Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

This page shows you the latest blogs posts in this category.

I Am Rebelling
Sometimes I need to let my inner rebel out and stop being such a good patient. I usually try to be a good patient (and go to my appointments, take my meds as prescribed, talk to my doctors honestly and generally do what they want me to). But not right now.Last fall I was told I have sleep apnea and my doctors want me to have a CPAP machine for sleeping. I got my CPAP machine and hate it. I can ' t stand having anything on my face while I sleep. I am on my second mask and still cannot deal with it. I wake up and want to rip it off my face. If I sleep with the mask on, I don ' t ever feel rested and have the weirdest dreams....
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: apnea CPAP lack of sleep rebelling Source Type: blogs

Things Are Not Working As Planned
Sometimes, things just don ' t go as you wanted or expected. Its a fact of life and we need to learn to cope, change directions, and move on.In the grand scheme of things, my original plans were that would I grow up, go to college, get a job, a career, married, kids, retire to a life of happiness and world travel. Well, we know what happened to that. I got as far as ' go to college ' when my health started taking over my life. One little cancer diagnosis has a big emotional impact and it took time to get my life back together.So I regrouped and started over at college, etc. The job and career went okay. I did eventually go...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being healthy housebound life new house Source Type: blogs

Study Links Multiple Sclerosis to Dementia Risk
It’s MS Awareness Week in the United States — the time of year that the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and people living with MS try to spread awareness of this disease. For the past several years, I’ve determined to spend this week educating people who live with MS about the disease they have. For past MS awareness weeks, I’ve written pieces on MS history and about the first recorded cases of MS. Today I write about research suggesting what might be in some of our futures. It’s not a happy topic, but I believe that forewarned is forearmed. A recent study published in the Journal of Epidemiology &...
Source: Life with MS - March 7, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Trevis Gleason Tags: multiple sclerosis awareness life with MS Living with MS MS and family MS symptoms trevis gleason Source Type: blogs

Invisible High-Risk Pools: How Congress Can Lower Premiums And Deal With Pre-Existing Conditions
As Congress and the Trump administration move forward with plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), they are looking for proven state-led reforms that maintain access for those with pre-existing conditions in the current exchange market while also lowering premiums for everyone buying insurance in the individual market. Maine faced similar challenges in 2011 as it sought to unwind failed experiments that pushed its market into a long-term death spiral. But by creating an invisible high-risk pool and relaxing its premium rating bands, Maine policymakers were able to cut premiums in half while still guarant...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 2, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Joel Allumbaugh, Tarren Bragdon and Josh Archambault Tags: Following the ACA Health Policy Lab Insurance and Coverage ACA repeal and replace high-risk pools pre-existing conditions Source Type: blogs

Could Grains Cause Autoimmunity?
The prolamin proteins of grains— the gliadin of wheat, secalin of rye, hordein of barley, and zein of corn— initiate the small intestinal process that cause a perfect storm in our bodies. And they do so in more than one way. You could even argue that prolamin proteins are perfectly crafted to create autoimmunity. Prolamin proteins of grains are masters at molecular mimicry. The prolamin proteins have been found to trigger immune responses to a number of human proteins, including the synapsin protein of the nervous system; the transglutaminase enzyme found in the liver, muscle, brain, and other organs; the endomysium of...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 1, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Autoimmunity Dr. Davis Grain Free Lifestyle Grains Grains and Grasses Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Success Stories Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat-Free Lifestyle Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Call me Ms. Grumpy
I am very grumpy these days. I think part of it is juggling my medical issues. But its also that I have been dealing with a lot of pain, and in new body parts. I am still on that never ending roller coaster of ' wait its another doctor appointment ' each week. Also, my stupid CPAP machine doesn ' t help me. I have given up even using it because the mask doesn ' t work for me.Last night I almost cancelled all my plans for today to stay home and pout. But I realize pouting never got anyone anything so I ditched that. I did get some good sleep last night which helps. And my reward today is getting my nails done this afternoon...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments crabbiness stress Source Type: blogs

I Need to Stop Reading Medical News
I usually like to read the latest medical news. Mostly because I have a lot of medical crap going on. I like to see what is going for advancements and research. I mean maybe some day someone will find the cure for me and all my ailments and I can go back to being a healthy person.But sometimes the news isn ' t what I want to hear and isn ' t very good. Liketoday." Fibromyalgia Worsens Function in RA " This is not what I wanted to hear. Also there is a higher prevalence of fibromyalgia in patients with RA. But there are treatment options for patients with both RA and fibromyalgia.But still, I don ' t like the part about wor...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fibromyalgia medical crap medical news rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

Breast Cancer Fake News
The ' secret ' breast cancer cure, that the pharmaceutical industry has known about and hidden from patients in an effort to make money, has been revealed and been approved by the FDA. Now you can just get an (side effect free) injection and are immunized from any potential cancer diagnosis. One lifetimeCures are also in the works for congestive heart failure, emphysema, Alzheimers, AML, MS, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. These should be approved by the FDA by the end of the year.As a result the world ' s population is now increasing at an exponential rate. NASA is developing new plans for colonies on Mars in the ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fake news wishful thinking Source Type: blogs

The fix for dry eyes
There are two unopened boxes of contact lenses in the cabinet under my sink. I’m not using those tiny disposables anymore; wearing them makes my eyes so dry they feel like they’re being sucked out of their sockets. Actually, it’s not the contacts — those have many benefits, and I’ve worn some version of them since my teens. But as a middle-ager now, the contacts aggravate a condition I have that’s apparently pretty common: dry eye syndrome. “I’d say at least a quarter of my patients have some degree of complaint about dryness,” says Dr. Matthew Gardiner, an ophthalmologist with Harvard-affiliated Massachu...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Eye Health Worplace health Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Early Stages of Inflammation in Arthritis
Researchers here examine the biochemistry and behavior of immune cells in the early stages of arthritis, a condition that is strongly associated with age-related increases in chronic inflammation. Inflammation in turn is associated with growing dysfunction of the immune system with age, a progressive failure that occurs for a variety of reasons, including the presence of metabolically active excess visceral fat tissue that is so common this age of cheap calories; a reduced supply of new immune cells due to declining stem cell activity and involution of the thymus; and dominance of the immune cell population by cells devote...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173. Question 1 What arm do most people hold their babies? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet2017184592'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink2017184592')) The Left The phenomenon, which is called left-side bias or left-cradling bias, encourages the right side of the brain to process emotions and ability to monitor the baby. It occurs 70-85% of the time in humans. However, human...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five ADHD anxiety bee stings depression dixon of dock green left cradling bias mees lines narcissistic personality OCD phonism rheumatoid arthritis whinnie-the-pooh Source Type: blogs

Cancer Prevention (Or Why Me?)
I have a feeling I am bit cynical these days. This morning I found a post by Dana Farber ' s Insight blog on cancer prevention tips, which caught my cynical eye.I was 19 when I was first diagnosed with cancer. Okay, I admit to smoking some by then but I wasn ' t much of a drinker until I got to college (!!). I was pretty active. I was young. Any bad habits didn ' t have much time to turn into a cancer, or so I think. Then by my second diagnosis, 26 years later, I might have had a few more bad habits but I was pretty active and got check ups, wore sun screen and in good shape. This is my family history of cancer: ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation cancer diagnosis cancer prevention frustration Source Type: blogs

Doctor Search
Dana Farber Cancer Institute just releasedthis list of what to look for in an oncologist. I just think that they are things we should look for in all doctors.I have ditched doctors who didn ' t have all these:Communication - why have a doctor who doesn ' t talk to you.Specific expertise - I wouldn ' t want a dermatologist to treat my rheumatoid arthritis but I would want them to remove funky looking moles. I would also want my oncologist to specialize in breast cancer.Willingness to collaborate - this is exactly why I am getting a new pain management doctor: he won ' t let his patients talk to someone else and then go back...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient doctors Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly Cruise 2016: A huge success!
Now that the 2016 Wheat Belly Cruise is over, I wanted to recap how it all went for those of you who would like to consider joining us in 2017. First of all, the food: spectacular! The Wheat Belly Cruise organizer, Paul MacInnis, and I met with executive chef, Victor, as well as several others among the nearly 160 or so culinary staff. While they were incredibly well-versed in gluten-free practices, we had to bring them up to speed on our grain-free, no-added-sugar lifestyle. They were interested and energetic, whipping up almond flour-based chocolate cake and other goodies for us, for instance. Beyond this, the food ship...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grains Wheat Belly cruise Source Type: blogs

What If You Had a Priceless Gift?
This holiday season we are all in search of the perfect gift. What is the one thing you truly desire? Don’t you think we all want it? What if you were handed a beautifully wrapped box containing a miraculous tool that caused dramatic weight loss without limiting calories or requiring exercise? What if this gift reduced appetite, shrunk belly fat, dropped your dress size into the single digits, and accomplished all of this while sparing you from a Biggest Loser sob fest? What if that same gift freed you from acid reflux, heartburn, bowel urgency, and diarrhea, but also improved mood, increased energy, deepened sleep, ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Dr. Davis Priceless Gift Weight loss Wheat allergy Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat Watch Wheat-Free Lifestyle Detox diabetes gluten gluten-free grain grains Source Type: blogs

The best gift of all
This holiday season we are all in search of the perfect gift. What is the one thing you truly desire for yourself and your family? Don’t you think we all want it? What if you were handed a beautifully wrapped box containing a miraculous tool that caused dramatic weight loss without limiting calories or requiring exercise? What if this gift reduced appetite, shrunk belly fat, dropped your dress size into the single digits, and accomplished all of this while sparing you from a Biggest Loser sob fest? What if that same gift freed you from acid reflux, heartburn, bowel urgency, and diarrhea, but also improved mood, incre...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Dr. Davis Priceless Gift Weight loss Wheat allergy Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat Watch Wheat-Free Lifestyle Detox diabetes gluten gluten-free grain grains Source Type: blogs

Breaking Down The Final 2018 Letter To Issuers
Editor’s note: The final 2018 Letter To Issuers In The Federally Facilitated Maketplaces, discussed below, was issued in conjunction with the final 2018 Benefit and Payment Parameters rule, discussed here and here. On December 16, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released its final 2018 Letter to Issuers in the Federally Facilitated Marketplaces (FFM). CMS releases a letter each year to insurers that offer coverage through the FFM or through state-based marketplaces that use the Healthcare.gov platform (SBM-FP), laying out the ground rule...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 19, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Source Type: blogs

Angiotensin Receptor Autoimmunity Correlates with Age-Related Frailty and Hypertension
Autoimmunity is the name given to a very large class of conditions in which the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own cells and machinery. Each different inappropriate target produces a different autoimmune condition, ranging from demyelination diseases like multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks processes and molecules necessary for maintenance of the sheath of myelin that coats nerves, to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, in which the most obvious damage occurs at the joints. In between lie autoimmune conditions for near every important aspect of our biochemistry. While i...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

An Important Step Forward Towards a Vaccine for Periodontal Disease
The various types of gum disease and periodontal conditions create insidious forms of damage, caused by the presence of unwanted but very persistent species of bacteria found in the mouth. Most people suffer inflammation of the gums to some degree, and this is due to the activities of bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. While it is true that there are a large number of ways to remove the bacterial species found in the mouth, the challenge is that they always return, and do so very quickly, often within days. This is obviously important from the point of view of the quality of your teeth over the long term, but argua...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 6, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Common Sense on Aging and the Role of Medicine
Ronald Bailey, who has written on and off on the topic of longevity science for about as long as I've been paying attention to the subject myself, here outlines a common sense view of aging and its treatment as a medical condition. That more people are stepping up to make reasoned arguments along these lines is a sign of progress. At the large scale and over the long term, the research that is carried out is that which is supported and understood, at least in outline, by the public at large. Lines of research that aim to control the causes of aging and thereby prevent and cure all age-related disease is not yet widely supp...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 5, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Keep Holiday Expectations Realistic and Make Adjustments Where You Can
Dear Carol: Last year Christmas was a mess and I’m determined to make this year better. Dad had a stroke two years ago and uses a wheelchair and mom has rheumatoid arthritis and uses a walker, so they both need a place with easy access. That would be my house. Both of my brothers, their wives, and their children join us. Along with our kids, the total of children is five. They are good kids but noisy which bothers my dad. Also, my brothers have opposing political views so I’m praying they don’t get into politics. To make things even more complicated, Mom is super judgmental and finds something to complain about...
Source: Minding Our Elders - December 3, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Pre and Post Cancer
There is a picture of me around here from back when we were dating. My then boyfriend-now-husband asked me for a framed photo for an occasion birthday/Christmas done by a professional photographer. So I went to a local studio and had a picture done where I look young and healthy. The picture has been some place packed away for a while but now is featured prominently in his office, also know as our second bedroom.As I walk by that picture these days, more frequently now considering where it is now positioned, I contemplate, me post cancer. In the picture I have long hair with natural blonde highlights. I was a goodthirty fo...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 27, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aging coping happiness marriage medical crap pictures Source Type: blogs

Anti-inflammatory medications and the risk for cardiovascular disease: A new study, a new perspective
This study only included people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. The results might be different if people with other conditions had been included. Other medical problems. The risks and benefits of celecoxib in people with other medical problems (such as significant kidney disease) are uncertain because this study excluded them. Other medical treatments. All patients in this study took a medication to protect the stomach; outside of studies, that’s not always the case. While these issues are valid, I think this study does provide a significant measure of reassurance regarding the cardiovascular risks of celec...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

The BIDMC CareKit app
The following is a guest blog post from Seth Berkowitz, MD, who authors many of the innovative apps in the BIDMC Crowdsourcing program:Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, has developed BIDMC@home, a new app for engaging patients using Apple ’s CareKit and ResearchKit frameworks and the HealthKit API. The app provides a flexible framework to help patients manage their health from home, as directed by their physicians. The app will be piloted in several specific patient populations and will eventually be offered to BIDMC’s entire net work of over 250,000 patients.BIDMC@hom...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - November 23, 2016 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Why We NEVER “ Cheat ” On the Wheat Belly Lifestyle?
I’ve heard this many times over the years: “I allow myself one cheat day a week.” Or “I allow myself a cheat every Friday night.” Or “I have a couple of slices of pizza every Saturday.” Or the comments from naysayers such as “A little bit can’t hurt” or “Everything in moderation.” I urge everyone to never cheat. On the Wheat Belly Lifestyle. – Tweet this! It’s not because I’m a control freak or because I like to make arbitrary rules. There are many reasons to never allow yourself such a cheat. This has nothing to do with the few calories ingested. The implications are also far greater than the...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Why We NEVER “ Cheat ” On the Wheat Belly Lifestyle
I’ve heard this many times over the years: “I allow myself one cheat day a week.” Or “I allow myself a cheat every Friday night.” Or “I have a couple of slices of pizza every Saturday.” Or the comments from naysayers such as “A little bit can’t hurt” or “Everything in moderation.” I urge everyone to never cheat on the Wheat Belly Lifestyle. – Tweet this! It’s not because I’m a control freak or because I like to make arbitrary rules. There are many reasons to never allow yourself such a cheat. This has nothing to do with the few calories ingested. The implications are also far greater than the ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Diabetes Dr. Davis Grain Free Lifestyle Grains Inflammation News & Updates Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat-Free Lifestyle Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The Role of the Clinical Lab in Immunogenicity Testing for anti-TNF
The use ofanti-TNF biologicals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been a major therapeutic advance. A recent article about testing for drug immunogenicity in these patients by a national reference lab,ARUP, was intriguing (see:Dancing Through the Pain: Advancements in Immunogenicity Testing Deliver Relief to Patients with Autoimmune Diseases). Below is an excerpt from it:To manage the overproduction of TNF seen in rheumatoid arthritis, patients are prescribed TNF blockers, medications that suppress the response to TNF and decrease inflammation. What happens is the body starts seeing the medicati...
Source: Lab Soft News - November 16, 2016 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Lab Processes and Procedures Laboratory Industry Trends Medical Consumerism Medical Research Pharmaceutical Industry Source Type: blogs

Pain Management
There is a lot of information on pain management. I even have a pain management doctor. But what constitutes pain management? I have several prescriptions for pain management - patches, pills, etc. I go to the gym and exercise to help control my pain. I do regular stretching and exercises for pain management.As you can see, pain management is not just about medication and injections. I want more than that. But I am not sure my doctor understands that. If I go to my pain management doctor and tell him my pain is acting up, he always tells me the same things:Don ' t sit around, get up and move.Here ' s more medication.He nev...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: medical tests MRI over treatment uncertainty with doctors Source Type: blogs

Are You Consuming Enough Omega-3 Fatty Acids?
Infrequent consumption of seafood, aversion to organ meats, and over-reliance on processed omega-6 oils in foods have led to deficient levels of omega-3 fatty acids in most people today. The seeds of grasses, with all their absorption-blocking and inflammatory effects just add to the problem. Once grains are removed, omega-3 fatty acid absorption may improve. – Tweet this! Intake typically remains low for most people and supplementation is necessary to achieve healthy blood levels. The omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil accelerate the clearance of fatty acids from the bloodstream and keep levels lower. Cholesterol panel...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 8, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Dr. Davis News & Updates Nutritional deficiencies Nutritional supplements Omega-3 Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Success Stories gluten Weight Loss Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

FDA Open to Biomarker Comments
FDA has announced the opening of a docket for interested parties to submit suggestions, recommendations, and comments on a proposed list of biomarkers that were used as outcomes to develop FDA-approved new molecular entities and new biological therapeutics from October 2007 to December 2015. The submissions from interested parties will help FDA determine the utility of the list and may assist FDA in developing databases on biomarkers for drug development. The 60-day window for submitting comments will close on November 18, 2016. The submissions can be either public or confidential. Specifically, FDA welcomes comments rega...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 3, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

That Breast Cancer Bond Thingy
While I was at the gym yesterday, I was on the bike getting my cardio in when I two women who I know started talking next to me. Then one of them came over to said hi. I knew she had a lot of cardiac issues last spring and I asked her how she was doing. She said she is better now but still had some soreness on the side of her rib cage. That didn ' t seem like a cardio issue so I asked her what it was.She had a mastectomy because she had her third occurrence of breast cancer. Twice on the left and this third time on the right. And all three were different cancers. I thought wow three different breast cancers and now two sep...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 13, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer bonds pinkification Source Type: blogs

So What Does RA Feel Like?
There is a big difference between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the kind from overuse that causes your knee/elbow/hand to hurt when you over use it, or maybe even when you aren ' t using it. Rheumatoid arthritis is systemic and starts with your little joints - like your feet and hands. The joints become achy and bulge and more.Thisarticle explains better than anything else I have seen on what RA really feels like:Like the fatigue and exhaustion after climbing a mountain or running a marathon.Like the aches and pains after a significant fall or being in a car accident.Like the full body aches an...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: pain rheumatoid arthritis stress Source Type: blogs

Stop Comparing
When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I quickly learned every person ' s cancer is different - even if they have the same diagnosis. (This is why it is so hard to treat.) I learned not to compare myself to anyone else. In every support group, even if we had the same diagnosis, we learned how different all are.I get this. We are all different. We can ' t compare our cancers to each other.But.... why do I keep comparing my rheumatoid arthritis to others? I have to stop comparing myself. My mother has had RA since 1989 and a friend (exact same age as me) has had RA since the early 2000 ' s. Their differences are striking. ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 24, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: diagnosis rheumatoid arthritis whininess Source Type: blogs

We Don ’ t Always Have to Say We ’ re Fine — and That ’ s Fine
We put so. much. effort into the illusion of being fine. There’s a picture saved on my computer that I will probably never show another person. It was taken a few hours before my mother died, at my daughter’s insistence, her sweet 4-year-old smile hovering over the planes and angles cancer had carved into my mom’s face. 15 Beautiful Ways To Reclaim Your Life When You’re Broken We do weird things in death sometimes, and my mom’s left eye just wouldn’t stay closed. Neither would her mouth, hanging open with each long, slow, laborious breath. I guess if you weren’t me, this picture c...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Depression Disorders Grief and Loss Publishers YourTango Anguish Bad Day broken Cassie Fox Compassion Crying death Emotions empty energy fine Lie loving Muriel Rukeyser Pain painful Sadness strong Truth vuln Source Type: blogs

Capping Co-Pays Doesn ’t Lower Drug Costs
By DEVON HERRICK Politicians are concerned about your drug costs. Unfortunately, their proposals could actually raise drug prices and force you to pay more, albeit indirectly. For instance, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton proposes to cap your prescription drug co-pays at no more than $250 per month. Rising drug costs are now a political issue because the number of diseases and conditions that can be treated using drug therapy has grown tremendously over the past 25 years. Arguably, one of the main reasons patients visit their doctors is to obtain or renew prescriptions. When they visit their doctors’ offices, Amer...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New Questions To Ponder
Sometimes I think I should stop receiving and reading emails. I got too many this week:Is Your Fibromyalgia Primary or Secondary? Basically from which ailment your fibromyalgia is manifesting it will indicate the correct direction for a more successful treatment protocol.New Guidelines for Adults with Chronic Pain and a History of Cancer - Oh, joy. Just another example of how cancer changes everything..." If a patient reports new onset of pain, clinicians should evaluate and monitor for recurrent disease, second malignancy, or late-onset effects of treatment. "How does that sound? Because with cancer, every pain not o...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments complications prognosis Source Type: blogs

I Think I Should Go Back To Bed
Sometimes the day just doesn ' t start off right.Somehow my laptop screen is cracked. It was fine last night.  I have no idea how this happened. I can order a new one and have it home waiting for me when we get back. (I get to use my husband ' s in the meantime.)I get an email that says people withRA have lower cancer survival rates. Need I say more?We are at the beach and its cloudy. Where ' s the sun?All reasons to go back to bed.... (Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog)
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 10, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggr cancer rates computer rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

A guide to surviving chronic disease
For many people with chronic disease, the toughest thing is convincing themselves they’re not crazy. This is especially true for those with an illness with no clear etiology. For millions of people around the world suffering from multiple sclerosis, lupus, fibromyalgia, chronic abdominal pain, ALS, rheumatoid arthritis, certain types of cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, and hundreds of other illnesses, just making it through the day is overwhelming. Not only do many of these individuals have to endure a life of constant pain, but they also have to struggle with the unrelenting anxiety inherent with their conditions. Not...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/alberto-hazan-and-jordana-haber" rel="tag" > Alberto Hazan, MD and Jordana Haber, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Emergency Primary care Source Type: blogs

Apple's ResearchKit Mobile Apps Make Strides in Clinical Research, But Is iPhone User Demographics an Issue?
As reported in the trade media, GSK developed an iPhone app for use in "clinical research" (read "GSK Develops Rheumatoid Arthritis App for Clinical Trial Using Apple's ResearchKit"). It is claimed that this "[marks] the first time a drugmaker has used the health system for the iPhone to conduct clinical research." ResearchKit is a set of tools for collecting participant consent, conducting surveys and assigning active tasks to participants that they can perform to help researchers achieve specific study goals.Keep in mind, however, that this use of a ResearchKit iPhone app is not part of ...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - July 20, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Clinical Trials GSK iPhone ResearchKit Source Type: blogs

Apple ' s ResearchKit Mobile Apps Make Strides in Clinical Research, But Is iPhone User Demographics an Issue?
As reported in the trade media, GSK developed an iPhone app for use in & quot;clinical research & quot; (read & quot; GSK Develops Rheumatoid Arthritis App for Clinical Trial Using Apple & #39;s ResearchKit & quot;). It is claimed that this & quot;[marks] the first time a drugmaker has used the health system for the iPhone to conduct clinical research. & quot; ResearchKit is a set of tools for collecting participant consent, conducting surveys and assigning active tasks to participants that they can perform to help researchers achieve specific study goals. Keep in mind, however, that this use of a ResearchKit iPhone app ...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - July 20, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Clinical Trials GSK iPhone ResearchKit Source Type: blogs

I'm Aggravated
I have decided I am very aggravated with my health. It drives me crazy. I would be lying if I didn't say that.I would be much happier if I didn't have so many issues. I would be happier if I wasn't in pain. I would be happier if I was able to sleep better. I would be happier if I could do everything that I used to be able to do. I would be happier if I had never had cancer, twice. Or RA or fibromyalgia.Did you know having any one of these cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia, can cause depression along with everything else? Many people who have a single one of these diseases get diagnosed with depression. So yes, ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - July 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation ailments coping depression Source Type: blogs

I ' m Aggravated
I have decided I am very aggravated with my health. It drives me crazy. I would be lying if I didn ' t say that. I would be much happier if I didn ' t have so many issues. I would be happier if I wasn ' t in pain. I would be happier if I was able to sleep better. I would be happier if I could do everything that I used to be able to do. I would be happier if I had never had cancer, twice. Or RA or fibromyalgia. Did you know having any one of these cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia, can cause depression along with everything else? Many people who have a single one of these diseases get diagnosed with depression...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - July 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation ailments coping depression Source Type: blogs

The Insanity of the Hepatitis B Vaccination
Conclusions The hepatitis B vaccination program targeting newborns and infants does NOT make sense. The vaccination itself has not proven to be effective in preventing hepatitis B. There is very little risk of children becoming infected with hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is a disease that is not highly infectious and tends to affect adults in high risk groups. The course of the disease is usually self-limiting with lifelong immunity acquired. In contrast, many serious health consequences have resulted from the hepatitis B vaccination, including permanent disability and death.   References http://www.nvic.org/nvic-archives...
Source: vactruth.com - July 8, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories adverse reactions Hepatitis B vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

June blogs digest: irritable bowel syndrome, regenerative medicine, single cell omics, and more
Overcoming irritable bowel syndrome The various mysteries about the nature and causes of irritable bowel syndrome are particularly frustrating for patients who experience it, as well as for those who try to treat it. Following the Digestive Disease Week conference which took place in San Diego from 21-24 May, Shanti Eswaran explained more about the work she presented on a diet found to improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Regenerative medicine in China: when myth meets reality Burns & Trauma has recently started a thematic series titled ‘Trauma regeneration’ introducing the latest developments of rege...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - July 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Sophie Marchant Tags: Biology Health Medicine blogs digest Source Type: blogs

The conundrum of clinical medicine is what makes it difficult
The term, “evidence-based medicine” (EBM), provokes strong feelings from its proponents and its skeptics.  I spent a full day recently in discussions about EBM.  As the day proceeded I understood that evidence is wonderful when it fits the clinical question, but that too often the clinical question does not, and probably will not have adequate evidence. We have great evidence for some clinical questions.  We all know that ACE inhibitors decrease mortality in patients having systolic dysfunction.  We know that antibiotics help a variety of documented infections.  We know which biologically active DMARDs imp...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Primary care Source Type: blogs

Smoke low-tar cigarettes? The fatal flaw in logic of nutritional studies
Just because something bad is reduced or eliminated in cigarettes, it should not logically follow that cigarettes must now be good, right? Low-tar, filtered cigarettes may be less harmful than full-tar, unfiltered cigarettes, but still contain heavy metals like mercury, lead, and cadmium, as well as nicotine, naphthalene, arsenic, formaldehyde, ammonia and other toxic compounds. Low- or no-tar does NOT mean healthy. This may seem obvious, but it is surprising how many people—physicians and dietitians included—fall for such flawed logic when applied to nutrition. We saw this play out in yet another flawed analys...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 16, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle barley corn epidemiological gluten longevity rye white flour whole grains Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 13th 2016
FIGHT AGING! NEWSLETTER June 13th 2016 Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to on...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 12, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Immune System Destruction and Recreation Can Cure Multiple Sclerosis
The latest update for ongoing efforts to test destruction and recreation of the immune system in patients suffering from the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis demonstrate that this approach is effectively a cure if the initial destruction of immune cells is comprehensive enough. Researchers have been able to suppress or kill much of the immune system and then repopulate it with new cells for about as long as the modern stem cell therapy industry has been underway, something like fifteen years or so. Methodologies have improved, but the destructive side of this process remains unpleasant and risky, something you wouldn'...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 9, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Does A ‘One-Size-Fits-All’ Formulary Policy Make Sense?
Over the last decade, insurers have increasingly used step therapy, or “fail-first,” policies as a strategy to contain pharmaceutical costs. Step therapy requires patients to begin treatment for a medical condition on a typically less expensive drug, and only progress to more costly second-line drugs when the first-line therapy becomes ineffective or inappropriate. Step therapy shifts clinical decision-making away from physicians and toward centralized policies that define treatment steps for patient populations based on the potential for more cost-effective care. The rapid growth in the use of step therapy policies in...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 2, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Adrienne Chung, Joanna MacEwan and Dana Goldman Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Health Policy Lab Health Professionals Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Quality Prescription Drugs step therapy Source Type: blogs

Specialty Drugs at Especially High Prices
There have been many wonderful new medications in the past decade or so, drugs that finally bring hope for many people with serious illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and even some advanced cancers. But these drugs often come at … Continue reading → The post Specialty Drugs at Especially High Prices appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care cancer healthcare costs Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs