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rofecoxib, Vioxx
Title: rofecoxib, VioxxCategory: MedicationsCreated: 10/14/1999 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/8/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Arthritis General)
Source: MedicineNet Arthritis General - August 8, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Ibuprofen linked to increased risk of heart attacks
Conclusion This study is a useful addition to our knowledge about the links between NSAIDs and heart attack risk. The study suggests all commonly-used NSAIDs are linked to a similarly-raised risk of heart attacks, that the risk generally rises with the dose, and that it is highest in the first month of treatment. The researchers did a good job at taking account of potential confounding factors that could have affected the results. Even so, we don't know for sure that the NSAIDs were the direct cause of the problem. For example, if you are prescribed NSAIDs for a painful condition, and have a heart attack two weeks later, i...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Major Breakthrough On Capitol Hill: Government May Stop Making Drugs Expensive
In keeping with their commitment to being ineffective, liberals have largely ceded the terms of major policy debates to conservatives. In particular, liberals have been happy to let the right say that they are the ones who want market outcomes, while the liberal do-gooders want the government to intervene to pursue their social agenda. This is horrible politics and happens not to be true. Conservatives want the government to intervene in all sorts of ways, but their goal is to redistribute income upward, not to ensure people a decent standard of living. (Yes, this is the topic of my book, Rigged.) The right’s interes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ibuprofen claimed to raise cardiac arrest risk by a third
Conclusion This study showed an association between taking ibuprofen or diclofenac and an increased risk of a cardiac arrest in the following 30 days, but no association was found with the other NSAIDs investigated. But this study does have its limitations: Although the researchers used the same people to avoid confounding variables, the same person will differ in certain aspects over time – for example, certain diseases may get better or worse, which might have affected the results. The study only looked at prescribed drugs and not over-the-counter drugs. In Denmark, ibuprofen was the only over-the-counter drug ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Louisiana Lawyers Sue Milberg Over Vioxx Fees, Seek Up To $10.6 Million
A Louisiana law firm known for representing investors in securities fraud class actions claims it is being shortchanged by a leading class action firm it teamed with to sue the maker of the painkiller Vioxx. In November, Kahn Swick& Foti LLC, considered one of the nation ’s premier boutique securities litigation [...] (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 5, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Legal Newsline, Contributor Source Type: news

Celebrex Is No Riskier For Heart Than Other Arthritis Drugs, Study Finds
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A new study gives some reassurance to arthritis sufferers who want pain relief but are worried about side effects. It finds that Celebrex, a drug similar to ones withdrawn 12 years ago for safety reasons, is no riskier for the heart than some other prescription pain pills that are much tougher on the stomach. “We do not want patients to suffer with pain and we need to know what is safe to give them,” said Dr. Steven Nissen, the Cleveland Clinic’s heart chief, who led the study. Fear that Celebrex would be worse than alternatives proved unfounded, and “on almost every endpoin...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Arthritis Celebrex Source Type: news

Pfizer's Celebrex shown to be as safe as ibuprofen or naproxen: study
NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Pfizer Inc's Celebrex arthritis drug was shown to be at least as safe as the widely used prescription-strength versions of painkillers ibuprofen and naproxen, and does not appear to cause heart problems that spurred the withdrawal of rival Vioxx, according to a large 10-year study presented on Sunday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Certain painkillers 'could increase risk of heart failure'
Arthritis patients who take common painkillers such as ibuprofen could be at a greater risk of heart failure, according to a new large-scale study.The research, led by the University of Milano-Bicocca in Italy and utilising data from more than eight million patients, has offered evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may lead to an elevated risk of a person being hospitalised with heart problems, meaning caution may need to be employed when using them.The heart health risks of NSAIDsPublished in the British Medical Journal, the study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs and to...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 29, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Ibuprofen-like painkillers linked to an increased risk of heart failure
Conclusion This useful and well-conducted study isn't the first to say NSAIDs may raise the risk of heart failure. We've known for some time that NSAIDs can have side effects, especially when used at high doses and for long periods. What this study does help show is the different levels of risk between different NSAIDs, and confirms that the risk depends partly on the dose. It's important to remember that the study only included people who were prescribed NSAIDs and not people who'd bought them over the counter. The information is most useful to older people taking prescribed NSAIDs long-term for conditions&...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Outlook & Research into Alzheimer ’ s
Developing new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease is an active area of research. Scientists are testing a number of drugs to see if they prevent Alzheimer’s disease, slow the disease, or help reduce behavioral symptoms. There is evidence that inflammation in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and that drugs to cut down on inflammation may help. One recent study showed that two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs — rofecoxib and naproxen — did not slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in people already diagnosed. Scientists believe, however, that anti-inflammatory dru...
Source: Psych Central - August 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jane Framingham, Ph.D. Tags: Alzheimer's Memory and Perception Alzheimer's disease anti-inflammatory drugs drug testing Ginkgo biloba mental decline new treatment vitamin E Source Type: news

Jill Stein May Not Be Anti-Vax, But She's Pushing A Dangerous Anti-Vax Theory
Green party candidate Jill Stein is a medical doctor, but she’s got some unorthodox views about an issue most of her peers and other experts find uncontroversial: the vaccine regulatory process. In a video interview with The Washington Post last Friday, she said that while vaccines have played an important role in keeping us healthy and safe, there are legitimate concerns about how those vaccines are approved and regulated.  “I think there’s no question that vaccines have transformed public health and have been absolutely critical in ridding us of the scourge of many diseases: small pox, polio, etc. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Jill Stein May Not Be Anti-Vax, But She's Pushing A Dangerous Anti-Vax Theory
Green party candidate Jill Stein is a medical doctor, but she’s got some unorthodox views about an issue most of her peers and other experts find uncontroversial: the vaccine regulatory process. In a video interview with The Washington Post last Friday, she said that while vaccines have played an important role in keeping us healthy and safe, there are legitimate concerns about how those vaccines are approved and regulated.  “I think there’s no question that vaccines have transformed public health and have been absolutely critical in ridding us of the scourge of many diseases: small pox, polio, etc. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rooibos: Better Than Green Tea For Many Reasons
When I hiked Table Mountain on my last trip to South Africa, the locals told me about an herb that is better than green tea that kept them disease-free. African Bushmen have used this herb since before recorded history, but it’s still pretty rare here in America. Studies on this plant are being done all over the world. But not in the U.S. Because Big Pharma and the FDA aren’t interested in a natural cure that can’t be patented — or profited from. What is This South African Herb? I’m talking about an herb called Rooibos — or red bush in Afrikaans. Rooibos (pronounced roy-boss) provides a ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 27, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Natural Cures Source Type: news

Vioxx (Rofecoxib) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - May 23, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Paracetamol 'useless' in treating osteoarthritis pain
Conclusion This Swiss study reviewed drugs commonly used and recommended to help pain associated with osteoarthritis. Through indirect comparison, it identified those likely to be most effective (diclofenac 150 mg/day) and those that are pretty likely to be useless (paracetamol any dose). The study looked at a large number of good-sized RCTs – all with more than 100 people – and covered a useful range of NSAIDS. The quality of the RCTs was also assessed and was generally not highly biased, although variable. However, the review included many indirect comparisons of the drugs, which is less accurate and reliable...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Older people Source Type: news

Which Drugs Are Best for Osteoarthritis Pain? (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac, etoricoxib, and rofecoxib were associated with the greatest pain reduction for patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis, while acetaminophen was not superior … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 18, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Jury slaps Johnson & Johnson with $500m verdict in Pinnacle hip bellwether
UPDATED March 18, 2016, with additional comment from DePuy, plaintiffs’ and defendant’s attorneys. A Texas federal jury today slapped Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) subsidiary DePuy Orthopaedics with a $500 million judgment in favor of a quintet of plaintiffs who said the metal-on-metal Pinnacle hip implant caused their injuries. After a 2-month trial, jurors found that the Ultamet metal-on-metal version of the Pinnacle hips were defectively designed and that DePuy failed to warn patients about the risks. Jurors awarded about $130 million in total compensatory damages and about $360 millio...
Source: Mass Device - March 17, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Metal-on-Metal Product Liability DePuy Orthopedics Hips Johnson & Johnson Source Type: news

Merck's Payments for Vioxx Rise
Merck agreed to pay more than $830 million to settle a lawsuit filed by shareholders who argued that the company had misled them by downplaying data regarding the former painkiller Vioxx. (Source: WSJ.com: Health)
Source: WSJ.com: Health - January 16, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: PAID Source Type: news

​Merck settles class-action case over Vioxx for $830M
Lawsuit involved shareholders; drugmaker pulled Vioxx from the market years ago over safety concerns (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Merck agrees to pay $830 million to settle Vioxx investor claims
Merck (NYSE: MRK), which operates a facility in north Durham, disclosed Friday it would pay $830 million plus attorneys’ fees to settle investor claims relating to how the company characterized Vioxx. The settlement applies to investors who bought shares between May 21, 1999, and Oct. 29, 2004. Merck had withdrawn Vioxx after studies showed an increased risk of heart attacks, but investors claimed the company did not adequately warn them of the risks associated with the drug. As part of the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 15, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

Merck Resolves Previously Disclosed Securities Class Action Lawsuit Related to Vioxx
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that it has reached an agreement with plaintiffs to resolve In re Merck & Co., Inc. Securities Litigation, a multi-district class action lawsuit pending in New Jersey federal court. The settlement class consists of persons who purchased Merck securities during the period from May 21, 1999, through Oct. Language: English Contact: MerckMedia:Lainie Ke...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - January 15, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK NYSE:MRK Source Type: news

Former Merck rep explains how mandatory vaccination is pushed for Big Pharma profit, not public health
(NaturalNews) For five ruthless years, Merck & Co. knowingly deceived and poisoned 80 million people around the world with their infamous and deadly drug Vioxx. The drug was taken off the market in 2004 after a study revealed that Vioxx doubled the risk of heart attack and stroke... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ex-Merck employee turned anti-vaccine activist now terrorized by Big Pharma Black Ops branch
(NaturalNews) "We may need to seek them out and destroy them where they live," wrote a Merck & Co. employee who was actively plotting to murder or discredit doctors who had voiced concerns regarding the adverse health effects of an anti-inflammatory drug called Vioxx.Launched... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA strengthens warning that NSAIDs increase heart attack and stroke risk
Back in 2005, the FDA warned that taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen and naproxen increased the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Last week it took the unusual step of further strengthening this warning. This was done on the advice of an expert panel that reviewed new information about NSAIDs and their risks. Because NSAIDs are widely used, it’s important to be aware of downsides of taking an NSAID and to take steps to limit the risk. Many people take NSAIDs to relieve mild to moderate pain. These medications may be particularly effective in conditions in which pain results pri...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gregory Curfman, MD Tags: Heart Health heart attack heart disease NSAIDS Stroke Source Type: news

Flashback: Merck created hit list to 'destroy,' 'neutralize' or 'discredit' dissenting doctors
(NaturalNews) Merck made a "hit list" of doctors who criticized Vioxx, according to testimony in a Vioxx class action case in Australia. The list, emailed between Merck employees, contained doctors' names with the labels "neutralise," "neutralised" or "discredit" next to them. (Story... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novartis' Game Changer: When Failure Turns To Success
Here's what two frequent skeptics have to say about the results of Novartis' new heart failure drug that were presented over the weekend. Stephen Nissen, chair of cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic and probably best known for highlighting safety problems with Merck's painkiller Vioxx, calls it "the first new heart failure drug in decades." Sanjay Kaul of Cedars-Sinai Health System, a stickler for procedure and nuance in the design of clinical trials, says that unless there are problems that only the Food and Drug Administration can uncover, it's "a major win." (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 2, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matthew Herper Source Type: news

Boxed Warnings Common Among Newly Approved Drugs (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH The number of boxed warnings and withdrawals of new drugs increased after Vioxx (rofecoxib) was pulled off the market in 2004, according to a … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - August 18, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Vioxx Maker Settles False Advertising Suit
NEW ORLEANS (MedPage Today) -- Almost a decade after the maker of rofecoxib (Vioxx) pulled the once-blockbuster pain killer from the market, the company settled a class action suit charging it with overselling the benefits of the Cox-2 inhibitor. (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - September 13, 2013 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Possible Fix Found For Arthritis Drug Side Effects
The drug rofecoxib (Vioxx), an anti-inflammatory drug used for arthritis, was previously taken off the US market because of serious cardiovascular side effects. However, new research has found that the class of drugs known as COX-2 inhibitors may yet be made safer. COX-2 inhibitors are used to reduce arthritis pain... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Arthritis / Rheumatology Source Type: news

High-dose painkiller heart risk: small but significant
Conclusion This large review adds to, and expands on, the current evidence on the risks of vascular disease and gastrointestinal complications for different NSAIDs. It largely concentrates on trials of high doses of NSAIDs that can only be prescribed by a doctor. It is unclear from this study whether there is any risk from taking lower doses available over the counter. While most experts advise that low-dose NSAIDs, taken occasionally, are safe for most people, an accompanying editorial points out that there are still “large gaps” in evidence on the risks with lower doses of NSAIDs. While the risk to individual...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Heart/lungs Source Type: news

High doses of common painkillers increase heart attack risks
LONDON (Reuters) - Long-term high-dose use of painkillers such as ibuprofen or diclofenac is "equally hazardous" in terms of heart attack risk as use of the drug Vioxx, which was withdrawn due to its potential dangers, researchers said on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Merck to Pay Pennsylvania $8.5 Million in Vioxx Case
From Philadelphia Inquirer (PA) (February 24, 2013) Feb. 24--Merck & Co. Inc., will pay $8.5 million to settle allegations by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that the drugmaker inappropriately marketed its controversial painkiller Vioxx,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 25, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Vioxx and Diclofenac: Why Are Two Heart Risky Pain Drugs Viewed Differently?
More than a decade ago, Merck launched Vioxx (rofecoxib),  one of the first of a new class of pain relievers known as COX-2 inhibitors. These compounds, by virtue of their mode of action, were deemed to be as potent arthritis pain relievers as traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen, but were believed to be safer than NSAIDs since they caused less gastrointestinal distress.  Vioxx was an immediate success with physicians and patients. New prescriptions for Vioxx soared. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 19, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John LaMattina Source Type: news

NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk: An examination of sales and Essential Medicines Lists in low-, middle-, and high-income countries
Source: PLoS Medicine Area: News It is known that certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke and should be avoided in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. A study, published in PLoS medicine, investigated the extent to which evidence on cardiovascular risk with NSAIDs has translated into guidance and sales in 15 countries.   The authors identified that three drugs (rofecoxib, diclofenac, and etoricoxib) ranked consistently highest in terms of cardiovascular risk compared with nonuse and naproxen was associated with a low risk. Diclofenac...
Source: NeLM - Cardiovascular Medicine - February 15, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Diclofenac and CVD risksDiclofenac and CVD risks
Diclofenac, which is listed on the essential-medicine lists of 74 countries, increased the risk of cardiovascular events between 38% and 63% in different studies. The increased risk with diclofenac was similar to the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib, a drug withdrawn from worldwide markets because of cardiovascular toxicity. Heartwire (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - February 13, 2013 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Widely used diclofenac associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events
Diclofenac, which is listed on the essential-medicine lists of 74 countries, increased the risk of cardiovascular events between 38% and 63% in different studies. The increased risk with diclofenac was similar to the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib, a drug withdrawn from worldwide markets because of cardiovascular toxicity. (Source: theHeart.org)
Source: theHeart.org - February 13, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Diclofenac Most Commonly Used NSAID In 15 Countries, Listed On 74 National Drug Lists, Despite Cardiovascular Risks
A study in this week's PLOS Medicine finds that the painkiller diclofenac (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in the same class as aspirin) is the most commonly used NSAID in the 15 countries studied and is included in the essential medicines lists of 74 low-, middle- and high-income countries, despite its known tendency to cause heart attacks and strokes in vulnerable patients. This risk is almost identical to that of Vioxx (rofecoxib), which was withdrawn from worldwide sales in 2004 because of cardiovascular risk... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pain / Anesthetics Source Type: news

Families face battle with GSK over dangerous diabetes drug
Exclusive: Pharmaceutical giant resists claims despite settlement with victims in USThousands of families in the UK could be deprived of compensation for the death or harm of a relative caused by the diabetes drug Avandia, even though the British maker has agreed to pay billions of dollars to settle similar claims in the US.The licence for Avandia was revoked in Europe, in September 2010, because of evidence that it could cause heart failure and heart attacks. The drug can still be prescribed in the US, but not to patients at risk of heart problems.A scientist with the Food and Drug Administration estimated that Avandia co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 29, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: The Guardian United States World news Pharmaceuticals industry Medical research Legal aid Law UK news Diabetes GlaxoSmithKline Business Source Type: news