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Linking death certificates, postmortem toxicology, and prescription history data for better identification of populations at increased risk for drug intoxication deaths - Slavova S, Bunn TL, Hargrove SL, Corey T, Ingram V.
OBJECTIVEsOur objective was to assess and improve the completeness of drug-related information, to evaluate the risk for drug intoxication deaths associated with specific drugs among different demographic groups, and to show the benefit of multi-source sur... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Organic food IS healthier says Teagasc
Products grown without using toxic chemicals, which can cost twice as much as a result, contain 20 per cent more protective flavonoids, Irish researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drugs and death in Las Vegas: a novel use of coroner data to create a toxicology surveillance system in pregnant women - Mahesan A, Paul AB, Mahesan A, Simms L.
Existing studies in the literature analyze self-reported use of substances or utilize prenatal laboratory testing to assess the prevalence of illicit substances in pregnant women. Our study explores a novel use of quantitative autopsy toxicology to underst... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Great New Toxicology Podcast
In the first episode of “The Dantastic Mr. Tox & Howard Show,” Drs. Dan Rusyniak and Howard Greller — formerly of the Journal of Medical Toxicology Podcast — have a superb discussion about the current expanding opioid crisis with Dr. David Juurlink from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto. Topics covered include opioid-induced hyperalgesia, the key difference between relieving pain and relieving suffering, and why tramadol is generally such a poor drug. The episode is smart, succinct, and highly recommended. I look forward to future podcasts. To listen, cli...
Source: The Poison Review - June 16, 2017 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical daniel rusyniak dantastic mr. tox & howard david juurlink howard greller podcast Source Type: news

Enzymes May Be Able To Give You A Real Tan Without The Damage
Sun worshippers might someday be able to get a tan without exposing their skin to the harmful ultraviolet radiation that’s responsible for skin cancers, a new study suggests. The goal of the research is to prevent skin cancers by darkening the pigmentation of people’s skin, senior author Dr. David Fisher told Reuters Health. “Very light skin and a very poor ability to tan correlates with a very high probability of developing cancer,” said Fisher, who is chief of the dermatology service at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Darker skin may block harmful UV radiation, Fisher said, so it’s...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Enzymes May Be Able To Give You A Real Tan Without The Damage
Sun worshippers might someday be able to get a tan without exposing their skin to the harmful ultraviolet radiation that’s responsible for skin cancers, a new study suggests. The goal of the research is to prevent skin cancers by darkening the pigmentation of people’s skin, senior author Dr. David Fisher told Reuters Health. “Very light skin and a very poor ability to tan correlates with a very high probability of developing cancer,” said Fisher, who is chief of the dermatology service at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Darker skin may block harmful UV radiation, Fisher said, so it’s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Man, 63, dies of Legionnaires' after working in garden  
Stephen Clements, a grandfather, from Cromer, Norfolk, inhaled toxic bacteria which had grown in stagnant water within the pipe. He died a week later at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Interdisciplinary Scientist (Biologist/Microbiologist/Toxicologist); apply by 6/28/17; https://go.usa.gov/xNp7p   https://go.usa.gov/xNp7v  
Interdisciplinary Scientist (Biologist/Microbiologist/Toxicologist); apply by 6/28/17; https://go.usa.gov/xNp7p  https://go.usa.gov/xNp7v  (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - June 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at FDADeviceInfo) Source Type: news

Themes and trends in intentional self-poisoning: perspectives from critical care toxicology - Rasimas JJ, Smolcic EE, Sinclair CM.
This research investigated the substances employed by and experiences of patients who come to acute treatment after self-poisoning. A retrospective search of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium Registry was performed to characterize a large cohort of p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Alere says Justice Dept. closed pain lab probe as Q1 losses soar
Alere (NYSE:ALR) said yesterday that the U.S. Justice Dept. closed a probe into its pain management lab in Texas without taking action against the diagnostics giant, which also reported a nearly 974% increase in 1st-quarter losses. Waltham, Mass.-based Alere said the Justice Dept. told it June 8 that the investigation into the lab in Austin was closed. The company reported losses of $-64.1 million, or -80¢ per share, on sales of $588.2 million for the 3 months ended March 31. That compared with losses of -$6.0 million, or -13¢ per share, on sales of $589.0 million during Q1 2016. Alere said the results do no...
Source: Mass Device - June 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Diagnostics Legal News MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat Alere Source Type: news

Modern dentistry dangers exposed by a dentist
(Natural News) Dental amalgam is made up of 50 percent mercury – a toxic heavy metal linked scientifically to neurological problems, kidney problems and infertility. In 1991, the World Health Organization reported that mercury fillings are the predominant cause of mercury exposure. So, the question remains: is YOUR dentist telling you the whole truth about... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report of increasing overdose deaths that include acetyl fentanyl in multiple counties of the southwestern region of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 2015-2016 - Dwyer JB, Janssen J, Luckasevic TM, Williams KE.
Acetyl fentanyl is a Schedule I controlled synthetic opioid that is becoming an increasingly detected "designer drug." Routine drug screening procedures in local forensic toxicology laboratories identified a total of 41 overdose deaths associated with acet... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Cardiological aspects of carbon monoxide poisoning - Marchewka J, Gawlik I, D ębski G, Popiołek L, Marchewka W, Hydzik P.
AIM: The aim of this study was to assess cardiological manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Background/introduction: Carbon monoxide intoxication is one of the most important toxicological causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early cli... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapy
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Cell-killing chemotherapies are designed to shrink cancerous tumors by accumulating in their ill-formed blood and lymph vessels, delivering a toxic dose to the cancer cells. A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute has developed a new drug delivery platform that uses safe, low-energy ultrasound waves to trigger aggregates of chemotherapy-containing nanoparticles to break apart precisely at tumor sites, resulting in dramatically improved targeting efficacy and toxicity profile in mouse models of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supply of promising T cell therapy is strained
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Couzin-Frankel, J. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Pharmacology, Toxicology In Depth Source Type: news

In a major shift, cancer drugs go 'tissue-agnostic
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Garber, K. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Pharmacology, Toxicology In Depth Source Type: news

12th Annual Symposium of the Penn Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Several critical periods over a human life span - including before birth -- determine when individuals are the most susceptible to environmental toxicants. Researchers will gather at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to discuss these " Windows of Susceptibility " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biotronik wins CE Mark for 3T scans with ProMRI pacers
Biotronik said today it won CE Mark approval in the European Union for 3 Tesla full-body scans with its latest range of MR conditional pacemakers featuring its ProMRI technology. The new clearance covers single and dual chamber pacemakers from the Edora, Evity and Enitra series during ultra-high field MRI scans. The approval makes it possible to scan areas of the body typically off limits to pacemaker patients, Biotronik said. “As 3 T MRI becomes increasingly prevalent in the management of a variety of diseases, it is vital that pacemaker patients also have access to this invaluable mode of imaging. Thoracic ima...
Source: Mass Device - June 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Regulatory/Compliance Biotronik Source Type: news

Prenatal exposure to lead, a toxic heavy metal, found to increase risk of autism
(Natural News) With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting that one out of every 68 children is affected by autism, scientists are actively looking to learn more about this confounding disorder. While environmental and genetic factors have long been investigated as potential causes, an innovative study that examined the makeup of baby... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Math Is Reshaping Mesothelioma Chemotherapy
This study demonstrates the feasibility of this approach since both preliminary encouraging signs of activity and no unexpected toxicities were observed, in this heavily pre-treated patients’ population.” Study Size and Rarity of Mesothelioma Present Challenges As a phase I clinical trial, it is a novel approach at this point but a promising step for future chemotherapy treatment plan protocols. The limited number of patients in the study — nine NSCLC and three mesothelioma — is also problematic, but the planned second phase of the study will include the new model’s effect on the immune syste...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 13, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Aix-Marseille University anemia chemotherapy best vinorelbine regimen chemotherapy side effects Fabrice Barlesi low-dose oral chemotherapy drugs math cancer chemotherapy math to fight cancer mathematical modeling cancer mesothelioma chem Source Type: news

Hybrid membrane creates a stir on the global market
(ETH Zurich) ETH Professor Raffaele Mezzenga and his senior researcher Sreenath Bolisetty have developed a filter membrane that efficiently removes heavy metals and other toxic substances from water. Strong demand for the new technology has encouraged them to set up a new ETH spin-off, BluAct Technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers discover what may be earliest stage of Alzheimer's disease
This study presents the toxic, sticky amyloid protein as part of Alzheimer's disease -- the earliest precursor before symptoms arise. If Alzheimer's prevalence estimates were to include this " preclinical stage " before symptoms arise, the number of those affected would more than double from the current estimate of 5.4 million Americans, the study stated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Huddersfield collaborates with Australian firm for scientific research
(University of Huddersfield) Dr. Jason Camp is working with Circa Group, who produce the solvent Cyrene, to investigate the potential of a non-toxic and more greener way to produce a wide range of medicines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotics and vitamin C could kill cancer cells
Conclusion This isn't the first time vitamin C has been studied for use against cancer: it has previously been shown to kill cancer cells in the laboratory and stop cancer growth in mice. This new two-pronged approach may well prove to be useful in eradicating cancer stem cells in humans, but robust clinical trials are necessary first as cells can behave very differently in a laboratory environment. Although all the drugs and natural products used in this study are already approved for use in humans, we don't know for certain what concentration would be required to obtain similar effects without being toxic. This study ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Cars 'boxes collecting toxic gases' that may stunt growth
Youngsters are most vulnerable to the effects of breathing in fumes because their bodies are still developing, Professor Sir David King, the former government chief scientific adviser said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cars 'boxes collecting toxic gases' that may shunt growth
Youngsters are most vulnerable to the effects of breathing in fumes because their bodies are still developing, Professor Sir David King, the former government chief scientific adviser said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Significant Toxicity, Infection Risk Associated With Elo-RVD in Myeloma
In patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, elotuzumab plus bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone was associated with significant toxicity and infections. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - June 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Tags: Conferences/ASCO Multiple Myeloma News Source Type: news

Air pollution more harmful to children in cars than outside, warns top scientist
Exclusive: Walking or cycling to school is better for children ’s health as cars are ‘boxes collecting toxic gases’ says David KingOpinion: Smoking in cars is banned. But children still inhale toxic fumes in backseatsChildren are at risk of dangerous levels of air pollution in cars because exposure to toxic air is often far higher inside than outside vehicles, a former government chief scientific adviser has warned.Prof Sir David King,writing for the Guardian, says walking or cycling to school would be much better for children ’s health. The warning comes as the UKgovernment faces a third legal defe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Pollution David King Transport policy Environment UK news Research Asthma Health Science Source Type: news

Smoking in cars is banned. But children still inhale toxic fumes in backseats
Studies show pollution levels inside cars are higher than outside where NO2 emissions are dissipated into the wider atmosphere•Air pollution more harmful to children in cars than outside, warns top scientistBy now, if you are a pedestrian or cyclist you are probably aware that traffic pollution is a danger to your health, but there is one group of people who are perhaps more at risk: children in cars.Numerous studies have shown how high pollution levels are in cars. Astudy in Copenhagen found that a driver actually breathed in higher amounts of pollution than a cyclist on the same road. For the cyclist, the emissions ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David King Tags: David King Pollution Environment Science Research Health Health policy Asthma General election 2017 Society Politics Education Source Type: news

PETA science consortium donates $400K in animal-free test equipment
(People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) The PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. announced that it is providing equipment to laboratories working on human-relevant methods to replace the use of animals in inhalation testing. Valued at more than $400,000, VITROCELL Systems inhalation exposure machines were awarded to four institutions in the US, UK, and Belgium that are leading the field of in vitro (non-animal) inhalation toxicology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Episode #15: How easy is it to get addicted to opioids?
TPR PODCAST EPISODE #15: HOW EASY IS IT TO GET ADDICTED TO OPIOIDS?     As has been well reported in medical papers, government studies and popular media, rates of overdose deaths from opioids have been increasing steadily over the last several decades. A recent article in the New York Times reported that there were likely more than 59,000 drug overdose deaths in 2016, an estimated 19% increase over the number in 2015. The total for 2017 is likely to be even higher.   Many deaths have been associated with prescription opioid analgesics, or have occurred among patients who became addicted to prescription opio...
Source: The Poison Review - June 11, 2017 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow The Poison Review Tags: Podcast Source Type: news

Gelsemium elegans poisoning: a case with 8  months of follow-up and review of the literature - Zhou Z, Wu L, Zhong Y, Fang X, Liu Y, Chen H, Zhang W.
BACKGROUND: Gelsemium elegans (G. elegans) is a toxic plant indigenous to Southeast Asia. It is highly poisonous due to its strong respiratory depressive effect. However, G. elegans poisoning cases have not been summarized comprehensively and are rarely re... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer
This research review has led to a practice changing update on DynaMed Plus. It concludes that the addition of platinum-based chemotherapy to adjuvant radiotherapy (chemoradiation) may improve survival in women with early stage cervical cancer (IA2-IIA) and risk factors for recurrence. Adjuvant chemoradiation is associated with an increased risk of severe acute toxicity, although it is not clear whether this toxicity is significant in the long term due to a lack of long-term data. The evidence is limited by the small numbers and low to moderate methodological quality of the included studies. (Source: Current Awareness Servi...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clemson graduate uncovers link between toxicants and lipid metabolism
(Clemson University) Doctoral graduate Namrata Sengupta's research on water fleas culminates in journal article that describes how certain toxicants can affect development and progression to reproductive maturity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BREAKTHROUGH science finds that exposure to toxic heavy metals (and deficiencies in nutritive minerals) linked to AUTISM
(Natural News) Anxious parents the world over have been waiting a long time to get definitive answers about the causes of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). ASD, which now affects one in 68 children, causes serious behavioral, social and communication issues. Though multiple studies have linked vaccines to the spike in autism rates – rates which... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: 15 Million Americans' Drinking Water Tainted By Toxic Chemical
Some 15 million Americans across 27 states are drinking water that could be contaminated with potentially carcinogenic man-made chemicals without even realizing it. According to a new analysis and map released Thursday by the Environmental Working Group and scientists at Northeastern University, perfluorochemicals (PFCs) — a class of chemicals including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFAS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) — were detected in 162 U.S. drinking water systems in recent Environmental Protection Agency testing. The toxic chemicals have been used over the years in a wide range of consumer products, ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Report: 15 Million Americans' Drinking Water Tainted By Toxic Chemical
Some 15 million Americans across 27 states are drinking water that could be contaminated with potentially carcinogenic man-made chemicals without even realizing it. According to a new analysis and map released Thursday by the Environmental Working Group and scientists at Northeastern University, perfluorochemicals (PFCs) — a class of chemicals including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFAS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) — were detected in 162 U.S. drinking water systems in recent Environmental Protection Agency testing. The toxic chemicals have been used over the years in a wide range of consumer products, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Technical Reports Peer Review Panel - July 13, 2017
(Source: NIEHS National Toxicology Program)
Source: NIEHS National Toxicology Program - June 8, 2017 Category: Toxicology Source Type: news

Developments in the Screening and Prognostication of Melanoma
This peer-to-peer discussion reviews the current strategies for managing patients with melanoma, including screening and prognosis for high-risk patients and how to choose the best therapies to avoid toxicities and treatment resistance. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - June 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Ahmad A. Tarhini, MD, PhD Sancy Leachman, MD, PhD Tags: Conferences/ASCO Street Team Melanoma Source Type: news

Research targets PFOA threat to drinking water
(Northwestern University) A highly toxic water pollutant, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), last year caused a number of US communities to close their drinking water supplies. PFOA contamination also is a pervasive problem worldwide. A Northwestern University-led research team now reports an inexpensive and renewable material that rapidly removes PFOA from water. The novel treatment effectively eliminates the micropollutant to below 10 parts per trillion, far below US Environmental Protection Agency and all state health advisory limits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

India resurrects forgotten leprosy vaccine
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kumar, S. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Epidemiology, Immunology, Pharmacology, Toxicology In Depth Source Type: news

A maternal-effect selfish genetic element in Caenorhabditis elegans
Selfish genetic elements spread in natural populations and have an important role in genome evolution. We discovered a selfish element causing embryonic lethality in crosses between wild strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The element is made up of sup-35, a maternal-effect toxin that kills developing embryos, and pha-1, its zygotically expressed antidote. pha-1 has long been considered essential for pharynx development on the basis of its mutant phenotype, but this phenotype arises from a loss of suppression of sup-35 toxicity. Inactive copies of the sup-35/pha-1 element show high sequence divergence from acti...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ben-David, E., Burga, A., Kruglyak, L. Tags: Evolution, Genetics r-articles Source Type: news

Balance and movement improved in animal model of Parkinson ’s disease
This study is the first to demonstrate CLR01’s effectiveness in a mammal, one of the last important steps before human clinical trials.The researchers are now working on optimizing the blood-brain barrier penetration of CLR01 and measuring all the pharmacological features necessary for applying to the Food and Drug Administration to begin the first human, clinical trials.AUTHORSBitan and Dr. Marie-Fran çoise Chesselet, the Charles H. Markham professor of neurology at UCLA, are the senior authors of the study. Franziska Richter, assistant professor at the University of Leipzig in Germany, is the first author.JO...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chemotherapy Mix Doubles Peritoneal Mesothelioma Survival
Surgeon Paul Sugarbaker at the Washington Cancer Institute has nearly doubled the five-year survival rate for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma by adding long-term regional chemotherapy to his already groundbreaking protocol. Sugarbaker, a pioneer in advancing peritoneal mesothelioma treatment for more than two decades, believes this latest development could have far-reaching implications. “This could be a game changer,” Sugarbaker told Asbestos.com. “The reaction has been, ‘Wow! [It’s] hard to believe.’ We’ve got to exploit this [advancement] as best as we can.” Sugarbak...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 7, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: cytoreductive surgery epithelioid cell type European Journal of Surgical Oncology HIPEC hyperthermic perioperative chemotherapy International Journal of Hyperthermia intraperitoneal chemotherapy long-term regional chemotherapy MedStar Wash Source Type: news

10 Quick and Effective Ways to Nip Your Anxiety in the Bud
While we can all feel anxious from time to time, some people feel overwhelming anxiety daily that can be emotionally and physically taxing. For that, professional help could be needed to deal with the anxiety in a healthy manner, and to help mitigate symptoms. On the other hand, if you find that you experience anxiety from time to time, try to utilize the tips below to overcome your feelings of worry and get your emotions back in check by recalibrating and centering yourself. While a little bit of anxiety can be a good tool to help motivate a person, and it is a part of our natural flight or fight response, severe and unco...
Source: Psych Central - June 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Anxiety Healthy Living Mindfulness Self-Help Anxiety Disorder anxious thoughts Calm chronic worrier Depression Mental Health Panic Attack Present Moment Rumination Stress Management worry Source Type: news

Pembrolizumab Plus Pazopanib Is Not Safe for Patients with RCC
Liver toxicity precludes development of pembrolizumab plus pazopanib immunotherapy for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - June 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Tags: Conferences/ASCO Renal Cell Carcinoma News Source Type: news

A more sustainable way to refine metals
(McGill University) A team of chemists in Canada has developed a way to process metals without using toxic solvents and reagents. The system, which also consumes far less energy than conventional techniques, could greatly shrink the environmental impact of producing metals from raw materials or from post-consumer electronics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Red onions pack a cancer-fighting punch, study reveals
(University of Guelph) A University of Guelph study is the first to reveal that Ontario-grown red onions are the most effective at killing colon and breast cancer cells compared to other types of onions. This is because of the onions' high levels of quercetin and anthocyanin. As part of this project, the researchers are also the first to develop a non-toxic way to extract quercetin from onions making it more suitable for consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Firms Ask High Court To Hear Flint Water Lawsuit; Residents Say Court Should Refuse
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The engineering firms asking the U.S. Supreme Court to hear their case against residents of Flint, Mich., regarding liability for the lead-contaminated water crisis in that city on May 22 filed their reply brief contending that the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals' decision that a plaintiff may obtain remand under the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA) without evidence of class members' citizenship results in a circuit split that is "stark and wide." The Flint residents who brought the initial lawsuit say the Supreme Court should refused to hear the case (Lockwood Andrews& Newnam P.C. v. J...
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - June 7, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news