Vet School research paves the way for improved horse welfare
A vision for improving horse welfare has been set out following research carried out by the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences and funded by World Horse Welfare. It is hoped the findings, to be unveiled at the House of Commons today [Tuesday 12 July], will enable the welfare priorities of the UK's 800,000 horses to be addressed. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - July 12, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Is the agile wallaby man's new best friend?
(Frontiers) Looking for a new pet? If so, consider the agile wallaby or the Asian palm civet.Responding to the growing trend in keeping exotic animals as pets a team, led by Dr. Paul Koene, has developed a methodology to assess the suitability of mammals to be kept domestically in a new study published in Frontiers in Veterinary Science.The top five animals were: the sika seer, agile wallaby, Tamar wallaby, llama, and Asian palm civet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vet School research paves the way for improved horse welfare
(University of Bristol) A vision for improving horse welfare has been set out following research carried out by the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences and funded by World Horse Welfare. It is hoped the findings, to be unveiled at the House of Commons Tuesday, July 12, will enable the welfare priorities of the UK's 800,000 horses to be addressed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 11, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why we are calling for a ban on vets offering homeopathic remedies | Danny Chambers
The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons should listen to more than 1,000 vets and end pseudo treatments for sick animalsWhen I wrote my open letter to the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) calling for a ban on the treatment of animals with homeopathic remedies, I hoped it would offer an opportunity for my colleagues in the veterinary profession to stand up for evidence-based veterinary care. Now, with more 1,000 vets lending their names to the letter as I submit it to the RCVS, along with hundreds of veterinary nurses and students, it’s time for our professional body to take our concerns seriously. The cas...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Danny Chambers Tags: Veterinary medicine Animals Medical research Science Homeopathy Alternative medicine UK news Source Type: news

Dogs suffering allergic reactions and death after being injected with popular Merck vaccine
(NaturalNews) Dog owners and veterinary associations in the United Kingdom have been warning of a rash of dangerous and even lethal side effects from a popular vaccine designed to protect dogs from a rare and mild illness.The disease in question, leptospirosis, can be serious... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research to reveal welfare priorities of UK equines at Westminster event
New research revealing the welfare priorities of the UK's 800,000 equines will be outlined at an event at the House of Commons next week [Tuesday 12 July]. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - July 7, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

6 th global veterinary summit
November 14-16, 2016, Atlanta, GA. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - July 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What does a healthy ageing cat look like?
Just as improved diet and medical care have resulted in increased life expectancy in humans, advances in nutrition and veterinary care have increased the life span of pet cats. The result is a growing population of ageing cats; in the USA, for example, it is estimated that 20 percent of pet cats are 11 years of age or older. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What does a healthy aging cat look like?
(SAGE) Just as improved diet and medical care have resulted in increased life expectancy in humans, advances in nutrition and veterinary care have increased the life span of pet cats. The result is a growing population of ageing cats; in the USA, for example, it is estimated that 20 percent of pet cats are 11 years of age or older. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Zika virus may be stopped by a harmless bacteria carried by bees and butterflies
The bacteria, called Wolbachia pipienti, is found in 60 per cent of insects globally and can be introduced to mosquitoes in the lab, the Madison School of Veterinary Medicine found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Benign bacteria block mosquitoes from transmitting Zika, chikungunya viruses
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have confirmed that a benign bacterium called Wolbachia pipientis can completely block transmission of Zika virus in Aedes aegypti. Matthew Aliota, a scientist at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine and first author of the paper, says the bacteria could present a 'novel biological control mechanism,' aiding efforts to stop the spread of Zika virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Veterinary forensics: firearms and investigation of projectile injury - Bradley-Siemens N, Brower AI.
Projectile injury represents an estimated 14% of reported animal cruelty cases in the United States. Cases involving projectiles are complicated by gross similarities to other common types of injury, including bite wounds and motor vehicle injuries, by wea... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Namibia: Measures Mooted Must Now Become Reality
[New Era] The gauntlet seems to have finally been thrown to the ground, and heavily so it seems as much as the consequences thereof must still be assessed, with the South African veterinary authorities finally deciding on implementing strict import regulations effective from July 1. And this time the South African authorities do not seem to be bluffing. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 24, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Female blue tits sing in the face of danger
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Birdsong has long been associated with courtship or competitive behavior. And males were considered to be more active. A team from Vetmeduni Vienna now shows that female singing is much more common. They demonstrated for the first time a connection between the song of female blue tits and the presence of a predator. This singing appears to be about their own defense. The study was published in the Journal of Ornithology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Low-Dose Radiography System enhances veterinary industry.
Using flat-panel detector, ImageVue™ DR50 enables low-dose radiation image capture in real-time at point of care without sacrificing diagnostic image clarity. Reduction in radiation promotes health and well-being of pets and veterinary professionals, while imaging capabilities enhance visualization of dense anatomy and fine anatomical structures. Capturing digital image in
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - June 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

NIH welcomes 52 young scientists to year-long medical research scholars program
A year-long residential program, the MRSP introduces medical, dental and veterinary students to cutting-edge research. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 22, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New mechanism activates the immune system against tumor cells
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) It is currently one challenge in cancer research to activate the body's natural defences to eliminate tumour cells. Veronika Sexl, head of the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at Vetmeduni Vienna, has now discovered with her team a surprising new function for the signalling molecule STAT1 in immune cells. This previously unknown feature could pave the way to a new therapeutic approach to immunological cancer therapy. The study results were published in the journal 'OncoImmunology'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 17, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Longtime UC Davis veterinary school executive named chief medical officer
Jane Sykes has been appointed as the chief veterinary medical officer of the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, the nation's top-ranked veterinary program. The university announced Sykes’ appointment Thursday. Her employment began June 1 for a five-year term. For the past year, she has been serving as interim director of the program, which has 500 faculty and staff. She reports to the dean of the medical school. The UC Davis William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 16, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Mark Anderson Source Type: news

Longtime UC Davis veterinary school executive named chief medical officer
Jane Sykes has been appointed as the chief veterinary medical officer of the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, the nation's top-ranked veterinary program. The university announced Sykes’ appointment Thursday. Her employment began June 1 for a five-year term. For the past year, she has been serving as interim director of the program, which has 500 faculty and staff. She reports to the dean of the medical school. The UC Davis William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 16, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Anderson Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Snoopy: Pet Medicines Spark a Biotech Boom
Firms chase a new breed of advanced veterinary care, from antibodies to cell therapies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research)
Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research - June 15, 2016 Category: Stem Cells Authors: Heidi LedfordNature magazine Tags: Health Biotech Medicine Medical & Biology Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Snoopy: Pet Medicines Spark a Biotech Boom
Firms chase a new breed of advanced veterinary care, from antibodies to cell therapies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research)
Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research - June 15, 2016 Category: Stem Cells Authors: Heidi Ledford Nature magazine Tags: Health Biotech Medicine Medical & Biology Source Type: news

Zoo Gives Up Aging Polar Bear To Give Her A Better Life
It’s hard to let go of an old friend, but sometimes it’s for the best. The Indianapolis Zoo will be closing its polar bear exhibit and moving Tundra, a 29-year-old polar bear, to better facilities in Detroit, the zoo announced Monday. Releasing Tundra, who was born in captivity, into the wild isn’t realistic, zoo spokeswoman Carla Knapp told The Dodo. “The zoo’s veterinary staff carefully reviewed all of the options and agree that the Detroit Zoo is the perfect facility for Tundra’s needs as a senior bear,” the Indianapolis Zoo wrote in a news release. “Considered one of the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

This Aquarium Is Moving All Its Dolphins To A Seaside Sanctuary
Baltimore’s National Aquarium is taking an colossal step toward animal welfare with the creation of a “seaside sanctuary” where it will retire the eight Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in its care. The aquarium put an end to dolphin performances in 2012, but the animals have remained on display in their tanks, the Associated Press reports. Chief executive officer John Racanelli announced Tuesday that the aquarium would be establishing “the nation’s first seaside dolphin sanctuary," and that the dolphins will be living there by 2020. That means an outdoor, enclosed area of natural ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Future Special Forces Medics to Train at West Virginia University
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - WVU Medicine has formed a new partnership with the U.S. Army Special Forces, also known as the Green Berets, to be the first academic medical center in the country to host clinical rotations for soldiers training to become Special Forces Medical Sergeants. The development of this partnership started with George Bal, M.D., WVU Medicine orthopaedic surgeon and combat-serving veteran with the 82nd Airborne, who heard that the Army was looking for hospitals willing to serve as clinical training sites for its Special Forces soldiers. Dr. Bal then reached out to Alison Wilson, M.D., director of the WVU Medic...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 14, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Future Special Forces Medics to Train at West Virginia University
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - WVU Medicine has formed a new partnership with the U.S. Army Special Forces, also known as the Green Berets, to be the first academic medical center in the country to host clinical rotations for soldiers training to become Special Forces Medical Sergeants. The development of this partnership started with George Bal, M.D., WVU Medicine orthopaedic surgeon and combat-serving veteran with the 82nd Airborne, who heard that the Army was looking for hospitals willing to serve as clinical training sites for its Special Forces soldiers. Dr. Bal then reached out to Alison Wilson, M.D., director of the WVU Medic...
Source: JEMS Operations - June 14, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Cantrell Office Building Sale Exceeds $2.6 Million (Real Deals)
A 20,232-SF office building in west Little Rock tipped the scales at $2.61 million. 8114 Cantrell LLC, led by Billy Roehrenbeck, purchased its namesake project. The seller is Atkinson Properties LLC, led by Russell and Richard Atkinson. The deal is financed with a $2.2 million loan from Centennial Bank of Conway. The 0.83-acre development previously was linked with two February 2013 mortgages totaling $1.9 million held by Central Bank of Little Rock. Atkinson Properties bought the Lenders Title Building at 8114 Cantrell Road for $2.25 million in October 2004 from Cantrell Road Partnership, led by David Boerner. Rural Acrea...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - June 13, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Joining The Docs: How A Unifying ‘Language Of Medicine’ Has The Potential To Make (And Break) Healthcare.
Consider a world in which we all understand one another; a world in which we not only speak the same language but also have the vocabulary to comprehend those whose working lives are profoundly different to our own. In such a world, economists could communicate with politicians; politicians could communicate with voters; voters could even discuss Minecraft with their children. Whether or not you consider this prospect attractive, it’s not a scenario that seems likely to come about any time soon. The world is now too complex, and our lives too short, for any one individual to master it all. Even Einstein, despite...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 10, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tom MacFarlane Source Type: news

How A Unifying ‘Language Of Medicine’ Has The Potential To Make (And Break) Healthcare.
Consider a world in which we all understand one another; a world in which we not only speak the same language but also have the vocabulary to comprehend those whose working lives are profoundly different to our own. In such a world, economists could communicate with politicians; politicians could communicate with voters; voters could even discuss Minecraft with their children. Whether or not you consider this prospect attractive, it’s not a scenario that seems likely to come about any time soon. The world is now too complex, and our lives too short, for any one individual to master it all. Even Einstein, despite...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 10, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tom MacFarlane Source Type: news

Cancer-causing virus strikes genetically vulnerable horses
(Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine) A new study shows genetic differences in immune function partly account for why some horses get sarcoid tumors while others do not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Filarial nematodes taking a fancy to Austria
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) A preliminary study by Vetmeduni Vienna has identified indigenous mosquitoes as carriers of Dirofilaria repens, suggesting for the first time that the parasite has become endemic in Eastern Austria. Dirofilaria immitis, the heartworm, also appears to be on the verge of becoming autochthonous. The slow pace at which the parasites are establishing themselves is probably due in part to the keeping conditions of dogs in Austria. The review was published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Ohio State University Disciplines 85 Veterinary Students For Cheating
(Reuters) - Eighty-five students have been disciplined for cheating on quizzes and tests at Ohio State University veterinary school, the university said on Tuesday. The university found in an investigation that doctoral students at the College of Veterinary Medicine wrongly collaborated on online, take-home assessments, according to a statement on the school's website. The school opened an investigation after finding "inconsistencies" in test-taking practices, the statement said. University officials contacted by Reuters declined to discuss details about the investigation that began in February, citing stude...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

From bench to bedside: new research centre to benefit humans, animals and the environment
A new national centre, unique in the UK and Europe, that will take research out of the laboratory and closer to the bedside to ensure more patients worldwide can access ground-breaking treatments as quickly as possible will be officially opened today [Thursday 9 June]. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 9, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

ISHAM Working Groups Veterinary Mycology and Medical Phycology
The Joint Symposium the Japanese Society of Veterinary Sciences, the ISHAM Working Groups Veterinary Mycology and Medical Phycology will be held in Fujisawa, Japan, on 8 September, 2016. For information, see here. Courses & Workshops (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - June 7, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

Last Known Living 9/11 Search Dog Passes Away
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (AP) — The last known living 9/11 search dog has died in a Houston suburb at age 16. Bretagne (BRIHT'-nee), a golden retriever, was euthanized Monday at a veterinary clinic in the Houston suburb of Cypress, according to a statement from the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service. Bretagne was 2 years old when she and her handler, Denise Corliss, were part of the Texas Task Force 1 sent to the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan after the terrorist attack brought down the buildings on Sept. 11, 2001. They spent 10 days at the scene searching rubble for human remains. About two-doz...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 7, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Source Type: news

Novavax presents data on developing seasonal influenza nanoparticles for RSV
US-based, clinical-stage vaccine company Novavax has presented data for the company’s nanoparticle programme at the New Approaches to Vaccines for Human and Veterinary Tropical Diseases Keystone Symposia in Cape Town, South Africa. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - June 6, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Shrimp: the robotic answer to the sheepdog – video
Researchers at the University of Sydney’s dairy farm on the outskirts of Sydney are experimenting with robotic farm assistants. The collaboration between the university’s Australian Centre for Field Robotics and the faculty of veterinary science’s dairy science group gives a glimpse of a high-tech future of farmingTransforming the bush: robots, drones and cows that milk themselves Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Robots Technology Agriculture Science Australia news Source Type: news

Moving beyond pro/con debates over genetically engineered crops
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zoo’s Tasmanian Devil gets pacemaker
(Reuters) — A Tasmanian devil named Nick is back in his exhibit at the San Diego Zoo after receiving a pacemaker to make his heartbeat normal. In January, zoo veterinarians discovered that Nick suffered from an abnormally slow heartbeat and his cardiologist decided that surgery was in order. Nick is only the 2nd of his species on record ever to be implanted with a pacemaker, according to staff at the San Diego Zoo. “His heartbeats were too slow and now the pacemaker is going to actually take over [pacing] his heart and is going to determine when to pace fast or slow, depending on his activity,” ...
Source: Mass Device - June 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Cardiac Rhythm Management Source Type: news

Shy wild boars are sometimes better mothers
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) The personality of wild boar mothers can affect the wellbeing of their young. A team from the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology at the Vetmeduni Vienna investigated whether and under which circumstances the personality affected the number of offspring reared. Whith sufficient food, shy wild boar mothers raise more young than risk-taking, aggressive females. When the availability of food becomes scarce, however, this advantage is no longer given. The study was published in Animal Behaviour. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 3, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

8 Remedies for Minor Pet Emergencies
1. Problem: Nail injury. Dogs and cats can slice up their nails in a variety of ways - everything from a too-close nail trim that nicks the quick, to running outdoors over sharp rocks. Solution: Styptic powder. If you don't have styptic powder on hand, for minor bleeding grab either cornstarch or flour from your kitchen, pour some into a small bowl, and dip the injured paw into the powder to stop the bleeding. 2. Problem: Bee sting. Most bee stings occur on a paw or the face. Not only are bee stings painful, but your pet could also have an allergic reaction. Solution: Credit card and quercetin. If you need to remove th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Veterinary forensic pathology of animal sexual abuse - Stern AW, Smith-Blackmore M.
Animal sexual abuse (ASA) involves harm inflicted on animals for the purposes of human sexual gratification and includes such terms as bestiality, zoophilia, zoosadism, animal sexual assault, and others. The prevalence of ASA is not known, although it may ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

New veterinary research helps distinguish accidents from abuse
Using data from criminal cases of animal abuse, researchers have demonstrated that motor vehicle accidents and non-accidental blunt force trauma cases in dogs and cats present with different types of injuries. The research can help in the effort to uncover and address animal abuse. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nigeria: Nigerian Veterinary Surgeons Can Compete With Global Trends - Avong
[Leadership] The registrar of the Veterinary Council of Nigeria (VCN), Dr Markus Avong, in this exclusive interview with Ruth Tene Natsa speaks on the many challenges facing the nation's veterinary profession and efforts to redress them. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 25, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New veterinary research helps distinguish accidents from abuse
(Tufts University) Using data from criminal cases of animal abuse, researchers from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals have demonstrated that motor vehicle accidents and non-accidental blunt force trauma cases in dogs and cats present with different types of injuries. The research, which appears online in advance of the September 2016 print edition of the Journal of Forensic Sciences, can help in the effort to uncover and address animal abuse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MSD Animal Health Receives Marketing Approval from European Medicines Agency for BRAVECTO™ (fluralaner) Spot-On Solution for Cats and Dogs
Dateline City: MADISON, N.J. Spot-On Treatment for Fleas and Ticks Effective For 12 Weeks MADISON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--MSD Animal Health (known as Merck Animal Health in the United States and Canada) today announced that, following a positive opinion from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Veterinary Use (CVMP), the European Medicine Agency has granted a marketing authorization for the veterinary medicinal product BRAVECTO™ (fluralaner) Spot-On Solution for both cats and dogs, a Spot-On treatment for fleas and ticks eff...
Source: Merck - May 24, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Animal Health #MSD $MRK Bravecto MSD Animal Health Source Type: news

New Head for Bristol’s Vet School
A veterinary surgeon who has experience across clinical, academic and commercial sectors, has been appointed as the new Head of the University of Bristol’s School of Veterinary Sciences. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 23, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

New strategy could yield more precise seasonal flu vaccine
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of researchers led by University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine virologist Yoshihiro Kawaoka describes a novel strategy to predict the antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses and give science the ability to more precisely anticipate seasonal flu strains. It would foster a closer match for the so-called 'vaccine viruses' used to create the world's vaccine supply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FYI, You Can Make Dog Food In A Slow Cooker
Any reader of Michael Pollan knows this to be true: "If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't." Eating fresh, home-cooked meals isn't only better for your health, it's better for your life. And the same applies to your dog. Why should you feed your pet unknown ingredients in canned dog food when you can make something delicious yourself? You'd have more control over the nutrients, with the same emotional benefits of sharing a meal with your pet that you'd have with a human. The following infographic from Breeder Retriever shows some basic guidelines for using your slow coo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Inbreeding might cause accelerated aging, suggests bird study
Research into Seychelles warblers brings new insight into the effects of inbreeding on cellular aging. The findings could, one day, help keep rare species healthy. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Veterinary Source Type: news