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LITFL Review 315
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 315th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Rob Macsweeney of Critical Care Reviews posts the 2 hour livestream of the ADRENAL...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 22nd 2018
In conclusion, death is a natural part of human existence, but human progress is essentially a story of overcoming undesirable natural limits. In the near future, technological progress might make it possible to stop natural biological death. Should humankind embrace such technology? Yes: Even though such technology would not be without risks, the risks are almost certainly manageable. The benefits of ending natural death, on the other hand, are immense. Death is an obstacle that is slowing down human progress. If we remove that obstacle, humankind could increase the speed of both its moral and its epistemic progress. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Toxic Urea Is A Major Cause Of Dementia, Research Finds
Could this discovery show the way to reversing dementia? → NEW EBOOK: 'Accept Yourself' by Dr Jeremy Dean will help you overcome barriers to self-acceptance and learn practices that promote emotional healing (OUT 23 JAN 2018). Other ebooks by Psyblog's author, Dr Dean, are: Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - January 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Dementia Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: January 20, 2018
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! So, you’ve heard of mental health days, right? Well, I’m taking a mental health weekend. Earlier this week, I realized I was headed toward a weekend with no plans, no leftover work, and no obligations of any sort. “Hmm…what am I going to do?” was all-too-easy to answer. “NOTHING!” Well, I’ll be doing some reading, maybe work on a story, probably continue on with my second binge of Peaky Blinders — but the point is, I have a weekend of absolutely no personal or professional obligations and when I realized that, I also realized it’d...
Source: World of Psychology - January 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Children and Teens Men's Issues Policy and Advocacy Psychology Around the Net Research Self-Esteem Sleep Confidence Daniel Johnston Gun Control improve sleep marijuana study Masculinity Mass Shootings Sleep Deprivation Sleep Source Type: blogs

Senescent Cells are Large, which Suggests a Few Simpler Paths to Assays for Senescence Level in Human Subjects
In this study, we utilized H2O2- and X-ray-induced senescent human MSCs spiked in whole blood, as a model biological system, to demonstrate the rapid separation and analysis of senescent cells using our senescence chip. The optimized device was then used for an animal study to isolate senescent cells from the bone marrow of mice undergone total body irradiation (TBI) of X-ray. To achieve ultrahigh-throughput removal of senescent cells for blood purification, we enlarged the chip dimensions and stacked multiple chips to build a multiplexed system. We demonstrated that our scaled-up senescent chip could achieve a parallel pr...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 19, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

What It Means to Not Take Things Personally
We often hear that we shouldn’t take things so personally. But what does this actually mean? If someone we’ve allowed into our heart says something shaming or hurtful, such as “You only think about yourself” or “How can you be so stupid?” we’re likely to feel the pain of being judged and criticized. It hurts to be viewed as an object with horrible traits rather than be seen in our wholeness. It’s not realistic to think we should not be personally affected when someone close to us sears us with a critical or dismissive comment. As human beings, we affect each other. It would ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Blame Confidence Criticism Defensiveness Four Agreements self-compassion Self-Esteem self-worth Shame taking things personally triggering Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 88 with Dan Davis
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Resus for dummies or resus for clever people? Dr Dan Davis and the art of ART. I was at Luna Park in Sydney last year. It is an ageing un-reconstructed theme park with rickety roller coasters, a whole bunch of noisy rides and fairground attractions. It is all very retro to the point of being almost ironically cool. That’s all wasted on the kids that love it. It has got all the classics and none of the super-stars. It is the old way of doing the theme park th...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean Advanced Resuscitation Training art Dan Davis resus for dummies Source Type: blogs

Much Ado About Yik Yak
Campus controversy is all the rage these days. Today ’s installment comes from the University of Mary Washington, located in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Members of the local student affiliate of the Feminist Majority Foundation took public positions against fraternities and various other problems exemplifying what was, in their view, a toxic student c ulture regarding sexual assault (for example, the men’s rugby team singing a necrophilic drinking song).Students who disagreed with the feminist activists went on Yik Yak, a now-defunct app that allowed anonymous users to post whatever they like. It turns out that t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro, Reilly Stephens Source Type: blogs

Why Enabling Someone Is Never A Loving Act
You're reading Why Enabling Someone Is Never A Loving Act, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. When You Only Want To Help Addiction is hard on everyone. If you watch your loved one continually abuse their body, you fear what they’re doing to their health. Abusing drugs and alcohol creates a potential for legal consequences and may interfere with your loved one’s ability to make a living. They make choices that cause unhealthy relationships and drain your bank account. When you see them make mistake...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NicoleClarke Tags: depression featured health and fitness psychology relationships self improvement Codependency Enabling Substance Abuse Family Intervention self growth Unhealthy Relationships Source Type: blogs

Biodegradable Pressure Sensor Doesn ’t Need to be Removed After Implantation
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a biodegradable pressure sensor that can be implanted in the body and help clinicians to monitor a variety of conditions over extended periods of time. What makes this sensor different from existing ones is that it doesn’t need to be removed and will eventually dissolve in the body, eliminating the risk of infection and the longer recovery associated with an invasive surgical procedure to remove a sensor. Clinicians can use implantable pressure sensors to monitor a variety of health conditions, including brain swelling as in hydrocephalus, chronic lung disea...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Source Type: blogs

Fear and Mass Surveillance: Our Constitutionally Toxic Political Cocktail
At 12:51pm on January 18, 2018 –just a day before it was set to expire–the Senate followed the House’s lead and reauthorized the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Amendments Act (FAA) Section 702 mass surveillance program for another six years by a vote of 65-34.Writing forJustSecurity.org in October 2017, I made thisprediction about the then-looming debate over extending the mass surveillance authority embodied in Section 702:  Absent another Snowden-like revelation, Section 702 of the FAA will be reauthorized largely without change, and any changes will be cosmetic, and almost certainly abused. Whe...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 18, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Patrick G. Eddington Source Type: blogs

Invest in Yourself: 5 Self-Care Tips for Bringing Out Your Best Self
In a busy life, self-care is often pushed aside or given low priority. Perhaps a weekly yoga class or run around the block on weekends are all you can fit in. But for optimal functioning you need to invest in your mind and emotions as well as your physical health. The basis of looking after yourself is self-love. Not the narcissistic kind with false self-admiration but the love you have for yourself as a precious human being who deserves to be treated with respect and care and who has the right to be who they really are. With such spiritually-based kind and generous attitude towards yourself you know that looking after you...
Source: World of Psychology - January 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christiana Star Tags: Happiness Self-Esteem Self-Help Confidence Self Care Self Improvement Source Type: blogs

Quercetin is Probably Not a Useful Senolytic
Senolytic compounds are those that preferentially destroy senescent cells. Since these cells are one of the root causes of aging, there is considerable interest in finding and then quantifying the effectiveness of senolytic compounds. The known and alleged senolytics vary widely in effectiveness and quality of evidence, and quercetin is one of the more dubious examples. I don't think that anyone expects quercetin, on its own, to have a useful level of impact on senescent cells and their contribution to degenerative aging. The study here comes to the plausible conclusion that quercetin really can't achieve that goal. Yes, i...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 15th 2018
This study is the longest, prospective randomized controlled trial that has documented the physiological effects of supervised, structured exercise training in a group of sedentary but healthy middle-aged adults. The key finding is that 2 years of exercise training performed for at least 30 minutes, 4 to 5 days per week, and including at least 1 high-intensity interval session per week results in a significant reduction in LV chamber and myocardial stiffness. The use of high-resolution, invasively measured LV pressure-volume curves and comparison with an attention control group enhances the confidence in this conclusion. T...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Earn the right to inflate your lifestyle
Recently, we learned how lifestyle inflation can be toxic.  In case you’re wondering, there is a time and place to inflate your lifestyle.  However, you can’t just do it whenever you want.  You have to earn it.  Here’s how it works. The basics If your goal is financial independence, I recommend that you live on half your income and save the rest. This means that if you’re making around $50,000 per year, you allocate $25,000 to saving or paying off debt.  After a rough estimate of $5,000 in taxes, that leaves you $20,000 to spend on living expenses, o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/live-free-md" rel="tag" > Live Free MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Update: January 14, 2018
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 11 to January 14, 2018 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (196 updates) 75 Diseases121 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (12 updates) 11 Drugs1 Toxicity database – New Microbiology – Bacteria (1 updates) 1 Bacteria Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 Mycobacteria The post Update: January 14, 2018 appeared first on GIDEON - Global Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Online Network. (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

How to Plan and Carry Out a Simple Self-Experiment, a Single Person Trial of Chemotherapeutic Senolytic Drug Candidates
The objective here is a set of tests that anyone can run without the need to involve a physician, as that always adds significant time and expense. Since we are really only interested in the identification of large and reliable effects as the result of an intervention, we can plausibly expect a collection of cheaper and easier measures known to correlate with age to be useful. Once that hill has been climbed, then decide whether or not to go further - don't bite off more than is easy to chew for a first outing. From an earlier exploration of likely tests, I picked the following items on the basis of a likely connect...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Self-Experimentation Source Type: blogs

An Approach to Starving Cancer Cells that is Applicable to Many Cancers
This study is very exciting because it sheds light on a new uncharacterized way to treat cancer with very limited toxicity." Although cancer cells contain REV-ERB proteins, somehow they remain inactive. The researchers used two REV-ERB activators that had already been developed - SR9009 and SR9011 - in studies on a variety of cancer cells, including those from T cell leukemia, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, melanoma, and glioblastoma. In each cell line, treatment with the REV-ERB activators was enough to kill the cells. The same treatment on healthy cells had no effect. "When we block access to these re...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How doctors add stress to the poor IVF patient's life
IVF treatment is stressful as it is , and many doctors make it even more stressful. Being infertile is bad enough, and an IVF cycle is stressful because you are never sure whether it's going to work or not. Not only is the uncertainty difficult to handle, the fact that it's so expensive just adds to your anxiety.While we can't reduce the uncertainty which plagues IVF , the tragedy is that IVF doctors often add insult to injury , by making the treatment unnecessarily stressful .For one thing, they subject patients to lots of useless tests, which are completely unnecessary , because they don't change the treatment options we...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - January 11, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Two Examples of Recent Work on Novel Drug Candidates to Treat Alzheimer's Disease
Absent any greater context on Alzheimer's disease research, one might look back at the past twenty years of clinical trials and consider this medical condition to be an insurmountable obstacle at our present stage of progress in biotechnology. The history is an unremitting series of abject and expensive failures. The underlying context is more promising, however - Alzheimer's research is the sharp, applied end of two massive, distributed research projects that are still somewhere in their middle stages. The first of these is the effort to map and understand the biochemistry and cellular function of the brain in detail. The...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Doctors, Data, Diagnoses, and Discussions: Achieving Successful and Sustainable Personalized/Precision Medicine
The following is a guest blog post by Drew Furst, M.D., Vice President Clinical Consultants at Elsevier Clinical Solutions. Personalized/precision medicine is a growing field and that trend shows no sign of slowing down. In fact, a 2016 Grand View Research report estimated the global personalized medicine market was worth $1,007.88 billion in 2014, with projected growth to reach $2,452.50 billion by 2022. As these areas of medicine become more commonplace, understanding the interactions between biological factors with a range of personal, environmental and social impacts on health is a vital step towards achieving sustaina...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 10, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Clinical Decision Support Genomics Healthcare HealthCare IT Personalized Medicine Drew Furst Elsevier Elsevier Clinical Solutions Precision Medicine Source Type: blogs

Draper ’s Microfluidic Artificial Kidney Reproduces Real Thing at Cellular and Tissue Levels
Kidney injuries from exposure to too many drugs are common among certain groups of patients, particularly those spending time in the ICU. Kidney injuries can also happen during drug testing, wounding subjects while eliminating candidate drugs far along their development pipeline. Engineers at Draper have now developed a so-called kidney-on-a-chip, an organoid that mimics a real kidney’s function, to use as a platform to test chemical compounds for their nephrotoxity. Human kidneys have a lot of complexity within their structural components, nephrons. These undergo rapid pressure changes due to blood and other fluids ...
Source: Medgadget - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Are You Making These 4 Communication Mistakes in Your Romantic Relationship?
We assume that communication should come naturally to us, and maybe we think it does, especially in our romantic relationships. After all, we communicate all the time. We talk to our partners all the time about a wide range of topics, from what’s going on with our jobs to what’s for dinner to why we’re feeling so upset. But good—clear, connection-enhancing—communication takes work. It requires some education, effort and practice. You’ll likely still stumble from time to time. Because, of course, you’re human. In fact, you might be unwittingly making certain communication mistakes r...
Source: World of Psychology - January 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Help Communication Dating Intimacy Source Type: blogs

What To Expect From Digital Health In 2018?
Digital health is booming and there are thrilling trends to be excited about for 2018. Trend-spotting with facts instead of crystal balls The first digital pill was approved by the FDA. Chinese researchers created the first gene-edited embryos. Microsoft launched a new healthcare division. 2017 was a year full of marvelous advancements in healthcare. So what’s next? As The Medical Futurist, my whole life is dedicated to digital health and how it should advance. My lifeblood is technology, healthcare and their intersection. At The Medical Futurist Institute, we work with governments and policy-makers worldwide to help...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine 2018 AI artificial intelligence augmented reality digital health Education Healthcare Innovation Personalized medicine technology wearables Source Type: blogs

Learn about Clostridium difficile infect with a Medcomic
Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus which secretes toxins (A and B) that cause diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile is the most common infectious cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Transmission of C. difficile can occur from contact with contaminated humans and fomites. The organism contains endospores that can survive the acidity of the stomach and reach the large intestine. C. difficile colonizes the intestinal tract after the normal gut flora has been altered by antibiotic therapy. It can flourish after any antibiotic therapy, but most notably occurs with b...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jorge-muniz" rel="tag" > Jorge Muniz, PA-C < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Learn about Clostridium difficile infection with a Medcomic
Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus which secretes toxins (A and B) that cause diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile is the most common infectious cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Transmission of C. difficile can occur from contact with contaminated humans and fomites. The organism contains endospores that can survive the acidity of the stomach and reach the large intestine. C. difficile colonizes the intestinal tract after the normal gut flora has been altered by antibiotic therapy. It can flourish after any antibiotic therapy, but most notably occurs with b...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jorge-muniz" rel="tag" > Jorge Muniz, PA-C < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

One Doctor's Struggles With Depression, Addiction, and Recovery: Finding Hope in An Intolerant Profession
Psychiatric News is running a series on Physician Burnout, part of an initiative by APA President Dr. Anita Everett.  They asked me to write about medical licensing for the series, and in the course of writing the article, I spent a while talking to Dr. Luther Philaya, an Emergency Room doc who lost his license for his addiction to alcohol and opiates.  Dr. Philaya sought help and things did not go smoothly.  Instead of writing about licensing, I ended up writing about Luther, and I'll invite you to read, "System Changes Needed to Support Physician Seeking Help." Dr. Philaya had more to say ab...
Source: Shrink Rap - January 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Try to avoid vancomycin/pip-tazo
This study used a retrospective matched cohort technique – not a randomized controlled trial, but a reasonable methodology. Patients in both VC and VPT groups had similar baseline characteristics in terms of age, length of ICU stay, Charlson comorbidity index score, baseline creatinine, and use of concomitant nephrotoxins. The groups had great similarity. The rate of AKI was higher among patients receiving VPT compared to those receiving VC combination therapy. Based on RIFLE criteria, 81 patients in the VPT group developed AKI compared to 31 patients in the VC group (29.0% vs 11.1%; hazard ratio [HR] = 4.0; 95% conf...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - January 8, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 314
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 314th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The Bottom Line has a comprehensive review on the role of steroids in sepsis &ndas...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 8th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How Do You Create Emotional Safety in Your Relationships?
One partner in a couple who have been married nearly four decades, reported that she felt controlled by her husband. When asked if it was always the case, she responded in the affirmative and when taken a step further, and asked why she married him, she shrugged her shoulders and sadly said, “Low self-esteem, I guess.” She admitted that their interactions over the years only served to deepen the divide between them. At a loss to know how to resolve her dilemma, she was willing to do what she could to establish some semblance of control in an otherwise untenable situation by working on improved self-care that c...
Source: World of Psychology - January 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Anger Bullying Inspiration & Hope LifeHelper Marriage and Divorce Motivation and Inspiration Personal Relationships Stress abuse Attachment Style Authenticity Boundaries Communication Disapproval Neglect Respect Security Source Type: blogs

These 9 Beliefs Block Your Path to Inner Peace
“Enlightenment is a destructive process. It has nothing to do with becoming better or being happier. Enlightenment is the crumbling away of untruth. It’s seeing through the facade of pretense It’s the complete eradication of everything we imagined to be true.” — Adyashanti I don’t know exactly when it happened. It was probably about eighteen months ago, maybe a couple of years. I can’t really remember, and it doesn’t really matter. I was up to my neck in stress, and having one of those days. It was one of those days where you wake up late and your neck is a little stiff. One...
Source: World of Psychology - January 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Happiness Mindfulness Publishers Self-Help Tiny Buddha Beliefs Inner Peace Meditation Source Type: blogs

Developed: Brain-on-a-Chip Featuring Multiple Cell Types
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a way to create “brain-on-a-chip” devices that can be used to study brain function, how various chemical compounds influence it, and what can be done to protect the brain from toxic chemicals, etc. The technology may help lessen the need for laboratory animals, speed up drug development, and help us understand how the brain works at the cellular level. The development is part of the iCHIP (in-vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform) project that aims to create ex vivo platforms that mimic the workings of different organs and body proces...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology Source Type: blogs

The Price of Progress
By ANISH KOKA, MD No one knows who Bennie Solis is anymore. He had the misfortune of being born in the early 1960s marked for death. He had a rare peculiar condition called biliary atresia – a disease defined by the absence of a conduit for bile to travel from his liver to his intestinal tract. Bile acid produced in the liver normally travels to the intestines much like water from a spring travels via ever larger channels to eventually empty into the ocean. Bile produced in the liver with no where to go dams up in the liver and starts to destroy it. That the liver is a hardy organ was a fact known to the ancient Gree...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A Call to Test Combinations of Drugs Shown to Slow Aging in Animal Studies
I expect that little progress towards sizable human life extension will be achieved in the next few decades via pharmaceuticals that slow aging through triggering various stress response mechanisms. This includes calorie restriction mimetics, autophagy enhancers, exercise mimetics, and the like. It may well be the case that researchers come up with a few drugs that, if taken regularly for decades, reliably add a few years to life expectancy and improve health in old age to a degree that is in the same ballpark as the present results of exercise or eating a better diet. Is that worth billions in funding and decades of dedic...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why do health care CEOs permit toxic workplaces?
Would patients be admitted, or people be allowed to come to work, in a hospital that had Legionnaires’ disease spreading through its HVAC system or cryptosporidium in its water supply? When there is an unusual smell associated with headaches and nausea in a surgical unit or emergency department, do people continue to work there and show up for their next shift as though this is status quo? Of course not. Why is it different for burnout? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/paul-dechant" rel="tag" > Paul DeChant, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

The changing needs of a cell: No Membrane? No Problem!
Russian nesting dolls. Credit: iStock. How “membrane-less” organelles help with key cellular functions Scientists have long known that animal and plant cells have specialized subdivisions called organelles.  These organelles are surrounded by a semi-permeable barrier, called a membrane, that both organizes the organelles and insulates them from the rest of the cell’s mix of proteins, salt, and water.  This set-up helps to make cells efficient and productive, aiding in energy production and other specialized functions. But, because of their semi-permeable membranes, organelles can’t regro...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Kathryn Calkins Tags: Cell Biology Cells Cellular Processes Nucleolus Organelles Proteins RNA Source Type: blogs

How to treat dry eyes
How common are dye eyes?The prevalence of dry eyes has been estimated to be 5-30% percent in persons aged 50 years and older, 7% of US adult population has been diagnosed with dry eye disease. The prevalence increases with age (2.7% in those 18 to 34 years old vs. 19% in those aged 75 years and older). Prevalence is higher in women than men (9% versus 4%).What are the risk factors for dry eye disease?- Advanced age- Female gender- Hormonal changes (primarily due to decreased androgens)- Systemic diseases (eg, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson disease)- Contact lens wear- Systemic medications (antihistamines, anticholinergi...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - January 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: noreply at blogger.com (Ves Dimov) Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

ALZFORUM Looks Back at 2017 in Alzheimer's Research
ALZFORUM should be on your reading list if you have more than a passing interest in research into neurodegenerative conditions. It is a great example of what can be achieved in educational advocacy if any earnest institutional funding is devoted to the task. That investment in advocacy exists today because Alzheimer's disease research is by far the largest portion of the broader aging research community, measured by funding and volume of projects, and has been for some time. The situation is quite different for our area of interest, rejuvenation research to repair the causes of aging. Here, the scientific programs of our c...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Remedy for Corruption
Do I really have a remedy for corruption? I wish I did. But, I have lately found an effective balm for the sickening discouragement that it is easy to feel when confronted day after day with another instance of the medical industry ’s price-gouging corruption, purposeful distortions, and callous disregard of patient welfare. That remedy is a new podcast from Australia:Ray Moynihan ’sThe Effective Dose. If you don ’t already recognize Moynihan’s name, he’s an author ofSelling Sickness and he ’s had a persistent interest in overdiagnosis and medicalization. He describes the ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: blogs

What to Do When You Work for a Narcissist
A covert narcissistic boss is strategic and dangerous. Don’t be an accessory, be the exception. You trusted him. You believed him. He is charming, loyal, and honest. So, you thought. Instead, you were nothing more than a pawn on his chessboard of pain. You were his talented tactician in his highly calculated mind games of manipulation. He used you and did so well. When you work for someone who spends hours devising elaborate plans to make themselves look good at the expense of others, the stress and anxiety are overwhelming and not conducive to your success. Your work is impressive and you create value for your clie...
Source: World of Psychology - January 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Disorders Industrial and Workplace Narcissism Publishers YourTango Boss Boundaries Central Accounts Drama Manipulation Mind Games Narcissist Narcissistic Source Type: blogs

What to Do When You Work for a Narcissist
A covert narcissistic boss is strategic and dangerous. Don’t be an accessory, be the exception You trusted him. You believed him. He is charming, loyal, and honest. So, you thought. Instead, you were nothing more than a pawn on his chessboard of pain. You were his talented tactician in his highly calculated mind game of manipulation. He used you and did it so well. When you work for someone who spends hours devising elaborate plans to make themselves look good at the expense of others, the stress and anxiety are overwhelming and not conducive to your success. Your work is impressive and you create value for your cli...
Source: World of Psychology - January 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Disorders Industrial and Workplace Narcissism Publishers YourTango Boss Boundaries Central Accounts Drama Manipulation Mind Games Narcissist Narcissistic Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 313
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 313rd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Hard to be skeptical about the Skeptic’s Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 31, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Touch of the flu … and carfilzomib
I began feeling a bit “off” right before Xmas…Fatigue (I mean, I couldn’t keep my eyes open…), immense fatigue…and a low-grade fever: those were my main symptoms. Nothing major, as you can see, but it was enough to slow me down at a time that is normally quite busy for me, including frenzied Xmas cookie baking and that sort of thing. The low-grade fever turned into a proper fever after Xmas, so I gave up fighting it and just slept. And slept and slept. Then, a day or so ago, the fever was gone. The main symptom is gone, but I’m still super fatigued. Bummer. That said, I’d ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - December 31, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Make a resolution that will change your life forever!
Get ready for a New Year’s challenge that will change your life forever. How many times have you promised yourself to finally lose that unwanted weight? How many times have you failed? This is nothing more than an exercise in self-destruction. This annual ritual results in lowering your self-esteem, not your weight. You can feel good about yourself again. You can achieve a physical makeover that makes you look 10, even 20 years younger without Botox, filler injections, surgery, or without any unwanted health consequences. You can actually enjoy shopping for clothing. You can eliminate the need for a multitude of pres...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 29, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Detox Undoctored Wheat Belly 10-Day Detox Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox Wheat Belly Challenge Wheat Belly Detox Wheat Belly/Undoctored Cruise acid reflux blood sugar cholesterol diabetes Dr. Davis grain-free health IBS Infla Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 25th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
This is the 1000th presentation to my bioethics blog since starting on Google Blogspot.com in 2004.There has been many topics covered. Though comments by the visitors has always been encouraged and, since as a "discussion blog", comments leading to discussions I have felt was the definitive function here. Virtually none of the thread topics have gone unread and most have had some commentary, some with mainly particularly strong and emphatic opinions http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2013/01/should-pathologists-be-physicians.html, some with extensive up to 12 years long continued discussion http://bioethicsd...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Surviving Christmas (and Other Gatherings)
In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales tackle Christmas. Specifically, how to survive it. For all the wonderful aspects of holidays, they are not without stressful aspects, especially for people who live with anxiety or depression. In this podcast, you’ll learn about some specific triggers that can make the holidays stressful, and how to mitigate or even avoid them. Such triggers include being alone over the holiday, false expectations we seem to have, toxic people, and the stress that comes along with our bank statements. Listen in to hear some helpful suggestions, and...
Source: World of Psychology - December 21, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Holiday Coping Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Bring it On
By Crabby McSlackerphoto: U.S. Air ForceSo it's Holiday Season!But wait, where's Santa Claus? No Menorah? No sugar cookies or snowmen or pine trees? And what's with the spunky aviator gals in leather jackets, that's not very Christmassy!Well, okay, traditionally the holidays are a time for festive celebrations, fun, frivolity, togetherness, and generosity. But also they're a time for year-end reflection. And my goodness, what a year 2017 has been!What a year indeed.So, setting aside any bright moments you may have enjoyed in your personal life this year (and I'm hoping there were many, many of them!)... does anyone else th...
Source: Cranky Fitness - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Crabby McSlacker Source Type: blogs