UC Davis veterinary hospital picks administrator for $508 million expansion
The University of California Davis appointed Joy Hoover as administrator of its veterinary medical teaching hospital, which is about to undergo a 10-year renovation. Hoover started two weeks ago, replacing Frank LaBonte, who retired after a decade with the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital on campus. For three years running, UC Davis has been ranked the world’s top school of veterinary medicine by QS World University Rankings. The u niversity is preparing to break ground… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Mark Anderson Source Type: news

UC Davis veterinary hospital picks administrator for $508 million expansion
The University of California Davis appointed Joy Hoover as administrator of its veterinary medical teaching hospital, which is about to undergo a 10-year renovation. Hoover started two weeks ago, replacing Frank LaBonte, who retired after a decade with the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital on campus. For three years running, UC Davis has been ranked the world’s top school of veterinary medicine by QS World University Rankings. The u niversity is preparing to break ground… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 11, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Anderson Source Type: news

Stressed seabird parents think only of themselves
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) To see how bird families interact with each other being stressed, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and University of Gdansk studied parent-offspring interactions in a long-lived seabird, the little auk (Alle alle). They increased their 'stress levels,' with the result that stressed offspring intensified begging and received more food. When parent birds were stressed, they however reduced offspring feeding their single chicks to search for food for themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

USDA has $80 million-$90 million to fight bird flu
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has $80 million to $90 million left over from the last major outbreak of bird flu to fight any new discoveries of the virus, the department's chief veterinary officer said on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Farma Research Animal Health-Independent Animal Health Research for Veterinary Applications
Farma Research Animal Health is an independent veterinary contract research organisation that conducts projects concerning the development of veterinary medicines and feed additives. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - March 8, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Rabies Kills 189 People Every Day. Here's Why You Never Hear About It.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. Rabies is one of the most lethal viruses known to man. It kills virtually 100 percent of victims who don’t get the vaccine. Today, there is both the knowledge and the practical means to eradicate the disease, but it still causes 69,000 deaths worldwide every year. That’s 189 people a day. Rabies is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected animal, usually a dog. After infection, it typically takes between one and three months for a person to show...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sea Turtle Named 'Bank' On The Mend After Swallowing 915 Coins
An endangered green sea turtle named “bank” now has a little less jingle in her step, and that’s a really good thing. Surgeons in Thailand removed 915 coins from the 25-year-old turtle’s stomach on Monday. Tourists had reportedly thrown the money into her pool for luck. The 130-pound animal named Osmin, which is said to mean “bank” or “piggy bank” in Thai, underwent a seven-hour operation at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. By the time it was over, veterinarians had removed approximately 11 pounds of coins, many of which were corroded, Reuters reported. “We think ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Online forecast maps warns sheep farmers about risk of Nematodirosis in lambs
With spring fast approaching the parasite Nematodirus is a deadly threat to the lives of lambing flocks. An online risk forecast could help UK sheep farmers assess the risk of outbreaks of the parasite in their lambs and take action before it is too late. The forecast maps will be updated daily to track changes in risk throughout the spring and early summer and include treatment and management advice. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Male poison frogs become cannibals after taking over territories
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Systematic 'infanticide' of unrelated young occurs in several animal species. For carnivores and primates, infanticidal actions are mainly sexually motivated. A study in Scientific Reports by researchers of Vetmeduni Vienna has shown for the first time that also male poison frogs selectively eat other males' offspring -- after having taken over their rivals' territories. They were thus able to demonstrate that even simple decision rules can mediate a complex behavioral pattern such as parental care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 28, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Penn vet team identifies new therapeutic targets for tropical disease leishmaniasis
(University of Pennsylvania) Each year, about 2 million people contract leishmaniasis, which results in disfiguring skin ulcers that may take months or years to heal and in rare cases can become metastatic, causing major tissue damage. Now a team led by University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine researchers have a promising target for treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zomedica Appoints Robert DiMarzo as Executive Vice President of Global Strategy
ANN ARBOR, Mich., Feb. 23, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (ZOM.V), a veterinary pharmaceutical and health care solutions company, today announced that Robert W. DiMarzo has joined the company as Executive V... Devices, Biopharmaceuticals, Personnel Zomedica, veterinary (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 23, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Significant epilepsy gene discovery in dogs
Research groups have described in collaboration a novel myoclonic epilepsy in dogs and identified its genetic cause. The study reveals a novel candidate gene for human myoclonic epilepsies, one of the most common forms of epilepsy. As a result, a genetic test was developed for veterinary diagnostics and breeding programs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Listeria may be serious miscarriage threat early in pregnancy
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Listeria, a common food-borne bacterium, may pose a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy than appreciated, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine studying how pathogens affect fetal development and change the outcome of pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

T cells support long-lived antibody-producing cells, Penn-led team finds
(University of Pennsylvania) A group led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, has come to a better understanding of how long-lived, antibody-producing plasma cells are maintained. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Metabolism drives growth and division of cancer cells
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Nobel Prize laureate Otto H. Warburg observed in the 1920s that tumor cells radically change their metabolism. This process, termed 'Warburg Effect,' was neglected until recently by cancer research, but latest results show ist fundamental importance for the development of aggressive tumors. Richard Moriggl from the VetmeduniVienna now published in Leukemia how the tumor promoter STAT5 integrates metabolic signals that contribute to oncogenic transformation and may have thus identified a new target to tackle cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cordova facility focuses on treating the sickest animals
When the Memphis Zoo's entire penguin population faced an ailment that leads to blindness, the zoo turned to an avian expert at a local speciality veterinary practice to save the day. Memphis Veterinary Specialists (MVS), founded by Dr. Todd Tobias, is the Mid-South's only board-certified speciality veterinary practice. Instead of offerings such as vaccines, flea prevention and wellness exams, MVS is home to specialists who practice veterinary oncology, ophthalmology, dermatolo gy, radiology, internal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 13, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elle Perry Source Type: news

Kenya: From Farm to Table - Poor Hygiene in Slaughterhouses in Rural Kenya
[The Conversation Africa] -Most people in the world never see the inside of a slaughterhouse. This is true in Kenya where concerns have been raised about the health risks associated with slaughterhouses, particularly in rural parts of the country. The Conversation Africa's Health and Medicine Editor Joy Wanja Muraya spoke to Veterinary Epidemiologist Elizabeth Cook about the condition of slaughterhouses in rural Kenya and the risks they pose to public health. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 13, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Wolf's budget proposes $30M cut to Penn's vet school
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf's belt-tightening budget includes a proposal to cut more than $30 million in state funds to the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine. The vet school, along with Penn State University, is a member of the Pennsylvania Animal Diagnostic Laboratory System that helps "detect, contain and eradicate livestock and poultry diseases," according to the governor's budget document calling for the "elimination of state subsidies for the priva te" veterinary college… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 13, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Katie Colaneri Source Type: news

Dog sedative could save thousands from suffering delirium
A British-Chinese study found that giving patients a dose of dexmedetomidine, a drug commonly used in veterinary medicine as an anaesthetic, during surgery, can reduce the prevalence of delirium. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (JVDI)
JVDI is devoted to all aspects of veterinary laboratory diagnostic science, including anatomic pathology, bacteriology/mycology, clinical pathology, epidemiology, immunology, laboratory information management, molecular biology, parasitology, public health, toxicology, and virology. Content is open access after a 12-month embargo. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

World Veterinary Association Library
Policy statements, newsletters, One Health issues, and documents/presentations from the WVA. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Nigeria: Govt Dismisses HIV/Aids Cure Claims
[Guardian] The Federal Government through the National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) and the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has dismissed the claims by a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Maduike Ezeibe, to have discovered a new drug for the cure of Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nigeria: NACA Dismisses HIV Cure Claim By Michael Okpara University Prof
[Vanguard] The National Agency for the Control of AIDS, NACA, has dismissed an HIV cure claim by Professor Maduike Ezeibe, a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Abia State. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Acute pesticide ingestion managed with yohimbine as a rescue therapy - Nasa P, Juneja D.
Amitraz is used as a pesticide in agricultural and veterinary medicine. It is primarily a central α2 adrenergic agonist and known to cause central nervous system depression, convulsions, respiratory depression, and bradycardia on severe intoxication. We r... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Salicylic acid promotes nasal mucosa colonization
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) An international research team, including scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna, has now shown that this multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron and lab tests showed that the iron limitation strongly promotes formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus. This allows the bacteria to survive and persist in our respiratory tract for longer periods of time which eventually trigger life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons. Published in Frontiers in Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 3, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Portugal strengthens bird flu controls after case in wild bird
LISBON (Reuters) - Portugal has reinforced veterinary controls in the southern Algarve region after detecting an isolated case of a highly contagious strain of bird flu virus in a gray heron, officials said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

KLIFOVET-Contract Development Organisation for Animal Health Products
KLIFOVET is your expert partner for all steps in the development of veterinary medicinal products and feed additives. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - February 2, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Calling all guinea pig owners
Academics from the University of Bristol ’ s School of Veterinary Sciences are asking for guinea pig owners to take part in a new research study on how pet guinea pigs are kept in the UK by completing an online questionnaire. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Ketamine's Versatility Makes it a Powerful Tool for EMS
Ketamine was first developed in 1962 as a safer anesthetic and alternative to phencyclidine (PCP), which had numerous problematic side effects.1 It was then used on the battlefields of Vietnam and was approved by the FDA in 1970 for civilian use since it proved to be a safe and effective anesthetic for both human and veterinary applications.2 However, in the 1980s, concerns over misuse and the psychodysleptic effects eventually led to ketamine being classified as a schedule III controlled substance.3 In addition, concerns for adverse effects led to markedly reduced medical use in humans. Interestingly, in the late 1990s an...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Scott D. Hax, NRP, FP-C, C-NPT Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Macedonia reports outbreak of H5N8 bird flu at farm: OIE
PARIS (Reuters) - Macedonia reported an outbreak of the highly contagious H5N8 bird flu virus at a farm in the southwestern part of the country, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday, citing a report from the local veterinary authorities. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Researchers identify drug that alleviates opioid withdrawal
(University of Calgary) Opioid use and abuse is a significant social, health and economic issue. Researchers at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Hotchkiss Brain Institute have discovered that an existing anti-gout medication is effective in reducing the severity of withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent rodents. For their study, the researchers looked specifically at two common opioid drugs: morphine and fentanyl. Their work is leading to the development of a clinical trial in Calgary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What We've Learned From Studying Microbiomes
What is a microbiome you ask? It's the tiny living community that surrounds us all and is the subject of investigation by human and veterinary health care providers everywhere. You've heard about microbiome from me before, see my post about it from last year, "What's in the Water." There is no question that the relationships all animals, including humans, have with the trillions upon trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi--in, on and around us--are a critical part of the life experience. At Shedd Aquarium, this is what the Aquarium Microbiome Project is all about. Our lab offers a comprehensive look at microbio...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dogs share food with other dogs even in complex situations
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Dogs also share their food, albeit mainly with four-legged friends rather than strangers. A new study conducted by behavioural biologists from the Messerli Research Institute at Vetmeduni Vienna has now confirmed this prosocial behaviour among canines. The more complex methodology of the study, however, showed that the experimental set-up has an impact on the dogs' behaviour and that even the mere presence of another dog makes the animals more generous. Published in PLOS ONE (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Diamondback Drugs ® Earns Industry ’s Coveted PCAB™ Accreditation
Veterinary-only Compounding Pharmacy Recognized for Excellence and Commitment to Quality Standards by Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board (PCAB)(PRWeb January 25, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Diamondback-Drugs/Earns-PCAB/prweb14007864.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Studies offer new hope for diagnosis of Chiari-malformation in toy dog breeds
(University of Surrey) Researchers from the University Of Surrey School Of Veterinary Medicine have made advances in the study of the Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia disorder in toy dogs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

DentalEZ ® Donates Massive Amount of Equipment, Supplies to Project Chimps Organization
Contribution Will Provide Complete Dental Care Facility forthe Organization ’s New LocationMalvern, PA (January 10, 2017) –For its latest philanthropic endeavor, DentalEZ®, a supplier of integrated products and services for dental health professionals worldwide, recently donated a full shipment of dental supplies and equipment to Project Chimps, a rescue organization dedicated to the lifetime sanctuary care of hundreds of captive chimpanzees.Specifically, the Company donated various dental products, and operatory and utility room equipment to Project Chimps ’ new northern Georgia sanctuary including N...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 20, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Ohio State's pet ER in Dublin hit with possible data breach, offers free ID theft protection
A data breach could have compromised private information of "some clients" of Ohio State University's emergency and specialty veterinary clinic in Dublin, the university confirmed to Columbus Business First. The main pet and livestock hospitals on the Columbus campus were not affected, university spokesman Chris Davey said. Malware infected a server, "creating the potential for" private client information to be accessed, he said via email. "We have no evidence that any confidential information… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Ohio State's pet ER in Dublin hit with possible data breach, offers free ID theft protection
A data breach could have compromised private information of "some clients" of Ohio State University's emergency and specialty veterinary clinic in Dublin, the university confirmed to Columbus Business First. The main pet and livestock hospitals on the Columbus campus were not affected, university spokesman Chris Davey said. Malware infected a server, "creating the potential for" private client information to be accessed, he said via email. "We have no evidence that any confidential information… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Protein involved in blood clotting stimulates liver repair
(Michigan State University) A team of Michigan State University researchers, led by James Luyendyk in the College of Veterinary Medicine, has uncovered a new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair.Using an experimental model of high-dosage acetaminophen, the team found that liver injury activated blood clotting, which then stimulated liver repair.The study is published online in the Journal of Hepatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bulgaria reports virulent bird flu at over 50 farms, culling 430,000 poultry
SOFIA (Reuters) - A virulent bird flu virus has spread to 55 poultry farms in Bulgaria prompting the veterinary authorities to announce a cull of some 430,000 birds since it was first detected in the middle of December, agriculture minister Dessislava Taneva said on Saturday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

No Antibiotic In The U.S. Could Save This Woman. We Should All Be Worried.
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No Antibiotic In The U.S. Could Save This Woman. We Should All Be Worried.
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnostic breakthrough: 'Shaking piglets' attributed to previously unidentified virus
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to detect a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus, in 'shaking piglets.' The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When Your Healers Become Your Killers
Since the introduction of penicillin in the middle of the 20th century, antimicrobial treatments have been used not only in human medicine but in veterinary care as well. But their excessive use in livestock (and aquaculture) contaminates the environment and contributes to a rise of resistant microorganisms, posing threats to human health, animal health, food security and people’s livelihoods. Photo: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Jan 11 2017 (IPS)There is a major though silent global threat to human and animal health, with implications for both food safety and food security and the economic well-being of millions of farming...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Projects TerraViva United Nations Improving the lives of rural populations: better nutrition & agriculture productivity Source Type: news

Houston veterinary company raises $12 million for acquisitions
A Houston-based veterinary management company has closed on more than $12 million to help the company make more acquisitions across the U.S. Petwell Partners LLC disclosed Jan. 5 it raised a $12.6 million equity round from 59 different investors, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Co-founder David Strauss declined to disclose who the investors were, but added that the investors were comprised of high-net -worth individuals and not institutional organizations. Petwell… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Joe Martin Source Type: news

Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
(University of Pennsylvania) A team of scientists led by Ronald Harty, a professor of pathobiology and microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, has identified a mechanism that appears to represent one way that host cells have evolved to outsmart infection by Ebola and other viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Will a Trump Administration Let Sleeping Stem Cells Lie?
Once upon a time, in a political universe far, far away, presidents and presidential candidates were obliged to weigh in on an esoteric laboratory procedure that extracted stem cells from human embryos, and on an innovative veterinary practice that enabled mammals to be cloned. In that exotic time and place, profound moral questions were vigorously debated in the media and in the Oval Office by big thinkers on the left and right, faith-based and secular. Presidential commissions furrowed their collective brows while scientists worried about their freedom to inquire, and policy wonks chewed over the spiritual implications...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Will The Trump Administration Let Sleeping Stem Cells Lie?
Once upon a time, in a political universe far, far away, presidents and presidential candidates were obliged to weigh in on an esoteric laboratory procedure that extracted stem cells from human embryos, and on an innovative veterinary practice that enabled mammals to be cloned. In that exotic time and place, profound moral questions were vigorously debated in the media and in the Oval Office by big thinkers on the left and right, faith-based and secular. Presidential commissions furrowed their collective brows while scientists worried about their freedom to inquire, and policy wonks chewed over the spiritual implications...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Africa: Strengthening Veterinary Services to Benefit the Poor
[SciDev.Net] Strengthening Africa's veterinary services could boost livestock production and livelihoods, writes Laura Higham. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Strengthening veterinary services to benefit the poor
Strengthening Africa ’s veterinary services could boost livestock production and livelihoods, writes Laura Higham. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - January 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news