Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
(University of Ottawa) In two recent journal articles, Dr. Marc Ruel explores how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

uOttawa researchers discover new sex hormone
(University of Ottawa) When University of Ottawa biologists Kim Mitchell and Vance Trudeau began studying the effects of gene mutations in zebrafish, they uncovered new functions that regulate how males and females interact while mating. They changed the secretogranin-2 genes through specific mutation and found that it affected the ability of females and males to breed. It severely reduced their sexual behaviour. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Substituting the next-best protein
(University of Ottawa) Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles. The loss of this protein causes severe symptoms, including deteriorating muscle strength beginning around the age of four. While there is no cure, a promising area of research has developed around the protein utrophin, which is ~ 80% identical to dystrophin and even takes its place early during muscle development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study points to evidence of stray dogs as possible origin of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) University of Ottawa biology professor Xuhua Xia, tracing coronavirus signatures across different species, has proposed that stray dogs -- specifically dog intestines -- may have been the origin of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mitigating the epidemic: UOttawa at the heart of Canada's response to COVID-19
(University of Ottawa) As the number of reported cases and countries affected by the coronavirus keep increasing, the entire research community is engaged in a race against the clock to develop an effective vaccine. Today, the Government of Canada announced it will invest close to $27M in medical, social and policy countermeasures research so that leading experts across the country work to find tangible solutions to mitigate this health crisis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 6, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bilingual mash ups: Counterintuitive findings from sociolinguistics
(Linguistic Society of America) A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency. The study, 'Revisiting phonetic integration in bilingual borrowing', by Shana Poplack, Suzanne Robillard, Nathalie Dion (all from the University of Ottawa), and John. C. Paolillo (University of Indiana Bloomington) will be published in March 2020 issue of the scholarly journal Language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of O students demand better mental health services amid deaths
There are growing calls from University of Ottawa students to increase mental health resources on campus in the wake of recent student deaths, including one over the weekend. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Ottawa Source Type: news

U of O students denounce anti-psychiatry exhibit
Some students at the University of Ottawa are denouncing an on-campus display that calls psychiatry an "industry of death," saying it further stigmatizes people who need medication to treat mental health conditions. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Ottawa Source Type: news

University of Ottawa tool to democratize nanopore research
(University of Ottawa) A team of researchers at the University of Ottawa is democratizing entry into the field of nanopore research by offering up a unique tool to accelerate the development of new applications and discoveries. The innovative T.-Cossa Lab came up with the idea to provide the research community with the protocols, hardware designs, and software required to fabricate solid-state nanopores in a fast, low cost, and completely automated fashion. This method is available in Nature Protocols. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Bullying May Shape Adolescent Brains
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - September 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rod McCullom / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news

How Bullying May Shape Adolescent Brains
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rod McCullom / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news

Cochrane expresses thanks to Professor Philippe Ravaud for leadership of Cochrane France
After leading  Cochrane France  for nine years, Professor Philippe Ravaud is stepping down as Director.   Philippe has led Cochrane France since 2010. His team and Epidemiology unit, basedat Paris Descartes University, is an extremely productive and innovative group that has been at the forefront in developing innovative approaches for disseminating Cochrane evidence in France particularly through language translation and training.Philippe ’s primary research focus is methodological research to assess treatments in chronic diseases. His research activities are structured around non-pharmacological...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 18, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments
A 3D hydrogel created by researchers in U of T Engineering Professor Molly Shoichet's lab is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers. Cell invasion is a critical hallmark of metastatic cancers, such as certain types of lung and brain cancer. Fighting these cancers requires therapies that can both kill cancer cells as well as prevent cell invasion of healthy tissue. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 25, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science& Engineering) A 3D hydrogel created by researchers at U of T Engineering is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Shalini Suresh
Cochrane is made up of  13,000 members and over 50,000 supporters come from more than 130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.  Many  of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Discovery points to innovative new way to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy
(The Ottawa Hospital) Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered a new way to treat the loss of muscle function caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy in animal models of the disease. As reported in Cell Stem Cell, the team restored muscle stem cell function that is impaired in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, resulting in efficient regeneration of the muscle and preventing the progressive loss of muscle strength characteristic of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Persistent postconcussive symptoms in children and adolescents - Arefeen Z, Kazmi SM, Shareef S.
Investigators from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Boston Children's Hospital, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Montreal, McGill University Health Center, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Calgary, and the University of Ottawa... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

New drug combination destroys chemo-resistant blood cancer
(The Ottawa Hospital) Researchers from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have developed a promising targeted strategy to treat chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and a diagnostic test to determine which AML patients would most likely benefit from this treatment. In a mouse model, the experimental treatment eliminated all signs of disease (complete remission) in 100 percent of animals, while those that received the standard treatment all died. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose podcast: long-time Cochrane luminary Jeremy Grimshaw
President, Campbell Collaboration& long-time Cochrane luminaryNamed by Reuters as one of the most influential scientific minds of our time, this week ’s guest wears many hats and pursues all kinds of surprising interests. Jeremy Grimshaw has earned a global reputation for translating evidence into genuine changes that improve human health. He’s a Professor of Medicine at the University of Ottawa, President of the global Campbell Collaboration and a long-time Cochrane luminary. And as Ray discovers, he can make complex behavioural science, obscure music festivals and Formula 1 racing the most comfortable of ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Medical students schooled in Indigenous issues
Students entering the University of Ottawa's faculty of medicine were welcomed Wednesday with a special ceremony on Victoria Island, a traditional meeting place of the Algonquin people. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Ottawa Source Type: news

Frailty may be more deadly in younger heart patients, study finds
(University of Ottawa Heart Institute) A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and published in the Journal of the American Heart Association examines the prevalence of frailty and its association with long-term mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Women At Higher Risk of Dying From Heart Failure Than Men
BOSTON (CBS) – While most people still associate heart disease with men, it is still the number one killer of American women, as well as men. Now a new study out of the University of Ottawa finds women are at greater risk of dying from heart failure than men. In people with heart failure, the heart does not pump blood as effectively as it should which can lead to shortness of breath and fatigue. It can be deadly. In fact, researchers looked at 90,000 heart patients over five years and found that women are dying from heart failure at higher rates than men. They also found that while hospitalizations for heart failure ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Failure Local TV university of ottawa Source Type: news

Death rates from heart failure higher for women than men
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Death rates from heart failure are higher for women than men, and hospitalization rates have increased in women while declining in men, found a study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sepsis-3 criteria 'preferable' in prognostication of critically ill patients
(American College of Chest Physicians) Researchers from the University of Ottawa sought to compare the prognostic accuracy of the Sepsis-3 septic shock criteria with the SIRS-based septic shock criteria for prediction of in-hospital mortality among patients hospitalized with suspected infection, receiving a RRT assessment for acute deterioration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tanzania:Research Sets Out Key Obstacles to Maternal Health in Rural Tanzania
[The Conversation Africa] University of Ottawa -In Tanzania's rural Rorya region, approximately 40% of women aren't in the care of medical staff at hospitals or clinics when they deliver their babies. Instead they give birth at home, sometimes with a traditional birth attendant. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - June 13, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

A mix of Viagra and the flu vaccine could treat cancer
The team at the University of Ottawa found that erectile dysfunction drugs block suppressor cells, allowing natural killer cells to do their cancer-fighting job. The flu vaccine further invigorates the killer cells. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using viruses to fight viruses: New approach eliminates 'dormant' HIV-infected cells
(The Ottawa Hospital) Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered that the Maraba virus, or MG1, can target and destroy the kind of HIV-infected cells that standard antiretroviral therapies can't reach. This laboratory discovery was published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. If this technique works in humans, it might possibly contribute to a cure for HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Firefighters cut cancer risk by showering after a blaze
Researchers at the University of Ottawa found five times the amount of cancer-causing chemicals on the skin of firefighters - a higher figure than previously thought - but a shower cut their risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Guttmacher Institute Honors Angel Foster with the 2017 Darroch Award
The Guttmacher Institute is pleased to announce that Angel M. Foster, associate professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa, is the 2017 recipient of the Darroch Award for Excellence in Sexual and Reproductive Health Research. (Source: The Guttmacher Institute)
Source: The Guttmacher Institute - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Guttmacher Source Type: news

Now and Zen: Lower prenatal stress reduces risk of behavioral issues in kids
(University of Ottawa) Expectant mothers may want to consider adopting today's trend towards stress management, in light of new research pointing to its ability to lower the risk of problematic behaviour in their offspring. A team led by Dr. Ian Colman at the University of Ottawa found that mothers who are exposed to high levels of stress during pregnancy have kids who are more than twice as likely to have chronic symptoms of hyperactivity and conduct disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Exercise pill' could potentially help people with heart failure
Conclusion The protein hCT1 caused heart muscles to grow in a more healthy way in rodents with heart failure. When treatment stopped, the heart went back to its original condition – something that does not happen when the heart grows in a dysfunctional way. There is currently no cure for heart failure and treatment is only available for keeping symptoms under control. Therefore, this very promising early-stage research with potential for developing a drug for people with heart failure, has huge implications. However, it is important to remember that as this is experimental laboratory research, there are man...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Delays in emergency surgery linked to higher risk of death
A recent study by University of Ottawa found delays in emergency surgery were linked to a higher risk of death for patients in the hospital. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Ottawa hospital emergency surgery study
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have conducted a rigorous study of the health and economic impacts of delays in emergency surgery. Their results suggests that keeping some operating rooms free for emergency surgery can save both money and lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A double Cochrane celebration in Croatia
A double celebration of Cochrane was organized this year in Croatia where, apart from the annualCroatian Cochrane Symposium, held at the University of Split School of Medicine (UoSSoM) from 9th -10th June,a celebration of Cochrane Croatia ’s independent Centre status was held on 8th June to a large crowd of Cochrane supporters, including government officials, health professionals, and students.On behalf of Cochrane Croatia ’s host institution, Prof. Zoran Đogaš, the Dean of the University of Split School of Medicine, gave the opening address at the Centre celebration, expressing his support of Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nowens at cochrane.org Source Type: news

A peer-based approach to reducing stigma and improving mental health support for medical students - Farber SB, Parlow SDG, Timmerman NP.
Medical students experience a tremendous amount of stress during their training, which can have a profound effect on mental wellness. Several medical students at the University of Ottawa have created a peer-based program called Mind the Gap (MtG), which ai... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

New research shows promise in disabling cancer's defences
(University of Ottawa) Part of what makes cancer cells so devastating is their ability to fight back against treatments -- sometimes they work, sometimes they don't. But what if we could take away cancer cells' defences altogether? Researchers from the University of Ottawa have taken an important step forward to doing just that. Dr. Kristin Baetz says the results of a three-way research collaboration could open doors to new therapeutics to treat a variety of diseases, including cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Listen up
Scientists at the University of Ottawa have developed a way of growing human cells and tissue on apples. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No signs of asthma found in third of adults diagnosed with it
For those diagnosed with asthma within the past five years, a JAMA study has found a current diagnosis could not be established in about one third of supposed asthma sufferers. We talked to the study's lead author, Shawn Aaron from the University of Ottawa, to find out what doctors and patients should do to ensure they're not getting misdiagnosed. ResearchGate: Could you briefly introduce your study and findings? Shawn Aaron: Our study set out to determine how often we could confirm or alternatively rule out active asthma in adults who had recently been diagnosed by physicians. We recruited 701 adults who had been diagno...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A third of adults treated for asthma 'may not have the disease'
Conclusion The study results show being diagnosed with asthma at one point in your life doesn't necessarily mean you need to take asthma medication forever. This study has some limitations. It was carried out in Canada, where the health service is different and doctors may use different practices to diagnose asthma. That means we don't know if the results are applicable to the UK. Also, many people invited to take part did not do so, which means the participants may not be representative of the general population of people with asthma. Not all doctors provided records of diagnosis, so we don't know how many people actua...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

This Lung Disorder Tends To Be Misdiagnosed In Many Adults
(Reuters Health) ― As many as one in three adults diagnosed with asthma may not actually have the chronic lung disorder, a Canadian study suggests. Researchers did lung function tests on 613 adults who had been diagnosed with asthma within the past five years. If participants took asthma medicines, researchers gradually weaned them off the drugs over four clinic visits to see how well their lungs worked without treatment. The evaluations ruled out asthma in 203 of the participants, or 33 percent. After one year of follow-up, 181 of these people still did too well on lung tests to be diagnosed with asthma, researchers rep...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Lung Disorder Tends To Be Misdiagnosed In Many Adults
(Reuters Health) ― As many as one in three adults diagnosed with asthma may not actually have the chronic lung disorder, a Canadian study suggests. Researchers did lung function tests on 613 adults who had been diagnosed with asthma within the past five years. If participants took asthma medicines, researchers gradually weaned them off the drugs over four clinic visits to see how well their lungs worked without treatment. The evaluations ruled out asthma in 203 of the participants, or 33 percent. After one year of follow-up, 181 of these people still did too well on lung tests to be diagnosed with asthma, researchers rep...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A third of those diagnosed with asthma DON'T have it
More than 90 per cent of those diagnosed with asthma were able to stop their medications and remained safely without drugs for a year, researchers from the University of Ottawa found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Your Workout Not Working? Maybe You ’ re a Non-Responder
People who don ’ t benefit from endurance workouts may get results from interval training, and vice versa, a new study suggests. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Tags: Exercise Research PLoS One (Journal) Queen's University University of Ottawa Source Type: news

Ontario start-up company secures US $41.4 million to advance cancer immunotherapy
(Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute) The Ottawa Hospital, the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, the University of Ottawa and McMaster University congratulate Turnstone Biologics Inc. on securing US$ 41.4 million in new private investments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Tanzanian Children Are The World’s Fittest While American Kids Are Among The Least
This article originally appeared on Quartz Africa. Sign up for the Quartz Africa Weekly Brief — the most important and interesting news from across the continent, in your inbox.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Coca-Cola Ties Seen Inside U.S. Centers For Disease Control
In June, Dr. Barbara Bowman, a high-ranking official within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unexpectedly departed the agency, two days after information came to light indicating that she had been communicating regularly with - and offering guidance to - a leading Coca-Cola advocate seeking to influence world health authorities on sugar and beverage policy matters. Now, more emails suggest that another veteran CDC official has similarly close ties to the global soft drink giant. Michael Pratt, Senior Advisor for Global Health in the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Should You Go To The Doctor After Fainting? Here's How To Tell.
Summer’s in full swing, and the hot, sweltering days might make some people more prone to fainting. Fainting, also known by the medical term syncope, is a momentary loss of consciousness caused by lack of blood flow to the brain. It can strike anyone, and it’s fairly common. Researchers estimate that anywhere between 15 and 39 percent of people will experience fainting at least once in their life, but people who take certain medications may be more prone to feeling dizzy, weak and eventually passing out. Still others may be more prone to fainting for genetic reasons.  Syncope can be caused by a wide variet...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Should You Go To The Doctor After Fainting? Here's How To Tell.
Summer’s in full swing, and the hot, sweltering days might make some people more prone to fainting. Fainting, also known by the medical term syncope, is a momentary loss of consciousness caused by lack of blood flow to the brain. It can strike anyone, and it’s fairly common. Researchers estimate that anywhere between 15 and 39 percent of people will experience fainting at least once in their life, but people who take certain medications may be more prone to feeling dizzy, weak and eventually passing out. Still others may be more prone to fainting for genetic reasons.  Syncope can be caused by a wide variet...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'No public health justification' for cancelling Rio Olympics over Zika virus, WHO argues
A University of Ottawa professor says the WHO's position to not postpone or move the Games despite a letter from more than 100 scientists raising concerns about spreading the Zika virus is "absolutely fanciful." (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/World Source Type: news