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Adjusting Neutrophil Behavior to Enhance Stroke Recovery
An emerging theme in regenerative research is the importance of the innate immune system to the mechanisms of tissue maintenance, and researchers have so far found a number of ways in which the behavior of these immune cells might potentially be adjusted in order to enhance healing. The scientific community has made initial strides with macrophages and microglia, shifting the balance of pro-inflammatory versus pro-regenerative cells, and here some of the same high level themes are observed in the response to injury of the innate immune cells known as neutrophils. It matters greatly as to whether these immune cells turn up ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Introduction to DAF-16 and FOXO in the Context of Aging and Longevity
In the early 1990s Cynthia Kenyon and others produced the first C. elegans nematode worms to exhibit significantly extended longevity through a single gene mutation, in daf-2, the nematode version of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor, and went on to map the relevant nearby biochemical landscape of these mutants. It is perhaps overly simplistic to mark this as the dividing line between a research mainstream whose members believed aging to be an intractably complex process, and a research mainstream increasingly interested in slowing aging through adjustment of metabolism, but that is the story as it is commo...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

HSP90 Inhibitors as Another New Class of Potential Senolytic Drug Compounds
The increasing number of senescent cells present in older tissues is one of the root causes of degenerative aging. It is also the closest to being effectively reversed. An open access paper describing the evidence for HSP90 inibitors to selectively destroy senescent cells was published earlier this month. I had half missed it in passing and half skipped over it in favor of a more general review of the current state of senolytic drug development, pharmaceuticals capable of clearing senescent cells, but on reflection I think it is worth pointing out. The number of senolytic drug candidates has not yet reached a count of twen...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 19, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Neuroexistentialism: A Brain in Search of Meaning
[image fromHuth et al., 2016]No, not“meaning” in the semantic sense... “Neuroexistentialism” is the angst that some humans feel upon realizing that the mind and spirit have an entirely physical basis. At a personal level I don't understand all the hubbub, because I accepted thatmind = brain when I entered graduate school to study neuroscience. But for others:“Coming to terms with the neural basis of who we are can be very unnerving. It has been called“neuroexistentialism”, which really captures the essence of it. We ’re not in the habit of thinking about ourselves that w...
Source: The Neurocritic - September 19, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Reviewing the Effects of Exercise on Mitophagy and Mitochondrial Function
Mitochondrial damage is important in aging, and many of the means shown to modestly slow aging in various species involve increased cellular maintenance activities directed towards mitochondria. One of these is mitophagy, a specialized form of autophagy that recycles damaged mitochondria. There is plenty of evidence to suggest that more efficient mitophagy is good for long-term health. There is also plenty of evidence for increased autophagy of all sorts to be one of the more important mediating mechanisms in many of the interventions shown to slow aging in laboratory species, including the long-studied and simple approach...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 298
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 298th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The UK Intensive Care Society recently had a meeting focusing on burnout. All the p...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 17, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 18th 2017
In this study, researchers put some numbers to the correlation, and improve on previous attempts to rule out wealth and other effects as significant contributing causes. A study finds that a Chinese policy is unintentionally causing people in northern China to live 3.1 years less than people in the south, due to air pollution concentrations that are 46 percent higher. These findings imply that every additional 10 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate matter pollution reduces life expectancy by 0.6 years. The elevated mortality is entirely due to an increase in cardiorespiratory deaths, indicating that air poll...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Having a BLaST in Alaska … and Beyond
Lori Gildehaus and her lovable, mischievous dog, Charley. Credit: Lori Gildehaus. Lori Gildehaus loves her job because she’s almost always doing something different. Some days, she leads professional development sessions for undergraduate students at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF). Other days, she’s weathered down in isolated communities along Alaska’s coast while leading community science and outreach events. These activities are just a few of her many responsibilities. Gildehaus is a laboratory research and teaching technician for UAF’s Biomedical Learning and Student Training (BLaST) ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - September 14, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Christa Reynolds Tags: Being a Scientist Training Source Type: blogs

New research reveals the long-term toll of keeping secrets
It is mind-wandering about our secrets that most seems to take a toll, rather than the job of concealing them By Alex Fradera Secrets burden minds. To understand how, researchers have previously focused on the act of concealment during one-off social interactions, showing that keeping a secret is draining and can increase anxiety. But what about the longer-term toll? A new paper in Attitudes and Social Cognition describes ten studies on the impact of secrecy day-on-day, showing how the burden of a secret peppers our waking life with reminders and periods of brooding. The Columbia University team – Michael Slepi...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Mental health Source Type: blogs

The ER ECG in drug overdose
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - September 11, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular toxicology Source Type: blogs

The Circular Relationship Between Senescent Cells and Chronic Kidney Disease
Growth in the number of senescent cells that linger in tissues is one of the root causes of aging. In this context, the open access paper noted here illustrates a couple of points that are worth bearing in mind while thinking about the biochemistry of aging, the first of which is that aging is a feedback loop of damage. Cell and tissue damage generates more cell and tissue damage, which is why aging accelerates as it progresses. The same rough structure of events is found in the age-related failure of any complex machinery. The second point is that many of the mechanisms and relationships established in past researc...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Powerful Exercise for Moving Past Regret
You stayed in many toxic relationships. Many years too long. You never finished college. You left a really good job for a job you now can’t stand. You had countless embarrassing, neglectful drunken moments, which ultimately led to your divorce. You filed for bankruptcy. You racked up thousands upon thousands of dollars in student loans. You threw yourself into work while a loved one was dying. You pursued the profession your parents demanded. You didn’t say what you wanted to say. You didn’t trust yourself. And you regret it. And you keep thinking about these regrets—these bad moments, these bad dec...
Source: World of Psychology - September 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Coping Skills Guilt living in the past moving on regret Remorse Source Type: blogs

CCC Update 015
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Updates to the CCC are still happening – sometimes I even find time to tell people about them… Keep the feedback coming on this free guide to Critical Care encompassing over 1650 pages. Here are some major updates since CCC Update 014: Antimicrobial dosing and kill characteristics A topic much loved by the CICM Fellowship examiners… and with good reason, it is important stuff! there is no point giving antibiotics if they don’t...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Critical Care Compendium antimicrobial dosing and kill characteristics CCC update spontaneous breathing and mechanical ventilation therapeutic drug monitoring trismus and restricted mouth opening urine drug screen Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 11th 2017
This study developed the first procedure for the removal of epithelium from the lung airway with the full preservation of vascular epithelium, which could be applied in vivo to treat diseases of lung epithelium. Whole lung scaffolds with an intact vascular network may also allow for recellularization using patient-specific cells and bioengineering of chimeric lungs for transplantation. In addition to the clinical potential, lung scaffolds lacking an intact epithelial layer but with functional vascular and interstitial compartments may also serve as a valuable physiological model for investigating (i) lung development, (ii)...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 10, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

More Evidence for Senescent Cell Signaling to be a Cause of Age-Related Fibrosis
Regeneration and tissue maintenance are highly complex, regulated processes. Unfortunately, these processes run awry as the low-level molecular damage of aging increases over the years. Cells change their behavior, change the signals they produce, and one of the detrimental outcomes of these changes is fibrosis. This is the creation of scar-like collagen structures in place of the expected arrangement of cells and extracellular matrix. Since the fine details of that arrangement matter greatly to the correct function of organs, fibrosis is very harmful. It features prominently in the most common age-related diseases of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 9, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

How to Stop Your Inner Critic from Sabotaging Your Happiness and Success
Know Your Inner Critic Most people believe and feed an inner critic who points out faults and flaws, dwells on the negative, and is often downright abusive. This can lead to procrastination, inactivity or avoidance. It affects your emotions, your self-esteem, confidence, courage and joy of life.  And most of all it diminishes your trust in your own strengths and abilities. Self-Criticism Being overly critical and dissatisfied with yourself. Often based on unrealistic and unreasonable expectations about who you should be and how you should act. Judging yourself negatively. Comparing yourself to others who seem superi...
Source: World of Psychology - September 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christiana Star Tags: Habits Happiness Self-Esteem Self-Help Success & Achievement Confidence Failure identity Self Awareness Self Criticism self-compassion self-worth Source Type: blogs

Oxidized Dopamine and Dysfunctional Lysosomes in Parkinson's Disease
This research improves on the established links between a few of the forms of molecular damage and cellular dysfunction that central to the SENS view of aging, at least in the case of Parkinson's disease. These are lysosomal failure, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the accumulation of damaged proteins that form solid deposits, alpha-synuclein in this case. All age-related diseases emerge from the various typs of root cause damage that causes aging, some more directly, some with more intervening layers of secondary failure and damage. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, pri...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 8, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Amazing Technologies Changing The Future of Dermatology
Smart algorithms will soon diagnose skin cancer, dermatologists consult patients online, and 3D printers will print out synthetic skin to fight tissue shortages. There is a lot going on in dermatology, and medical professionals should prepare in time for the technological changes before they start swiping through the specialty. Let’s start by familiarizing with the most amazing technologies changing dermatology! Your body’s best guard in a hostile world: your skin Everything is written on your skin. Every wrinkle, spot, and color tells a story, and not only a medical one. This miraculous organ can show you as a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 7, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine 3d printing AI artificial intelligence dermatology digital GC1 Healthcare Innovation nanotechnology Personalized medicine robotics wearables Source Type: blogs

Reduced Mitochondrial Fusion or Increased Fission Slows Aging in Flies
In this study, the condition was delayed after flies were given more Drp1. In another part of the experiment, also involving middle-aged fruit flies, the scientists turned off a protein called Mfn that enables mitochondria to fuse together into larger pieces. Doing so also extended the flies' lives and improved their health. "You can either break up the mitochondria with Drp1 or prevent them from fusing by inactivating Mfn. Both have the same effect: making the mitochondria smaller and extending lifespan." Promoting Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission in midlife prolongs healthy lifespan of Drosop...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Inflammation, Ablation, Fats, LDL, etc .. My review of ESC 2017
The European Cardiology Congress, ESC as it is called, has grown into the largest medical meeting in the world. This year, about 38,000 attendees came to Barcelona. I was busy. Here is an update of the big stories: Inflammation:  Experts agree that inflammation associates with heart disease. One of the keys to showing inflammation causes heart disease would be to show a reduction of cardiac events with a drug that blocks inflammation. The CANTOS trial tested the ability of a drug called canukinumab, which is already approved for rare causes of inflammatory diseases, to reduce cardiac events. Canukinumab exerts its ant...
Source: Dr John M - September 6, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

The Osteoporosis/Osteopenia Set-Up
Your doctor advises you to take calcium supplements and follow a balanced diet low in fat and rich in healthy whole grains for bone health and prevention of osteoporotic fractures—but it does NOT work. Such advice can even be dangerous. He/she then prescribes drugs for osteoporosis that are costly and toxic. Yet there are a number of ways to prevent or reverse abnormal bone thinning that are 1) effective, 2) safe, 3) yield many other health benefits, and 4) inexpensive. Because the doctor dispenses ineffective advice that leads you down the path of prescription medication, we do it ourselves, UNDOCTORED. About Undoc...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 5, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle bisphosphonates bone health calcium osteopenia osteoporosis vitamin D Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 4th 2017
In conclusion, KPE delays intrinsic skin aging process by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. KPE does not only attenuate cellular senescence through inhibition of the p53/p21, p16/pRb, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways but also improve mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1α stimulation. Consequently, KPE prevents wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing collagen and elastic fibers in hairless mice. The Society for the Rescue of our Elders https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/08/the-society-for-the-rescue-of-our-elders/ The Society for the...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 3, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Pleasure from Someone Else ’s Pain
When I hear a word not commonly used in my vernacular twice in a period of a few days, I know I need not wait for a third time to explore the concept. Schadenfreude (pronounced ‘shade n froid’) which comes from German and originates from the words ‘harm’ and ‘joy. It is defined as, “enjoyment obtained from the troubles of others.” Chances are, you know someone who indulges in this practice, or perhaps, you do so yourself. It may seem like human nature to wish ill will on someone who wreaks havoc or does harm to others. As much as I am aware that cause and effect ultimately occurs,...
Source: World of Psychology - September 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Family Friends Happiness Mindfulness Minding the Media Relationships Self-Esteem Bigotry Charlottesville Compassion Empathy fear of terrorism Mass murder Politics Racism white nationalism white supremacy Source Type: blogs

How to Be Cool
​A 27-year-old man with an unknown past medical history presented with altered mental status. Bystanders found him on the sidewalk acting strangely, according to EMS. The patient was drowsy with incomprehensible speech on arrival. He was diaphoretic, tachycardic, and combative. No signs of trauma were noted. His heart rate was 130 bpm, blood pressure 169/90 mm Hg, respiratory rate 30 bpm, SPO2 98% on room air, and temperature 105.3°F. His blood glucose was 150. The patient continued to be minimally responsive.​Etiologies of HyperthermiaNeuroleptic malignant syndromeSerotonin syndromeAnticholinergic syndromeSympatho...
Source: The Tox Cave - September 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Restoring Osteocalcin Reverses Memory Loss in Old Mice
Last year researchers showed that raising levels of osteocalcin in old mice reverses some of the age-related decline in exercise capacity. In the paper noted here, the same research group shows that increased osteocalcin also reverses some of the loss in memory function that takes place in later life, at least in mice. Taken together these are quite interesting demonstrations, and we might speculate on whether this could be a cause of improvements in the health of old mice obtained via heterochronic parabiosis, wherein the circulatory systems of an old and a young mouse are linked together. Osteocalcin levels decline with ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Patient-Centered Medical Home: A new model for medical care
The world of primary care is challenging right now. It can be frustrating for both patients and doctors. From the patient’s perspective Let’s say you’re basically healthy, but overweight. You can’t quite get your diet under control. You’d like your doctor’s help and maybe some testing, like thyroid. So you call your primary care doctor. You work through the practice’s phone tree and leave a message for the nurse. The nurse may get back to you within a day or a few days, and after you talk, she or he will pass the message on to your doctor, who says you should come in. Then it takes...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Health Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

A fast narrow complex rhythm.
A 50-something called 911 for palpitations.He was tachycardic and diaphoretic. POCUS cardiac ultrasound was hyperdynamic.Medics recorded this ECG:This appears to be atrial flutter with 2:1 conduction, and narrow complexMedics diagnosed atrial fibrillation with RVR.It cannot be atrial fibrillation with RVR because it is regular.The patient arrived in the ED with a heart rate that ranged from 135 to 150 and did NOT look like flutter on the monitor (not available).A 12-lead was recorded:There is a regular, narrow complex tachycardia at a rate of 135.What is it?It is important to know that the heart rate on the monitor (n...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - August 30, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

You can actually look younger within the first week
Once you make the decision to completely remove grains from your diet, the inflammatory effects of grain proteins are eliminated. In a very short period of time—-usually within the first week—-you can begin to see a change in your appearance. You will see the difference when you look in the mirror as well as when you step on the scale. Your face will begin to look younger. Poor choices in food have the potential to cripple health, whether in the form of hemorrhoids or ulcerative colitis. As you will see, many, if not most, of the health conditions that make us reliant on the healthcare system are caused by the ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grain Free Lifestyle Grains Sugar Undoctored Weight loss Wheat Belly Wheat Belly 10-Day Detox Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox Wheat Belly Challenge anti-aging antiaging Dr. Davis edema facial change gluten-free grain-free In Source Type: blogs

Integrated Heart/Cancer on a Chip Helps Discover Side Effects of Drugs
At Kyoto University in Japan researchers have created what they call an Integrated Heart/Cancer on a Chip (iHCC) that was designed to help discover side effects of anti-cancer and other medications. The microfluidic system, which is smaller than a common glass slide used with microscopes, consists of healthy myocardial cells populating some chambers and cancerous liver cells living in different chambers, each pair making up a unique line of testing. The chambers are connected to a pump that can control how fluids move through the system, allowing a liquid to circulate round. The idea is to simulate how blood circ...
Source: Medgadget - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Genetics Oncology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 28th 2017
In conclusion, CAVD is highly prevalent. Long understood as a passive process, it is now known to be complex and one which involves pathophysiological mechanisms similar to those of atherosclerosis. Understanding these mechanisms could help to establish new therapeutic targets that might allow us to halt or at least slow down the progression of the disease. Early Steps in the Tissue Engineering of Intervertebral Discs https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/08/early-steps-in-the-tissue-engineering-of-intervertebral-discs/ In this paper, researchers report on progress towards the manufacture of interver...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Crosspost: #MoBE17: Microbiology of the Built Environment Research & Applications Symposium – microBEnet: the microbiology of the Built Environment network
Discussion: Myth and Reality of MoBE ManipulationRob Knight(UCSD),ModeratorRita Colwell (University of Maryland)Jeffrey Siegel (U of T)Ilana Brito (Cornell)Jessica Green (University of Oregon)Poster Session& ReceptionThursday October 12thWelcomeJordan Peccia (Yale). Gordon Conference Announcement.KeynoteMarc Edwards (Virginia Tech). MoBE, Public Health and the Flint Water CrisisSession 5 - From MoBE Research to MoBE ApplicationsScott Kelley (San Diego State University).Session Chair.Jack Gilbert (University of Chicago). From Hospitals to Forensic ApplicationsRichard Shaughnessy (University of Tulsa).&nbs...
Source: The Tree of Life - August 26, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Safely ‘ Get High ’ with Your Kids
Everyone needs to feel EXTRA alive sometimes. I’ve been thinking lately about the term “getting high”, as it is so commonly used in our culture today. As a student of NLP (neuro-linguistic programming), I know the real power our language has in influencing our lives. This leads me to wonder about the relationship between how we define getting high and the epidemic we now face with substance use disorder in our country. The Deep Reason We Have ‘Parental Intuition’ — And Why We Need To Trust It More Dictionaries define “getting high” as exhibiting elation or euphoric excitemen...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Addiction Children and Teens Family Happiness Parenting Personal Publishers Recovery Substance Abuse Video YourTango Source Type: blogs

Human Trials of Therapies that Aim to Clear α-synuclein from the Aging Brain
A major theme in rejuvenation biotechnology is periodical removal of metabolic waste. The accumulation of various altered proteins into solid deposits that are not found in young tissues is a form of damage. The presence of this waste at best alters cellular behavior in undesirable ways, and at worst causes harm and cell death. This is a root cause of aging, and thus the ability to safely remove the buildup of waste, once achieved, will be a form of rejuvenation. There are many forms of unwanted waste proteins found in old tissues: the amyloid-β and tau best known for their appearance in Alzheimer's disease; the trans...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Kelsey Moody on Antoxerene and the Near Future of Applied Aging Research
Antoxerene formally launched today, concurrently with a $1.5 million funding round, a spin-off venture of Ichor Therapeutics. I recently had the chance to ask Kelsey Moody at Ichor Therapeutics a few questions on the new lines of work that will proceed under the Antoxerene umbrella, as well as his thoughts on the current state of the industry; I think you'll find those interesting. It looks like involvement in the growing senolytics industry is on the cards, and why not? That market will be enormous, with room for many companies and classes of therapy. As you'll no doubt recall, the staff at Ichor Therapeutics are...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

New Glue Derived from Mussels to Make Fetal Surgeries Safer
Fetal surgeries using laparoscopic tools have proven to be effective at treating a number of difficult conditions that would otherwise lead to tragic results. A major difficulty with these surgeries is that the amniotic sac is penetrated in order to reach the fetus. The sac is extremely fragile and once the instruments are removed the remaining hole is difficult to seal. A tear could occur and quickly propagate, leading to a serious emergency. A glue based on a mussel adhesive is strong enough to suspend a bag of shellfish. Credit: Diederik Balkenende Researchers at University of California, Berkeley have been working on d...
Source: Medgadget - August 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

10 Things Introverts Should Start Doing Today to Live a Happier Life
You're reading 10 Things Introverts Should Start Doing Today to Live a Happier Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. It’s not easy being an introvert, because our society seems designed for extroverts. Job interviews favor those who are personable, smooth-talking, and quick-thinking. Classrooms are noisy, busy places that reward the students who raise their hands frequently and dive into group work. The social scene lauds those who are confident, outgoing, and quick to make small talk. How can an in...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenn Granneman Tags: featured happiness self improvement best self improvement blog confidence introverts pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Inside EMS Podcast: Carfentanil Cooties
In this week’s episode of Inside EMS, co-host Chris Cebollero and I welcome Dr. David Tan, President-Elect of NAEMSP, to talk about his organization’s endorsement of the latest guidance from the American College of Medical Toxicology and the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology on occupational exposure to fentanyl and fentanyl analogues. That document, in addition ... (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - August 22, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: EMS Health & Safety HazMat Inside EMS Podcasting Source Type: blogs

Clearing Senescent Cells Partially Reverses Osteoporosis in Mice
Senescent cells accumulate in tissues with age, a consequence of the normal operation of cellular biochemistry. While these cells can be beneficial in small numbers and for short period of times, such as while playing a role in wound healing, it is unfortunately the case that - when present in large numbers and lingering for years - the activities of these cells contribute meaningfully to the progression of age-related disease. Their signals and other secreted molecules generate chronic inflammation, corrode tissue structure, and alter the behavior of normal cells for the worse. Senescent cells are one of the causes of a...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Processes of Atherosclerosis Damage the Heart in Addition to Blood Vessels
In conclusion, CAVD is highly prevalent. Long understood as a passive process, it is now known to be complex and one which involves pathophysiological mechanisms similar to those of atherosclerosis. Understanding these mechanisms could help to establish new therapeutic targets that might allow us to halt or at least slow down the progression of the disease. Link: https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5178631 (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - August 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 294
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 294th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Ken Milne highlights another Legend in EM, Dr. Jerry Hoffman, on the SGEM thi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 21st 2017
This study didn't measure whether receiving the cardiosphere-derived cells extended lifespans, so we have a lot more work to do. We have much to study, including whether CDCs need to come from a young donor to have the same rejuvenating effects and whether the extracellular vesicles are able to reproduce all the rejuvenating effects we detect with CDCs." Cardiac and systemic rejuvenation after cardiosphere-derived cell therapy in senescent rats Cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy has exhibited several favourable effects on heart structure and function in humans and in preclinical models; however,...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Exercise Restores Failing Autophagy in Damaged Heart Tissue
Despite the very promising progress in aging research that has taken place since the turn of the century, it remains the case that exercise and calorie restriction are still the most reliable and and beneficial methods of improving long-term health and life expectancy. That should cease to be true a few years from now when the first senolytic drug candidates are better categorized and more easily available, but for today the oldest of free methodologies have a better expectation value than anything you might consider paying for. Precisely because these effects are reliable, and to a lesser degree because present medical ap...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 19, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Psychology Today Promotes Its Own Trump Fake News
No matter what your political view, it is disconcerting when we run across news online that is not factually correct. President Trump refers to such news stories as “fake news” — but also includes in this category any news story he simply doesn’t agree with. Earlier this month, Psychology Today ran an article entitled, “60,000 Psychologists Say Trump Has ‘Serious Mental Illness’.” The problem with this headline? It wasn’t true. But that didn’t stop them from publishing it on their site for four days, before they were called out on the issue on Twitter for its in...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Celebrities General Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Psychology Source Type: blogs

Silver Nanoparticle Coating and Tiny Electric Current Prevent Bacteria from Settling on Medical Devices
Silver ions and electric current are well known killers of bacteria that have been utilized to keep things clean in different scenarios for many years. Yet, their use is limited to only certain applications as a fairly high current or potentially toxic concentration of silver ions are needed to destroy bacterial buildup. At the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden researchers have now come up with a way to combine silver nanoparticles and electric current at a low concentration and reduced power level, respectively, so that bacteria is still killed off but humans are not affected. The technology may allow the pro...
Source: Medgadget - August 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Doctors Should Play Board Games to Get Better At Teamwork
The objective of the game is to remove jargon from explaining conditions, diseases, treatments. For example, you pick a card for example with the word migraine on it, while on the back of the card you also get 5 words to avoid. A brilliant way to force out jargon from the language of medicine! 4) Healing Blade: the (board) Game of Thrones for learning antibiotics As a medical student, you have to memorize plenty of information, which takes a lot of time and energy. And most of the times, there is no rational or logical explanation behind the labels, titles or a huge bulk of the material in general. Nerdcore Medical&r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 15, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design Medical Education board games future gamification gc4 Health 2.0 Hospital Innovation Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 14th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How to Become a More Mindful Person
We all have heard of the concept of becoming more mindful. But what does that actually mean in our everyday lives? Is it strictly tied to various forms of meditation or breathing exercises? It can be, according to the experts, but in actuality it is more practical and something you can even do on a daily basis. Utilize the ideas below to become a more mindful person, and your body and mind will thank you. Take a walk outside. Taking a breather outside is one of the most mindful things you can do. Walking in and of itself is very therapeutic. Taking a walk, a break in the middle of your day or early in the morning, calms ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Creativity Habits Happiness LifeHelper Mindfulness Self-Help Calm Personal Growth Present Moment Relaxation Source Type: blogs

Bio-Compatible, Flexible, Aqueous, Salt-Powered Batteries for Implantable Devices
Implantable medical devices powered by batteries only exist in a few spheres of clinical practice. It is partly because most batteries are made of nasty things that have to be safely contained inside a strong metal case, making impractical a lot of what is actually possible. Researchers at the Fudan University in Shanghai, China have just reported on a new type of battery that relies on electrolytes that are commonly used in medicine and research, including saline solution and cell-culture medium. Being sodium-ion batteries, since they’re not relying on toxic or corrosive substances to operate, makes them fundamental...
Source: Medgadget - August 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Dysfunctional Golgi Apparatus Implicated in Some Forms of Neurodegeneration
Researchers have shown that dysfunction in Golgi apparatus organelles in brain cells is important in some forms of neurodegenerative disease, and identified a controlling protein that might be used in order to partially reverse this dysfunction. The Golgi apparatus is involved in the later stages of production and deployment of protein machinery in the cell; it packages up proteins for dispatch to their destination inside the cell, or for secretion outside the cell. Some past research has suggested relevance for Golgi apparatus failure in Alzheimer's disease, and there are indications that Golgi function might be one of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How To Be In Control Of Your Future (Even After A Past Riddled With Failure)
You're reading How To Be In Control Of Your Future (Even After A Past Riddled With Failure), originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. [caption id="attachment_51359" align="alignnone" width="299"] You determine your future[/caption] Sometimes you encounter situations that make you question your luck. You could be the desperate single lady, or the sterile man with no kids, or the college graduate with a shitty job and less pay. You could have an ill mannered housemate or a wife who isn'...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: adogagodwin Tags: confidence featured happiness productivity tips self improvement best self-improvement blogs Comfort Zone failure fear motivation pickthebrain positivity power of positivity self confidence Source Type: blogs