Doctors: The Death of the Doctor ’ s Dog
In contrast to veterinary practice, the medical profession has long forbidden the notion of speeding death. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BARRON H. LERNER, M.D. Tags: Dogs Death and Dying Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Doctors Source Type: news

Scientists grapple with worms to improve co-existence with wildlife in Africa
Farming at the border of National Parks in Africa can lead to conflict with wildlife, due to the belief that wild animals bring disease, prey upon livestock, and damage crops. In an unexpected twist, research conducted by the University of Bristol and Queen ’ s University Belfast with the charity ‘ Elephants for Africa ’ and the University of Pretoria has found that grazing livestock with wildlife may benefit farmers by reducing parasitic disease. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: ; Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Morris Animal Foundation-funded study points way to improved stem cell therapies
(Morris Animal Foundation) In a study using equine mesenchymal stem cells, Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from Cornell University and North Carolina State University found that stem cell function can be enhanced through manipulation of their culture environment, and that 'priming' prior to patient administration could optimize their therapeutic potential. The research team published their results in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘We Made Little Spring Rolls With Their Feet.’ These Bears Are Getting Special Treatment for Their Wildfire-Burned Paws
(SAN FRANCISCO) — Veterinarians successfully used alternative medical treatments such as acupuncture on three wild animals burned in the Southern California wildfires, although one patient — a 5-month-old mountain lion — did keep eating his fish-skin and corn-husk bandages, vets at the University of California, Davis said Wednesday. Rescuers brought two adult bears, one of them pregnant, and the young mountain lion to veterinarians with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and the university after the animals were hurt in the largest wildfire in state history. They were found in the Los Padres Nation...
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ellen Knickmeyer / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals APH healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Diamondback Drugs Now a Recommended Veterinary Pharmacy of The...
National veterinary compounding pharmacy Diamondback Drugs is excited to announce their recent partnership with The Veterinary Cooperative (TVC).(PRWeb January 25, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15121921.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New £ 1M poultry research facility aims to improve bird welfare and help consumer confidence
A new £ 1M state-of-the art poultry facility offering specialist, industry-focused research into both laying hen and broiler health, welfare, behavior and productivity, will open today [Wednesday 24 January] at the University of Bristol ’ s Veterinary School. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Grants and Awards, International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Recent Dog Flu Outbreaks Have Pet Owners Worried. Here ’s What to Know
The San Francisco SPCA announced Friday on Twitter that cases of dog flu had been confirmed in the Bay Area, and encouraged dog owners to contact their veterinarians if their pets display symptoms of the virus. California is one of several states that has reported outbreaks of dog flu, also known as canine influenza, over the past several months. The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, which monitors reports of dog flu around the country, confirmed that six dogs have tested positive for the canine influenza H3N2 virus in California in the last 45 days. Although there is also an H3N2 strain of human seasonal ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Can a dog get the flu Can dogs get the flu Can you give your dog the flu Dog flu 2018 Dog flu symptoms Dog flu symptoms and treatment dog flu vaccine healthytime public health Signs of dog flu Symptoms of dog flu the Source Type: news

We may finally know why dogs choose to eat their own poop
A team of veterinary researchers at University of California at Davis have discovered why your dog may decide to eat its own or others feces. The reason is partly tied to their wolf ancestors. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hunting dogs as possible vectors for the infectious disease tularaemia
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) The zoonosis Tularaemia is life-threatening for rodents, rabbits and hares, but which can also infect humans and dogs. While contact with contaminated blood or meat makes hunters a high-risk group, the frequency of infections among hunting dogs has not been much studied. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now confirmed a relevant prevalence of infections in Austrian hunting dogs. This could intensify the debate whether the often asymptomatic animals represent an additional risk of infection for people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FDA to expedite release of recall information
Douglas Stern, FDA’s Director, Office of Enforcement and Import Operations, Office of Regulatory Affairs By: Douglas Stearn, J.D. When FDA identifies that a product it regulates violates the law, it protects the public by working with the manufacturer and distributors to facilitate the product’s recall (i.e., removal from the marketplace or product correction). Among other actions, FDA assures that the public is warned when products present the most significant public hazards, including those recalls associated with an outbreak. Now, as part of a larger effort to increase transparency, empower consumers, a...
Source: Mass Device - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog FDA Voice Source Type: news

OSU announces largest gift ever — $50M to veterinary school
Oregon State University announced that it received $50 million for the College of Veterinary Medicine, the largest gift it has ever received. OSU said in its announcement that the gift will dramatically increase the vet school’s ability to provide clinical care and to educate future veterinarians and research animal and human health. It will enable the OSU Small Animal Hospital to double in size. The university will name the college of veterinary medicine in recognition of the donor. The Gary… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

OSU announces largest gift ever — $50M to veterinary school
Oregon State University announced that it received $50 million for the College of Veterinary Medicine, the largest gift it has ever received. OSU said in its announcement that the gift will dramatically increase the vet school’s ability to provide clinical care and to educate future veterinarians and research animal and human health. It will enable the OSU Small Animal Hospital to double in size. The university will name the college of veterinary medicine in recognition of the donor. The Gary… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 17, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Strange Weather Triggered Bacteria That Killed 200,000 Endangered Antelope
Over a three-week span in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in Kazakhstan. The animals would be grazing normally, then dead in three hours. A new study points to heat and humidity. (Image credit: Courtesy of the Joint saiga health monitoring team in Kazakhstan (Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity, Kazakhstan, Biosafety Institute, Gvardeskiy RK, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK)) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Promising Experimental Drug Treating Dogs With Cancer
NORTH GRAFTON (CBS) – When it comes to cancer research, dogs just might be the key to unlock vital clues needed to find a cure. Veterinarians in central Massachusetts are excited about some recent results and it’s also making for some extremely thankful pet owners. “They gave me my best friend back and they gave him more time, quality time,” said Edward Sloan, whose dog, Dozer, a 7-year-old bull mastiff, became sick last fall. “All of sudden he went blind, overnight,” Sloan said. “He was scared.  He was sad.” Dozer had cancer. Dozer, a 7-year-old bull mastiff, is be...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

What to do if your dog catches the flu
The Atlantic Veterinary College in Charlottetown is telling pet owners to keep an eye out for signs of canine influenza or dog flu. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/PEI Source Type: news

For a banded mongoose in northern Botswana, communicating with family can be deadly
(Virginia Tech) A novel tuberculosis pathogen, Mycobacterium mungi, closely related to human TB, infects and kills banded mongooses through a surprising route -- olfactory communication. Now, a detailed investigation published in the journal Veterinary Pathology provides a window into how this deadly disease moves between mongooses and within the mongoose host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Think twice about buying 'squashed-faced' breeds, vets urge dog-lovers
British Veterinary Association launches #breedtobreathe campaign to highlight serious health issues breeds such as pugs and French bulldogs are prone toVets have urged dog-lovers to think twice about buying squashed-faced dogs such as pugs and French bulldogs, after many would-be owners were found to be unaware of the health problems such breeds often experience.According to data from the Kennel Club, registrations of squashed-faced, or brachycephalic, breeds have shot up in recent years: while just 692 French bulldogs were registered in 2007, registrations reached 21,470 in 2016.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dogs Animals Pets Science Biology Genetics Source Type: news

CFO Forecast: In booming veterinary industry, Banfield sets lofty goal — 800 new doctors
The biggest challenge for Vancouver-based veterinary services company is increasing the pipeline of veterinarians. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

CFO Forecast: In booming veterinary industry, Banfield sets lofty goal — 800 new doctors
The biggest challenge for Vancouver-based veterinary services company is increasing the pipeline of veterinarians. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 4, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Southern Veterinary Partners acquires Helena Veterinary Clinic
A regional animal hospital network based in Birmingham has brought on board another clinic in the metro Birmingham area. Southern Veterinary Partners has acquired Helena Veterinary Clinic in Helena, bringing its number of animal hospitals owned to 39. The network currently operates in 10 Southern states, and has 10 locations in Alabama. “I am proud to say that in 2017, 22 hospitals joined Southern Veterinary Par tners," said SVP CEO Jay Price. "Our company more than doubled in size this year. Helena… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 2, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Stephanie Rebman Source Type: news

Penn Vet's Boris Striepen receives $1.8m grant to fight deadly diarrheal disease in infants
(University of Pennsylvania) Boris Striepen, PhD, Professor of Pathobiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1.8-million, three-year grant from the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation to enable the development of drugs for cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by microscopic parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn Vet's Boris Striepen receives $1.8 million grant to fight deadly diarrheal disease in infants
(University of Pennsylvania) Boris Striepen, Ph.D., Professor of Pathobiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1.8-million, three-year grant from the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation to enable the development of drugs for cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by microscopic parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Veterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery to treat hydrocephalus in fur seal
(Tufts University) A neurosurgical team at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition. Ziggy, an adult female, is recovering well at her permanent home at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, Conn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Christmas Brings Chocolate Poisoning Warning For Dogs
CBS Local — The holiday season is here and veterinarians are warning pet owners that all the extra candy laying around this time of year can be fatal for their dogs and cats. Writing in the journal Veterinary Record, Vets say Christmas and Easter are the most dangerous times of the year for pets to fall ill from eating chocolate. Their study found hundreds of cases of dogs suffering from chocolate poisoning after stealing candy, eating out of open chocolate boxes, or even drinking unguarded cups of hot cocoa. “The take home message is firstly to make sure that people recognize that chocolate is a potential...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Chocolate Chocolate poisoning Chris Melore Christmas Dogs Local TV Pets talkers Source Type: news

Aratana nears approval for canine cancer vaccine
Aratana Therapeutics Inc.'s cancer immunotherapy drug for dogs gained a conditional license from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the company announced Wednesday. To gain full licensure, Aratana (Nasdaq; PETX) will start another field study in early 2018. The vaccine initially will be available for purchase at 12 veterinary oncology practices participating in the study. It's designed to treat dogs with bone cancer after the tumor is surgically removed. It works using listeria, a type of bacteria,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 21, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Aratana nears approval for canine cancer vaccine
Aratana Therapeutics Inc.'s cancer immunotherapy drug for dogs gained a conditional license from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the company announced Wednesday. To gain full licensure, Aratana (Nasdaq; PETX) will start another field study in early 2018. The vaccine initially will be available for purchase at 12 veterinary oncology practices participating in the study. It's designed to treat dogs with bone cancer after the tumor is surgically removed. It works using listeria, a type of bacteria,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 21, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Aratana nears approval for canine cancer vaccine
Aratana Therapeutics Inc.'s cancer immunotherapy drug for dogs gained a conditional license from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the company announced Wednesday. To gain full licensure, Aratana (Nasdaq; PETX) will start another field study in early 2018. The vaccine initially will be available for purchase at 12 veterinary oncology practices participating in the study. It's designed to treat dogs with bone cancer after the tumor is surgically removed. It works using listeria, a type of bacteria,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 21, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Top tips for keeping your pets happy and healthy this Christmas
Christmas is a time for family, friends and fun but it's important to make sure four-legged family members enjoy the celebrations too. A dog behaviour expert from the University of Bristol's Vet School offers some advice for pet owners over the festive season. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:Foot and Mouth Outbreak Hits Mvuma
[The Herald] A foot-and-mouth disease outbreak has hit Mvuma District in the Midlands Province and might spread if urgent action is not taken. An official with the Midlands Veterinary Services, Dr Munyaradzi Chigiji, confirmed the development yesterday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 15, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Research highlights need for new approach to crippling horse disease
(University of Liverpool) A new review 'Paradigm shifts in understanding equine laminitis' published in the Veterinary Journal, demonstrates how University of Liverpool led research has changed the way we think about a crippling disease of horses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Finding a lethal parasite's vulnerabilities
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers from Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine have landed on encouraging findings to take on Strongyloides stercoralis, a parasitic nematode that's infected millions of people around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PhD opportunity: Sexually dimorphic development of the human fetal brain: critical role in the programming of neurodevelopmental disorders
Location:College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, United KingdomSalary:A stipend of£14,553& tuition feesClosing Date:10 January 2018 Supervisors: Dr Michelle Bellingham, Dr Amanda Drake, Prof Paul A. FowlerProject details: The fetal environment plays a key role in programming normal brain development in the womb. Maternal lifestyle factors such as malnutrition, obesity, smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with altered brain development and behaviour, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and anxiet...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - December 13, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Scientists successfully demonstrate a new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
A new way of triggering nerve regeneration to help repair spinal cord injury and in the longer-term potentially paralysis has successfully been demonstrated by University of Bristol scientists. The work is published in PLOS ONE today [Monday 11 December]. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Translational Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Source Type: news

Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet tooth
(Cornell University) Although the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi   has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study from researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine addresses this knowledge gap and may lead to novel, targeted treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study funded by Morris Animal Foundation demonstrates loss of drug potency
(Morris Animal Foundation) Drugs work best when their potency remains stable or consistent, but a new study funded by Morris Animal Foundation shows a commonly compounded antimicrobial drug used in veterinary medicine may be losing potency over time. The study recently was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Resistance to Antibiotics: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Antimicrobial drugs play a critical role in the treatment of diseases, their use is essential to protect both human and animal health. However, antimicrobials are often misused for treatment and prevention of diseases in livestock sector, aquaculture as well as crop production. Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Dec 6 2017 (IPS)The growing resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobials due to their overuse and misuse both in humans and animals has become an alarming global threat to public health, food safety and security, causing the deaths of 700,000 people each year. This is a fact. The good news is that now more and mo...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Improving the lives of ru Source Type: news

Action Needed to Avoid the End of Modern Medicine
This study influenced the development of the WHO’s new  guidelines, which are aimed at influencing policy makers in the agriculture and health sectors.   According to a WHO press release, the guidelines include:An overall reduction in the use of all classes of medically important antibiotics in food-producing animals.Complete restriction of these antibiotics for growth promotion and for disease prevention without diagnosis.Healthy animals should only receive antibiotics to prevent disease if it has been diagnosed in other animals in the same flock or herd or fish population.Antibiotics used in animals ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martin Khor Tags: Development & Aid Global Governance Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Researchers funded by Morris Animal Foundation make breakthrough in fatal cat disease
(Morris Animal Foundation) A new clinical trial funded in part by Morris Animal Foundation has resulted in a critical veterinary breakthrough -- cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in remission following treatment with a novel antiviral drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From Horses to Humans: Uncovering a Clue to Sore Throats
MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 -- The fight against germs that cause millions of sore throats each year may have gotten a boost from horses. Working in partnership, scientists from the Animal Health Trust, a veterinary and scientific research charity in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

USDA awards funds to support rural veterinary services
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced 13 grants to support rural veterinary services and relieve veterinarian shortages in parts of the US and its insular areas. The funding from NIFA's Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP) is authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How antibiotic use in animals is contributing to antibiotic resistance
(Wiley) The overuse of veterinary antibiotics in animal production and the subsequent land applications of manure contribute to increased antibiotic resistance in soil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Your dog could help you live longer
Your pooch is not just great company. A new study finds that our four-legged friends could reduce the likelihood of premature death. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Veterinary Source Type: news

Puppy poo needed to monitor antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Researchers at the University of Bristol are asking puppy owners in the south west to send them samples of their puppy ’ s poo so that they can be monitored for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 17, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Press Release Source Type: news

Good to Know (Perhaps) That Food Is Being ‘Nuclearised’
Using nuclear sciences to feed the world. Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Nov 16 2017 (IPS)It might sound strange, very strange, but the news is that scientists and experts have been assuring, over and again, that using nuclear applications in agriculture –and thus in food production—are giving a major boost to food security. So how does this work? To start with, nuclear applications in agriculture rely on the use of isotopes and radiation techniques to combat pests and diseases, increase crop production, protect land and water resources, and ensure food safety and authenticity, as well as increase livestock pro...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

5 things to know and UC Davis wants to know about your pets and cannabis
In case you missed it yesterday, the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine announced an interesting and timely study: The veterinarians want to know how you use cannabis to treat your pets' health issues. Now, here at the Business Journal, we've already thought about the possibilities for an anxious dog in our lives. And you're welcome to add your own suggestions in the comments on our Facebook page. Thinking as business journalists, we also look forward to seeing what may… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Adam Steinhauer Source Type: news

Bristol Vet School leading the way to change antimicrobial (AM) use on farms
Researchers from the Bristol Veterinary School at the University of Bristol are leading the way to inspire and change antimicrobial (AM) use on farms and in veterinary prescribing practices. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Dog Daze: UC Davis veterinary school launches survey on the use of marijuana products on pets
UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine has launched a survey to learn more about the use of marijuana products on pets. The survey comes as California prepares to legalize the sale of recreational marijuana in January. The city of Sacramento and entrepreneurs see the expansion of the legal cannabis industry, from medical to recreational use, as a chance to launch new businesses that could create thousands of local jobs and generate billions of dollars in revenue. "With the increasing use of medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 13, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Scott Rodd Source Type: news

Dog Daze: UC Davis veterinary school launches survey on the use of marijuana products on pets
UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine has launched a survey to learn more about the use of marijuana products on pets. The survey comes as California prepares to legalize the sale of recreational marijuana in January. The city of Sacramento and entrepreneurs see the expansion of the legal cannabis industry, from medical to recreational use, as a chance to launch new businesses that could create thousands of local jobs and generate billions of dollars in revenue. "With the increasing use of medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 13, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Scott Rodd Source Type: news

Taking blood using 'push-pull' method gets accurate results with fewer pokes
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special 'mixing' technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) Guidelines on Use of Medically Important Antimicrobials in Food-Producing Animals
World Health Organization. 11/06/2017 This 88-page document provides guidelines that present evidence-based recommendations and best practice statements on use of medically important antimicrobials in food-producing animals, based on the World Health Organization (WHO) list of critically important antimicrobials for human medicine (WHO CIA List). It aims primarily to help preserve the effectiveness of medically important antimicrobials, particularly those antimicrobials judged to be critically important to human medicine and to help preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobials for veterinary medicine, in direct support of ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news