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Cornelis (Cees) Wortel, Ichor Therapeutics Chief Medical Officer, on Rejuvenation Research and Its Engagement with the Established Regulatory System
Ichor Therapeutics is the most mature of the US-based companies that have emerged from the SENS rejuvenation research community in recent years. You might recall a number of interviews back in the Fight Aging! Archives with founder and CEO Kelsey Moody. He has his own take on how our community should proceed from laboratory to clinic: he is very much in favor of demonstrating (a) that the formal regulatory path offered by the FDA can work for the treatment of aging, and (b) that - given the right strategic approach - rejuvenation therapies can attract the attention, collaboration, and backing of Big Pharma entities in the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 23, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Remote-Controlled Signal Activates T Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy
Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed a technique to remotely activate genetically-modified T cells to attack cancer. The method employs a near-infrared laser that heats gold nanorods present in the tumor, causing local heating. This heat activates the T cells, making them more aggressive in killing cancer cells. Immunotherapies, such as T cell therapy, hold significant promise in treating cancer. However, the technique is still very new, and isn’t always effective. “Right now, we’re adept at harvesting a patient’s own T-cells, modifying to target cancer, growing them outside the body until the...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 23rd 2018
In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Declutter Your Brain this Spring
The coming of spring always feels like a time of renewal and awakening. People often use it as a reason to spring clean their homes and offices, making things feel fresh, clean and new. Reorganizing all your closets, cupboards, and drawers can help you feel re-energized in the moment, but don’t dismiss or neglect your mind — that needs a clean up, too. A cleanup of your mind can really help you feel like you are starting the spring season with a clean slate, and a de-cluttered brain. If you are looking for a fresh start, begin by doing a little less spring cleaning of your closets and more spring cleaning of yo...
Source: World of Psychology - April 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Exercise & Fitness Habits Happiness Health-related LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Sleep Stress Breathing Exercise declutter Meditation Productivity Relaxation stress reduction Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs

Venting Too Much Can Actually Make Stress Worse
Here’s why. Getting things off your chest is a positive thing, isn’t it? It feels good to vent about your stress or problems to caring friends or post your worries on social media and is a go-to strategy for how to feel better. Doing so provides a release, support, validates your feelings and you get to hear everyone else’s horror stories in the process — some of which make yours seem small. Talking about your problem is often the first thing we do when we’re struggling with something that’s causing us stress and concern. And while it’s definitely healthier to vent than stuff away ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Friends Publishers Self-Help Stress YourTango venting Source Type: blogs

Transgenic Silkworms Produce Fluorescent, Bacteria Killing Silk
Fluorescent proteins tend to be toxic, so their clinical applications are sometimes limited and suspect. Researchers from Purdue University and the Korean National Institute of Agricultural Research engineered a new material, made of silk and some genetic engineering, that fluoresces well under green light without causing too much toxicity. The technology works thanks to a protein, which glows in the far-red spectrum, whose genetic code was transferred to silkworms that then produced the silk. The researchers have already developed smart bandages that kill bacteria when illuminated by green light. They put E. co...
Source: Medgadget - April 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Source Type: blogs

An Interview with a Programmed Aging Theorist
Josh Mittledorf holds an interesting somewhat group selection based view on the evolution of programmed aging, and here is interviewed by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation volunteers. I have long said that the important divide in the research community is between (a) those who think that aging is programmed, in the sense that evolution selects for epigenetic changes in later life that are a primary cause of damage and dysfunction, and (b) those who see aging as a stochastic process of damage accumulation, that occurs in later life because there is little to no selection pressure for ways to prevent it, and this damage...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Eponymythology: Atraumatic Abdominal Ecchymosis
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Overview We review the original descriptions of 5 eponymous signs (n=6) associated with non-traumatic abdominal ecchymosis. These commonly cited eponyms involving the abdominal wall and flanks (Grey Turner, Cullen and Stabler); scrotum (Bryant) and upper thigh (Fox) may be useful clues directing the examiner to consider potentially serious causes of abdominal pathology. Cullen sign Thomas Stephen Cullen (1869–1953) was a Canadian gynecologist Non-traumat...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Eponymythology Abdominal Ecchymosis Bryant sign Cullen sign fox sign Francis Edward Stabler George Grey Turner Grey Turner sign John Adrian Fox John Henry Bryant Stabler sign Thomas Stephen Cullen Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: April 17, 2018
Hi guys. I’m recovering from the flu, which makes sense because life has been crazier than normal and I haven’t gotten much sleep. While feeling ill is never fun, it’s given me oodles of time to rest. And it was direly needed. My body and mind needed time to recoup. I started thinking about how different things were when you were sick as a kid. There was the joy of not going to school and the possibility of a popsicle. I don’t know about you, but getting sick as an adult just feels like another opportunity to worry. When there’s nothing to do, but think my mind goes free-range. From worrying a...
Source: World of Psychology - April 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

TAPNA 2018: Its toxicology, Australian Style.
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog What is it? TAPNA is the annual scientific meeting for the Toxicology and Poisons Network Australia. Join Australian and International toxicologists at Sydney to run through a plethora of topics including fomepizole (should we use it in Australia?), urine drug screens, what to do with an anion gap and the latest in OP poisoning. TAPNA is hosting a stellar faculty including Dr Michael Eddleston from Edinburgh whose primary research is in pesticides and antidotes...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Conference TAPNA toxicology Source Type: blogs

What can we learn from growth curves?
Here's the results of the Bioscreen growth curves I ran forRhodobacter capsulatus strains:Each dot is the mean OD600 of 15 replicate wells, each containing 300 µl of culture, with ODs read every 20 minutes for 45 hours.  The cultures all grew up at about the same times, but I've shifted the X-axes so the curves don't overlap.  OD values below about 0.015 are not significantly above the backround absorption of the culture medium. The Y-axis is a log scale, so when doubling time is constant the dots will fall in a straight line.I did these runs 'just-in-case', because I'm going to be working withRhodobacter c...
Source: RRResearch - April 16, 2018 Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Rosie Redfield Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 327
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 327th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Rory Spie...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 15, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The Art of Medicine: Taking a Military History
This article was prepared by the authors above in his/her personal capacity. The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not reflect the view of the Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Connecticut Healthcare System or the United States government. Title: The Forgotten Question: Taking a Military History Authors: Meredith Bertrand, NP1 Eugenia Betz, MD1,2 Alice Grant, NP1 Leila Haghighat, MD1,2 Janet Ku, NP1 Sumit R. Kumar, MD1,2 Mona Lalehzari, MD1,2 Benjamin Y. Lu, MD1,2 J. Nicholas Pumilia, MD1,2 Jonathan Stock, MD1,2 Anna Reisman, MD1,2,3 1.     VA Centers of Excellence in...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Emergency physicians are glorified secretaries with medical degrees
This article originally appeared in Emergency Medicine News. Image credit: Shutterstock.com Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/edwin-leap" rel="tag" > Edwin Leap, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 16th 2018
This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel: (1) no treatment, (2) Ca2+ and PO43- only, (3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F), (4) 20 000 ppm F, (5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and (6) peptide alone. While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Push back on toxic behaviors from other doctors
“Don’t get tired! Don’t f*cking move! Don’t you f*cking move, or I’ll f*cking die!” That’s an excerpt from an OR in St. Louis on March 12th. This is just one of the outbursts that was reported from a single, multi-hour surgery — an attending’s toxic mandate to her resident, who was poised in a precarious situation under the drapes. The rest of the OR staff caught plenty of its own abusive flak throughout the case as she denied the circulating nurse relief: “No one’s f*cking leaving! Nobody is signing out!” And to the scrub tech who didn’t have av...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/todd-rice" rel="tag" > Todd Rice, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

James Hayes Fellowship Study Group 2018
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The Victorian Registrar Study Group is held in at the Australasian College of Emergency Medicine Headquarters at West Melbourne on Saturday mornings, and has been a very great success since its inception.It was developed from Dr James Hayes’ Victorian Registrars Teaching program that ran from the Northern Hospital for just on 15 years. When this program was terminated in 2013, the current program at the College was created by a group of highly esteemed educator...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: FACEM Fellowship James Hayes Study group VIC VIC FACEM Source Type: blogs

A Failure to Treat Alzheimer's by Interfering in RAGE-Induced Inflammation
Alzheimer's disease certainly has an inflammatory component to it, as do other neurodegenerative conditions. The immune system of the brain runs awry in characteristic ways. Evidence exists to suggest that short-lived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of the sort found in individuals with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes are a significant source of inflammation. They act via the receptor for AGEs, RAGE. This, I should note, is entirely unrelated to the detrimental effects of persistent, long-lived AGEs on tissue structure. Short-lived AGEs are more of a lifestyle issue, in that everyone has them to some degree, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Anti-Microbial Nanotechnology: Interview with Adrian Fellows, Head of R & D at AGA Nanotech
AGA Nanotech, a medtech company based in the UK, has developed nanotechnologies aimed at overcoming antimicrobial resistance, with a view to offering an alternative to conventional antibiotics. The company has collaborated with researchers from University College London to create poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles that can deliver highly oxidative biocides, using a Thermally Induced Phase Separation (TIPS) technique to load the particles. The nanoparticle payloads consist of precursors for hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid. These oxidative components are toxic to many antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but b...
Source: Medgadget - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Materials Nanomedicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

The SENS Research Foundation on the Ongoing Development of Senolytic Therapies to Treat Neurodegenerative Conditions
Senescent cells are a significant cause of age-related disease. Now that the research community is earnestly developing ways to remove senescent cells, and trying them out in animal studies, every few months there is a new announcement of one or another definitive connection between the accumulation of senescent cells and a specific medical condition. The SENS vision for the development of rejuvenation therapies assembled the existing evidence and strongly advocated for senescent cell clearance around the turn of the century, ten long years prior to the point at which the rest of the research community finally got on board...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Three Recent Papers on the Use of Senolytic Therapies to Address Age-Related Disease
We present concepts of the immune response to tissue trauma as well as the interactions with SnCs and the local tissue environment. Finally, we discuss therapeutic implications of targeting SnCs in treating osteoarthritis. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - April 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Breakthrough: Researchers Fix Genetic Risk Factor for Alzheimer ’s Disease in Human Brain Cells
Scientists have known for decades that people with two copies of a gene called apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease.One copy of the apoE4 gene variantdoubles the risk (likelihood) of developing Alzheimer's disease.Having two copies of this genetic variantputs people at 12 times the risk.The apoE4 variant is the largest known genetic risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease.What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and Dementiaby Alzheimer's Reading RoomSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading - This is a Free Service - Join NowScientists Fix Genetic Risk Factor for...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - April 11, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Alzheimers Prevention alzheimers research alzheimers risk alzheimers symptoms alzheimers treatment APOE4 brain science Source Type: blogs

The Coroners Recommendations On A Death At Least Partially Caused By Electronic Prescribing Misuse. Sensible Stuff!
Last week we saw a number of reports on the Inquest into the death of Paul Lau.Here is one such:Computer prescribing error turns 'uneventful' procedure fatal An anaesthetist accidentally used the wrong patient fileCarmel Sparke4th April 2018A father of two died in hospital following a routine knee reconstruction because his anaesthetist accidentally entered fentanyl into the wrong computer file, the NSW Coroner ’s Court has found.Paul Lau, 54, died from multiple drug toxicity after being mistakenly prescribed fentanyl intended for another more complex surgical patient at Sydney’s Macquarie University Hospi...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 11, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

It ’ s not a white issue — it ’ s a grain issue. There is no such thing as “ healthy whole-grains ”
We’ve been told for decades that whole grains are healthy, healthier than processed white flour products. The flawed logic of replacing bad with less bad has thrown off an entire generation of dietitians, physicians, and government agencies charged with providing nutritional advice who have all embraced the less bad whole grains, going as far as urging all of us to make them the dominant ingredient in diet every day. The misconception that whole grains are not just better for you, but healthy is simply not true. If we replace something bad–white flour products–with something less bad–whole grains&nd...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly blood sugar cholesterol diabetes Dr. Davis gluten grain grain-free grains healthy whole-grains joint pain Weight Loss Wheat Belly Total Health whole grains Source Type: blogs

There is no such thing as “ healthy whole-grains ”
We’ve been told for decades that whole grains are healthy, healthier than processed white flour products. The flawed logic of replacing bad with less bad has thrown off an entire generation of dietitians, physicians, and government agencies charged with providing nutritional advice who have all embraced the less bad whole grains, going as far as urging all of us to make them the dominant ingredient in diet every day. The misconception that whole grains are not just better for you, but healthy is simply not true. If we replace something bad–white flour products–with something less bad–whole grains&nd...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly blood sugar cholesterol diabetes Dr. Davis gluten grain grain-free grains healthy whole-grains joint pain Weight Loss Wheat Belly Total Health whole grains Source Type: blogs

What Are Lectins? The Health Implications and How to Avoid It
Over the past few years, there has been so much hype and speculation around gluten, with many people considering it the number one gut health enemy. While you could genuinely be having gluten intolerance or any other health condition linked to gluten, sometimes this protein isn’t the real menace. Individuals claiming to have gluten intolerance may actually be suffering from lectin sensitivity. So if you have been experiencing symptoms of gluten intolerance especially after eating something that’s made from wheat, then lectin could be the cause of your problems. Read on to find out more about lectin and how you ...
Source: Nursing Comments - April 9, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: M1gu3l Tags: Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Conspiratorial ear mongering about cell phones and cancer, courtesy of The Nation
The overwhelming scientific consensus is that it is incredibly unlikely that cell phone radiation causes cancer or other health problems. That doesn't stop The Nation from constructing a conspiracy theory inn which cell phone companies are likened to tobacco companies in their campaign of denial designed to hide evidence of harm while disingenuously claiming to be neutral regarding the science and saying that scientists should determine whether radiation from cell phones is hazardous. The post Conspiratorial ear mongering about cell phones and cancer, courtesy of The Nation appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: ...
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 9, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Biology Cancer Medicine cell phones featured George Carlo International Agency for Research on Cancer Lennart Hardell Mark Dowie Mark Hertsgaard National Toxicology Program The Nation Source Type: blogs

Conspiratorial fear mongering about cell phones and cancer, courtesy of The Nation
The overwhelming scientific consensus is that it is incredibly unlikely that cell phone radiation causes cancer or other health problems. That doesn't stop The Nation from constructing a conspiracy theory inn which cell phone companies are likened to tobacco companies in their campaign of denial designed to hide evidence of harm while disingenuously claiming to be neutral regarding the science and saying that scientists should determine whether radiation from cell phones is hazardous. The post Conspiratorial fear mongering about cell phones and cancer, courtesy of The Nation appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source:...
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 9, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Biology Cancer Medicine cell phones featured George Carlo International Agency for Research on Cancer Lennart Hardell Mark Dowie Mark Hertsgaard National Toxicology Program The Nation Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 326
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 326th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Read this...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Physician suicide is also a problem in India. Here ’s what you can do.
Today a physician told me she lost three colleagues to suicide in the last two months. Loma Linda Hospital just lost three young doctors to suicide in 6 months. Mount Sinai had 3 docs jump in less than 2 years — from the same building. An anesthesiologist recently told me he lost 8 of his colleagues to suicide. Each suicide should be fully investigated, yet few receive root cause analysis of the specific circumstances leading to their deaths. In January, I reported on my investigation into 757 doctor suicides in The Washington Post. (Now I’ve got nearly 900 suicides on my registry.) Recently, Dr. Oz e...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 9th 2018
This studycounters that notion, and the findings may suggest that many senior citizens remain more cognitively and emotionally intact than commonly believed. "We found that older people have similar ability to make thousands of hippocampal new neurons from progenitor cells as younger people do. We also found equivalent volumes of the hippocampus (a brain structure used for emotion and cognition) across ages. Nevertheless, older individuals had less vascularization and maybe less ability of new neurons to make connections. It is possible that ongoing hippocampal neurogenesis sustains human-specific cognitive fun...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Valproic acid overdose
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 7, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: toxicology Source Type: blogs

New Nano CT-Scanner Produces High-Resolution Images of Acute Areas
A group of researchers from the Technical University of Munich have developed a specialized CT-scanner device that can create highly detailed 3D images of specific tissue samples. The nano-CT scanner quickly captures images of soft tissues that would normally require sectioning and slide mounting. The device will ultimately help physicians save time evaluating images. CT scanning soft tissue typically poses two major challenges: applying a toxic stain to the tissue that can damage the body, and traditional micro and nano scanners can ’t produce sufficient resolution. However, the Munich researchers have dedicated the...
Source: radRounds - April 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 007 Mega Malaria Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs

Disease-Responsive Hydrogel Can Release Drug During Arthritis Flares
Researchers at the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed a disease-responsive hydrogel for anti-inflammatory drug delivery. The hydrogel could be injected into joints in patients with inflammatory arthritis for long-term local treatment. The gel breaks down in response to enzymes that are increased in an inflamed joint during an arthritis flare, meaning that it could provide anti-inflammatory treatment directly in response to disease severity, at the place it is most needed. Arthritis flares, during which symptoms of inflammatory arthritis get significantly worse, are often unpredictable, and...
Source: Medgadget - April 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

A Lengthy Discussion of Oxidative Stress in the Progression of Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease is very complex and incompletely understood because the brain is very complex and incompletely understood. Efforts to make progress towards therapies for Alzheimer's disease have progressed in parallel with, and often driven and funded, efforts to map the works of the brain at the detail level of cellular biochemistry. Even though Alzheimer's will turn out to have easily stated causes, a set of comparatively simple biochemical processes, even simple origins expand - over time and through chains of cause and effect - to produce end state conditions that are as complex as their environment. Researc...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Trauma-informed care: What it is, and why it ’s important
Many years ago, when I was a trainee, I helped take care of patients at a family medicine clinic.* One day, a school-aged brother and sister came in for their annual physicals. They were due for vaccines. Neither wanted any shots, and they were both quite upset. “You’ll do what the doctor tells you, is that clear?” ordered the mother. She and the nurse worked together to hold the sister’s arm down. But just as the nurse was about to deliver the injection, the young girl jerked her arm away and ran to the opposite corner of the room, crying. The brother then ran over and stood in front of her, his ar...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Health care Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

Cellular Footprints: Tracing How Cells Move
An engineered cell (green) in a fruit fly follicle (red), or egg case, leaves a trail of fluorescent material as it moves across a fruit fly egg chamber, allowing scientists to trace its path and measure how long it took to complete its journey. Credit: David Bilder, University of California, Berkeley. Cells are the basis of the living world. Our cells make up the tissues and organs of our bodies. Bacteria are also cells, living sometimes alone and sometimes in groups called biofilms. We think of cells mostly as staying in one spot, quietly doing their work. But in many situations, cells move, often very quickly. For exam...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - April 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Kathryn Calkins Tags: Cell Biology Bacteria Biofilms Cells Cellular Imaging Source Type: blogs

Inadvertent Overdose in First Responders
​Part 4 in a Four-Part SeriesThe United States is in the midst of a significant opioid epidemic, and a large proportion of the illegal opioids being sold contain fentanyl or fentanyl analogs. The Drug Enforcement Administration reported that U.S. law enforcement agencies seized at least 239 kilograms of illicitly produced fentanyl from August 2013 to the end of 2015. (http://bit.ly/2obUOLs.) This drug is responsible for many opioid overdoses and deaths because of its extremely low lethal dose.First responders, a population not initially thought to be at risk, have been found to be exposed to synthetic fentanyl analogs. S...
Source: The Tox Cave - April 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 325
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 325th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Alzheimer ’ s Disease
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, “Today, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds.” To date, there is no cure regarding this most common form of dementia, which affects nearly all individuals worldwide regardless of race, or socioeconomic status, a trend that continues to grow at a disturbingly alarming rate. Scientists however are close to identifying contributing factors that may hinder or help the progression of this illness in the long run. Listed below are the top 5 f...
Source: World of Psychology - April 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Health-related Memory and Perception Stress Alzheimer's disease Memory Loss Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 2nd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Isagenix. – Diet Review
Conclusion – Does Isagenix Work? Isagenix Isalean’s shake is marketed well, but it’s loaded with sugar and calories. There’s also a lot of protein added, but once you research what kinds of ingredients are included, you realize it’s not a quality meal replacement. The protein added is cheap and can be found for a reduced price elsewhere. Many customers have also complained about the taste, lack of weight loss, and the hard to drink consistency. There are better options which have only 1 gram of sugar, no added fructose, only high quality whey protein, and great reviews to back up their weight ...
Source: Nursing Comments - March 30, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: M1gu3l Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

California's Coffee Chaos -- And Why Prop 65 Goes Unreformed
A judge in Los Angelesruled Wednesday that Starbuck ’s, Peet’s, and many other retailers face potentially massive liability under California law for not warning consumers that naturally occurring substances in roasted coffee beans can cause cancer, at least in lab animals. Absurd? Outrageous? Yes. But the scorn and outrage should be directed not at the judge but at the law whose terms he was required to enforce – Proposition 65, adopted by state voters through the initiative process in 1986 – as well as the lawyer-swayed California political system that still, more than 30 years later, is ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 30, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Walter Olson Source Type: blogs

“ Rice ” Pudding
Every once in a while, I missing having some rice pudding. Even though rice does not contain a damaging prolamin protein like the gliadin protein in wheat or the zein in corn, it still contains a mixture of unhealthy components. Wheat germ agglutinin, for instance, the very same protein in wheat, is also in rice, ready to exert its gastrointestinal toxic effects such as direct inflammatory injury to the intestinal lining, blocking the hormone cholecystokinin and thereby causing bile stasis that leads to gallstones, and blocking release of pancreatic enzymes and thereby disrupting the process of normal digestion. Rice also ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 30, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Recipes Wheat Belly Lifestyle Cauliflower gluten-free grain-free low-carb Source Type: blogs

Chronic pain and childhood trauma
Recently a journalist colleague of mine put out a call for quotes from those who suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysmorphic disorder (more commonly known as PMS and PMDD, respectively) who also suffered a history of childhood abuse. Her interest was piqued by a 2014 peer reviewed article that appeared in the Journal of Women’s Health linking the disorders with early onset abuse. I answered the call, having both PMS and PMDD, as well as a history of child abuse by both my stepfather and my mother. Yet despite having both a history of abuse and several diagnoses that contribute to chronic pain...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Behavioral Health Children's Health Mental Health Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs

3 Ways Highly Successful People Handle Self-Doubt
Think about the last time you felt fear and anxiety take control of your day. Maybe it stopped you from speaking up in a meeting because you felt like your opinion wasn’t worthwhile. Perhaps a simple email took you hours to write because your inner-critic kept telling you it wasn’t good enough — that you weren’t good enough. Despite a track record of accomplishments, many high-achievers struggle with thoughts that they are a fraud and that they are incompetent. This psychological phenomenon, known as Impostor Syndrome, can show up in many areas of our lives, including at work in the form of: Downpl...
Source: World of Psychology - March 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melody Wilding, LMSW Tags: College General Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Perfectionism Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Women's Issues Career Goals Confidence Cop Source Type: blogs

The Rise of Oisin Biotechnologies
This recent interview with Gary Hudson of Oisin Biotechnologies covers a range of topics; there is a lot more to it than is quoted here. The company is working on the application of a programmable gene therapy to the targeted destruction of senescent and cancerous cells. Since the approach can be adjusted to kill cells that express significant amounts of any arbitrarily selected target protein, it can in principle be adapted to destroy other types of unwanted cell. The immune system in older individuals or patients with autoimmune diseases, for example, contains any number of problem cells that it would be beneficial to re...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 29, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Drowning in Toxic Thoughts? Is Your Mind a Master or a Servant?
Mindfulness. Most people have heard of it. But what exactly is it and why would you ever want it? The image people usually associate with mindfulness is someone sitting off by themselves, shut off to the world, blissfully enjoying a mind devoid of thoughts. Not only is that not true, but it’s actually impossible. Our minds are “thought” generating machines. You can’t shut them down. But you can develop a practice of “not believing everything you think” and put your mind it in “its place” as servant, not master. Occasionally our thoughts are original and generated from our ow...
Source: World of Psychology - March 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Yana Hoffman, CCDC Tags: Anxiety and Panic Family Habits Happiness Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress Monkey Brain Monkey Mind toxic shame Toxic thoughts Source Type: blogs

The Most Toxic Relationship Pattern
This pattern is a classic sign that the relationship is in trouble. Articles marked (S) are for subscribers only. → Subscribe for just $4 per month. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: NEW: Accept Yourself: Self-Acceptance Practices For Emotional Healing Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - March 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Relationships Source Type: blogs