Nigeria: Govt Dismisses HIV/Aids Cure Claims
[Guardian] The Federal Government through the National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) and the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has dismissed the claims by a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Maduike Ezeibe, to have discovered a new drug for the cure of Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nigeria: NACA Dismisses HIV Cure Claim By Michael Okpara University Prof
[Vanguard] The National Agency for the Control of AIDS, NACA, has dismissed an HIV cure claim by Professor Maduike Ezeibe, a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Abia State. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Acute pesticide ingestion managed with yohimbine as a rescue therapy - Nasa P, Juneja D.
Amitraz is used as a pesticide in agricultural and veterinary medicine. It is primarily a central α2 adrenergic agonist and known to cause central nervous system depression, convulsions, respiratory depression, and bradycardia on severe intoxication. We r... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Salicylic acid promotes nasal mucosa colonization
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) An international research team, including scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna, has now shown that this multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron and lab tests showed that the iron limitation strongly promotes formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus. This allows the bacteria to survive and persist in our respiratory tract for longer periods of time which eventually trigger life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons. Published in Frontiers in Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 3, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Portugal strengthens bird flu controls after case in wild bird
LISBON (Reuters) - Portugal has reinforced veterinary controls in the southern Algarve region after detecting an isolated case of a highly contagious strain of bird flu virus in a gray heron, officials said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

KLIFOVET-Contract Development Organisation for Animal Health Products
KLIFOVET is your expert partner for all steps in the development of veterinary medicinal products and feed additives. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - February 2, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Calling all guinea pig owners
Academics from the University of Bristol ’ s School of Veterinary Sciences are asking for guinea pig owners to take part in a new research study on how pet guinea pigs are kept in the UK by completing an online questionnaire. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Ketamine's Versatility Makes it a Powerful Tool for EMS
Ketamine was first developed in 1962 as a safer anesthetic and alternative to phencyclidine (PCP), which had numerous problematic side effects.1 It was then used on the battlefields of Vietnam and was approved by the FDA in 1970 for civilian use since it proved to be a safe and effective anesthetic for both human and veterinary applications.2 However, in the 1980s, concerns over misuse and the psychodysleptic effects eventually led to ketamine being classified as a schedule III controlled substance.3 In addition, concerns for adverse effects led to markedly reduced medical use in humans. Interestingly, in the late 1990s an...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Scott D. Hax, NRP, FP-C, C-NPT Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Macedonia reports outbreak of H5N8 bird flu at farm: OIE
PARIS (Reuters) - Macedonia reported an outbreak of the highly contagious H5N8 bird flu virus at a farm in the southwestern part of the country, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday, citing a report from the local veterinary authorities. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Researchers identify drug that alleviates opioid withdrawal
(University of Calgary) Opioid use and abuse is a significant social, health and economic issue. Researchers at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Hotchkiss Brain Institute have discovered that an existing anti-gout medication is effective in reducing the severity of withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent rodents. For their study, the researchers looked specifically at two common opioid drugs: morphine and fentanyl. Their work is leading to the development of a clinical trial in Calgary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What We've Learned From Studying Microbiomes
What is a microbiome you ask? It's the tiny living community that surrounds us all and is the subject of investigation by human and veterinary health care providers everywhere. You've heard about microbiome from me before, see my post about it from last year, "What's in the Water." There is no question that the relationships all animals, including humans, have with the trillions upon trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi--in, on and around us--are a critical part of the life experience. At Shedd Aquarium, this is what the Aquarium Microbiome Project is all about. Our lab offers a comprehensive look at microbio...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dogs share food with other dogs even in complex situations
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Dogs also share their food, albeit mainly with four-legged friends rather than strangers. A new study conducted by behavioural biologists from the Messerli Research Institute at Vetmeduni Vienna has now confirmed this prosocial behaviour among canines. The more complex methodology of the study, however, showed that the experimental set-up has an impact on the dogs' behaviour and that even the mere presence of another dog makes the animals more generous. Published in PLOS ONE (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Diamondback Drugs ® Earns Industry ’s Coveted PCAB™ Accreditation
Veterinary-only Compounding Pharmacy Recognized for Excellence and Commitment to Quality Standards by Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board (PCAB)(PRWeb January 25, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Diamondback-Drugs/Earns-PCAB/prweb14007864.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Studies offer new hope for diagnosis of Chiari-malformation in toy dog breeds
(University of Surrey) Researchers from the University Of Surrey School Of Veterinary Medicine have made advances in the study of the Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia disorder in toy dogs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

DentalEZ ® Donates Massive Amount of Equipment, Supplies to Project Chimps Organization
Contribution Will Provide Complete Dental Care Facility forthe Organization ’s New LocationMalvern, PA (January 10, 2017) –For its latest philanthropic endeavor, DentalEZ®, a supplier of integrated products and services for dental health professionals worldwide, recently donated a full shipment of dental supplies and equipment to Project Chimps, a rescue organization dedicated to the lifetime sanctuary care of hundreds of captive chimpanzees.Specifically, the Company donated various dental products, and operatory and utility room equipment to Project Chimps ’ new northern Georgia sanctuary including N...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 20, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Ohio State's pet ER in Dublin hit with possible data breach, offers free ID theft protection
A data breach could have compromised private information of "some clients" of Ohio State University's emergency and specialty veterinary clinic in Dublin, the university confirmed to Columbus Business First. The main pet and livestock hospitals on the Columbus campus were not affected, university spokesman Chris Davey said. Malware infected a server, "creating the potential for" private client information to be accessed, he said via email. "We have no evidence that any confidential information… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Ohio State's pet ER in Dublin hit with possible data breach, offers free ID theft protection
A data breach could have compromised private information of "some clients" of Ohio State University's emergency and specialty veterinary clinic in Dublin, the university confirmed to Columbus Business First. The main pet and livestock hospitals on the Columbus campus were not affected, university spokesman Chris Davey said. Malware infected a server, "creating the potential for" private client information to be accessed, he said via email. "We have no evidence that any confidential information… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Protein involved in blood clotting stimulates liver repair
(Michigan State University) A team of Michigan State University researchers, led by James Luyendyk in the College of Veterinary Medicine, has uncovered a new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair.Using an experimental model of high-dosage acetaminophen, the team found that liver injury activated blood clotting, which then stimulated liver repair.The study is published online in the Journal of Hepatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bulgaria reports virulent bird flu at over 50 farms, culling 430,000 poultry
SOFIA (Reuters) - A virulent bird flu virus has spread to 55 poultry farms in Bulgaria prompting the veterinary authorities to announce a cull of some 430,000 birds since it was first detected in the middle of December, agriculture minister Dessislava Taneva said on Saturday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

No Antibiotic In The U.S. Could Save This Woman. We Should All Be Worried.
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No Antibiotic In The U.S. Could Save This Woman. We Should All Be Worried.
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnostic breakthrough: 'Shaking piglets' attributed to previously unidentified virus
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to detect a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus, in 'shaking piglets.' The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When Your Healers Become Your Killers
Since the introduction of penicillin in the middle of the 20th century, antimicrobial treatments have been used not only in human medicine but in veterinary care as well. But their excessive use in livestock (and aquaculture) contaminates the environment and contributes to a rise of resistant microorganisms, posing threats to human health, animal health, food security and people’s livelihoods. Photo: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Jan 11 2017 (IPS)There is a major though silent global threat to human and animal health, with implications for both food safety and food security and the economic well-being of millions of farming...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Projects TerraViva United Nations Improving the lives of rural populations: better nutrition & agriculture productivity Source Type: news

Houston veterinary company raises $12 million for acquisitions
A Houston-based veterinary management company has closed on more than $12 million to help the company make more acquisitions across the U.S. Petwell Partners LLC disclosed Jan. 5 it raised a $12.6 million equity round from 59 different investors, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Co-founder David Strauss declined to disclose who the investors were, but added that the investors were comprised of high-net -worth individuals and not institutional organizations. Petwell… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Joe Martin Source Type: news

Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
(University of Pennsylvania) A team of scientists led by Ronald Harty, a professor of pathobiology and microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, has identified a mechanism that appears to represent one way that host cells have evolved to outsmart infection by Ebola and other viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Will a Trump Administration Let Sleeping Stem Cells Lie?
Once upon a time, in a political universe far, far away, presidents and presidential candidates were obliged to weigh in on an esoteric laboratory procedure that extracted stem cells from human embryos, and on an innovative veterinary practice that enabled mammals to be cloned. In that exotic time and place, profound moral questions were vigorously debated in the media and in the Oval Office by big thinkers on the left and right, faith-based and secular. Presidential commissions furrowed their collective brows while scientists worried about their freedom to inquire, and policy wonks chewed over the spiritual implications...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Will The Trump Administration Let Sleeping Stem Cells Lie?
Once upon a time, in a political universe far, far away, presidents and presidential candidates were obliged to weigh in on an esoteric laboratory procedure that extracted stem cells from human embryos, and on an innovative veterinary practice that enabled mammals to be cloned. In that exotic time and place, profound moral questions were vigorously debated in the media and in the Oval Office by big thinkers on the left and right, faith-based and secular. Presidential commissions furrowed their collective brows while scientists worried about their freedom to inquire, and policy wonks chewed over the spiritual implications...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Africa: Strengthening Veterinary Services to Benefit the Poor
[SciDev.Net] Strengthening Africa's veterinary services could boost livestock production and livelihoods, writes Laura Higham. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Strengthening veterinary services to benefit the poor
Strengthening Africa ’s veterinary services could boost livestock production and livelihoods, writes Laura Higham. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - January 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Manufacturer to expand engineering group, 21 new local jobs
Midmark Corp. is planning to expand its engineering group, which will mean new jobs in both Dayton and Versailles. The growth of Midmark's engineering team, which will bring new engineering and technology employees to four Midmark offices, will boost the local presence for the company. Midmark is a major manufacturer of medical, dental and veterinary equipment, which is based in Dayton and has production and a dministrative offices in Darke County. “We are thrilled to be adding new talent and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tristan Navera Source Type: news

Stewardship policy reduces antimicrobial use on farms
Evidence suggests the frequent use of certain antimicrobials (AM) in food-producing animals may reduce their effectiveness as treatments for both animals and humans. Researchers at the University of Bristol ’ s School of Veterinary Sciences are finding novel ways to address these concerns, working with farmers to empower them to develop policies to promote more responsible use of medicines on farms. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

U.S. Navy Dolphins Join The Fight To Save Endangered Vaquita Porpoises
A “dream team” of scientists and veterinary specialists has been assembling in a last-ditch effort to save the critically endangered vaquita ― the world’s smallest porpoise and rarest marine mammal. With fewer than 60 of the species now left on the planet, the Mexican government launched the “risky” rescue mission last month. The aim is to capture — and hopefully conserve — as many vaquitas as possible. This week, a skilled new addition to the capture team was announced. Dolphins have joined the fight to save the vaquita, the U.S. Navy confirmed. Armed with their n...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cancer treatment for pooch could help people, too
Cancer treatments for Smokey, a rescue dog with osteosarcoma, may help similar dogs in the future — but they could also help kids who have osteosarcoma as well, veterinary researchers hope. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for December 22, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Milestone Scientific closes $3m round Milestone Scientific‘s said today it closed a $3 million round, selling approximately 2 million shares at $1.50 per share. Each share sold includes warrants for the purchase of an addi...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Varian Medical Systems puts up $276m for PerkinElmer ’ s medical imaging biz
Varian Medical (NYSE:VAR) said today that it agreed to put up $267 million to acquire the medical imaging business of PerkinElmer Inc. (NYSE:PKI) for the planned spinout of its Varex imaging components unit next month. The 280-worker PerkinElmer segment is an OEM business that makes digital flat panel X-ray detectors for industrial, medical, dental and veterinary X-ray imaging systems. Varian said Varex plans to finance the buyout of the Santa Clara, Calif.-based operation by expanding its credit line to $600 million;l the deal is expected to close after the Varex spinout concludes in Jan...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Imaging Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat PerkinElmer Inc. Varex Imaging Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

Penn: Epigenetic change ties mitochondrial dysfunction to tumor progression
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new report published in the journal Cell Discovery, a team led by researchers in the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has identified a mechanism by which mitochondria can drive changes in nuclear gene expression that are associated with tumor progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New test and better understanding of deadly infection in boas and pythons
A new study sheds light on inclusion body disease, and may help veterinary care teams better protect the health of their populations of large snakes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Carfentanil Exposure Treatment & Precautionary Measures for EMS Providers
As EMS providers, our jobs continue to get more and more difficult, and a new threat has recently made prehospital emergency care even more dangerous. It is imperative that all of us rapidly educate ourselves and our colleagues on the extremely potent narcotic carfentanil. The primary danger of carfentanil is its potency—it is 10,000 times more potent than morphine and 100 times more potent than fentanyl.1–2 Carfentanil is an extremely potent synthetic fentanyl analogue that is supposed to be highly restricted for veterinary use for the tranquilizing of large animals, such as elephants. It is not approved for u...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 16, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H. Evan Dingle, MD Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Researchers develop new test, better understanding of deadly infection in boas and pythons
(Morris Animal Foundation) A newly published study in The Veterinary Journal sheds light on inclusion body disease, and may help veterinary care teams better protect the health of their populations of large snakes. The study was funded in part by a grant from Morris Animal Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Does omega-3 algal oil improve osteoarthritis in dogs?
Owners of dogs showing signs of osteoarthritis are being asked by the University of Bristol ’ s School of Veterinary Sciences to take part in the first study of its kind to find out whether an omega-3 oil derived from algae can help dogs with osteoarthritis (OA). (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 14, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

A Year In Review: 2016 Animal Success Stories
This is the time of the year when most of us tend to do a lot of looking back and reflecting on the events of the past year. Which of those resolutions did we keep? What did we accomplish in our personal lives or in the workplace? I've had the opportunity to witness quite a few remarkable events of late at Shedd Aquarium, and I for one have been "wowing" and "holy cowing" quite a bit lately. Looking back for us is another reminder of what a cool place the aquarium is and how with over 32,000 patients of 1,500 or so species we never fully know what the day will bring. I'd like to share here a few example...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stress Can Even Make The Dog Go Prematurely Gray
This study found that the use of such pressure wraps can markedly decrease heart rate in anxious dogs and also affect other behavioral measures of stress. Dog trainers and veterinarians suggest that physical activities ― like a game of fetch or a walk around the block―  can be a great stress reducer for dogs. They also suggest creating a safe zone ― an area in your house where the dog can escape high-stress events like thunderstorms or loud parties. Provide your dog with a favorite “security blanket” such as a toy and visit your dog often. If possible, stay with him until the high-stress ev...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Feeling Too Much Better?
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 20-year-old male was recently treated with a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor for an episode of major depressive disorder lasting one month. He presents for follow up 3 weeks after initiation of treatment. On follow up three weeks after initiation of treatment, he says that he feels " great and has had increased energy for the past week, with a decreased need for sleep. He appears more talkative than previously and confides that he attributes some of his improvement to several sexual encounters with different women he met in bars over the weekend. He is in veterinary sc...
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - December 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

National teaching award for 'outstanding' Vet School educator
Mrs Sheena Warman, of the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences, has been awarded a National Teaching Fellowship by the Higher Education Academy. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 8, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences Source Type: news

Major urinary proteins do not allow kin recognition in male mice
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now found evidence that directly refutes this hypothesis. They discovered that the MUP genes of wild house mice show a surprising lack of variability, and rather than providing a stable barcode, individuals dynamically regulate the number of MUP excreted depending upon social context. These findings contradict the widely assumed hypothesis that MUPs control kin recognition. The results were published in Scientific Reports and Molecular Biosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Veterinary supplier plans to add 50 jobs in Columbus, Dublin
Veterinary supplier Henry Schein Inc. plans to add 50 employees in Dublin and Columbus over the next three years as it expands a distribution center on the west side of the city. The company expects to invest $1.3 million in renovation and equipment at its 67,000-square-foot distribution center at 3880 Twin Creeks Drive, according to a fact sheet prepared for Columbus City Council. It will add 25 jobs there, most of them warehouse workers at an average $13.50 hourly salary . Melville, New York-based… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 5, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

New, more effective strategy for producing flu vaccines
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of researchers led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has developed technology that could improve the production of vaccines that protect people from influenza B. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 5, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Evaluation of scientific rigor in animal research
(PLOS) The 'reproducibility crisis' in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. In research publishing in the open-access journals PLOS Biology and PLOS ONE on Dec. 2, 2016, researchers from the University of Bern have assessed scientific rigor in animal experimentation in Switzerland. The study, commissioned by the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office, found widespread deficiencies in the reporting of experimental methodology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 2, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pro Bono: Legal Issues in Treating Injured Pets
In addition to our human loved ones, our pets are also treasured family members. EMS providers may be the only ones equipped for the moment when a four-legged life is on the line. Do we increase our legal risk if we take that extra step to render aid to a pet on scene? As with anything we do on the job, there of course can be legal consequences. But the benefits of helping a family save their pet far outweigh the minimal legal risk of taking action and using our human care skills to help save the life of an animal in crisis. Legal Review The law is starting to take more formal steps to recognize and protect public safety p...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steve Wirth, Esq., EMT-P Tags: Columns Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Research team discovers a pathogen's motility triggers immune response
(University of Georgia) Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news