Diagnostic breakthrough: 'Shaking piglets' attributed to previously unidentified virus
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to detect a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus, in 'shaking piglets.' The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When Your Healers Become Your Killers
Since the introduction of penicillin in the middle of the 20th century, antimicrobial treatments have been used not only in human medicine but in veterinary care as well. But their excessive use in livestock (and aquaculture) contaminates the environment and contributes to a rise of resistant microorganisms, posing threats to human health, animal health, food security and people’s livelihoods. Photo: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Jan 11 2017 (IPS)There is a major though silent global threat to human and animal health, with implications for both food safety and food security and the economic well-being of millions of farming...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Projects TerraViva United Nations Improving the lives of rural populations: better nutrition & agriculture productivity Source Type: news

Houston veterinary company raises $12 million for acquisitions
A Houston-based veterinary management company has closed on more than $12 million to help the company make more acquisitions across the U.S. Petwell Partners LLC disclosed Jan. 5 it raised a $12.6 million equity round from 59 different investors, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Co-founder David Strauss declined to disclose who the investors were, but added that the investors were comprised of high-net -worth individuals and not institutional organizations. Petwell… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Joe Martin Source Type: news

Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
(University of Pennsylvania) A team of scientists led by Ronald Harty, a professor of pathobiology and microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, has identified a mechanism that appears to represent one way that host cells have evolved to outsmart infection by Ebola and other viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Will a Trump Administration Let Sleeping Stem Cells Lie?
Once upon a time, in a political universe far, far away, presidents and presidential candidates were obliged to weigh in on an esoteric laboratory procedure that extracted stem cells from human embryos, and on an innovative veterinary practice that enabled mammals to be cloned. In that exotic time and place, profound moral questions were vigorously debated in the media and in the Oval Office by big thinkers on the left and right, faith-based and secular. Presidential commissions furrowed their collective brows while scientists worried about their freedom to inquire, and policy wonks chewed over the spiritual implications...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Will The Trump Administration Let Sleeping Stem Cells Lie?
Once upon a time, in a political universe far, far away, presidents and presidential candidates were obliged to weigh in on an esoteric laboratory procedure that extracted stem cells from human embryos, and on an innovative veterinary practice that enabled mammals to be cloned. In that exotic time and place, profound moral questions were vigorously debated in the media and in the Oval Office by big thinkers on the left and right, faith-based and secular. Presidential commissions furrowed their collective brows while scientists worried about their freedom to inquire, and policy wonks chewed over the spiritual implications...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Africa: Strengthening Veterinary Services to Benefit the Poor
[SciDev.Net] Strengthening Africa's veterinary services could boost livestock production and livelihoods, writes Laura Higham. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Strengthening veterinary services to benefit the poor
Strengthening Africa ’s veterinary services could boost livestock production and livelihoods, writes Laura Higham. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - January 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Manufacturer to expand engineering group, 21 new local jobs
Midmark Corp. is planning to expand its engineering group, which will mean new jobs in both Dayton and Versailles. The growth of Midmark's engineering team, which will bring new engineering and technology employees to four Midmark offices, will boost the local presence for the company. Midmark is a major manufacturer of medical, dental and veterinary equipment, which is based in Dayton and has production and a dministrative offices in Darke County. “We are thrilled to be adding new talent and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tristan Navera Source Type: news

Stewardship policy reduces antimicrobial use on farms
Evidence suggests the frequent use of certain antimicrobials (AM) in food-producing animals may reduce their effectiveness as treatments for both animals and humans. Researchers at the University of Bristol ’ s School of Veterinary Sciences are finding novel ways to address these concerns, working with farmers to empower them to develop policies to promote more responsible use of medicines on farms. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

U.S. Navy Dolphins Join The Fight To Save Endangered Vaquita Porpoises
A “dream team” of scientists and veterinary specialists has been assembling in a last-ditch effort to save the critically endangered vaquita ― the world’s smallest porpoise and rarest marine mammal. With fewer than 60 of the species now left on the planet, the Mexican government launched the “risky” rescue mission last month. The aim is to capture — and hopefully conserve — as many vaquitas as possible. This week, a skilled new addition to the capture team was announced. Dolphins have joined the fight to save the vaquita, the U.S. Navy confirmed. Armed with their n...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cancer treatment for pooch could help people, too
Cancer treatments for Smokey, a rescue dog with osteosarcoma, may help similar dogs in the future — but they could also help kids who have osteosarcoma as well, veterinary researchers hope. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for December 22, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Milestone Scientific closes $3m round Milestone Scientific‘s said today it closed a $3 million round, selling approximately 2 million shares at $1.50 per share. Each share sold includes warrants for the purchase of an addi...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Varian Medical Systems puts up $276m for PerkinElmer ’ s medical imaging biz
Varian Medical (NYSE:VAR) said today that it agreed to put up $267 million to acquire the medical imaging business of PerkinElmer Inc. (NYSE:PKI) for the planned spinout of its Varex imaging components unit next month. The 280-worker PerkinElmer segment is an OEM business that makes digital flat panel X-ray detectors for industrial, medical, dental and veterinary X-ray imaging systems. Varian said Varex plans to finance the buyout of the Santa Clara, Calif.-based operation by expanding its credit line to $600 million;l the deal is expected to close after the Varex spinout concludes in Jan...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Imaging Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat PerkinElmer Inc. Varex Imaging Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

Penn: Epigenetic change ties mitochondrial dysfunction to tumor progression
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new report published in the journal Cell Discovery, a team led by researchers in the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has identified a mechanism by which mitochondria can drive changes in nuclear gene expression that are associated with tumor progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New test and better understanding of deadly infection in boas and pythons
A new study sheds light on inclusion body disease, and may help veterinary care teams better protect the health of their populations of large snakes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Carfentanil Exposure Treatment & Precautionary Measures for EMS Providers
As EMS providers, our jobs continue to get more and more difficult, and a new threat has recently made prehospital emergency care even more dangerous. It is imperative that all of us rapidly educate ourselves and our colleagues on the extremely potent narcotic carfentanil. The primary danger of carfentanil is its potency—it is 10,000 times more potent than morphine and 100 times more potent than fentanyl.1–2 Carfentanil is an extremely potent synthetic fentanyl analogue that is supposed to be highly restricted for veterinary use for the tranquilizing of large animals, such as elephants. It is not approved for u...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 16, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H. Evan Dingle, MD Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Researchers develop new test, better understanding of deadly infection in boas and pythons
(Morris Animal Foundation) A newly published study in The Veterinary Journal sheds light on inclusion body disease, and may help veterinary care teams better protect the health of their populations of large snakes. The study was funded in part by a grant from Morris Animal Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Does omega-3 algal oil improve osteoarthritis in dogs?
Owners of dogs showing signs of osteoarthritis are being asked by the University of Bristol ’ s School of Veterinary Sciences to take part in the first study of its kind to find out whether an omega-3 oil derived from algae can help dogs with osteoarthritis (OA). (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 14, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

A Year In Review: 2016 Animal Success Stories
This is the time of the year when most of us tend to do a lot of looking back and reflecting on the events of the past year. Which of those resolutions did we keep? What did we accomplish in our personal lives or in the workplace? I've had the opportunity to witness quite a few remarkable events of late at Shedd Aquarium, and I for one have been "wowing" and "holy cowing" quite a bit lately. Looking back for us is another reminder of what a cool place the aquarium is and how with over 32,000 patients of 1,500 or so species we never fully know what the day will bring. I'd like to share here a few example...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stress Can Even Make The Dog Go Prematurely Gray
This study found that the use of such pressure wraps can markedly decrease heart rate in anxious dogs and also affect other behavioral measures of stress. Dog trainers and veterinarians suggest that physical activities ― like a game of fetch or a walk around the block―  can be a great stress reducer for dogs. They also suggest creating a safe zone ― an area in your house where the dog can escape high-stress events like thunderstorms or loud parties. Provide your dog with a favorite “security blanket” such as a toy and visit your dog often. If possible, stay with him until the high-stress ev...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Feeling Too Much Better?
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 20-year-old male was recently treated with a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor for an episode of major depressive disorder lasting one month. He presents for follow up 3 weeks after initiation of treatment. On follow up three weeks after initiation of treatment, he says that he feels " great and has had increased energy for the past week, with a decreased need for sleep. He appears more talkative than previously and confides that he attributes some of his improvement to several sexual encounters with different women he met in bars over the weekend. He is in veterinary sc...
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - December 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

National teaching award for 'outstanding' Vet School educator
Mrs Sheena Warman, of the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences, has been awarded a National Teaching Fellowship by the Higher Education Academy. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 8, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences Source Type: news

Major urinary proteins do not allow kin recognition in male mice
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now found evidence that directly refutes this hypothesis. They discovered that the MUP genes of wild house mice show a surprising lack of variability, and rather than providing a stable barcode, individuals dynamically regulate the number of MUP excreted depending upon social context. These findings contradict the widely assumed hypothesis that MUPs control kin recognition. The results were published in Scientific Reports and Molecular Biosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Veterinary supplier plans to add 50 jobs in Columbus, Dublin
Veterinary supplier Henry Schein Inc. plans to add 50 employees in Dublin and Columbus over the next three years as it expands a distribution center on the west side of the city. The company expects to invest $1.3 million in renovation and equipment at its 67,000-square-foot distribution center at 3880 Twin Creeks Drive, according to a fact sheet prepared for Columbus City Council. It will add 25 jobs there, most of them warehouse workers at an average $13.50 hourly salary . Melville, New York-based… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 5, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

New, more effective strategy for producing flu vaccines
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of researchers led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has developed technology that could improve the production of vaccines that protect people from influenza B. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 5, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Evaluation of scientific rigor in animal research
(PLOS) The 'reproducibility crisis' in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. In research publishing in the open-access journals PLOS Biology and PLOS ONE on Dec. 2, 2016, researchers from the University of Bern have assessed scientific rigor in animal experimentation in Switzerland. The study, commissioned by the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office, found widespread deficiencies in the reporting of experimental methodology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 2, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pro Bono: Legal Issues in Treating Injured Pets
In addition to our human loved ones, our pets are also treasured family members. EMS providers may be the only ones equipped for the moment when a four-legged life is on the line. Do we increase our legal risk if we take that extra step to render aid to a pet on scene? As with anything we do on the job, there of course can be legal consequences. But the benefits of helping a family save their pet far outweigh the minimal legal risk of taking action and using our human care skills to help save the life of an animal in crisis. Legal Review The law is starting to take more formal steps to recognize and protect public safety p...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steve Wirth, Esq., EMT-P Tags: Columns Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Research team discovers a pathogen's motility triggers immune response
(University of Georgia) Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Romania confirms H5N8 bird flu in dead swan
BUCHAREST (Reuters) - A dead wild swan found in southeastern Romania earlier this month was found to be infected with H5N8 bird flu that has hit several countries in Europe, the country's veterinary and food safety agency (ANSVSA) said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Online training improves understanding of EU pig welfare legislation
Animal welfare legislation has been developed for many countries and many species but its impact depends on whether it is followed. New research has found an online training tool can improve participants ’ understanding of EU tail docking and enrichment legislation, as well as risk factors for tail biting. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 23, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Fly larvae clean bee-eater's nest
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Bird nests are home not only to bird parents and their offspring but also to other inhabitants, such as insect larvae. So far, there has been no research into the possible benefit for birds from this living arrangement. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna have now shown that fly larvae in nests of European bee-eaters help clean the nest. The 'waste removal' has a positive effect on offspring development. Published in Journal of Ornithology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Decrease in the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Austrian dairy cows is necessary
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) A study on the use of antibiotics on Austrian dairy farms by the Institute of Veterinary Public Health at Vetmeduni Vienna showed that dairy cattle are less frequently treated with antibiotics than pigs and poultry. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics such as cephalosporins should nevertheless be reduced to avoid resistance to these important human antibiotics. The study was published in the Berliner and M ü nchner Tier ä rztlichen Wochenschrift. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 18, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Goffin ’s cockatoos make same tool from different materials – video report
Researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna and the University of Oxford have shown that Goffin ’s cockatoos can make and use elongated tools out of different materials. In video footage released on Wednesday, the cockatoo makes tools from wood and twigs, but also from cardboard, suggesting the birds can anticipate how the tools will be usedContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 16, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Birds Science Animals Wildlife World news Source Type: news

Laundry Detergent Pods Are Toxic to Pets
An item that doesn't often show up on lists of household products toxic to pets is laundry detergent. But it should, because most detergents and soaps contain ionic and anionic surfactants. When ingested in small amounts, these chemicals can cause GI upset in a pet, such as excessive drooling, vomiting or diarrhea. Fortunately, it's unlikely most pets would have the opportunity or desire to ingest a large amount of bottled detergent. But a new concern these days are those little brightly colored laundry detergent pods that smell good and look like candy or some other type of yummy treat to a small child or a pet. It's con...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Doubting Dog
Most people tend to think dogs are just naturally happy creatures, always ready for a good time. But an Australian study suggests that some dogs are actually pessimists based on the theory that animals who show heightened expectation of positive outcomes are optimistic, while those who are more inclined to expect negative outcomes are pessimistic. Optimistic Dogs Expect Good Things to Happen to Them For the study, which was conducted at the University of Sydney and involved 40 dogs of various breeds and ages, researchers played two tones for the dogs that were two octaves apart. The dogs were taught that if they touched ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dog bites - are vets missing an educational opportunity? - Mannion CJ, Greenberg D.
Veterinary surgeons have a key role to play in tackling the public health problem of dog bites, say CHRISTOPHER MANNION: and DANIELLE GREENBERG: , who argue that a multiprofessional approach to the problem is needed.British Veterinary Association.... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

IDEXX Welcomes Healthcare Technology Veteran Pat Venters as Chief Marketing Officer
WESTBROOK, Maine, Nov. 14, 2016 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- IDEXX Laboratories, Inc. (IDXX), the global leader in veterinary diagnostics, software, and water microbiology testing, today announced that Pat Venters has joined the company as... Diagnostics, Personnel IDEXX Laboratories (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 14, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Ebola Virus and Animal Quarantine
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Network for Public Health Law. 11/08/2016 This resource provides information about legal authority in Michigan to quarantine animals in the event of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD). The information is from a review of relevant state and local laws regarding animal quarantine, as well as general guidance from the American Veterinary Medical Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

New findings about the honey bee infecting deformed wing virus
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have succeeded for the first time in simulating the course of disease using artificial genetic material of the deformed wing virus. The symptoms of the so-called mite disease were reproduced in the laboratory without mites by the injection of synthetic RNA. This enabled the prudent development of new strategies in order to protect the bee population in the future. The results were published in the journal PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MedQ unveils new analytics dashboard
Radiology informatics firm MedQ is rolling out its new Q/ris real-time customer-configurable...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MedQ adds teleradiology installation MedQ completes Tenn. installation MedQ installs RIS software in Neb. MedQ unveils new Q/ris 3000 software release MedQ enters veterinary market (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 9, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Treating farm animals with compassion led to her own health and wellness
Mention “animal rescues” and chances are, you’ll think of dogs, cats or even marine mammals — but not farm animals. Author Tracey Stewart, a former veterinary technician, and her spouse, former Daily Show host Jon, have become advocates for abused farm animals. To help Farm Sanctuary celebrate... (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - November 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Valli Herman Source Type: news

Compost bedding good for cow claw health
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Dairy cows kept in barns often develop claw damage because of humid and unsuitable roaming areas. A study conducted by Vetmeduni Vienna now shows that the use of wood shavings and sawdust in dairy barns instead of straw bedding was especially good for claw health. A comparison with other barn types demonstrated that cows kept in compost bedded barns exhibited a lower frequency and lesser severity of claw disorders. The results were published in The Veterinary Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Midmark acquires Missouri-based manufacturer
One of the Dayton region's largest companies has acquired another manufacturer. Dayton-based Midmark Corp. — a medical, dental and veterinary equipment manufacturer — has acquired Missouri-based VSSI Inc., according to a press release. The 42-employee company that was acquired was founded in 1988 and makes veterinary practice equipment, like cabinets, exam and surgery ta bles, and boarding and holding products. John Baumann, president and CEO of Midmark, said that together, the companies can… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 3, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Kaitlin Schroeder Source Type: news

USDA Awards $4.3 Million to Ensure Access to Needed Veterinary Services in Rural Communities
The USDA is providing $4.3 million to 48 veterinarians to repay their student loans in return for filling shortages in rural areas. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - November 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Ketamine Considerations for Prehospital Use
At 3 a.m. you're toned out to a single vehicle accident with one passenger who slid off the road and wrapped his car around a light pole. A 44-year-old male is alert, rates his pain a 13 on a 1–10 scale, and reports he has asthma. Vital signs include a heart rate of 70, blood pressure of 90/60, and a respiration rate of 25. Extrication will be at least 30 minutes and the patient has multiple fractures. What drug will you consider that can manage this patient's pain, improve his cardiovascular state, and sedate him for extrication? Have you considered ketamine? History For 63 years ketamine has been administered acros...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsay Henderson, MD, EMT-P Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

How Treating Cancer in Canines Is Advancing Human Medicine
Veterinary treatment is impacting the process for developing human treatments. (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cheryl London Source Type: news

Rapid spread of dog disease can be stopped with diligent infection control
Protocol for keeping dogs from transmitting disease has, until now, lagged decades behind efforts to contain human infectious disease. New guidance for halting the spread of a multitude of dog diseases is now available, thanks to an effort led by veterinary experts. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rapid spread of dog disease can be stopped with diligent infection control
(Ohio State University) Protocol for keeping dogs from transmitting diseases to one another has, until now, lagged decades behind efforts to contain human infectious disease. New guidance for halting the spread of a multitude of dog diseases is now available, thanks to an effort led by veterinary experts at The Ohio State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Antibiotics could be cut by up to a third, say dairy farmers
Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Those questioned also think that over the next five years they could cut their own antibiotic use by almost a third in dry cow therapy and a fifth in clinical mastitis. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 3, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news