Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

What ’ s the story with zinc?
In the several decades since the need for dietary zinc was discovered, it has proven to be far more important to overall health than initially thought. And deficiency is proving to be common. You may recall that the phytates of wheat and grains block nearly all absorption of dietary zinc, along with blocking iron, calcium, and magnesium (all positively-charged cations). Just as iron deficiency anemia with hemoglobin values of 7 or 8 g/dl resistant to iron supplementation commonly develops in grain-consuming populations, so a parallel zinc deficiency also develops (although not well reflected by blood levels of zinc, which ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gastrointestinal gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains hormonal Inflammation phytates rash zinc Source Type: blogs

How Exercise Can Boost your Mental Health
You're reading How Exercise Can Boost your Mental Health, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In an age where pharmaceutical drugs dominate television advertisements (the average US television viewer sees nine pharmaceutical ads per day (C. Lee Ventola, 2011)), it’s not surprising that the overwhelming majority of the population are looking for quick fixes to often complex problems. After all, there’s a pill for almost anything these days. But one of the most time-tested and effective mental...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Katz Tags: depression featured health and fitness psychology self improvement anxiety exercise mental health pickthebrain stop depression Source Type: blogs

Physician wellness programs are lipstick on a pig
Here it comes — another email about “physician wellness,” advertising mindfulness training, an ice cream social, or a volunteer day. As a psychiatrist, I can attest to the importance of tending to one’s own mental and physical health in order to strive for wellness. However, the trend of implementing physician wellness programs throughout the U.S. is nothing more than putting proverbial lipstick on a pig. Or, stated differently, this may amount to a very muted and unintentional form of victim blaming: “If doctors just learned to take better care of themselves, they wouldn’t feel burnt ou...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/linda-drozdowicz" rel="tag" > Linda Drozdowicz, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Five Tips to Beat Holiday Stress
Conclusion. . .  The five tips listed above won’t work for everyone, but they may give you some ideas on how to make the holidays more enjoyable. Remember, there is no right way to celebrate, just remember to enjoy yourself. Talkback: Using the comments sections below, share your tips and tricks for surviving the holidays and avoiding the blues. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - November 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Family General Holiday Coping Relationships Self-Help Stress Boundaries Expectations Family Gatherings Gratitude Holiday Season Holiday Stress Perfectionism Relaxation Sadness Source Type: blogs

Burdened by High Medication Costs? Your Boss May Be Able to Help
Shutterstock Pharmaceutical companies have been charging way too much for way too many of their products. Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton complained about drug prices during the election campaign, but neither political party has taken action since November to … Continue reading → The post Burdened by High Medication Costs? Your Boss May Be Able to Help appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care financial toxicity healthcare costs Peter Ubel price transparency reference pricing syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: November 17, 2017
I hope you read this before the holiday craziness. There’s one thing I keep forgetting and I want you to get it before you get lost in the loop too. I find myself falling into a pitt of resentment. It happens when I start doing for everyone else, when I cook multiple meals, shop for the perfect outfits for my kids, and stay up late just to make sure I’ve got rainy day activities and holiday ideas planned. Suddenly, I’m angry. I feel alone. I think no one cares how tired I am, or sick I feel. Somewhere in that loop, I stop and realize it’s me. I need to take care of myself. I need to set time to bath...
Source: World of Psychology - November 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Manganese Based Alternative to Gadolinium: Journal Watch
The use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in MR images has become one of radiology ’s most debated topic.  In a study published in Radiology, a manganese-based contrast agent, manganese-N-picolyl-N,N ’,N’-trans-1,2-cyclohexenediaminetriacetate (Mn-PyC3A) is shown  enable contrast-enhanced MR angiography with comparable contrast enhancement to gadolinium-based agents and may overcome concerns regarding gadolinium-associated toxicity and retention.  Eric M. Gale et al compared contrast material –enhanced MR angiography  in baboons by using Mn-PyC3A and Gd-DTPA. Ref...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - November 16, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Why Be a Thanksgiving “Orphan”?
“What are you doing for Thanksgiving?” It’s usually an innocent question this time of year, meant to just make conversation. It is bandied about at work, among the parents picking up their kids at school or when talking to friends. “What are you doing?” For those who have places to go, it’s a simple enough question to answer. Whether or not they are looking forward to the yearly stuff-yourself-day with relatives, they know what they are doing and probably just how it’s going to be. (Yearly family events do tend to repeat themselves.) But for those who either can’t or don&rsq...
Source: World of Psychology - November 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Family Friends Happiness Holiday Coping Inspiration & Hope Family Gatherings Friendsgiving Holiday Season home for the holidays Thanksgiving Source Type: blogs

Nanoparticles with Long Afterglow for Life Sciences Research
Molecular-scale fluorescent markers are a staple of many branches of life sciences research. They get excited and emit a glow when illuminated with a laser, and so can be spotted and associated with cells and other biological things they’re attached to. A common problem with the fluorescent agents is that they lose their glow shortly after being energized. Moreover, tissues nearby get excited by the laser too, producing their own “autofluorescence” that muddies the glow coming from the fluorescent dyes. Now researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have developed new, biocompatible semi...
Source: Medgadget - November 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

When the Career Cookies Crumble
As a seasoned career coach working with nurses and other healthcare professionals, I often hear stories from my clients that are both heartbreaking and maddening. Nurses and nursing students go through so much in their careers, and there can be a lot of pain and struggle along the way. And when things go south and a nurse's career seems endangered, it can be a frightening and worrisome time.No matter the cause of a nurse's career cookies appearing to crumble, there is almost always a way to get things back to the way they should be. I've seen so many varied scenarios of how a nursing career can take a bad turn, and I've se...
Source: Digital Doorway - November 13, 2017 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare careers nurse nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 306
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 306th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week RebelEM unleashes his top 10 pearls from ACEP17 [LP] EPMonthly published an ER acco...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review #FOAMped #FOAMresus #FOAMsim #FOAMus #meded FOAMcc FOAMed LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 13th 2017
In conclusion, we have developed an effective PILs strategy to deliver the AUF1 plasmid to a specific target, and this system may be useful for the development of new anti-aging drugs. Considering the Evidence for Vascular Amyloidosis as a Cause of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/11/considering-the-evidence-for-vascular-amyloidosis-as-a-cause-of-aging/ The balance of evidence for the aging of the cardiovascular system suggests the following view. It starts off in the blood vessels, with the accumulation of senescent cells and cross-links. Cross-links directly stiffen these tissues, while ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Gold Nanoshells Ferry Chemo Drugs Into Cancer Cells to Spare Rest of Body
By combining cross sections of a macrophage cell from the x-, y-, and z-axes, researchers could examine how nanoshell-drug complexes (red) distributed inside cells after a 24-hour period of incubation. A dye was used to distinguish the cell nucleus (blue). (Image by O. Neumann/Rice University)   Researchers at Rice and Northwestern universities engineered a way of encapsulating toxic chemo agents inside of gold nanoshells that deliver and deposit their contents only inside neoplastic cells. Reported on in the latest Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study involved getting ...
Source: Medgadget - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Early Life Protein Restriction can Extend Fly Lifespan by Reducing Levels of Late Life Metabolic Waste
This study shows that dietary yeast restriction during Drosophila development can induce long-term changes in adult triglyceride storage, xenobiotic resistance, and lifespan. It can also extend lifespan even when adults are switched to a high yeast diet. In contrast, longevity obtained via adult-onset dietary restriction (DR) is largely reversible upon switching to a non-restricted diet. Developmental-diet induced extensions of median lifespan can be as large or larger than those observed with adult DR but this depends strongly upon the adult environment. We found that yeast restricted males reproducibly lived longer than ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 9, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Help! My Coworker Is a Narcissist!
  In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome back Dr. Ramani Durvasula to discuss narcissism… this time, in the workplace. Everyone believes they’ve got a narcissist as a coworker and, often, they’re correct. In this episode, you’ll learn how to tell if your coworker is a narcissist, how common this is (especially among executives), and how to handle them, even if it’s your boss. You’ll learn about gaslighting and the link between narcissism and low self-esteem. Dr. Ramani also warns what can happen to a person who remains in the ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Narcissism The Psych Central Show Bullying In The Workplace Narcissistic Personality toxic coworkers Source Type: blogs

Nickel ‐Catalyzed Cyanation of Aryl Chlorides and Triflates Using Butyronitrile: Merging Retro‐hydrocyanation with Cross‐coupling
We describe a nickel ‐catalyzed cyanation reaction of aryl (pseudo)halides that employs butyronitrile as a cyanating reagent instead of highly toxic cyanide salts. A dual catalytic cycle merging retro‐hydrocyanation... (Source: Organometallic Current)
Source: Organometallic Current - November 9, 2017 Category: Chemistry Tags: Al catalyzed Cyanation Ni Catalyzed Source Type: blogs

A Demonstration in which Cellular Senescence is Reversed
In principle any cell state can be reprogrammed into another cell state - it is a matter of figuring out the machinery involved, which remains no small task even now in this age of revolutionary progress in the tools of biotechnology. Some cell state changes are more plausible and easily discovered since they correspond, nearly or exactly, to transitions that already take place in at least some circumstances and species. So skin cells can be turned into the induced pluripotent stem cells that are near identical to embryonic stem cells, and which can then differentiate into another cell type, such as a neuron. Alternatively...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 8, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A Focus on Amyloid- β Outside the Brain in Alzheimer's Research
A few studies provide evidence to suggest that the levels of amyloid-β in the brains of Alzheimer's patients are influenced by the levels of amyloid-β outside the brain. These are based on parabiosis, the process of joining the circulatory systems of two mice for an extended period of time, in this case one engineered to accumulate amyloid-β and exhibit the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and the other normal. Given the additional capacity of the normal mouse to clear amyloid-β outside the brain, the engineered mouse improves, and researchers observed reduced levels of amyloid-β in the brain. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Considering the Evidence for Vascular Amyloidosis as a Cause of Aging
The balance of evidence for the aging of the cardiovascular system suggests the following view. It starts off in the blood vessels, with the accumulation of senescent cells and cross-links. Cross-links directly stiffen these tissues, while senescent cells produce inflammation and changes in cell behavior that promote calcification - again leading to stiffness. These and other processes also disrupt the delicate balance of cell signaling responsible for blood vessel constriction and relaxation. All of this combines to degrade the feedback system controlling pressure in the cardiovascular system, and blood pressure rises as ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why We Sabotage Ourselves
Counseling psychologist Rosy Saenz-Sierzega, Ph.D, was working with a client who yearned to find a better job. But he wouldn’t apply for any job until his resume was ready. The problem? It was taking him months to “perfect” it. In reality, he was sabotaging his success, ensuring he’d stay stuck at his current company. Sometimes, we sabotage ourselves by setting unrealistic expectations. We decide to try something when we can do it perfectly—which means we don’t do anything at all. We stay in the dead-end job. We stay in the toxic relationship. We don’t finish the degree. We also as...
Source: World of Psychology - November 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress Students Success & Achievement Life Goals Perfectionism Procrastination Self Sabotage Unrealistic Expectations Source Type: blogs

Why Seeking Reassurance Is a Good Thing
When we talk to a friend about a personal concern, what are we really seeking? Advice? Direction? Or maybe something else? If we feel muddled about a difficult relationship or a job search, we might use a friend as a sounding board to sort things out. We may get clearer about what we want to say to our partner as we talk it out. We might blow off steam by venting about today’s political situation and find it helpful that others feel similarly. We may not realize it, but oftentimes there’s a deeper reason we like to talk things out: we want reassurance. More Than a Pat on the Back If we think of reassurance as ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Friends General Relationships Self-Esteem Appreciation Perspective Reassurance support Validation Source Type: blogs

STEM Resources for Higher Ed
NLM Toxicology and Environmental Health (TEH) highlights several sites and how to use them in the October 25th issue of STEM News: Resources for Higher Ed. Spotlight: ToxTutor Resources to Support Coursework ChemIDplus Research Poster Tips (2016 post from our own NTO) Tools & Tips Case Study featuring: Hazardous Substance Data Bank Household Products Database Check out the issue for more information. If you’d like to receive future ones in your inbox, sign up for Email Updates from NLM TEH. (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - November 3, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: Environmental Health National Library of Medicine News higher education Source Type: blogs

Fibrinogen Leakage as a Cause of Reduced Myelin Production in the Aging Brain
Myelin sheaths nerves, and is essential to their function. Demyelinating conditions in which myelin is lost are debilitating and ultimately fatal. We all lose myelin to some degree over the course of aging, however. This is thought to contribute to age-related cognitive decline, among other aspects of aging. The researchers here identify a mechanism that causes this loss, and it arises as a consequence of the progressive age-related dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier, intended to seal away the biochemistry of the central nervous system from the biochemistry of the rest of the body. As this barrier breaks down, allowing...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 3, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Popular Science View of Exercise Mimetic Research
This article surveys some of the research groups working on exercise mimetic drugs, potential ways to artificially induce some of the beneficial metabolic reaction to exercise. This proceeds in much the same way as the past few decades of calorie restriction research that also aims for pharmaceutical methods of inducing metabolic change, which is to say that it is slow going, very expensive, there are ever a slate of potential candidate drugs, but none result in practical outcomes for clinical medicine. The main output is increased knowledge of narrow slices of the operation of metabolism, rather than drug candidates on th...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Senate HELP Committee Holds Hearing on Opioid Response
Discussion Senator Chris Murphy highlighted that Dr. Katz is the first Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use at SAMHSA, a new position created under the 21st Century Cures Act. She detailed for the committee the many activities SAMHSA is overseeing to implement the CARA and 21st Century Cures Act, including administering a wide range of grant streams aimed at mental health interventions and the proliferation of medication assisted treatment. She emphasized to the lawmakers the importance of greater integration of mental health and substance abuse treatment into primary care, and better training among a w...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 1, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

3 More Things That Keep Us Lonely
In a recent article, I discussed three things that may keep us lonely: Being critical of others, our tendency to shame people, and believing that we should be perfect. Here are some additional reasons we may find ourselves feeling isolated. Fear of Taking Risks If we hold the unrealistic belief that we should be perfect, we may be unwilling to do anything that might expose our imperfections. We may be so paralyzed by the fear of failing that we won’t take steps that might alleviate our loneliness. We might think, “Yeah, I should go out more or write a personal ad for a dating site… and some day I&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - October 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Friends General Happiness Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Communication connection Embarrassment Friendship Humiliation Intimacy Loneliness Perfectionism Rejection Shame Vulnerability Source Type: blogs

Barriers and hope for diversity when it comes to clinical trials
The diversity of patients seen in any oncologist’s clinic is a microcosm of what makes America so unique. From one room to the next, I am amazed by the various ethnicities, economic backgrounds, and religious faiths that I encounter. Each of these patients forms a composite of beliefs regarding their cancer; just as every tumor we treat is different, so is every patient. This diversity is what makes generalizations in cancer care so difficult. Inevitably, I am asked by my patients, “So what will the treatment do for my cancer?” I usually answer the question based on clinical trial data and my “real-...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/prateek-mendiratta" rel="tag" > Prateek Mendiratta, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Breaking Up (with a Friend) Is Hard to Do
Breakups are hard. They can be emotionally taxing, stressful and isolating. While we generally attribute the word “break up” to the dissolution of an intimate relationships — a partner, marriage or significant other — breaking up with a friend can be just as hard and lonely. Reasons for a break up with a partner or significant other may be more clear cut — infidelity, conflicts in values and beliefs or mistreatment, but we sometimes have trouble determining whether it makes sense to break up with a friend. Friendships can naturally fizz out — circumstances such as a move and life trans...
Source: World of Psychology - October 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Erin Swinson, LPC, LMHCA Tags: Books Bullying Friends Personal Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Betrayal Breach Of Trust Breakups Forgiveness Friendship making new friends Toxic Relationships Source Type: blogs

Don ’t be so rigid in your thinking
“She doesn’t look like a person with an addiction problem to me,” replied the physician to the psychiatrist, referring to a patient who was admitted to the hospital for confusion. She was found at home amidst an array of bottles containing various controlled substances, and a toxicology screen positive for cannabis. She was in a higher socioeconomic bracket having retired from a professional job. The psychiatrist explained that addiction crosses all social lines, and there was no typical “look,” but there was an ongoing reluctance by the physician to concede that addiction was an issue. Cognit...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/smitha-murthy" rel="tag" > Smitha Murthy, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 30th 2017
In this study, the researchers showed a causal link between dynamic changes in the shapes of mitochondrial networks and longevity. The scientists used C. elegans (nematode worms), which live just two weeks and thus enable the study of aging in real time in the lab. Mitochondrial networks inside cells typically toggle between fused and fragmented states. The researchers found that restricting the worms' diet, or mimicking dietary restriction through genetic manipulation of an energy-sensing protein called AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), maintained the mitochondrial networks in a fused or "youthful" sta...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 29, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The R & R in the Fastlane team needs YOU!
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog ‘Research and Reviews (R&R) in the Fastlane‘ is a free weekly resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. The idea for this project came to life about six years ago. I wondered what the clinicians I looked up to in emergency medicine and critical care wer...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: R&R in the FASTLANE recruitment research and reviews Source Type: blogs

The Mitochondrial Contribution to Alzheimer's Disease
Like many neurodegenerative conditions, Alzheimer's disease is associated with a general reduction in the function of mitochondria. Since these cellular components are responsible for generating energy store molecules to power cellular processes, and since brain cells require a lot of energy to function, it makes sense to find that declines in mitochondrial function are associated with disorders of the brain. Where does this fit into the chains of cause and consequence in aging, however? What causes global mitochondrial failure throughout cell populations? Evidence suggests that these general mitochondrial declines ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Health Wonk Review: Disaster edition
Welcome to the disaster edition of the Health Wonk Review! Fire, fire everywhere At Workers’ Comp Insider, Julie Ferguson focuses on response and recovery in the California fires. The cleanup of the toxic devastation poses enormous environmental health risks to fire fighters and residents alike.  She also offers a tribute to the workers who battled the fires, including a little-recognized segment –prisoners who volunteer for fire fighting duty. Can it get any worse? Roy Poses at Health Care Renewal shares the Worst Revolving Door Health Care Case So Far. After having followed and documented many in...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 26, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: dewe67 Tags: Blogs Policy and politics Source Type: blogs

Experimental and Computational Exploration of para ‐Selective Silylation with a Hydrogen‐Bonded Template
AngewchemExperimental and Computational Exploration of para ‐Selective Silylation with a Hydrogen‐Bonded Template: The regioselective conversion of C −H bonds into C−Si bonds is extremely important owing to the natural abundance and non‐toxicity of silicon. Classical silylation reactions often suffer from poor functional... (Source: Organometallic Current)
Source: Organometallic Current - October 26, 2017 Category: Chemistry Tags: para selective Pd Catalyzed Silylation Source Type: blogs

Scientists Develop Squirtable Glue That Seals Wounds In Seconds
A potentially life-saving surgical glue that is highly elastic and adhesive can quickly seal wounds in seconds without the need for common staples or sutures.The surgical glue, called MeTro, is a development from biomedical engineers at the University of Sydney and biomedical engineers from Harvard University.MeTro has a high elasticity that can seal wounds in body tissues that need to expand and contract continuously, like the lungs, heart and arteries. Wounds on these types of tissues are prone to re-opening after sealing with staples and sutures.The glue is also beneficial for wounds that are in hard-to-reach places tha...
Source: Medical Hemostat - October 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: hemostatguy at gmail.com (hemostat guy) Source Type: blogs

Witchcraft or simply the adverse effects of consuming rye?
Rye has the unique potential to be infected with a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea, that produces a human toxin called ergotamine. When ingested via, say, a loaf of rye bread, it exerts a range of hallucinogenic effects on humans, partly because it is converted to lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly known as LSD. History is filled with fascinating and terrifying stories of humans exposed to rye and ergotamine. Because some victims afflicted with contaminated rye experienced an intense dermatitis (skin inflammation), the condition became known as St. Anthony’s Fire, named after the early 11th-century sanctuary o...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 24, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Rye Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar Dr. Davis Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

A Concise Overview of Amyloid- β in Alzheimer's Disease
The open access paper noted here is a fairly concise tour through current thinking on the role of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloids are solid deposits that appear in aged tissues, a few specific proteins that can misfold or become altered in ways that cause them to clump together and precipitate from solution into fibrils and other structures. Either the amyloid itself or, as in the case of amyloid-β, the surrounding biochemistry prompted by its existence causes harm to cells. Since amyloids are created as a side-effect of the normal operation of cellular metabolism, and since they do in fact cause harm,...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Truth
Ariel Dorfman has an essay in NYRB which says what a lot of people are saying, but says it particularly well. Here's a key paragraph:There has always been a disturbing strand of anti-intellectualism in American life —the very title of Richard Hofstadter’s 1963 book—but never has an occupant of the White House exhibited such a toxic mix of ignorance and mendacity, such lack of intellectual curiosity and disregard for rigorous analysis (despite his untested boast that his IQ is “one of the highest,” certainly higher than Obama’s and a host of other worthies’). “The experts are ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - October 23, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 23rd 2017
In this study, we demonstrate that irrespective of the derivation of CD8+ CD45RA+CD27- T cells, these primed cells exhibit a unique highly inflammatory secretory profile characteristic of the SASP, and we also provide evidence that ADAM28 can be used as a functional marker of senescence in CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we show that the secretory phenotype in CD8+ CD45RA+CD27- T cells is controlled through p38 MAPK signalling, which contributes to age-associated inflammation. Patient Paid Clinical Studies are a Good Plan for Rejuvenation Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/10/patient-paid-clinical-st...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Test 5
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information This test series requires login for attempting. You can login easily with your Facebook account (Use the CONNECT WITH icon on the upper part of right sidebar displaying t...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 22, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Gluten, Depression, and Anxiety: The Gut-Brain Link
In this study, 22 participants ate a gluten-free diet low in FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) for a three-day baseline period, and then received one of three dietary challenges (supplemented with gluten, whey, or placebo) for three days, followed by a three-day minimum washout period before starting the next diet. Researchers assessed the participants at the end of the study using a psychological tool called the Spielberger State-Trait Personality Inventory (STPI). People in the study who consumed gluten had higher overall STPI depression scores compare...
Source: World of Psychology - October 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Anxiety and Panic Depression Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research brain-gut connection celiac disease Gluten Gluten sensitivity Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

A Better Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease
Gamma-secretase inhibitors block the formation of the amyloid-β associated with Alzheimer's disease, but to date they are just one more in a long line of failed attempts to produce a therapy for that condition by adjusting the operation of cellular metabolism in the disease state in some way. Existing pharmaceutical gamma-secretase inhibitors act too generally, causing significant disruption of essential mechanisms that far outweighs whatever benefit they might produce. Here, however, researchers claim to have established a much more specific gamma-secretase inhibitor, one that only disrupts the formation of amyloid-&...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Test 2
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information This test series requires login for attempting. You can login easily with your Facebook account (Use the CONNECT WITH icon on the upper part of right sidebar displaying t...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 19, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Biologic License Applications
The FDA recently released draft guidance offering recommendations for holders of biologics license applications (BLAs) on the minor changes that should be documented in an annual report. As the number of chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC) postapproval manufacture supplements continue to increase, the FDA decided to publish this guidance. Guidance This guidance provides recommendations to holders of biologics license applications (BLAs) for specified products regarding the types of changes to an approved BLA to be documented in an annual report under 21 CFR 601.12. Specifically, the guidance describes chemistry, ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Senescent T Cells Generate the Same Damaging Secretions as Other Senescent Cells
In this study, we demonstrate that irrespective of the derivation of CD8+ CD45RA+CD27- T cells, these primed cells exhibit a unique highly inflammatory secretory profile characteristic of the SASP, and we also provide evidence that ADAM28 can be used as a functional marker of senescence in CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we show that the secretory phenotype in CD8+ CD45RA+CD27- T cells is controlled through p38 MAPK signalling, which contributes to age-associated inflammation. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Update on the viral connection to myeloma
Discussion part, perhaps this could be feasible in the early stages of the “chronic underlying infection”…But they also add that it might even be effective in later stages of MM. Boy, that would really be something, wouldn’t it? Here are some excerpts from the Discussion (my highlights): “Overall, our findings imply that chronic stimulation by infectious Ag may promote MGUS and MM in certain patient subsets. Importantly, some of the identified infectious pathogens (HSV, HCV, H. pylori) can be effectively treated. This observation has obvious clinical consequences, since the detection of MGUS ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - October 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll myeloma viral connection to myeloma virus Source Type: blogs

Processed Snacks and Desserts: What the Hell, Let's Have Some!
 viaflickrBy Crabby McSlackerAre you one of those people who eats only healthy whole foods, having absolutely no desire to consume tasty and convenient items created in some huge factory somewhere, packaged up and shipped thousands of miles away to your very own neighborhood grocery store?Well, congratulations!Enjoy that little cute little plate of fresh cut veggies and hummus. Savor that teeny-tiny handful of raw nuts. Arrange those fresh apple slices into a Pinterest-ready photo broadcasting your virtue.Me? Sometimes I buy processed stuff in boxes and bags and cartons and resealable pouches.My meals are generally pr...
Source: Cranky Fitness - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Crabby McSlacker Source Type: blogs

Nitric Oxide Absorbing Hydrogel Releases Drugs to Fight Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other Diseases
At the Institute for Basic Science in Daejeon, South Korea, scientists have developed a hydrogel that responds to the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and releases drugs when so activated. This kind of drug delivery system may be particularly effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis, as immune cells within inflamed joints release toxic NO in large quantities. Injecting a gel that actively responds to inflammation, absorbs NO, and immediately delivers anti-inflammatories or other drugs may allow for automatic long-term control of inflamed joints. The same applies to many other diseases and conditions involving inflamma...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 302
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 302nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The ALIEM AIR Series delivers another amazing collation of the best resources in FO...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 16th 2017
In this study, we have shown that the lipid chaperones FABP4/FABP5 are critical intermediate factors in the deterioration of metabolic systems during aging. Consistent with their roles in chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in young prediabetic mice, we found that FABPs promote the deterioration of glucose homeostasis; metabolic tissue pathologies, particularly in white and brown adipose tissue and liver; and local and systemic inflammation associated with aging. A systematic approach, including lipidomics and pathway-focused transcript analysis, revealed that calorie restriction (CR) and Fabp4/5 deficiency result ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 15, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs