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Peer Review of Draft NTP Approach to Genomic Dose-Response Modeling - October 23-25, 2017
(Source: NIEHS National Toxicology Program)
Source: NIEHS National Toxicology Program - August 31, 2017 Category: Toxicology Source Type: news

Monsanto knowingly sold dangerous, illegal chemicals for YEARS, uncovered documents reveal
(Natural News) Monsanto’s reputation has been taking a lot of hits lately, and the news just keeps getting worse for the agrochemical company. As unsealed court documents continue to show how they acted to cover up the dangers of their toxic Roundup herbicide, other documents have come to light showing that deceit has been the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neglected role of hydrogen sulfide in sulfur mustard poisoning: Keap1 S-sulfhydration and subsequent Nrf2 pathway activation - Meng W, Pei Z, Feng Y, Zhao J, Chen Y, Shi W, Xu Q, Lin F, Sun M, Xiao K.
Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent and a terrorism choice that targets various organs and tissues, especially lung tissues. Its toxic effects are tightly associated with oxidative stress. The signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

The case of the macho crocs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Leslie, M. Tags: Ecology, Pharmacology, Toxicology Feature Source Type: news

Anti-inflammatory prevents heart attacks
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Couzin-Frankel, J. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Pharmacology, Toxicology, Physiology In Depth Source Type: news

Toxic algae may be culprit in mysterious dinosaur deaths
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gramling, C. Tags: Paleontology In Depth Source Type: news

Third World farmers are committing suicide by consuming toxic pesticides
(Natural News) Neither using a secured storage nor implementing stricter pesticide access were effective in stemming chemical-related self-poisoning and suicide in rural Asia, two studies revealed. The use of pesticides as an act of self-poisoning remains to be one of the three leading means of suicide worldwide, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported. According to the WHO,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flooded Texas Chemical Plants Raise Concerns About Toxic Emissions
Houston is home to hundreds of petrochemical plants and some of them are damaged by flooding. Environmental groups worry about toxic emissions, and one plant is at risk of a possible explosion. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mose Buchele Source Type: news

Before Volcano Buried Pompeii, Toxic Water May Have Plagued Residents
TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 -- Before a nearby volcano blew and buried the ancient Roman town of Pompeii centuries ago, residents were drinking toxic water that probably caused a host of ills, a new study suggests. Based on an analysis of pipes that ran... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Extended AI Use Linked to CV Events and Bone Fractures Extended AI Use Linked to CV Events and Bone Fractures
There is growing interest in extending the use of adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer, but the benefit vs risk for toxicity is not yet defined.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Penn Medicine pharmacologist given Founders' Award from ACS
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Ian A. Blair, Ph.D., an internationally recognized expert on applying mass spectrometry, has won the 2017 Founders' Award from the Division of Chemical Toxicology of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A milestone in aquatic toxicology
(Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) The public release of first generation annotations for the fathead minnow genome was published today in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

California Baby ’s Jessica Iclisoy To Be Presented Mom First Award at...
Starting as a mom in her kitchen to create a non-toxic environment for her family, Jessica launched California Baby which is now the industry standard for natural skincare, and today offers more than...(PRWeb August 29, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/08/prweb14643238.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

REUTERS now in bed with Monsanto, committing journalistic fraud to cover up evidence of harm from toxic agricultural poisons
(Natural News) House Republicans are going to bat for Monsanto, the world’s most evil corporation, which is having a very difficult time maintaining any semblance of a positive reputation in the public eye after it was revealed that its most famous weed killer causes cancer in humans. In an effort to steer the narrative back... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Half of farmed salmon found to be DEAF due to toxic effects of confined aquaculture
(Natural News) With a new wave of health consciousness sweeping the nation, an increasing number of people are incorporating more fish into their daily diets. After all, fish are purported to be some of the healthiest sources of protein on the planet, high in the feel-good hormone vitamin D, and packed with omega-3 essential fatty... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: Harvey forces hospitals, nursing homes to evacuate
ABC News' senior medical contributor Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses what Houston hospitals are doing now amid flooding and evacuations and the health issues Texans may face from the toxic flood waters. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Hospital HORRORS: Cancer patient poisoned with chemo, then left HALF-NAKED on gurney for 13 hours after blood became infected
(Natural News) Chemotherapy is no joke. This toxic chemical treatment has debilitating side effects, including anemia, bleeding, infections, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, constipation, hair loss, mouth sores and extreme fatigue, to name just a few. Imagine trying to deal with all that and then being left lying “half-naked” on a hospital gurney in the corridor... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial uses nicotine patches to treat chronic lung disease
(MediaSource) Nicotine patches were created to help smokers quit, but researchers are conducting a study to see if they can also help patients who suffer from a chronic lung disease. Sarcoidosis is a growth of inflammatory cells, most likely triggered by inhaling pesticides or other toxic materials. If the condition doesn't go away on its own, it can cause severe lung damage and even death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mainstream media trying to discourage women from using licorice root extract, saying it "interferes" with all the toxic medications they're supposed to swallow
(Natural News) As people become increasingly drawn to natural remedies, pharmaceutical companies are doing all they can to draw them back over to the dark side of conventional medication, and one common tactic is scaring them away from popular herbal remedies. Women who are hoping to find some relief from menopause have long turned to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New low-tech method developed for instantly testing tap water for toxic contaminants
(Natural News) People in the United States have been questioning the composition of their water, especially with the recent spate of contaminations of major water sources in the country. Researchers who presented their work on Tuesday, August 22 at the 254th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society said they are utilizing the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Body-on-a-chip ’ device screens human heart cells for drug toxicity
Researchers at Kyoto University‘s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences have developed a ‘body-on-a-chip’ device that can evaluate the side-effects of drugs on human cells, according to a study published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry Advances. The device was used to test the toxicity of doxorubicin, a cancer-killing drug, on human heart cells. The researchers found that although the drug wasn’t toxic to the cells, a metabolite of the drug was. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post ‘Body-on-a-chip’ device screens human h...
Source: Mass Device - August 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Oncology Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Kyoto University Source Type: news

China says will check egg producers for use of fipronil insecticide
BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese authorities said on Friday they will launch spot checks of egg producers to make sure a toxic chemical known as fipronil is not being used as a cleaning product, in animal drugs or feed after higher than acceptable levels of the insecticide were detected in farms in Europe. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Inhaled carbon monoxide: from toxin to therapy - Hess DR.
Carbon monoxide (CO) is usually recognized as a toxic gas that can be used to assess lung function in the pulmonary function laboratory. The toxicity of CO relates to its high affinity for hemoglobin and other heme molecules, producing carboxyhemoglobin (H... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Recognizing and responding to the "toxic" work environment: worker safety, patient safety, and abuse/neglect in nursing homes - Pickering CEZ, Nurenberg K, Schiamberg L.
This grounded theory study examined how the certified nursing assistant (CNA) understands and responds to bullying in the workplace. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze data from in-depth telephone interviews with CNAs ( N = 22) who experienc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Prehospital management of acute childhood poisoning in Spain - Salazar J, Zubiaur O, Azkunaga B, Carlos Molina J, Mintegi S, Intoxicaciones Sociedad Espa ñola de Urgencias de Pediatría G.
OBJECTIVES: This objective was to analyze prehospital management of acute childhood poisonings. Poisonings treated in 59 pediatric emergency departments participating in the Toxicology Observation Project of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Emergency Medic... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Trump ’ s Halt on Coal Mining Study Has Asbestos Implications
The U.S. Department of the Interior has ordered a halt to a study on the public health risks of mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia — an area ripe with natural asbestos deposits. A letter from the Interior Department on Monday directed the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to “cease all work” on the study, citing responsible spending of taxpayer dollars as the reason for the decision. The $1 million National Academies study began in 2016 and was expected to take two years to complete. It aimed to evaluate health risks of a common mining technique for people living near surfac...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 24, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Appalachian Mountains arsenic asbestos exposure Appalachia asbestos exposure coal mining asbestosis coal mining Bill Price Central Appalachia coal mining Appalachia Donald Trump Environmental Health Perspectives Glenda Owens House Co Source Type: news

Toxic metals in hip replacements found to cause Alzheimer's
(Natural News) New advice from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) may mean that approximately 56,000 Britons need to undergo a series of medical tests to determine if they are suffering from muscle or bone damage caused by metal toxicity. The health regulatory group has warned that metal-on-metal hip replacement surgery is more... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Manganese in underground drinking water is cause for concern
(University of California - Riverside) Underground drinking water sources in parts of the US and three Asian countries may not be as safe as previously thought due to high levels of manganese, especially at shallow depths, according to a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside. Manganese, a metal that is required by the body in tiny amounts, can be toxic at elevated levels, particularly in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illegal dumping during road construction in Ethiopia affects child mortality
(Queen Mary University of London) Researchers have shown that living near newly built roads in Ethiopia is associated with higher rates of infant mortality. Proximity to new roads has negative health effects because of toxic waste dumped illegally during the construction phase. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The organoid architect
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sinha, G. Tags: Development, Medicine, Diseases, Pharmacology, Toxicology, Scientific Community Feature Source Type: news

Zebrafish larvae could help to personalize cancer treatments
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Leslie, M. Tags: Development, Medicine, Diseases, Pharmacology, Toxicology In Depth Source Type: news

Contaminated eggs cost Dutch chicken farmers 33 million euros
AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Dutch chicken farmers have suffered around 33 million euros ($39 million) in damages as a direct result of culls and other measures carried out after their eggs were found this month to be tainted with a toxic chemical. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Sirtex swings to a loss after ‘ challenging ’ year
Shares in Australian cancer treatment developer Sirtex Medical (ASX:SRX) plunged more than 15% yesterday after the company posted a net loss of -A$26.9 million in 2016, compared to a profit of A$54 million the year before. Sirtex has faced a barrage of obstacles this year, including a number of clinical trials that failed to meet primary endpoints. The company’s full-year results were hit by a slowdown in sales growth of its SIR-Spheres Y-90 radioactive microspheres and by the costs linked to its restructuring efforts. In June, Sirtex said it planned to cut 15% of its workforce, estimating that it would sav...
Source: Mass Device - August 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Source Type: news

Los Angeles homes, schools and workplaces still heavily contaminated with lead
(Natural News) Residents of southeast Los Angeles County in California recently discovered from media reports and public health experts that their homes, schools, and places of work may be contaminated with lead. This may be due to a former battery recycling plant in Vernon that had supposedly spewed toxic chemicals before it stopped its operations. The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anglers' delight as algal blooms breakthrough highlights innovative science
(John Innes Centre) Millions of fish-deaths caused by toxic Prymnesium algal blooms could be prevented with the application of a household chemical best known for bleaching hair, breakthrough research has revealed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The science of fluoride flipping
(University of North Carolina Health Care) So much of what happens inside cells to preserve health or cause disease is so small or time-sensitive that researchers are just now getting glimpses of the complexities unfolding in us every minute of the day. UNC researchers have discovered one such complexity -- a previously hidden mode of RNA regulation vital for bacterial defense against toxic fluoride ions. The discovery opens a new research avenue for developing drugs that target RNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What causes algal blooms to become toxic?
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by marine algae and discovered in 1987 as the cause of amnesic shellfish poisoning. Scientists at UC Santa Cruz have made substantial progress in understanding and predicting the conditions that lead to large blooms of the toxin-producing algae (diatoms called Pseudo-nitzschia). But one aspect of these toxic algal blooms, which affect wildlife as well as economically important fisheries, remains a mystery: how do the algae make domoic acid and what triggers its production? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Interior Dept. halts study into Appalachian mining technique's likely health hazards
The Trump administration has halted a study of the health effects of a common mining technique in Appalachia, which is believed to deposit waste containing toxic minerals in ground waters. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common antiseptic ingredients inhibit mitochondria and impair hormone response
‘Quats’, used in antiseptics, in toothpastes, eye drops, shampoos and other products inhibit mitochondrial energy production and cellular oestrogen responses, potentially causing reproductive toxicity and reduced fertility, according to research published in Environmental Health Perspectives.Medical Xpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - August 22, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

$417 Million Awarded in Suit Tying Johnson ’ s Baby Powder to Cancer
A Los Angeles jury voted the damages for a medical receptionist who developed ovarian cancer after using Johnson& Johnson ’ s talc for decades. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Ovarian Cancer Decisions and Verdicts Johnson & Hazardous and Toxic Substances Suits and Litigation (Civil) Source Type: news

Technique speeds chemical screening to prioritize toxicity testing
(North Carolina State University) Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a high-throughput technique that can determine if a chemical has the potential to activate key genes in seconds rather than the typical 24 hours or more. The technique can be used to prioritize chemicals for in-depth testing to determine their toxicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Opioid misuse can be tracked using Twitter
(Springer) Social media can be a useful tool to find out how widespread the misuse of prescribed opioid drugs is, or to track the dynamics of opioid misuse in a given locality over time. This is according to a study in Springer Nature's Journal of Medical Toxicology. Lead author Michael Chary and his team analyzed more than 3.6 million tweets and found that the information about opioid misuse was significantly correlated with federal surveys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

At What Height Do You Consider Preventative Treatment for Acute Mountain Sickness?
Discussion Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a well-known problem for some people who travel to high altitude, especially altitudes> 2500 m (~8200 feet). Symptoms include headache, nausea or emesis, shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue, difficulty sleeping and poor appetite. The incidence in adults ranges from 25% at 2975 m to up to 75% at 5896 m. The incidence in children is less clear but it appears that children are more susceptible at 45% for 16-19 year olds for similar altitudes. Risk factors are numerous including age, gender, obesity, ascent rate, altitude for sleeping, previous exposure to high altitude, previ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

California's hemp farms producing massive tonnage of toxic chemical runoff, polluting thousands of acres of land
(Natural News) Illegal marijuana farms in California have left acres of land so contaminated with toxic chemicals and fertilizers that a quarter-teaspoon could kill a bear. Already five law enforcement officers have been sent to the hospital for severe skin rashes and respiratory problems. This, after just touching a polluted area. Government officials say that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Batteries for Apple's new electric car will be made in China using toxic heavy metals
(Natural News) Chinese publication, Yicai Global has reported that global tech giant, Apple, is renewing its plans to be a major player in the electronic vehicle (EV) market, with operations to develop its own autonomous car on the way. Supposedly, Apple would be sourcing their batteries from leading Chinese manufacturer, Contemporary Amperex Technology Ltd. (CATL).... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'There are hundreds of sick crew': is toxic air on planes making frequent flyers ill?
Kate Leahy used to work as cabin crew, until she was signed off sick. Then a young colleague died in 2014. She talks to the former staff looking for answersThree years ago, Matt Bass, 34, died suddenly in his sleep. According to his father, Charlie, he had been feeling unwell for a few months. He ’d lost weight, had digestive and respiratory problems, and suffered from severe fatigue. Doctors thought he might haveCrohn ’s disease, but were struggling to reach a diagnosis.Matt was cabin crew forBritish Airways, and on the day he died had returned overnight from Accra, Ghana (by cabin crew standards, a relatively...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kate Leahy Tags: Aeronautics Air transport British Airways Boeing Virgin Atlantic Science Death and dying Business Source Type: news

Ask Well: Can You Sweat Out Toxins?
Heavy metals and BPA can be detected in sweat. But whether tiny amounts of chemicals present a health concern is unknown. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KAREN WEINTRAUB Tags: Sweating Hazardous and Toxic Substances Saunas and Sweat Lodges Bisphenol A (BPA) Source Type: news

Advantages of analyzing postmortem brain samples in routine forensic drug screening-Case series of three non-natural deaths tested positive for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) - Mardal M, Johansen SS, Thomsen R, Linnet K.
Three case reports are presented, including autopsy findings and toxicological screening results, which were tested positive for the potent hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). LSD and its main metabolites were quantified in brain tissue a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

A 'murder' mystery with a toxic twist ... and pygmy goats
Three victims, a country house and poison could be a case for Hercule Poirot. But this is a sad case of botanical ignorance rather than murder most foulA recent reportappeared in the news about the sad demise of Mirabel, Adele and Jet of Walton Hall, Cheshire. The deaths were initially suspected of being due to deliberate poisoning when it became clear that there had been intruders in the grounds of the hall. The case seemed to have all the ingredients for an Agatha Christie novel: multiple deaths, poison, suspicious circumstances and even a big country house setting.Except in this case the unfortunate victims were not cha...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kathryn Harkup Tags: Forensic science Poison Chemistry Biology Plants Environment Animals Source Type: news

Agroindustrial waste can be used as material for housing and infrastructure
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Converting waste into resources, substituting toxic raw materials for healthy inputs, migrating from harmful to sustainable production processes. These are some of the guidelines for a research project about agroindustrial wastes and their potential use as appropriate materials for housing and infrastructure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news