Comparing the Health Effects of Ambient Particulate Matter Estimated Using Ground-Based versus Remote Sensing Exposure Estimates

Conclusions: We found significant associations between PM2.5 and mortality in every model; however, relative risks estimated from exposure models using ground-based information were generally larger than those estimated with RS alone. This EHP Advance Publication article has been peer-reviewed, revised, and accepted for publication. EHP Advance Publication articles are completely citable using the DOI number assigned to the article. This document will be replaced with the copyedited and formatted version as soon as it is available. Through the DOI number used in the citation, you will be able to access this document at each stage of the publication process. Citation: Jerrett M, Turner MC, Beckerman BS, Pope CA III, van Donkelaar A, Martin RV, Serre M, Crouse D, Gapstur SM, Krewski D, Diver WR, Coogan PF, Thurston GD, Burnett RT. Comparing the Health Effects of Ambient Particulate Matter Estimated Using Ground-Based versus Remote Sensing Exposure Estimates. Environ Health Perspect; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP575 Received: 3 August 2015 Revised: 30 June 2016 Accepted: 18 August 2016 Published: 9 September 2016 Note to readers with disabilities: EHP strives to ensure that all journal content is accessible to all readers. However, some figures and Supplemental Material published in EHP articles may not conform to 508 standards due to the complexity of the information being presented. If you need assistance accessing journal content, ple...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

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Are healthy habits worth cultivating? A recent study suggests healthy habits may help people tack on years of life and sidestep serious illnesses, such as diabetes and cancer. After all, if you’re going to gain an extra decade of life on this earth, you want to enjoy it! What did this research focus on? Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at data from more than 73,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) who were followed for 34 years, and more than 38,000 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) who were followed for 28 years. In a previous s...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Healthcare providers now have information to advise clients with health conditions on the effectiveness of Tai Chi for overall health promotion.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONTai Chi is a form of safe, enjoyable, light-to-moderate aerobic physical activity for adults that is inexpensive to implement in diverse community settings.Adults with health conditions require physical activity for prevention of secondary impairments and over-all health promotion.This scoping review of meta-analyses elucidates "high" and "moderate" quality evidence of the effectiveness of Tai Chi in improving importan...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
(CNN) — Science shows moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise is good for us — it improves sleep; lowers blood pressure; protects against heart disease, diabetes and cancer; reduces stress; boosts mood; and fights anxiety and depression. It’s especially important in adolescence, where the first signs of depression often begin, studies show. But unless your child is an athlete, it can be tough to wean them away from social media and the ever-present screen to swim laps or go for a blood-pumping jog. A new study has some good news: even light exercise may help protect children against developing depression. T...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Depression Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Jeremy Chataway, Floriana De Angelis, Peter Connick, Richard A Parker, Domenico Plantone, Anisha Doshi, Nevin John, Jonathan Stutters, David MacManus, Ferran Prados Carrasco, Frederik Barkhof, Sebastien Ourselin, Marie Braisher, Moira Ross, Gina Cranswick, Sue H Pavitt, Gavin Giovannoni, Claudia Angela Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Clive Hawkins, Basil SharrackSummaryBackgroundNeurodegeneration is the pathological substrate that causes major disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. A synthesis of preclinical and clinical re...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Study after study reminds us that as challenging as it can be, sticking with healthy habits—eating right, exercising regularly, not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and controlling how much alcohol you drink—can help us to live longer. But tacking on extra years isn’t so appealing if some or most of them are riddled with heart disease, diabetes or cancer. In a 2018 study, an international group of researchers led by scientists at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that adopting five healthy habits could extend life expectancy by 14 years for women and by 12 years for men: eating a die...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer diet Exercise Heart Disease Source Type: news
ConclusionsIn all cases men exhibited an earlier age of death than women. While in all other investigated diseases the age of death increased, it dropped for COPD. COPD seems to have become a more frequent cause of death in recent years.
Source: Journal of Public Health - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study aimed to estimate the health and economic co-benefits for the adult population of modal shift from driving to active travel in urban environments. Three scenarios were modelled for the case study, the city of Porto, Portugal, by comparing travel patterns of 2013 to hypothetical scenarios of modal shifts from driving to active transport, namely: i) SC1 - conservative scenario, with a change of 5% from driving to cycling and 10% from driving to walking; ii) SC2 - moderate scenario, with a shift of 10% and 15%, respectively; and iii) SC3 - optimistic scenario, with a shift of 15% and 20%, respectively. The mortalit...
Source: Environmental Pollution - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Pollut Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2019Source: The Lancet Global Health, Volume 7, Issue 12Author(s): Geetha R Menon, Lucky Singh, Palak Sharma, Priyanka Yadav, Shweta Sharma, Shrikant Kalaskar, Harpreet Singh, Srividya Adinarayanan, Vasna Joshua, Vaitheeswaran Kulothungan, Jeetendra Yadav, Leah K Watson, Shaza A Fadel, Wilson Suraweera, M Vishnu Vardhana Rao, R S Dhaliwal, Rehana Begum, Prabha Sati, Dean T Jamison, Prabhat JhaSummaryBackgroundMany countries, including India, seek locally constructed disease burden estimates comprising mortality and loss of health to aid priority setting for the prevention and treatment of disease...
Source: The Lancet Global Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
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