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Firefighters cut cancer risk by showering after a blaze
Researchers at the University of Ottawa found five times the amount of cancer-causing chemicals on the skin of firefighters - a higher figure than previously thought - but a shower cut their risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Guttmacher Institute Honors Angel Foster with the 2017 Darroch Award
The Guttmacher Institute is pleased to announce that Angel M. Foster, associate professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa, is the 2017 recipient of the Darroch Award for Excellence in Sexual and Reproductive Health Research. (Source: The Guttmacher Institute)
Source: The Guttmacher Institute - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Guttmacher Source Type: news

Now and Zen: Lower prenatal stress reduces risk of behavioral issues in kids
(University of Ottawa) Expectant mothers may want to consider adopting today's trend towards stress management, in light of new research pointing to its ability to lower the risk of problematic behaviour in their offspring. A team led by Dr. Ian Colman at the University of Ottawa found that mothers who are exposed to high levels of stress during pregnancy have kids who are more than twice as likely to have chronic symptoms of hyperactivity and conduct disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Exercise pill' could potentially help people with heart failure
Conclusion The protein hCT1 caused heart muscles to grow in a more healthy way in rodents with heart failure. When treatment stopped, the heart went back to its original condition – something that does not happen when the heart grows in a dysfunctional way. There is currently no cure for heart failure and treatment is only available for keeping symptoms under control. Therefore, this very promising early-stage research with potential for developing a drug for people with heart failure, has huge implications. However, it is important to remember that as this is experimental laboratory research, there are man...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Delays in emergency surgery linked to higher risk of death
A recent study by University of Ottawa found delays in emergency surgery were linked to a higher risk of death for patients in the hospital. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Ottawa hospital emergency surgery study
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have conducted a rigorous study of the health and economic impacts of delays in emergency surgery. Their results suggests that keeping some operating rooms free for emergency surgery can save both money and lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A double Cochrane celebration in Croatia
A double celebration of Cochrane was organized this year in Croatia where, apart from the annualCroatian Cochrane Symposium, held at the University of Split School of Medicine (UoSSoM) from 9th -10th June,a celebration of Cochrane Croatia ’s independent Centre status was held on 8th June to a large crowd of Cochrane supporters, including government officials, health professionals, and students.On behalf of Cochrane Croatia ’s host institution, Prof. Zoran Đogaš, the Dean of the University of Split School of Medicine, gave the opening address at the Centre celebration, expressing his support of Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nowens at cochrane.org Source Type: news

A peer-based approach to reducing stigma and improving mental health support for medical students - Farber SB, Parlow SDG, Timmerman NP.
Medical students experience a tremendous amount of stress during their training, which can have a profound effect on mental wellness. Several medical students at the University of Ottawa have created a peer-based program called Mind the Gap (MtG), which ai... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

New research shows promise in disabling cancer's defences
(University of Ottawa) Part of what makes cancer cells so devastating is their ability to fight back against treatments -- sometimes they work, sometimes they don't. But what if we could take away cancer cells' defences altogether? Researchers from the University of Ottawa have taken an important step forward to doing just that. Dr. Kristin Baetz says the results of a three-way research collaboration could open doors to new therapeutics to treat a variety of diseases, including cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Listen up
Scientists at the University of Ottawa have developed a way of growing human cells and tissue on apples. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No signs of asthma found in third of adults diagnosed with it
For those diagnosed with asthma within the past five years, a JAMA study has found a current diagnosis could not be established in about one third of supposed asthma sufferers. We talked to the study's lead author, Shawn Aaron from the University of Ottawa, to find out what doctors and patients should do to ensure they're not getting misdiagnosed. ResearchGate: Could you briefly introduce your study and findings? Shawn Aaron: Our study set out to determine how often we could confirm or alternatively rule out active asthma in adults who had recently been diagnosed by physicians. We recruited 701 adults who had been diagno...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A third of adults treated for asthma 'may not have the disease'
Conclusion The study results show being diagnosed with asthma at one point in your life doesn't necessarily mean you need to take asthma medication forever. This study has some limitations. It was carried out in Canada, where the health service is different and doctors may use different practices to diagnose asthma. That means we don't know if the results are applicable to the UK. Also, many people invited to take part did not do so, which means the participants may not be representative of the general population of people with asthma. Not all doctors provided records of diagnosis, so we don't know how many people actua...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

This Lung Disorder Tends To Be Misdiagnosed In Many Adults
(Reuters Health) ― As many as one in three adults diagnosed with asthma may not actually have the chronic lung disorder, a Canadian study suggests. Researchers did lung function tests on 613 adults who had been diagnosed with asthma within the past five years. If participants took asthma medicines, researchers gradually weaned them off the drugs over four clinic visits to see how well their lungs worked without treatment. The evaluations ruled out asthma in 203 of the participants, or 33 percent. After one year of follow-up, 181 of these people still did too well on lung tests to be diagnosed with asthma, researchers rep...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Lung Disorder Tends To Be Misdiagnosed In Many Adults
(Reuters Health) ― As many as one in three adults diagnosed with asthma may not actually have the chronic lung disorder, a Canadian study suggests. Researchers did lung function tests on 613 adults who had been diagnosed with asthma within the past five years. If participants took asthma medicines, researchers gradually weaned them off the drugs over four clinic visits to see how well their lungs worked without treatment. The evaluations ruled out asthma in 203 of the participants, or 33 percent. After one year of follow-up, 181 of these people still did too well on lung tests to be diagnosed with asthma, researchers rep...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A third of those diagnosed with asthma DON'T have it
More than 90 per cent of those diagnosed with asthma were able to stop their medications and remained safely without drugs for a year, researchers from the University of Ottawa found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Your Workout Not Working? Maybe You ’ re a Non-Responder
People who don ’ t benefit from endurance workouts may get results from interval training, and vice versa, a new study suggests. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Tags: Exercise Research PLoS One (Journal) Queen's University University of Ottawa Source Type: news

Ontario start-up company secures US $41.4 million to advance cancer immunotherapy
(Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute) The Ottawa Hospital, the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, the University of Ottawa and McMaster University congratulate Turnstone Biologics Inc. on securing US$ 41.4 million in new private investments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Tanzanian Children Are The World’s Fittest While American Kids Are Among The Least
This article originally appeared on Quartz Africa. Sign up for the Quartz Africa Weekly Brief — the most important and interesting news from across the continent, in your inbox.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Coca-Cola Ties Seen Inside U.S. Centers For Disease Control
In June, Dr. Barbara Bowman, a high-ranking official within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unexpectedly departed the agency, two days after information came to light indicating that she had been communicating regularly with - and offering guidance to - a leading Coca-Cola advocate seeking to influence world health authorities on sugar and beverage policy matters. Now, more emails suggest that another veteran CDC official has similarly close ties to the global soft drink giant. Michael Pratt, Senior Advisor for Global Health in the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Should You Go To The Doctor After Fainting? Here's How To Tell.
Summer’s in full swing, and the hot, sweltering days might make some people more prone to fainting. Fainting, also known by the medical term syncope, is a momentary loss of consciousness caused by lack of blood flow to the brain. It can strike anyone, and it’s fairly common. Researchers estimate that anywhere between 15 and 39 percent of people will experience fainting at least once in their life, but people who take certain medications may be more prone to feeling dizzy, weak and eventually passing out. Still others may be more prone to fainting for genetic reasons.  Syncope can be caused by a wide variet...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Should You Go To The Doctor After Fainting? Here's How To Tell.
Summer’s in full swing, and the hot, sweltering days might make some people more prone to fainting. Fainting, also known by the medical term syncope, is a momentary loss of consciousness caused by lack of blood flow to the brain. It can strike anyone, and it’s fairly common. Researchers estimate that anywhere between 15 and 39 percent of people will experience fainting at least once in their life, but people who take certain medications may be more prone to feeling dizzy, weak and eventually passing out. Still others may be more prone to fainting for genetic reasons.  Syncope can be caused by a wide variet...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'No public health justification' for cancelling Rio Olympics over Zika virus, WHO argues
A University of Ottawa professor says the WHO's position to not postpone or move the Games despite a letter from more than 100 scientists raising concerns about spreading the Zika virus is "absolutely fanciful." (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/World Source Type: news

Canadian study shows effectiveness of hospital-initiated smoking cessation programs
(University of Ottawa Heart Institute) A new study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, in collaboration with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, has established that greater adoption of hospital-initiated tobacco cessation interventions improve patient outcomes and decrease further healthcare utilization. The study is published today in the British Medical Journal's Tobacco Control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Does this Ankle Need an X-ray? There's an App for That
The Ottawa Rules, a set of rules used around the world to help health professionals decide when to order x-rays and CT scans, are now available as a free mobile health app. Developed by emergency department physicians at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa, the Ottawa Rules are evidence-based decision trees that help physicians determine whether a scan is needed for injured bones, cutting down on unnecessary radiation and wait times. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 23, 2016 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Development Research and Development Source Type: news

Brazil Should Not Host The Olympic Games, Public Health Expert Warns
Because Brazil is at the heart of the current Zika virus epidemic, the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janiero should be postponed or moved to a new location, a leading expert in population health and global development argues in the Harvard Public Health Review. The Olympics draws hundreds of thousands of spectators from all over the world, writes Amir Attaran, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa, adding that this will only serve to create new routes for the disease to migrate to other countries. Attaran's call to action is all the more urgent considering the fact that scientists believe the Zi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brazil Should Not Host The Olympic Games, Public Health Expert Warns
Because Brazil is at the heart of the current Zika virus epidemic, the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janiero should be postponed or moved to a new location, a leading expert in population health and global development argues in the Harvard Public Health Review. The Olympics draws hundreds of thousands of spectators from all over the world, writes Amir Attaran, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa, adding that this will only serve to create new routes for the disease to migrate to other countries. Attaran's call to action is all the more urgent considering the fact that scientists believe the Zi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rio Olympics ‘Must Not Proceed’ Due To Zika Virus, Professor Argues
CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro should be postponed or moved as Brazil deals with the threat of the Zika virus, an article in the latest edition of the Harvard Public Health Review argues. The special commentary by Amir Attaran, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa, says the games “must not proceed” because the mosquito-borne virus is flourishing in Rio. A municipal agent sprays anti Zika mosquitos chimical product at the sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro. (Photo by Cristophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images) “Simply put, Zika infection is more dangerous, and Bra...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: nealjriley Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Olympics zika Zika Virus Source Type: news

Special Collection: the health of refugees and asylum seekers in Europe
Guest post by Kevin Pottie, Associate Professor in Family Medicine and Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, CanadaA new Cochrane Library Special Collection, developed in conjunction with Evidence Aid, brings together Cochrane Reviews addressing health conditions relevant to refugees and asylum seekers.Migrant health crises require a range of planned and coordinated interventions, and, as this collection highlights, a foundation of relevant evidence. Systematic reviews are needed to inform the development of community programs, clinical and public health guidelines, and national and international polic...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 15, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Ottawa researchers find Achilles' heel of a severe form of childhood leukemia
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have found the Achilles' heel of one of the most aggressive forms of leukemia that affects both children and adults. They have also identified a possible new treatment that exploits this fatal weakness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Many prostate cancer patients saved from unnecessary treatments and side effects
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) A new study from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa shows that men with slow-growing prostate cancer are increasingly avoiding unnecessary and potentially harmful treatment in favor of an approach called active surveillance -- monitoring the cancer with regular tests and treating it only if it changes to a higher risk form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Neuro-Philosophy & the Healthy Mind: Learning from the Unwell Brain
In applying philosophical questions to neuroscience and the study of how we think and feel, Georg Northoff’s new book is a game changer. Neuro-Philosophy and the Healthy Mind: Learning from the Unwell Brain applies philosophical questions to subjects such a consciousness, the self, the understanding of time, identity, the brain, and the mind. In it, Northoff, himself a neuroscientist, philosopher, and psychiatrist at the University of Ottawa, seeks to answer philosophical questions such as Where do thoughts begin? Does consciousness exist in the mind or the brain? How is the self defined and ...
Source: Psych Central - January 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Psychiatry Psychology biological basis of the mind books on neurophilosophy emotions and the brain Georg Northoff how to define the self learning from the unwell brain neurophilosophy and the healthy mi Source Type: news

Societies Release Recommendations for Diagnosing Chest Pain in the Emergency Department
Washington, DC — New recommendations from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) have established appropriate use of diagnostic imaging for patients with chest pain, one of the most common reasons for emergency department visits. The document addresses 20 fundamental clinical scenarios for emergency imaging for chest pain and assesses when imaging is useful in each case, and if so, what information is provided by the specified imaging procedure. The clinical scenarios are broken down into leading critical diagnoses: acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism and acute a...
Source: American College of Radiology - January 26, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Controversial prostate cancer screening can be improved by repeating abnormal tests
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) For more than 20 years, the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test has been used to help screen for prostate cancer, but in recent years, some task forces have called for this blood test to be abandoned because it leads to many unnecessary biopsies. Now, a new study from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa shows that simply repeating abnormal PSA tests dramatically reduces unnecessary biopsies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Heart disease patients who sit a lot have worse health even if they exercise
(University of Ottawa Heart Institute) Patients with heart disease who sit a lot have worse health even if they exercise, reveals research from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why Would I Be Low in Vitamin D?
My doctors and I test blood levels of vitamin D on everyone we see in our clinic. When the results come in, two things happen: 1. Pretty much everyone is low in vitamin D. 2. Pretty much everyone is shocked that they are low in vitamin D. Why worry about vitamin D? It's important. Multiple studies have shown that people with low levels of Vitamin D have the following: • Weaker bones [1] • Higher mortality rate [2] • More allergies and asthma [3] • Greater risk of cancer [4] • Higher risk of diabetes [5] • Greater risk of heart attacks [6] • Higher rates of MS [7] • Higher risk of in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Normal BMI with a big belly 'deadlier than obesity'
ConclusionThis study adds to previous research that it may not be just your weight that matters, but where you carry it. It found that – especially for men – those with a high WHR had a greater chance of dying from any cause during study follow-up than those without. The results were less strong for women.A high WHR suggests excess fat around the waist, as muscle mass is unlikely to lead to greater waist circumference. Although this study does not explore why WHR may be linked to chances of dying earlier, other studies have shown that carrying excess fat around your waist may be more harmful than carrying it in...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news

Will E-Cigs and Vaping End Smoking, or Just Create New Problems?
E-cigarettes could be the key to finally ending tobacco smoking and all its related diseases. Or are they delaying the goal of a smoke-free world? The scientific community hasn't rolled out the red carpet just yet. We look at both sides, and talk to someone who says her life has been totally transformed by vaping. Pro: E-cigs are 'very much less harmful' "An electronic alternative is a less harmful way of consuming nicotine than smoking," acknowledges Hazel Cheeseman, director of policy at Action on Smoking & Health. "What many people don't realize is that while smokers are addicted to nicotine, it is th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bees Are Losing Their Habitat Because of Climate Change
As if pesticides, disease and habitat loss were not enough, there’s more bad news for bees. Changing temperature and weather conditions due to climate change has restricted the area where bees can survive, and the pollinators have struggled to adapt, according to new research published in the journal Science. “They just aren’t colonizing new areas and establishing new populations fast enough to track rapid human-caused climate change,” said study author Jeremy Kerr, a professor at the University of Ottawa, on a call for journalists. “Impacts are large and they are underway. They are not just s...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - July 9, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals Bees bees climate change Bees habitat loss climate change animals climate change news pollinators Source Type: news

Study could reduce unnecessary cancer screening
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) A large clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa has found that contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs. The results, published in the June 22nd edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, are expected to improve patient care and reduce screening costs around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 22, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Childhood maltreatment linked to sleep problems among adult Canadians
(University of Toronto) Adults who experienced multiple incidents of childhood maltreatment were more than two times as likely to have trouble sleeping than their counterparts who were not maltreated during childhood, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto, University of Ottawa, and Western University. The study appears online in the journal Sleep Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Partners herald new cancer immunotherapy company
(Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute) The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, The Ottawa Hospital, the University of Ottawa and McMaster University congratulate its researchers on forming Turnstone Biologics Inc., a biotechnology company focused on developing new treatments for cancer that harness the patient's own immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

University of Ottawa Selects Freeslate Reaction Screening System to...
Freeslate expands its collaboration with academic centres(PRWeb April 21, 2015)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12666577.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - April 22, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Adults are right to let Bambi break the bad news
Children’s films are emotional workouts that gently teach the hardest truth: that most things may never happen – this one willWhy does death feature in children’s films and stories as much as it does? Even if death isn’t the main storyline, as in Cinderella, the gloom of Cinders having lost her mother and being largely unprotected in the world is pretty scary.A group of researchers watched 45 of the top-grossing children’s animated films, and compared them with the most popular action movies aimed at adults, noting how often a main character was killed. The study, conducted by University Colle...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 18, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Philippa Perry Tags: Children Society Animation Film Death and dying Life and style Parents and parenting Family Psychology Source Type: news

Do dopamine drugs lead to compulsive shopping?
Conclusion This study analysed serious adverse drug events reported to the US FDA over a 10-year period, and found that 710 events (just under half of all impulse control disorders reported during this period) were attributed to dopamine receptor agonists. Most of these disorders involved gambling, followed by hypersexuality and compulsive shopping. This group of six drugs are used in Parkinson’s disease (and a small number of other conditions) where there is a lack of the chemical dopamine. The drugs act directly on dopamine receptors, effectively taking the place of dopamine and stimulating the receptor in the sam...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Researchers identify new pathway linking the brain to high blood pressure
(University of Ottawa Heart Institute) New research by scientists at the Ottawa Heart Institute and the University of Maryland School of Medicine has uncovered a new pathway by which the brain uses an unusual steroid to control blood pressure. The study, which also suggests new approaches for treating high blood pressure and heart failure, appears today in the journal PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

University of Ottawa and Drexel University scientists receive 'Best of Research' award
(JMPR Associates, Inc.) Dr. Chantal Matar, University of Ottawa, and Dr. Barry W. Ritz, Drexel University, received the 'Best of Research' award from Hokkaido Prefecture Bureau of Economy, Trade and Industry for a new study presented at the 22nd International Congress on Nutrition and Integrative Medicine held in Sapporo, Japan.Dr. Matar and Dr. Ritz were recognized for their pioneering research on the mode of action of the mycelial mushroom compound AHCC, an alpha-glucan rich immune modulator. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 1, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why age reduces stem cells' ability to repair muscle
As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. Researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and University of Ottawa have discovered the reason why this decline occurs in our skeletal muscle. Their findings were published online today in the influential journal Nature Medicine. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 7, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why age reduces our stem cells' ability to repair muscle
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. Researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and University of Ottawa have discovered the reason why this decline occurs in our skeletal muscle. Their findings were published online today in the influential journal Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Could a protein be linked to heart attacks?
(University of Ottawa Heart Institute) A team of researchers at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, led by Dr. Alexandre Stewart, have uncovered an intriguing link between heart attacks and a protein that is of great interest to drug companies for its impact on cholesterol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 3, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news