Penn Vet research suggests a way to identify animals at risk of blood clots
(University of Pennsylvania) With new findings from a retrospective study, a team at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has found that a common diagnostic tool often used to identify patients at risk of bleeding may also be used to identify those predisposed to clot excessively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Contagious canine cancer: How it evolved over 2,000 years
A new study has shed light on the evolution of transmissible cancer in dogs, as well as some of the mechanisms underlying the disease, which could offer insight into human cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Veterinary Source Type: news

Dog Rehab: A Second Chance at Life
ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More than $15 billion were spent on veterinary care in 2015, almost double the amount from 2005, according to a study by market research. Most owners will do anything and pay anything to keep them alive. But when they have to make a decision whether to euthanize, it usually boils down to old age and difficulty walking. But one veterinarian says we put people through physical rehab, why not our pets? Now, she’s showing us how she’s rehabilitating dogs that other vets have given up on. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - May 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New insights into human rare disorders with dogs
Three novel canine genes for Caffey, Raine and van den Ende-Gupta syndromes have been discovered by investigators. Research reveals close similarities of the canine models of human rare disorders and highlights the potential of comparative research approach for the development of rare disease diagnostics and treatments. Gene discoveries will benefit also veterinary diagnostics and breeding programs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Namibia: FMD Vaccination Campaign Continues
[Namibian] THE directorate of veterinary services will continue vaccinating cattle against foot-and-mouth disease to avoid a possible outbreak. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 17, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Drug against breast cancer is also highly potent against a frequent form of leukaemia
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is the most frequent form of blood cancer. In about 30 percent of AML patients, a mutation in the FLT3 tyrosine kinase accelerates the course of the disease. Common therapies were not successful in healing these patients so far. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna managed now to specifically target and kill AML cancer cells carrying this activating mutation. The study was published in the top hemato-oncology journal Blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New insights into human rare disorders with dogs
(University of Helsinki) Professor Hannes Lohi's research group from the University of Helsinki has discovered three novel canine genes for Caffey, Raine and van den Ende-Gupta syndromes. Research reveals close similarities of the canine models of human rare disorders and highlights the potential of comparative research approach for the development of rare disease diagnostics and treatments. Gene discoveries will benefit also veterinary diagnostics and breeding programs. The study was published in PLOS Genetics on May 17, 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Animal welfare initiatives improves feather cover of cage-free laying hens
Recognised welfare outcome assessments within farm assurance schemes have shown a reduction in feather loss and improvement in the welfare of UK cage-free laying hens, according to the findings of a study from the AssureWel project by the University of Bristol, RSPCA and the Soil Association. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 16, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Namibia: FMD Outbreak a False Alarm
[New Era] Windhoek -Chief veterinary officer of the Directorate of Veterinary Services (DVS) Dr Milton Maseke yesterday assured Namibians that the country is still foot-and-mouth disease free. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 12, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New Zealand veterinarians are taking a stand against excessive antibiotic treatments in animals, vowing to ban all use by 2030
(NaturalNews) New Zealand veterinarians have resolved to put an end to the practice of using non-medicinal antibiotics in the country's livestock by the year 2030.Southland vet and New Zealand Veterinary Association Board Member, Mark Bryan, said that the stance stems from the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antarctic whales and the krill they eat
(Springer) The Western Antarctic sector of the Southern Ocean is the regular feeding ground of a large number of fin and humpback whales of the Southern Hemisphere. Around 5,000 fin whales likely migrate to its ice-free waters during summer, along with at least 3,000 humpback whales. This is according to a study that was led by Helena Herr of the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover in Germany, and is published in Springer's journal Polar Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Origin of dromedary domestication discovered
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Dromedaries have been used for transportation for over 3,000 years. But it was not known where they were first domesticated or which genetic structure was selected in the process. A team of researchers including Pamela Burger of Vetmeduni Vienna now identified the origin of the domesticated dromedary and showed that the dromedaries, unlike other domesticated animals, have maintained extensive gene flow in the modern population. The study is published in the journal PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 9, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Web Industries Opens New Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFI) Manufacturing Facility
Web Industries, Inc., provider of precision contract manufacturing and converting services, is proud to announce the opening of the company’s first lateral flow immunoassay (LFI) production facility. Co-located within the company’s existing Web Boston location, the Lateral Flow Diagnostics Center of Excellence will provide companies marketing LFI tests with a one-stop outsource manufacturing solution that offers a reliable path from small-scale test development to high-volume commercialization of new LFI devices. The 6,500 square foot environmentally-controlled facility was purpose-built for automated reel-to-r...
Source: Mass Device - May 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Web Industries Source Type: news

Why did Heska shares soar in yesterday's trading?
Shares in Heska Corp. rose more than 20 percent in Tuesday trading, rising $6.07 to close at $35.86. Why did shares in the Loveland veterinary products (Nasdaq: HSKA) climb so much? The overall veterinary market is healthy, company officials said, which was reflected in the company's first-quarter earnings. Revenues rose more than 19 percent to more than $27 million, above analysts' expectations of $23.2 million. Earnings also rose, to 17 cents per share. Analysts were expected a loss of 2 cents… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 4, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ben Miller Source Type: news

New rules on horse nosebands needed to prevent distress, say researchers
Study found horses’ heart rates increased and they struggled to chew when nosebands were over-tightened, leading to calls for stricter regulations on useResearchers studying the physiological impact of nosebands on horses competing in international equestrian competitions including the Olympics are calling for new regulations to reduce potential pain and distress from the equipment.The scientists found that horses’ heart rates were raised and they struggled to chew when nosebands were fitted too tightly around the animals’ heads. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 3, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Veterinary medicine Equestrianism Science Animal welfare Sport Animals Olympics Source Type: news

New guidelines explain how to monitor and treat hyperthyroid cats
Over the last 30 or so years, veterinary professionals' understanding of clinical feline hyperthyroidism has evolved tremendously. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New guidelines explain how to monitor and treat hyperthyroid cats
(SAGE) Over the last 30+ years, veterinary professionals' understanding of clinical feline hyperthyroidism has evolved tremendously. The Guidelines for the Management of Feline Hyperthyroidism, from the American Association of Feline Practitioners, are published today in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Deafening Silence of an Empty Pool and Voiceless Dolphins
A lone trainer watches over Monterey Bay and the empty marine mammal pools at Long Marine Lab (photo: TM Williams) This week in the pre-dawn hours we lifted Primo, the bottlenose dolphin, out of his home of 22 years and into a carrier in the back of a covered truck. Under the watchful eyes and gentle hands of his long-time caregivers, his veterinary team and SeaWorld animal care staff, he made the slow journey to his new aquarium residence. He was the last of my research "zoo" at Long Marine Lab on the University of California- Santa Cruz campus, the last of an eclectic assortment of rescued and retired dolphin...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kenya: Vets Converge for Conference in Meru
[Nation] Veterinary doctors and veterinary para-professionals are set to meet for a three day annual scientific conference in Meru Town. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 28, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Tanzania: Avoid Contracting Diseases From Livestock, Prof Kambarage Cautions
[Daily News] Sixty to 80 per cent of all human diseases are estimated to be transmitted by animals to human beings, the Tanzania Veterinary Association has said. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 28, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Thermal injuries in veterinary forensic pathology - Wohlsein P, Peters M, Schulze C, Baumgartner W.
Localized thermal injuries in animals may be caused by exposure to fire and radiant heat, contact with hot items including hot liquids or steam, inhalation of hot air, and exposure to cold temperatures. In addition, animal fire victims may have intoxicatio... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Changes in 'microbiome' during canine atopic dermatitis could lead to antibiotic-free therapies for human and canine disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) How atopic dermatitis (AD) arises isn't yet fully understood, but a new study from researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine, have uncovered important insights about the association of AD in dogs compared to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Prestigious distinction for poultry expert Michael Hess from Vetmeduni Vienna
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) The Robert Fraser Gordon Memorial Trust has chosen Michael Hess from Vetmeduni Vienna for this year's edition of the renowned Robert F. Gordon Memorial Lecture and honored him with the R. F. Gordon Memorial Medal. This internationally recognized distinction of researchers from all fields of poultry science was awarded at the annual conference of the UK branch of the World's Poultry Science Association in Chester, England, which took place on April 6-7, 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Merck Animal Health to Acquire Worldwide Rights to Whisper® Veterinary Stethoscope System
Dateline City: MADISON, N.J. Non-Invasive Device Helps Diagnose Bovine Respiratory Disease MADISON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck Animal Health (known as MSD Animal Health outside the United States and Canada) today announced plans to acquire worldwide rights for the Whisper® Veterinary Stethoscope System from Minnesota-based Geissler Companies. The Whisper Veterinary Stethoscope System is a Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) detection system which is used to determine the severity of an animal’s lung condition so that the ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - April 19, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Animal Health Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK MSD Whisper Source Type: news

Scientists describe new research model to enhance Zika virus research
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine have developed one of the first mouse models for the study of Zika virus. The model will allow researchers to better understand how the virus causes disease and aid in the development of antiviral compounds and vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Multiple paternity may offer fewer advantages than previously thought
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Females can enhance the survival chances of their offspring by mating with multiple males. When it comes to immunological benefits, however, female promiscuity may not provide the young the advantages long suspected, as a research team from Vetmeduni Vienna confirmed. The researchers also provided the first evidence that females are much more susceptible to Salmonella infection than males. The study was published in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Q&A: It’s Probably Not the Cat Eating Too Much Fat
Are animals susceptible to cholesterol problems? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: C. CLAIBORNE RAY Tags: Cats Cholesterol Veterinary Medicine Animals Dogs Clinical Biochemistry of Domestic Animals (Book) Source Type: news

FDA takes steps to withdraw approval of the swine drug carbadox due to safety concerns
Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) took the first step toward rescinding its approval of the use of carbadox to treat swine because the drug may leave trace amounts of a carcinogenic residue. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - April 8, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Rescue Dog Helps Save Scrappy Kittens' Sight, Gains Two New BFFs
Rescue dog Jemmie has made friends for life in these stray kittens. The Shih Tzu Lhasa apso mix is not only playing mom to the scrappy little ginger cat and his sibling, but also donating blood to help save the pair's eyesight. The two young kittens were recently brought into Sacramento SPCA after being found dumped in a California back yard. Veterinarians discovered one of the pair had ulcers in his eyes. Left untreated, he'd most likely have ended up completely blind. To save his eyesight, medical staff took blood from Jemmie, whose owner is SSPCA foster care coordinator Sarah Varanini. Veterinarian Dr. Laurie Sipe...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

FDA takes steps to withdraw approval of the swine drug carbadox due to safety concerns
April 8, 2016 -- Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) took the first step toward rescinding its approval of the use of carbadox to treat swine because the drug may leave trace amounts of a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 8, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Vasculitis after snorting cocaine contaminated with levamisole
Lawrence et al. Allergy Rhinol (Providence) 2014Copyright policy — open-access 3.5 out of 5 stars Cocaine-induced ecchymotic rash. Voore NK. Cleve Clin J Med 2016 Apr;3:252-253. Full Text Since at least 2010, a large percentage of cocaine samples seized in the United States has contained levamisole, a veterinary anti-worm medication. Levamisole had previously used in humans as an anti-helminthic and also in some chemotherapy regimens. It was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 1999 because of its association with agranulocytosis and vasculitis. It is apparently added to cocaine because it increases catecholamine r...
Source: The Poison Review - April 7, 2016 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical cocaine levamisole vasculitis Source Type: news

Australians seek out pugs and bulldogs as pets despite health issues, research finds
Such breeds have increased in popularity despite being more susceptible to respiratory problems, skin and eye conditions, and digestive disordersPurebred dogs with shorter snouts, little legs and wider heads have become increasingly popular in Australia in the past 28 years, despite concerns for their wellbeing. Breeds such as French bulldogs and pugs have increased in popularity since 1986, analysis of Australian National Kennel Council registration statistics shows. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt and Nick Evershed Tags: Dogs Animals Science Veterinary medicine Australia news Pets Source Type: news

'Problems from head to tail': craze for pedigree pugs raises health concerns
Popularity of pugs and bulldogs leads experts to warn owners of breathing difficulties, skin problems and other disorders faced by the breedsThe growing popularity of dogs with extremely wide faces and short bodies, such as pugs and bulldogs, has prompted experts to warn owners of the health issues associated with flat-nosed breeds. A study by a group of Australian veterinary scientists has found that dog owners increasingly favour such types of small dog over larger breeds, but are unaware of the myriad problems, including breathing difficulties, skin disorders, overheating, eye conditions and premature death that are com...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dogs Biology Pets Animals Science Genetics Source Type: news

ERC Advanced Grant for cancer researcher from Vetmeduni Vienna
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Veronika Sexl of the Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology at Vetmeduni Vienna has been awarded a coveted ERC Advanced Grant from the European Research Council. The grant will provide funding of about € 2.5 million over the next five years for research into new possibilities of cancer therapy using the enzyme CDK6. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Handbook for the Assessment of Capacities at the Human-Animal Interface
World Health Organization. 07/30/2015This 51-page Handbook was developed by the World Health Organization and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) to facilitate the assessment of public health capacities in countries for areas in which veterinary services contribute to the implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR) (2005). It highlights complementarities between the WHO IHR Monitoring Tool and the Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) Pathway, and aims at facilitating annual reporting on country compliance with IHR (2005) requirements by using the results of the PVS Pathway missions. (PDF) (S...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Cigarette Smoke Can Make Your Pet Sick
Most adults who smoke recognize that second- and third-hand smoke is harmful to other people around them, especially children. But not as many smokers realize their habit can also damage their pet's health. Animals can develop lung damage and certain kinds of cancer just like humans do when exposed to second-hand smoke, residual chemicals from cigarettes, and even the hands and clothing of a smoker. According to veterinary oncologist Heather Wilson-Robles of Texas A&M University, in an interview with Medical Daily: "Animals with asthma or bronchitis may have difficulties controlling their disease. A lot of vets, e...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Quirky Differences Between Democrats And Republicans
If nothing else, this election cycle has proven how divided our political inclinations can be. Voters across the spectrum have struggled to see others' points of view. But science might be able to explain why we feel so different from one another: Research shows that liberal and conservative brains are wired differently. And those opposing preferences extend far beyond the political realm into mundane, but personally defining factors like beer tastes, bedroom habits and opinions on Justin Bieber.  Below are seven interesting contrasts between Republicans and Democrats. Do you follow your party's preferences? &nbs...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Government of Canada announces simultaneous approval with the United States of veterinary drug Imrestor
Health Canada and the United States Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine today announced a simultaneous approval of the veterinary drug Imrestor. Access to this drug will provide Canadian dairy farmers with an innovative product to reduce the incidence of clinical mastitis, a significant infectious disease that affects approximately 15% of dairy cattle. (Source: Government of Canada News - Health Canada)
Source: Government of Canada News - Health Canada - March 25, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Health Canada Source Type: news

A New Act Could Provide Veterans Who Have PTSD With Service Dogs
Some soldiers find themselves fighting a completely different battle when they return to civilian life — dealing with post-traumatic stress. That's why Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.) has introduced the Puppies Assisting Wounded Servicemembers Act. The bill, cleverly called PAWS, would be a $10 million pilot program that would pair post-9/11 veterans with severe PTSD with service dogs, according to a press release. “The threat to our service members does not end when they return home, as evidenced by the tragic rates of veteran suicides,” DeSantis wrote in a guest column for The Florida Times-Union.‎ &ldqu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aratana files for second FDA approval
A day after receiving its first Food and Drug Administration approval, Aratana Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: PETX) announced Tuesday that it has applied for a second FDA approval. The Leawood-based pet therapeutics company submitted an administrative New Animal Drug Application with the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine for the drug Entyce. Entyce is a flavored, oral liquid prescription that helps stimulate appetite in dogs. The chemical entity is a "first-of-its kind therapeutic" that works by… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Dora Grote Source Type: news

Aratana files for second FDA approval
A day after receiving its first Food and Drug Administration approval, Aratana Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: PETX) announced Tuesday that it has applied for a second FDA approval. The Leawood-based pet therapeutics company submitted an administrative New Animal Drug Application with the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine for the drug Entyce. Entyce is a flavored, oral liquid prescription that helps stimulate appetite in dogs. The chemical entity is a "first-of-its kind therapeutic" that works by… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dora Grote Source Type: news

MSD Animal Health Receives Positive Final Opinion from European Medicines Agency for BRAVECTO™ (fluralaner) Spot-On for Cats and Dogs
Dateline City: MADISON, N.J. Only Spot-On Treatment for Fleas and Ticks Effective For 12 Weeks MADISON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--MSD Animal Health (known as Merck Animal Health in the United States and Canada) today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Veterinary Use (CVMP) of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a positive final opinion, recommending the granting of a marketing authorization for the veterinary medicinal product BRAVECTO™ (fluralaner) Spot-On for both cats and dogs. Language: ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - March 22, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Animal Health Latest News Source Type: news

Exploring the Benefits of Animal Physiotherapy
Animals have always been a part of my life, even before I took my first breath. Carrying me to full term was a difficult pregnancy for my mom, but it was her two Yorkies, Kirsch and Butch, who laid by her side and comforted her during the nine months that she was bed ridden. They could sense when my mom was in pain, and licked her face until the moment passed. They could feel when the baby was moving, and repositioned themselves next to her belly until the stirring soothed. And although they couldn't speak English, their message was loud and clear, they were there to protect the family using their senses to guide the way. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dogs needed to help with arthritis study
Owners of dogs with osteoarthritis are helping with the Bristol Dog Arthritis study being run by the University of Bristol, but even more dogs are needed to help. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 14, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Marshall School of Pharmacy publishes in national journal on veterinary pharmacy course
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine ) Marshall University School of Pharmacy 4th-year student Jennifer C. Miller, B.S., along with Inder Sehgal, D.V.M, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology at the school and a graduate veterinarian, recently published an instructional design and assessment article in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 14, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Animal abuse and interpersonal violence: the cruelty connection and its implications for veterinary pathology - Lockwood R, Arkow P.
The role of the veterinary forensic pathologist in the investigation of animal abuse or neglect can go beyond documenting the condition of animals presented as evidence. Although animal cruelty is a moral concern and a crime in itself, law enforcement resp... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Tilikum, SeaWorld killer whale and subject of Blackfish, is dying
The famous killer whale that drowned a trainer, and later became the subject of a film that sparked a backlash against SeaWorld, has a fatal infectionThe popular orca at SeaWorld Orlando and star of the documentary Blackfish, Tilikum, is dying, the entertainment park company announced.“We are saddened to report that over the past few weeks, Tilikum’s behavior has become increasingly lethargic, and the SeaWorld veterinary and animal care teams are concerned that his health is beginning to deteriorate,” the company said on Tuesday in a post on their website. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 9, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Nicky Woolf in Los Angeles Tags: SeaWorld Florida Orlando City Animal behaviour Animals Biology US news Science Animal welfare Marine life Wildlife Whales Cetaceans Environment Source Type: news

Couple Pulls Paw-some Move And Rescues All 265 Dogs From Overcrowded Shelter
One couple made over 265 tails wag when they rescued every dog at an overcrowded facility. Danielle Eden and Rob Scheinberg, a married couple who live in King City, Canada, are no strangers to shelters. In 2014, they founded Dog Tales, a 50-acre rescue organization with walking trails, large fenced-in paddocks and therapy pools for elderly, abused and disabled dogs that are usually the last to be adopted from shelters. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news