Ibuprofen linked to increased risk of heart attacks

Conclusion This study is a useful addition to our knowledge about the links between NSAIDs and heart attack risk. The study suggests all commonly-used NSAIDs are linked to a similarly-raised risk of heart attacks, that the risk generally rises with the dose, and that it is highest in the first month of treatment. The researchers did a good job at taking account of potential confounding factors that could have affected the results. Even so, we don't know for sure that the NSAIDs were the direct cause of the problem. For example, if you are prescribed NSAIDs for a painful condition, and have a heart attack two weeks later, it's hard to know whether the cause was the NSAID or the condition itself. They were also not able to take into account some known risk factors for heart attacks such as smoking and body mass index (BMI). The study doesn't tell us about our own individual risk of heart attack, which is important when thinking about how you might be affected by NSAIDs. If your risk of having a heart attack in the next 10 years is high – say 30% – then a 48% increased chance of heart attack takes it up to just under 45%. But if you have a low risk of having a heart attack – say 1% – then a 48% increase only takes the risk up to 1.48%. An increase in risk may be statistically significant, but have little clinical significance. The study findings back up current advice that doctors should consider people's heart attack risk before prescribing cou...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

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RARITAN, NJ, March 28, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson today announced the VOYAGER PAD study met its primary efficacy and principal safety endpoints, demonstrating the XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) vascular dose (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily) was superior to aspirin alone in reducing the risk of major adverse limb and cardiovascular (CV) events by 15 percent in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) after lower-extremity revascularization, with similar rates of TIMI[1] major bleeding. VOYAGER PAD is the only study to show a significant benefit...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
While at work, one my partners showed me this ECG of a 50-something woman with abdominal pain associated with alcohol withdrawal and alcoholic ketoacidosis.  There was no reported chest pain or SOB.What do you think?I said it " looks like takotsubo.  Electrolytes might contribute.  Are they back yet? (they were not).  I do not think this is a coronary event. "He asked why.I responded: " bizarre T-waves, with T-wave inversion and extremely long QT.  The computer measures the QT at 506 ms, but it really is more like 560-580 ms, with a QTc of 600-620 ms.  This is not at all typical...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
RARITAN, N.J., March 20, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson announced today that it will unveil late-breaking data from its leading cardiovascular and metabolism portfolio during the virtual American College of Cardiology’s 69th Annual Scientific Session together with the World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC) on March 28-30, 2020. Notably, four late-breaking abstracts for XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) will be presented, including data from the Phase 3 VOYAGER PAD study in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) after lower-extremity revascularization.Click to ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
When most people think about E coli, the first thing that comes to mind likely is eating tainted food or as a result of improper handwashing. What came as a surprise to me was that it can also show up as a UTI (Urinary Tract Infection) caused by kidney stones that back up in the urethra, which prohibits the flow of urine. It is more than an academic exercise that had me researching this all too common condition in men and women. As I am writing, I am less than 24 hours post-surgery to remove these pesky critters that have been backing up the works since 2014. It was my fourth go around that culminated in a cystoscopy,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health-related Personal caregiving Source Type: blogs
If you have a CT heart scan score (also called coronary calcium score), what effect do statin cholesterol drugs have on stopping or slowing the increase in score? (Increasing scores pose increasing risk for heart attack and other cardiac events.) NONE. If you do nothing at all, the score increases by 25% per year, on average. If you take a statin drug, aspirin, and follow a low-fat diet, what my colleagues call “optimal medical therapy,” the score increases . . . 25% per year—no difference. Yet this is the “solution” that conventional doctors push on their patients, a “treatment” t...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open cholesterol coronary calcium ct scan do statin drugs reduce heart scan scores reduce coronary calcium reverse coronary calcium reverse heart disease undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
A middle-aged man complained of 15 minutes of classic angina that resolved upon arrival to the ED.Here is his initial ECG:What do you think?There is sinus rhythm with RBBB and possible LPFB (see Dr. Grauer's detail below).  There is ST elevation in II, III, and aVF, and reciprocal ST depression in aVL.  And there are Q-waves in both inferior and lateral leads.  So this is indeed diagnostic of myocardial infarction.Should we activate the cath lab?No! Not immediately, at least, because this is NOT diagnostic of ACUTE (occlusion) myocardial infarction (Acute OMI).  We need to do some more investigatio...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
This study may be the first to provide details regarding the relationship between cell phone use and head and neck injuries. However, it had some significant limitations. Keep in mind that the study focused on head and neck injuries. People with multiple injuries or more serious injuries (such as a heart attack or an ankle fracture) might not have been included in the count. Individuals who sought care at their doctor’s office or urgent care centers would also be excluded from this study. In addition, information about the circumstances of an injury can be incomplete. Embarrassment or concerns about legal liability m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: More than two-thirds of patients with ACS reported at least 1 prodromal symptom, with some significant sex differences. Most patients do not attribute their symptoms to an impending ACS event. PMID: 31977563 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: J Cardiovasc Nurs Source Type: research
 Trauma eventually comes for all of us.  It isn’t just stereotypical things like war or assault that are traumatic, there is also the everyday realities of things like illness or job loss. As painful as it is, trauma can be an invitation to a process of growth and change. Join us as today’s guest, Dr. James Gordon, explains some of the techniques of trauma healing, including some surprising ones, like laughter and spending time with animals. Dr. Gordon also shares with us how he personally handles his own trauma and the programs most often used by the Center for Mind-Body Medicine. SUBSCRIBE &REVIE...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs
BOSTON (CBS) — Would you know if you were having a heart attack? According to a new study reported in JAMA Network Open, there’s a good chance you might not. Researchers in Texas looked at a national survey of more than 25,000 American adults and found that nearly half didn’t recognize some heart attack symptoms, and nearly 6% were not familiar with any. Most people knew chest pain or pressure and shortness of breath were symptoms, but fewer were aware that lightheadedness, arm, jaw, neck or back pain might also be signs. Additionally, almost 5% chose something other than calling 9-1-1 if they thought the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Attack Source Type: news
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