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New Way to Reprogram Macrophages Helps Immune System Kill Tumors
Macrophages, as their greek-derived name implies, are hungry white blood cells that consume all kinds of foreign and unwanted objects within the body. They are one of the primary methods that the immune system uses to fight off disease, and they work by checking the protein content on the exterior of cells to identify whether the cells are native or are invaders. In terms of cancer, macrophages, unlike T-cells, are able to penetrate solid tissue but are often a long way from being effective, ignoring diseased cells because the proteins on their outer layer match the ones found on healthy cells. At the University of Pennsyl...
Source: Medgadget - July 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Oncology Source Type: blogs

Vitamin D: Finding a balance
Over the July 4th weekend, my non-physician husband with a history of skin cancer tried to justify not wearing sunscreen in order to get some vitamin D. My husband, of course, has no idea how much vitamin D he needs or why, and I suspect he is not alone. Why do we need vitamin D? The easy answer is for bones. Vitamin D facilitates absorption of calcium and phosphate, which are needed for bone growth. Without sufficient vitamin D, bones become brittle (in children this is called rickets and in adults it is called osteomalacia) and break more easily. Vitamin D is likely beneficial for other parts of the body as well; studies...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily S. Ruiz, MD, MPH Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Prevention Source Type: blogs

The Top 15 Examples of Gamification in Healthcare
If you measure your daily step count or raise a virtual plant to drink more water a day, you already fell victim of the charms of gamification. Is it bad news? On the contrary! Gamified apps, devices, and therapies will gradually appear in every field of healthcare making behavior change easier and more fun. Here are the greatest examples of gamification! Why is it so hard to change? Sequin dresses, champagne and smiling faces counting down to the new year. Some kisses here and some resolutions there. This time, Samantha thought everything will be different. She made a resolution every year to change her lifestyle into som...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 20, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Mobile Health diabetes Education future games gamification gc3 Innovation Medicine Personalized medicine technology wearable wearables Source Type: blogs

New Tissue Glue Can be Clearly Seen With X-Rays and Ultrasound
Nanoparticles made with a shell of silica (SiO2) and a core of radiopaque tantalum oxide (TaOx) are used to make a tissue adhesive and visible to ultrasound, X-ray, and fluorescent imaging. Researchers at Korea’s Institute for Basic Science and Seoul National University Hospital have designed and tested a glue for binding tissues that also works as a contrast agent for X-rays, CTs, and ultrasound imaging modalities. This is the first such tissue glue to have this set of properties, and, if approved for clinical applications, may end up displacing other adhesives because it can be later easily monitored as to how...
Source: Medgadget - July 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Emergency Medicine Military Medicine Nanomedicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Engineering Macrophages to Ignore " Don't Eat Me " Signals from Cancer Cells
Macrophages are one of the types of immune cell responsible for destroying potentially dangerous cells, such as those that have become cancerous. Unfortunately cancerous cells tend to circumvent the immune system by displaying molecules on their outer surface that cause macrophages to leave them alone. This is an abuse of recognition mechanisms that exist to protect other cell types. Researchers here show that producing engineered macrophages that ignore this signal can be a viable approach to cancer therapy, even though past attempts have proven too harmful to normal cells to proceed towards the clinic. Their new methodol...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Study Finds Mistakes with Medications are on the Rise at Home
When people take medicine at home, mistakes happen. Some people end up taking the wrong dose of a medication or the wrong pill. Sometimes, they don’t wait long enough before taking a second dose. Other times, it’s a health professional who’s at fault. A pharmacist might have dispensed a medication at the wrong concentration, for example. These kinds of mistakes are on the rise, according to a study published Monday in the journal Clinical Toxicology. The researchers looked at a small subset of the medication errors that happen in the U.S. every year. The FDA estimates that about 1...
Source: BHIC - July 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: terri ottosen Tags: Articles Health Information Literacy drug safety medication errors patient safety Source Type: blogs

Hemopurifier Filters Ebola, Hep C, Metastatic Melanoma: Interview with James A. Joyce, CEO of Aethlon Medical
Filtering infectious pathogens and cancer cells directly from whole blood has been an almost fantastic proposition, but the Hemopurifier from Aethlon Medical does just that. We’ve been covering it for over 10 years on Medgadget as it proves itself in clinical trials and new applications for it are discovered. It has already been studied as a treatment option for hepatitis C, metastatic melanoma, and the Ebola virus. Recently at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego, virus capture data was presented from a study of the Hemopurifier involving health-compromised patients i...
Source: Medgadget - July 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 18, 2017
How do you prepare for difficult situations? Whether an upcoming test, presentation or event with a toxic family member, we usually avoid thinking about it. But preparing can mean the difference between leaving the situation victorious or feeling like a victim and failure. Don’t wait for your next uncomfortable event to prepare. You can start with small tasks and gradually increase the difficulty. Small exercise sessions can eventually lead to overcoming bigger obstacles. If you have an upcoming event with a toxic relative, for example, rehearse what to say and how to protect yourself first with a love...
Source: World of Psychology - July 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 17th 2017
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 16, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Opioid Epidemic Resources from NLM
The National Library of Medicine has created a number of portals and lists with numerous resources on opioid abuse, addiction, and treatment. Diverse Populations – Public, Multiple Languages, and Healthcare Professionals (Outreach and Specific Populations Branch bulletin, 2017-05-10) Opiate Addiction and Treatment Portal (SIS Environmental Health and Toxicology) Response to the opioid epidemic – includes those listed in the Diverse Populations link as well as several other federal sites (DISASTR-OUTREACH-LIB listserv archives) (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - July 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: National Library of Medicine News Opioid Abuse and Addiction Public Health Websites Source Type: blogs

Fisetin Slows Onset of Degeneration in SAMP8 Accelerated Aging Mice
Fisetin is a candidate senolytic compound, demonstrated to induce apoptosis in senescent cells in a petri dish. Clearance of senescence cells is a path to rejuvenation therapies capable to some degree of turning back aspects of aging: the presence of these cells is harmful, a cause of aging. It is also a supplement, and can be obtained from a few different companies that - at present, at least - all repackage the product of a single bulk supplier. The principle reason why I'm not presently arranging a self-experimentation study of one involving this substance is that there is no demonstration that fisetin is senolytic in m...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Toxic Nanoparticles Coated with Antibiotics Safely Kill Drug Resistant Bacteria
A team of Brazilian scientists may have come up with a practical way of killing off resistant bacteria by targeting them with toxic silver-silica nanoparticles coated with an antibiotic. Since antibiotics don’t have the full punch to eliminate bacteria resistant to them, the researchers instead used the antibiotic ampicillin as a mechanism to deliver the killer nanoparticles to the pathogens. Normally, silver-silica nanoparticles would be toxic to the body, but because they’re coated with ampicillin they seem to be inert to the body’s cells and don’t affect how they divide and multipl...
Source: Medgadget - July 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Beware: What ’ s in that glass of water?
We are living in a dangerous era, a time when industrial compounds have proliferated to such an extraordinary degree that literally everyone is exposed to chemicals that cause potential harm to our systems. This includes the perfluorooctanoic acid residues from Teflon in your cooking, restaurant food, or groundwater. It can be caused by triclosan in antibacterial hand soaps and hand sanitizers. It can be due to polybrominated diphenyl ethers from the flame retardant in carpeting and clothing, contaminants in the water supply, and plastics that are everywhere and in everything, from cars to the lining of canned foods to wat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 11, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora chemicals chlorine dysbiosis fluoride industrial small intestinal bacterial overgrowth toxins Source Type: blogs

What is the Goal of Treating Aging as a Medical Condition?
Thanks to a great deal of hard work and advocacy, there is now a much greater enthusiasm and public discussion in the research community regarding treatment of the causes of aging than was the case at the turn of the century. This is as opposed to continuing the past strategy of attempts to patch over the late stages of age-related diseases without addressing their root causes. Nonetheless, many researchers are still reluctant to openly advocate for significant extension of human life spans, and bury that goal in favor of talking about compression of morbidity, shortening the period of disability at the end of life. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 10, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How to Create Emotional Boundaries
Those who have experienced physical abuse are advised by therapists to create physical boundaries with the abuser, as in distancing themselves from them and in some extreme cases, warranting a restraining order. The same method should be employed for toxic emotional abuse between two people. It could very well be that a person turns to abusive behaviors after years of not exhibiting any, which will necessitate the need for a boundary.   It’s normal to feel weird about setting up a boundary, especially if there has been no previous need to protect yourself against someone. People are not static beings, and circum...
Source: World of Psychology - July 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maria Bogdanos Tags: Bullying Relationships Trauma boundary violation Child Abuse Domestic Violence Emotional Abuse Physical Abuse Setting Boundaries Source Type: blogs

Behind the scenes of a detox scam
It is surprisingly easy to sell snake oil. I know, because I’ve done it. In 2014, I helped create and sell The Right Detox. This was a bogus detoxification program that purported to improve anyone’s well-being and perhaps, cure disease. I was the face of the scam. I launched The Right Detox at a spring-time women’s health expo in Tucson, Arizona. I kicked off my sales-pitch in front of a small audience with an inspirational story about curing myself of psoriasis using natural remedies and diet changes like those promoted in the The Right Detox program. My presentation began this way: Processed foods, pest...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/britt-marie-hermes" rel="tag" > Britt Marie Hermes, ND < /a > Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

Healthy Low-Carb Barbecue Sauce
Here’s a recipe for a Low-Carb Barbecue Sauce I modified slightly from the original I shared in the Wheat Belly 30-Minute Cookbook. You may have noticed that nearly all commercial barbecue sauces at the supermarket contain high-fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, or sugar as primary ingredients, converting your tasty barbecued ribs or chicken into a toxic sugar exposure. This low-carb version yields 8 grams net carbs per 1/4 cup due to the carbs from tomatoes and the bit of molasses. (The molasses is optional, but does add some extra depth of flavor.) Spread on ribs, chicken, or burgers that contain zero carbs, and you...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 7, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Recipes Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar Dr. Davis erythritol Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free low-carb monk fruit virtue Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Progress in the Creation of a Neoantigen Cancer Vaccine
Targeting therapies to some combination of neoantigens, distinctive markers on the surface of cancerous cells that the immune system learns to recognize, and which vary from patient to patient, represents an advance in the specificity of targeted cancer immunotherapy. It should, in principle, better rouse the immune system to attack cancerous cells, while producing fewer side-effects. Researchers here report on an early human trial of this sort of approach; the initial results look promising, certainly from the perspective of an absence of serious side-effects, though a more robust demonstration of the ability to reduce tu...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Can Existing Mechanisms be Enhanced to Clear Age-Related Protein Aggregates?
Human biochemistry does include systems capable of breaking down or otherwise removing the hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposits observed to be associated with the neurodegenerative conditions known as tauopathies, a class that includes Alzheimer's disease. Obviously, these mechanisms are far from adequate in the normal operation of aged metabolism, but could they be boosted to effectively clear out deposits of broken proteins? That is essentially what is taking place in the development of immunotherapies to clear out β-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer's patients, harnessing the immune system to the task. But are there...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Ways To Have A Great Smoking Session?
When people normally think of smoking, the first thing that comes to their mind is cigarette smoke. After all, cigarettes are easy to use, as well as being cost-effective for pretty much anybody out there who wants to try their hand at smoking for a change. Nevertheless, the world of smoking is much more varied than that: there exist some unique ways to have a smoking experience that it many times better than just lighting up a cigarette, no matter how good it is.  Bubblers – Bubblers are equally used by professional smoker and beginners. The main reason for this is that they produce smoke that is easy to tole...
Source: Nurse Blogger - July 6, 2017 Category: Nursing Authors: Fabiola Panicucci Tags: Ecommerce Source Type: blogs

Beyond “ Repeal and Replace ”
BY DANIEL STONE, MD The toxic polarization of Washington politics might lead even the most stubborn optimist to abandon any hope for bipartisanship on healthcare. Despite endemic pessimism, the flagging efforts to forge a Republican consensus on “repeal and replace” might set the stage for overdue efforts at compromise. Congress will be tempted to move on to more promising areas such as tax reform and infrastructure funding. That temptation should be resisted. The threat to the nation posed by the current state of American healthcare calls for Congress to resurrect the long lost spirit of bold bipartisanship. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized ACA CBO Daniel Stone Medicare Medicare Advantage Repeal Replace Source Type: blogs

Study shows how practicing gratitude can help train your brain and improve mental health over time
— With the rise of managed health care, which emphasizes cost-efficiency and brevity, mental health professionals have had to confront this burning question: How can they help clients derive the greatest possible benefit from treatment in the shortest amount of time? Recent evidence suggests that a promising approach is to complement psychological counseling with additional activities that are not too taxing for clients but yield high results. In our own research, we have zeroed in on one such activity: the practice of gratitude. Indeed, many studies over the past decade have found that people who consciously count t...
Source: SharpBrains - July 5, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness anxiety college students counseling depression fMRI fMRI scanner Gratitude healthcare managed health care Mental-Health Positive-Psychology Psychotherapy Source Type: blogs

Growing Up Too Fast: Early Exposure to Sex
Children are naturally exploratory beings. As we develop, we engage with the world around us using all our senses. Imagine yourself at 2 or 3, crawling around in a grassy field on a summer day. You feel the warmth of the sun on your skin, the gentle breeze blowing through your hair, you breathe in the aroma of the fresh green grass, perhaps even pluck a piece and sample it. A puddle from a recent rain storm beckons you and you splash about in it, drenching yourself. An ice cream cone is offered to you and you savor the sweetness and stickiness as it drips down your chin and onto your clothes. Our skin is our single larges...
Source: World of Psychology - July 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Sexuality Students Trauma Child Development Exposure high-risk behavior Self Harm sexting Sexual Abuse Sexual Assault sexual development Sexual Imagery Sexual Interaction sexual situations Teen Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 4, 2017
For so long you’ve kept quiet. You squelched feelings. You’ve put on a happy face. You’ve taken care of everyone, but yourself. All along, there’s a part of you that’s been waiting. Sometimes you’ll hear it in body aches, anger, and even illness. It’s rebelling against your true feelings. It’s asking for your attention, acknowledgement and expression. Today while you celebrate Independence Day save a little time to honor your true self by listening to it. Tune into how your body feels when you accept an invitation to your family’s party or say, “No” to helpi...
Source: World of Psychology - July 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs bullying Childhood neglect and emotional drain Childhood neglect and joy Disempowering songs Hearing Hollywood Therapy Kristin Noreen Narcissism Narcissistic co workers Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissists Source Type: blogs

A Buggy Case
​A 35-year-old man with a history of asthma presented with an exposure after spraying his garage with an insecticide he bought at the hardware store. Shortly after spraying the insecticide, he noticed eye itchiness, tingling, pruritus over his arms and legs, and shortness of breath. His blood pressure was 130/85 mm Hg, heart rate 70 bpm, respiratory rate 14 bpm, temperature 98.7°F, and SpO2 96% on room air.​He was alert and anxious, his skin was warm with mild erythema, and he had urticaria over his forearms and ankles. His lung exam revealed diffuse wheezing bilaterally. His eyes were watery, and his pupils were 4...
Source: The Tox Cave - July 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

How to Accept That Time Doesn ’ t Heal All Wounds
Wounds don’t heal with time; you just get better at living with them. I never like to be the bearer of bad news, but unlike a scrape on the knee or a cracked femur, emotional wounds do not heal with time. It’s a nice, thoughtless cliché that people resort to when they feel like others need hope or comfort, but it isn’t true. You Need To Know The Differences Between Healthy And Unhealthy Relationships I get that all this sounds very pessimistic, but hear me out: I’m of the firm belief that looking at life’s storms directly is what prepares us for any type of weather. Instead of struggli...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Grief and Loss Happiness Publishers Self-Help YourTango acceptance Cliche comfort emotional wounds Feelings healing with time hope Liz Pardue-Schultz Love Pain Past Perfectionism Present Relationships self-compassion Source Type: blogs

How to Nourish Your Soul
For me writing is nourishment. Writing an article. Writing in my notebook. Writing down a poignant quote. Reading a stunning, sincere sentence is nourishment. So is having a heart-to-heart with my husband. So is stopping and staring at the sky, trying to grasp and appreciate the mystery and beauty of the stars. So is singing to my daughter. So is solitude and a haunting melody. So is sketching, however clumsy and amateurish it might look. All these things reach something deep within me. All these things nourish my soul. The soul resides beneath the ego, or our conscious, “thinking” brain; it is the root of who ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Personal Self-Help Spirituality Stress Fulfilling Life Fulfillment Inner Wisdom Intuition Journaling Joy Malek nourishing our souls Personal Needs purpose Rebecca Turner Source Type: blogs

An interesting finding, and absence of another, in an intoxicated patient found down
CONCLUSION: Administration of subcutaneous terbutaline obviates the need for intravenous access and should be considered as an alternative to nebulized or inhaled beta-agonists to treat acute hyperkalemia in patients with CKD. As with the use of any beta-adrenergic agonist, close cardiovascular monitoring is necessary to avoid or minimize toxicity during therapy.Hypokalemic effects of intravenous infusion or nebulization of salbutamol in patients with chronic renal failure: comparative study.AULiou HH, Chiang SS, Wu SC, Huang TP, Campese VM, Smogorzewski M, Yang WC SOAm J Kidney Dis. 1994;23(2):266. To exami...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 1, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

How to Kick Your Divorce Resentment to the Curb
Getting our lives back after divorce can be hard. There are financial issues, co-parenting, and emotional roller-coasters to ride that can leave us feeling exhausted, wondering if we’ll ever move on and feel happy. Among these stressors, one of the most challenging obstacles to overcome when recovering from divorce is one that can grab hold of even the most patient of people. Resentment and bitterness Resentment is nasty. What makes it so ugly is that it has a tendency to turn you, an otherwise kind and reasonable person, into someone who is so angry at their own life situation that it is nearly impossible to ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Martha Bodyfelt Tags: Anger Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Aggression Anger Management Guilt Personal Growth Remorse Resentment Self Care self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: June 27, 2017
Having trouble getting along with someone? If your relative dug in deep with an insensitive remark or a co-worker is getting on your nerves, there’s a quick life hack you can do to ease your emotional discomfort. Empathy. It’s a surprisingly quick and easy way to momentarily cool off and prevent further discord. That’s because it depersonalizes the situation. It’s easy to get sucked into who is right and wrong, and wondering how could he or she say this to me. But putting yourself in someone else’s shoes pulls us back. Maybe he’s having a hard day. Maybe this is a trigger for him. I...
Source: World of Psychology - June 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Adoption baby boomer parents Boundaries Compassion Empathy Narcissism narcissist and boundaries Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissists and success narcissists and work professional success and narcissism si Source Type: blogs

Vaccine Ingredients: America ’s Dirty Little Secret
Conclusion The increase in childhood illness must have a cause or trigger. There must be common factors when half of America’s children are chronically ill. Could vaccine ingredients be the causal factor of the increase in childhood illnesses? This question remains unanswered by the CDC. As stated above, many CDC employees have a vested financial interest in continuing to sell and market vaccines. As childhood illnesses continue to increase, logic and reason must be applied to the debate and we must identify common factors. What do American children have in common? The large majority receive vaccines per the CDC sche...
Source: vactruth.com - June 25, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Sarah Carrasco Tags: Logical Sarah Carrasco Top Stories Polysorbate 80 truth about vaccines vaccine ingredients Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 26th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 25, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

SENS Research Foundation Publishes the 2016 Annual Rejuvenation Research Report
The SENS Research Foundation annual reports tend to arrive in the middle of the following year, and today the 2016 report was published. You can find it in PDF format at the foundation website. The story of SENS rejuvenation research, approaches that aim to repair the cell and tissue damage that causes aging, is one of growth and success over the years. It has been a bootstrapping from idea to reality, powered by the philanthropy and determined support of our community. We have come a long way and achieved a great deal these past fifteen years. Yet there remains the upward curve ahead, and the completion of the vision of a...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Newly Designed Nanorods Act as Dual Imaging Agents for Improved Diagnostics and Surgical Use
Scientists at the PNG College of Technology have developed new nanoscale rods that may be an effective dual-mode imaging agent for detecting cancer. The nanorods can be seen using both magnetic resonance and optical imaging techniques. Combining the two offers potentially better localization results during pre-op imaging, but can also allow for easy to use optical intraoperative identification of tumor tissue that was originally spotted using MRI. The nanorods are made of gadolinium oxide doped with the element europium. They are also coated in a layer of silica so that the potentially toxic material they’re made of ...
Source: Medgadget - June 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Activates Nanoparticle Aggregates for Selective Drug Delivery
Researchers at the Harvard Wyss Institute have developed a nanoparticle aggregate system that releases a drug when it is dispersed using ultrasound. This means that it can be used to deliver toxic chemotherapy drugs directly to a tumor while reducing side-effects in healthy tissues. Normally, many tumors are treated using chemotherapy drugs that travel throughout the entire body and cause lots of side-effects, such as hair-loss and nausea. Researchers have been working to develop highly specific drug delivery systems that limit the drug to the immediate surroundings of the tumor. This new technique consists of chemotherapy...
Source: Medgadget - June 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

A new study sheds light on “chemobrain”
By Christian Jarrett After chemotherapy treatment, many patients say their mind has been affected. For example they describe symptoms such as feeling confused, memory problems and difficulty concentrating – a phenomenon that has been dubbed “chemobrain” (Cancer Research UK has more information). The causes are little understood. Are these apparent neuropsychological effects due to a direct physical effect of chemotherapy on the brain? Or could it be the stress and worry involved in chemotherapy that is responsible. Perhaps it’s both. To find out more, Mi Sook Jung at Chungnam National University in ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Cancer Cognition Health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 19th 2017
This study is the first to show that downregulation of PAPP-A expression in adult mice can significantly extend life span. Importantly, this beneficial longevity phenotype is distinct from the dwarfism of long-lived PAPP-A KO, Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor (GHR) KO mice with germ-line mutations. Thus, downregulation of PAPP-A expression joins other treatment regimens, such as resveratrol, rapamycin and dietary restriction, which can extend life span when started in mice as adults. In a recent study, inducible knockdown of the GHR in young adult female mice increased maximal, but not median, lif...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Don ’t Underestimate Patients
By GEORGE BERGER, PHD I was diagnosed with aggressive but localized prostate cancer at a major Dutch academic hospital. My parameters were PSA 29 or 31, Gleason sum 4 + 4, and stage T2c. Fortunately, there were no detectable distant metastases. The specialist drew a simple image of my urinary tract and told me I was excluded from brachytherapy, which I had never heard of before, because of the size of my prostate. I had to choose between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and radical prostatectomy (RP). How on Earth could I choose rationally while knowing so little about prostate cancer? However, I had studied maths and phy...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized ADT Dutch Health Care System Gleason Prostate Prostate Cancer Sweden Source Type: blogs

This Is How Childhood Bullying Affects Your Adult Life
You're reading This Is How Childhood Bullying Affects Your Adult Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Bullying is a serious problem and it's effects are going to be seen in a couple of decades, as today's kids will grow into adults, bearing the scars. There are people who still try to find excuses for this behavior, saying that kids will be kids and so on, but the reality is childhood bullying does leave a mark on the adult to be, which is not a pretty picture. From cyberbullying to gang stalking, ther...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: davidgeer Tags: confidence psychology self improvement adult bullying pickthebrain side effects of bullying stop bullying Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: June 16, 2017
There’s one thing you can do right now to improve your relationships with others, cultivate greater peace and be more efficient. Can you guess what it is? Slow down. Slow down your movements. Slow down to listen to how you feel, what he or she said, and what’s going on around you. We’re always anticipating the next thing. But rushing from one thing to the next isn’t only exhausting it pushes us from the present moment. Slowing down gives us time to reflect, pause and do things carefully. In this culture of instant gratification and responses, slowing down, not speeding up will give us what we&rsquo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Business Decision Mapping Childhood Trauma Codependency Codependency and self care Cognition Decision Making Decision making software Decision theory Egotism how narcissists seem themselves how to make decisions i Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 193
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 193. Question 1 Who discovered DNA? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet74617630'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink74617630')) Not Crick, Watson or Rosalind Franklin but Johannes Fried...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five copper toxicity Corrigan's line Corrigan's sign Crick DNA finger Johannes Friedrich Miescher quarantine Rosalind Franklin vitamin b12 Watson Source Type: blogs

5 Things Your Therapist Would Love You to Do
You're reading 5 Things Your Therapist Would Love You to Do, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Congratulations! Chances are that if you are reading this, you have decided that your mental health is very important to you, and you have finally made the choice to see a therapist. So, you are on the right track! However, a lot of people feel overwhelmed at the idea of therapy, not exactly knowing what to do to move their treatment in the right direction. Thankfully, your therapist is a trained professional who ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Tags: confidence creativity featured happiness health and fitness psychology relationships self improvement benefits of therapy best self improvement blog better mental health pickthebrain seek therapy treatment Source Type: blogs

BIOTRONIK ’s Pacemakers Get 3 Tesla MR-Conditional Approval in Europe
BIOTRONIK won European regulatory approval allowing its Edora, Evity, and Enitra series of pacemakers to be safe for 3 Tesla full body scans, as long as certain precautionary measures are taken. This approval will allow more patients to take advantage of the high quality imaging that the more powerful MRI scanners offer, as previously these implants had MR-conditional approval up to only 1.5 Tesla. Full body scanning, on the other hand, opens up scanning of the chest, heart, and other organs close to the pacemaker and its leads. Since these are existing pacemakers and it’s getting a bit confusing which are cleared fo...
Source: Medgadget - June 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Groups of Nanoparticles Powered by a Magnet Team Up to Kill Cancer Cells
Number of ways have been developed that allow nanoparticles to kill cancer cells. Some of these include delivering chemo agents, converting electromagnetic energy beamed into heat, and manipulating with the signaling processes of tumor cells. An international team of researchers is now reporting in journal Theranostics a way of bunching iron oxide particles doped with zinc around tumors and then crushing the nearby cells using an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles have epidermal growth factor peptides attached to them, helping the particles to hone in on a tumor. Once they’ve gathered together, a ro...
Source: Medgadget - June 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Measurable Amyloid Buildup Occurs Significantly Before Alzheimer's Disease
Named and formally recognized age-related diseases are the late stages of processes of damage that start much earlier in life. So it is never a surprise to see that specific forms of damage strongly associated with any one specific age-related disease can be detected in smaller amounts earlier in old age, and that the people with more of that damage have a higher risk of later exhibiting the disease state. In the case of the research materials noted here, the disease is Alzheimer's, and the damage is accumulation of amyloid-β, a form of misfolded protein that accumulates in the brain. It and its surrounding halo of ch...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 14, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

With leader charisma, it ’s possible to have too much of a good thing
By Alex Fradera If there’s one quality you absolutely want in a leader, it’s surely charisma. Celebrated leaders are invariably associated with this magic word, and evidence suggests charismatic people inspire more trust, commitment, and results from their followers. But across a number of other supposedly virtuous traits, such as political ability or assertiveness (pdf), researchers are starting to realise that it’s possible to have “too much of a good thing.” Could charisma fall in that category? That’s the suggestion of new research in the Journal of Personality and Social Psycho...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: leadership Occupational Personality Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: June 13, 2017
Your doctor may have created a treatment protocol for your physical health. You may have a business protocol at work. But creating a mental health protocol could also do wonders for your emotional well-being. Setting up a systemized plan can give you a sense of control and organize your day. Recently, I started my own wellness schedule that consists of things like daily meditation, afternoon calming tea, and evening walks. You could create your own plan for anything, more creativity, greater awareness and to help you get more rest at night. Consider planning out a mental health summer retreat, which could simply inclu...
Source: World of Psychology - June 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Abusive Families Antisocial Personality Disorder diagnosing your family Egotism Emotional Neglect Misdiagnosis of Personality Disorders Narcissism Narcissistic families Narcissistic father Narcissistic Personality Dis Source Type: blogs

Kudos to Bicycling Magazine for pedaling so so so much overselling of the microbiome
Well ... this was not a fun read.There is an article in Bicycling Magazine by Berne Broudy and it is pretty painful to read. The article is ​Is Poop Doping the Next Big Thing? | Bicycling.And the answer should be "We have no $(*#()$()@#)@# idea if this is a good idea". But instead the answer was hype, overselling, and some bad microbiology reporting.Here are some parts I am not a fan of.The results showed she was populated by 96% gram-negative pathogens so toxic that if they got into her blood stream they could kill her. “I had no microbes to help me break down food, and I had picked up bug...
Source: The Tree of Life - June 12, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 12th 2017
In this study, we focused on two pathways of cardiomyocytes or heart cells: the Hippo pathway, which is involved in stopping renewal of adult cardiomyocytes, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) pathway, essential for cardiomyocyte normal functions." Previous work had hinted that components of the DGC pathway may somehow interact with members of the Hippo pathway. The researchers genetically engineered mice to lack genes involved in one or both pathways, and then determined the ability of the heart to repair an injury. These studies showed for the first time that dystroglycan 1, a component of the DGC ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Why is overtreatment of infertility so rampant?
Lots of Indian IVF doctors put their patients on anti-TB medicines . While some of them will do tests to decide which patients to treat with these toxic medicines, others routinely put all their patients on the drugs, irrespective of whether they actually have TB or not. Thus, in the Ashvini Hospital of the Indian Navy in Mumbai, all infertile patients are put on anti-TB treatment " empirically".I have often wondered why medical treatments which are completely unproven have become so prevalent. In this case, it's obviously not driven by financial considerations - after all, it's not as if the Navy doctor mak...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - June 10, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs