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 30, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

How will the Budget 2017 affect people with arthritis?
On 22nd November, the Chancellor Phillip Hammond, announced the Government’s plans for taxation and spending. Our policy, public affairs and campaigns teams have been working hard to increase the Government’s investment into services that will benefit people with arthritis, as well as trying to protect budgets which are at risk of reduction.If you are affected by arthritis, here are the top four topics you need to know about.Science and research– industrial strategyTo meet our ambition of finding new treatments, and eventually a cure, for arthritis, it’s essential that money is invested in the life ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 27, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Juliette and Kirran explain what working on our campaign has meant to them
Arthritis Research UK’sThe Nation’s Joint Problem campaign has reached millions of people over the last three months, through national news stories and features and TV, cinema and billboard advertising. We asked two people who helped to shape the campaign content about their experience of being part of our ground-breaking push to change attitudes to arthritis.JulietteJournalist and author ofMostly Cloudy, Some Bright Spells Juliette Wills, 45, has lived with inflammatory spinal arthritis for 18 years. She wrote thesix powerful stories featured in The Guardian which exposed the hidden impact of arthritis, as wel...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

We ’ve joined forces with Arthritis Care to do more for people with arthritis
Arthritis Research UK and Arthritis Care have a shared ambition to support people with arthritis to live full and active lives. That’s why from 1 November 2017 we've joined forces. We’re working together, sharing our expertise and combining our strengths to become a single charity committed to having an even bigger positive impact on the over 10 million people in the UK living with arthritis.Together our two organisations have decades of expertise and experience – in science and research, in campaigning, in providing information, advice and support and creating online and face to face networks for pe...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Top arthritis and cancer scientists work together on ideas which could lead to new treatments
A collaboration between Arthritis Research UK and Cancer Research UK is bringing together leading research scientists specialising in inflammatory arthritis and cancer to share expertise and explore ideas which could lead to exciting new treatments for both diseases.The body’s immune system plays a vital role in the development of both inflammatory arthritis and cancer. In cancer the immune system is underactive, failing to attack unhealthy cells which leads to the growth of tumours. While in rheumatoid arthritis the immune system becomes overactive, attacking healthy cells by mistake causing inflammation and pa...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New report says PIP process 'not fit for purpose'
The problems experienced by many people with arthritis when trying to access Personal Independence Payments (PIP) are highlighted inSupporting Those Who Need It Most?, a hard-hitting report from the Disability Benefits Consortium (DBC)– a group of more than 80 national organisations, including Arthritis Research UK.PIP is a source of financial support designed to help people manage the extra costs they may face when living with a disability or long-term condition. It provides a lifeline to many people with arthritis. However, this new report exposes a PIP system not fit for purpose in its current form, with many des...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Innovative design tackles everyday challenges
When you’re dealing with the big problems of living with arthritis, like pain, stiffness and inflamed joints, the last thing you need is lots more smaller problems that can make life even more difficult. Those everyday struggles to open a jar, lock a front door, get out of the bath or lift a kettle can sometimes feel like the last straw. So, for the second year running, we’ve teamed up with the Design Council to find and fund the best and brightest design ideas hoping to make everyday life better for people with arthritis.Once again Arthritis Research UK supported a category at the annual Spark Awards inviting ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Can symptom tracking apps help people manage their arthritis?
With smartphones now an integral part of our lives, and free apps readily available to help us track and manage everything from our money and social lives to diet and exercise, it’s vital we invest in research exploring how technology can help to improve treatment and care for people with arthritis of all ages.Two pilot studies, both supported by funding from Arthritis Research UK, have worked closely with people with inflammatory arthritis to design, develop and test apps to help with symptom tracking and monitoring. Positive feedback from patients suggests apps have potential to help people with arthritis to better...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

3D-printed implants and scaffold technology – how bioengineering innovation could treat and prevent osteoarthritis
The need for new and effective ways to treat and preventosteoarthritis has never been more urgent. Demand for total joint replacements is rising every year, and expected to double by 2030, placing a huge strain on the NHS. Meanwhile, those living with the pain of early stage osteoarthritis or at risk of developing it due to injury face limited treatment options.That’s why Arthritis Research UK is investing in innovative research dedicated to developing medical technologies which could provide an answer. By 'medical technologies' we mean cutting-edge medical devices, orthotics, implants and imaging techniques, harness...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Vitamin D 'may help prevent development of rheumatoid arthritis'
People who consume plenty of vitamin D could lower their risk of developing rheumatoidarthritis, according to a new study. The University of Birmingham research, published in the Journal of Autoimmunity, has revealed key insights into the relationship between vitamin D and inflammatory diseases such asrheumatoid arthritis, with implications for those at risk for such conditions as well as those already affected. The vital role vitamin D plays in rheumatoid arthritis The researchers analysed samples of blood and synovial fluid from the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, making this the first study to cha...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Government announces proposals for social care
On 16 November 2017, the Government announced that it will publish a green paper on social care and support by summer 2018.Good quality, accessible social care is vital for many people living with arthritis. We know that, when done well, it can mean people live fuller and more independent lives. It can also provide those affected by arthritis with much-needed aids and adaptations to support theirdaily living.Currently, the social care system is letting people down, and must be improved. As members of the Care and Support Alliance (CSA), we have been campaigning for the Government to put the social care system on a sustaina...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Decompression surgery 'may not benefit people with shoulder pain'
This study suggests that other treatments such as physiotherapy can be just as effective as shoulder surgery, and should be taken into consideration with patients considering surgery and could influence the decisions made by health providers. "Often shoulder pain can be short-lived, but if you’re experiencing shoulder pain which continues for more than two weeks, or gets worse, speak to your doctor or aphysiotherapist in case you have a more complex problem." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Osteoarthritis patients 'negatively affected by a fear of movement'
People with kneeosteoarthritis are experiencing a decreased quality of life due to a fear of movement associated with the condition. This is according to a new US study carried out by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which has indicated that this fear of movement may be causing those with osteoarthritis to lead less active lifestyles, putting them at risk of their conditions worsening. Factors affecting fear of movement For this study, a total of 350 participants taking part in a clinical trial were asked to evaluate their fear of movement, as well as providing details on their age, sex, race, education,pai...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 15, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Arthritis Research UK hunts for product design ideas to help people living with arthritis
Arthritis Research UK and Design Council Spark are making a final call for innovative design ideas, which would be life altering for people with arthritis. Applications close at midday on 21st November 2017.The 2017 winner, Geoff Rolandsen, won with the Workey design. Workey helps people with arthritis open doors with ease. He was inspired after he discovered that his father, who lives with arthritis, struggled to use certain door keys. Geoff started sketching some ideas which would help his dad, and the original Workey assistive device was born. Keys slide into it and it creates a larger and more ergonomic surface area fo...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 14, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Help us improve the care people with arthritis receive
Good quality, and cost effective, social care is vital for many people with arthritis. When done right it can mean people are supported to live well, regardless of whether they are in their own home, the home of a family member, or a residential care home.Please join us and ask the Government to take action toimprove the social care system.The term social care can often be misunderstood, and many people living with arthritis don’t know how it could help them. Social care covers much more than residential care homes; it can provide personal care and practical support (such as help to wash, dress, or go to the toilet) ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 13, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Former cricketers 'more likely to experience osteoarthritis and joint surgery'
Elite-level cricketers are more likely than most to experience osteoarthritis and other related bone health issues, according to new research. The University of Oxford-led study, which was supported by theArthritis Research UK Centre for Sport,Exercise andOsteoarthritis* and the England and Wales Cricket Board, has offered evidence that more needs to be done to monitor and address the specific health risks associated with the sport, and to offer tailored support for those in need. The impact of cricket on musculoskeletal health For this research, a group of 113 former elite cricket players were asked to complete a health q...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Retired professional footballers at higher risk of knee osteoarthritis
Retired professional footballers are far more prone to develop knee pain and osteoarthritis and face problems with their knees earlier in life than the average person, a study has revealed.The research was led by academics at The University of Nottingham and funded by Arthritis Research UK with collaborative support from FMARC (FIFA’s Medical and Research Centre), the Professional Footballers Association (PFA) and SPIRE Healthcare Group.The study reported that male ex-footballers were two to three times more likely to suffer from knee pain and knee osteoarthritis and require a total knee replacement, even after ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 3, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

We ’re a finalist for a Market Research Society Award for Application of Research
Arthritis places limits on people’s lives and takes away their ability to do the things they love most. For many, it seriously impacts their daily lives - from getting dressed or making a cup of tea, to being able to continue working and maintain a social life. Yet people with the condition are more likely to hide their arthritis and keep it to themselves.We want all this to change. To do this we needed to widen out from purely focusing on medical scientific research and put people with arthritis front and centre of our work. Research is still incredibly vital and we continue to invest in breakthrough treatments, but...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 2, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New survey highlights impact of rheumatoid arthritis in the workplace
Rheumatoidarthritis patients are frequently not being provided with the level of support they require from their employers, according to a new report. A survey carried out by the University of Manchester and the NationalRheumatoid Arthritis Society has indicated that many patients feel their bosses are not aware enough of their condition, with many having to change jobs as a consequence of their condition. The challenges faced by arthritis patients at work The survey questioned more than 1,500 people in the UK and found that 39 per cent of patients feel that their employer lacks awareness of rheumatoid arthritis, up from 2...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - October 25, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Obesity 'driving rising arthritis risk in recent generations'
The rising prevalence of obesity is leading to an increase in the frequency of rheumatoidarthritis cases. This is according to a new study from the University of Toronto and Krembil Research Institute in Canada, which has indicated that weight problems are cancelling out the positive impact of other lifestyle factors when it comes torheumatoid arthritis risk. Arthritis risk increasing over time The study analysed data from 8,817 people taking part in the Canadian National Population Health Survey between 1994 and 2011 to determine whether successive generations were affected by different arthritis prevalence and risk facto...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - October 24, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New hydrogel developed to combat rheumatoid arthritis
A new gel-based material has been developed that could help to treat rheumatoidarthritis through a number of modes of action. Researchers from South Korea's Institute for Basic Science have created the gel to detect nitric oxide, a core mechanism that allows the substance to be used to absorb additional fluid from swollen joints, or to release medication to affected areas. How the gel works A report published in the journal Advanced Materials has shown how the gel is able to respond to the overproduction of nitric oxide, which often occurs when immune cells become overactive in inflamed joints. Research leader Kim Won ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - October 24, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Former rugby union players 'at greater risk of arthritis'
This study provides information for those who play the sport on the short and long-term risks and benefits associated with rugby. It is also hoped that further studies, building on this work, will generate better preventative advice and treatment for both professional and recreational sports players." (Source: Arthritis Research UK)
Source: Arthritis Research UK - October 11, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Arthritis on the agenda at party conferences
The policy, public affairs and campaigns team (PPA) has been raising recognition of arthritis at four key political party conferences: Liberal Democrats, Labour, Conservatives and the Scottish National Party.Alongside our Chief Executive, Liam O’Toole, staff attended various high profile events and round tables, and for the first time, at Labour and Conservative conferences, we also had an exhibition stand:showcasing hard hitting stats about the impact of arthritisproviding copies of ourPrevent, Transform, Cure manifesto, with key asks for MPsproviding local statistics for MPs to learn about prevalence in their ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - October 10, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Committee of MPs launch new inquiry into benefits
On the 29th September, the Work and Pensions Committee, an influential group of MPs, launched a new inquiry where they will investigate how the application, assessment and appeals processes are working for two benefits: Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP).If you’re ill or disabled, ESA offers you financial support if you can’t work, alongside help to get you back into work if you’re able to. PIP provides financial support to help with some of the extra costs caused by living with a long-term condition or disability. The amount you get depends on how your condition a...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - October 4, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

The life sciences, Brexit and the UK Government ’s Industrial Strategy
In this report, we highlighted the benefits that collaboration has delivered for European science, and ultimately how this has improved the health of patients and the public across the European Union. The study has already proven influential and was widely referenced in the Government’s recent Brexit position paper on its ambitions for UKscience and innovation published earlier this month, which included the aim of continued future collaboration with the EU. The Life Sciences Industrial Strategy In response to the Industrial Strategy, sector leaders from the life sciences, including the Association of Medical Researc...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 24, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Raising the profile of long term conditions in Parliament
On Monday 11th September, our Policy and Public Affairs team attended a Parliamentary drop-in to help MPs understand more about the needs of people with long term conditions. The event was coordinated by the Richmond Group, a coalition of 14 leading health and social care organisations - including Arthritis Research UK - who work together to influence policy and practice.The organisations that make up the coalition represent 15 million people with long term conditions in the UK who regularly need to rely on health and care services. We work together to campaign for improvements, and ensure that everyone with a long term co...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 17, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Get a grip on PIP
A new report released on 14 September 2017 by the Disability Benefits Consortium (DBC) - of which Arthritis Research UK is a member- demonstrates the huge problems which many people experience when trying to access Personal Independence Payments. A Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a source of financial support designed to help disabled people and those with long-term conditions manage the extra costs of their condition.Debs is in her forties and has had arthritis since she was born. Her story is featured in the‘Supporting those who need it most?’ report:“When I wake up I am in pain instantly. My hu...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 13, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Osteoporosis gene study reveals potential new treatment targets
Scientists have identified a number of new genetic variants that are implicated in the development ofosteoporosis following a major study. The research, led by the University of Queensland in Australia and McGill University in Canada, have carried out the largest ever genetic study of osteoporosis, with their findings potentially paving the way for new approaches to treating the bone disease. A broad-ranging study The study was published in the medical journal Nature Genetics and analysed data from more than 140,000 individuals from the UK Biobank, with bone mineral density assessments taken from ultrasounds of the heel. A...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Campaigner Frances who lives with arthritis tells us why she is going to party conferences
I was 23 when I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis . I had trained to be a teacher but it became clear that it would no longer be possible for me to keep up with a class and spend long hours standing. It wasn’t the life I expected to live.You have to make a new life, and let go of what you thought was going to happen. Arthritis can affect every aspect of your existence, from your career to your relationships and social life. As well as the big changes, there are little things too, for example I can find it a struggle to take the cap off a bottle of water.I am joining Arthritis Research UK at party conferences to...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 3, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New app helps adults to get more active
As a charity, we know how important remaining active is for the 10 million people living with arthritis. Which is why we have been working in partnership with Public Health England to encourage physical activity.As a part of this collaborative work, we are pleased to support the launch of Public Health England’s‘Active 10’ app as part of its‘One You’ health and wellbeing platform.The app encourages people to walk just ten minutes a day, an activity which is beneficial for people living with musculoskeletal conditions.This ten minutes can make a huge difference to your health, it gets the heart...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 23, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

The true impact of arthritis
You'll know all too well the impact arthritis has on your own life. Perhaps you also think about how your arthritis affects your loved ones or your employer, but the impact doesn’t stop there. With 10 million people in the UK living with arthritis, each with friends and family, many with work colleagues and employers and all supported by a team of healthcare professionals, the ripple effect of arthritis touches every person in our society, either directly or indirectly.To support our campaign, we've gathered evidence to reveal the extent of the hidden impact of arthritis on our society, published in a new report...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

The nation ’s joint problem – our CEO explains urgent need for new campaign
Arthritis affects over 10 million people living in the UK. And yet how often is it talked about or represented on our TV screens, in magazines or newspapers? Over the coming weeks that's set to change with the launch of our new high-profile campaign.Our research shows that over three quarters of people with arthritis think that society doesn’t understand what it’s like to live with arthritis and 78% said other people don’t understand the impact because they don’t look seriously affected. We want to change that.Developed with the help of people with arthritis, our campaign advert depicts the impact o...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New research shines spotlight on mental health and arthritis
Around a third of the 400,000 people in the UK with rheumatoid arthritis also experience mental health issues. Statistics like these clearly show arthritis does not just affect people’s physical health. Without the right treatment and support the pain and fatigue of rheumatoid arthritis can take its toll on our minds, as well as our bodies.We want this to change and for the mental health issues associated with arthritis to be taken seriously, recognised early and treated effectively. We've forged a new partnership with mental health research charityMQ: Transforming Mental Health to support vital research in this...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Preventing the pain of osteoarthritis – do molecules and proteins hold the answers?
This study also includes several collaborators, including members of the Arthritis Research UK Centre of Excellence for Pain (Professor Victoria Chapman and Dr. Federico Dajas-Bailador) and of the Arthritis Research UK Centre of Excellence for Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis (Professor Tonia Vincent).Nerve protein may protect against the onset and pain of arthritisMeanwhile, another three-year study will explore if a protein found on nerves in and around our joints could be used to reduce pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis.Susan Brain, Professor of Pharmacology at King’s College London, tells us more ab...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Can we really work for longer? Study asks how feasible a higher retirement age is for people with arthritis
With retirement ages going up and the value of pensions and savings going down, more and more people with arthritis will need and want to work for longer. Arthritis can be a barrier to working at any age, with thousands losing out in the world of work every year because of their condition. That’s why we're funding health and work research to help people with arthritis find or stay in work, inspire changes in the workplace and influence and inform policy-makers and employers.The Health and Employment After 50 (HEAF) study at the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work has recruited more than 8...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Anne's story – Let’s be honest about the hidden impact of arthritis
Anne Kearl, 55, was first diagnosed with osteoarthritis in her spine twenty years ago. Chronic back and neck pain affect every aspect of her life, contributing to her giving up work aged 52, but this impact is often hidden and rarely understood by others. This is something Anne believes needs to change."Pain is normal to me. It’s always there. I may paint a smile on my face, but I'll be hurting all over. You get used to it, but it does grind you down. It’s had a big impact on my mental health; pain and depression feed off each other and in my experience, it’s hard to separate them out a lot of the ti...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Cost of arthritis
The Times today featured a letter to editor which reports that Arthritis Research UK is calling for arthritis to be recognised for what it is: a public health priority and a significant problem facing the UK. Our call to action has been signed by 16 notable people, including BBC journalist and broadcaster Julian Worricker, actress Sally Hawkins, Caroline Lucas MP, Paralympic athlete Pamela Relph and Professor Luke O’Neill from Trinity College, Dublin. Read the letter in full below:Dear Sir,Arthritis affects over 10 million people and is the number one cause of disability in the UK. Four in five of those who...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Contraceptive pill 'may lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women'
Women who regularly use oral contraceptives may be at a lower risk of developing rheumatoidarthritis. This is according to a new study led by the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and published in the British Medical Journal, which adds to the body of evidence suggesting that hormonal and reproductive factors may explain why women are generally at greater risk of developingrheumatoid arthritis than men. The study findings For this study, data was collated from the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis on 2,809 women who had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and 5,312 women without the disease. ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 21, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

The nation's #jointproblem: Arthritis will cause 25.9 million lost working days costing £3.43 billion by 2030
Arthritis Research UK, the UK’s leading arthritis charity, is today launching a major nationwide campaign to reveal the true impact of arthritis across society. The campaign will highlight that, either directly or indirectly, arthritis impacts everyone in the UK. The campaign will also highlight that there are over 10 million people living with arthritis and the condition can cause high levels of daily pain and fatigue.As part of the launch, Arthritis Research UK is releasing The Nation’s Joint Problem report which reveals the current and future impact of two major forms of the condition, osteoarthritis (O...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 20, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New study highlights key quality of life factors for ankylosing spondylitis
A new study has shed light on some of the most prevalent modifiable factors that predict a poor quality of life in people withankylosing spondylitis. Moreover, the University of Aberdeen research indicated that some of these factors - which include pain,fatigue and poor physical function - are currently better monitored than others, suggesting new approaches to treating this painful condition may be needed. The most important predictors for poor quality of life The study analysed data from 959 patients involved in the Scotland Registry for Ankylosing Spondylitis, which collected clinical and patient-reported data on ankylo...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 16, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Rheumatoid arthritis risk 'may be elevated for people in certain jobs'
This study, published in the medical journal Arthritis Research& Care, assessed data from 3,522 Swedish individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 5,580 control subjects, including information on environmental, genetic and immunological factors between 1996 and 2014. Male workers in the manufacturing sector were shown to have a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis than those working in professional, administrative and technical roles, with electrical and electronics workers and material handling operators experiencing a twofold increased risk, while bricklayers and concrete workers were three times more likely...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 10, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New nurse and allied health professional interns 2017
This year’s nurse and allied health professional (AHP) interns have begun their research placements.Over the course of three years, the internship scheme will support 18 newly qualified AHPs at the start of their professional career and bring them into rheumatology research teams.The governance of the£120,000 programme is being overseen by Professor Catherine Bowen at the University of Southampton, who is joined by colleagues from a network of universities including Leeds, Salford, Oxford and West of England, Bristol.This project is now in its second year, with six interns due to undertake research project...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 8, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

New study to assess whether painkillers make axial spondyloarthritis harder to detect
A new study is being launched in the UK to determine whether people with axial spondyloarthritis are being misdiagnosed because of thepainkillers they are using. The University of Aberdeen study, funded byArthritis Research UK, will examine how big a role patients' medication plays in slowing down the diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis, and to establish whether new approaches to treating and diagnosing the disease are needed. How painkillers may mask the signs of axial spondyloarthritis Axial spondyloarthritis is an inflammatory arthritic condition affecting around 700,000 people in the UK. It afflicts the spine and ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - August 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Arthritis Care and Arthritis Research UK – joining together
Arthritis Care and Arthritis Research UK have a shared ambition– to help over 10 million people living with arthritis in the UK. At the beginning of 2017, the charities began discussions about how we could best serve their needs. After careful consideration, the decision was made by the boards of both organisations to merge Arthritis Care into Arthritis Research UK. Due diligence has been commissioned and the aim is for the two charities to come together into a single organisation in October this year.Standing together with one louder voiceDr Liam O’Toole, chief executive officer of Arthritis Research UK, and J...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - July 26, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news