Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

How important is Vitamin D?
FACT: A vitamin D deficiency may result in as much as a 50 percent increased potential for diabetes. FACT: A vitamin D deficiency puts you at a higher risk for cancer, especially breast, prostate, colon, ovarian, and melanoma. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY is a widespread phenomenon with significant implications for health. In modern society vitamin D deficiency is the rule, rather than the exception. While we can blame more severe cases of deficiency on grains, it also commonly occurs independent of grain consumption. The restoration of vitamin D levels is second only to grain elimination when considering the most powerful healthy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 13, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Cancer Depression Diabetes News & Updates Undoctored Vitamin D Weight loss Source Type: blogs

Unprecedented range of therapeutic options for rheumatic diseases is now available — challenge is to make them accessible
From The Lancet:Small molecule inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK)Much of the recent knowledge of the underlying mechanisms that drive rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases has come from preclinical studies of key cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and granulocyte –macrophage colony-stimulating factor. New Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors include tofacitinib and baricitinib which are approved for treatment of arthritis and other rheumatoid diseases.Aggressive treatment, earlyFor a complex, progressive, chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, the timing of intervention is critical...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - June 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Finding Support Resources
In my personal experience the most important thing to do after a'yucky'diagnosis (after going to the doctor and taking your meds) is to find support resources. I keep saying that the emotional part of you is just as important of the physical side of you and this is yet another example.First I would ask your doctor for information and then look at the source of the information they give you. For example, at my breast cancer diagnosis I was given a folder of information with resources - including a flyer from the American Cancer Society, and one from a local support organization. Two good places to start. But I was also told...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer resources cancer support emotional toll emotions support group Source Type: blogs

Exercise versus caffeine: Which is your best ally to fight fatigue?
Chronic lack of sleep makes it hard to focus on a task. As if this didn’t make complete logical sense, multiple research studies have shown that sleep deprivation has about the same effect on our cognition and coordination as a few alcoholic beverages. What do you do when you need to concentrate, but you’re tired? Many of us reach for a cup of coffee, or a soda. Mountains of solid research have shown us that caffeine (in doses ranging between 30 and 300 milligrams) improves attention, alertness, reaction time, and mood, especially when we’re tired. An average cup of brewed coffee contains between 80 and 1...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Exercise and Fitness Source Type: blogs

Diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis with a Blood Test: Interview with IQuity CEO, Dr. Chase Spurlock
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that afflicts an approximate 2.5 million patients world-wide, giving rise to multiple issues regarding quality of life and the potential for disability. Up to 15,000 people are newly diagnosed with MS every year in the US, while another 45,000 experience a clinical precursor with similar symptoms. Distinguishing between MS and other possible neurological conditions typically requires multiple brain MRIs and cerebrospinal fluid testing, which are costly and take a long time. Fortunately, the diagnostic technology company IQuity (pronounced I-Q-witty) has been working to ...
Source: Medgadget - June 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Genetics Neurology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Once Upon A Time, I Was A Healthy Person
I have many friends who, after cancer, get back to their old lives for the most part. I'm not talking about that'new normal'bull, but just doing normal things like going back to work, taking part in all their family activities and all sorts of regular, every day life things.Me, I did not get to go back to my regular life after breast cancer. My body had other plans for me. It decided it was time to fall apart.After breast cancer, I got gall stones and had my gallbladder out six months after radiation ended. That winter I slipped on the ice, landed on my left hand and started all my lymphedema crap.The following fall my bac...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 31, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments being healthy being me Source Type: blogs

MIT Scientists Develop Microfluidic Device to Screen Biologics for Quality During Production
Biologics, which are drugs made of biochemical compounds produced by living organisms, are becoming more common to treat a variety of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, chronic plaque psoriasis, and breast cancer. They’re usually proteins that are immensely easier to produce by plant or animal cells than synthesizing them from scratch in a complex chemical process. Yet, the same difference in manufacturing is a reason for the difficulty of maintaining quality control of such drugs: synthesizing allows for purity of production, but letting nature do it can lead to imperfect results. Researchers at MIT ha...
Source: Medgadget - May 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Source Type: blogs

Over-the-counter pain relievers and your heart
Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like naproxen are and have been the go-to “benign” pain medication for doctors and patients alike. Why? They aren’t addictive, and it’s not easy to overdose. Serious side effects like gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeding seemed to be limited to high doses taken for longer periods or time, or to people with significant medical problems. Even before the era of the opioid epidemic, it was raining NSAIDs, across the country. In 2004, the manufacturer of the NSAID Vioxx pulled it from the market because the drug was associated with serious...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Heart Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Medicare ’s Bundled Payment Programs Suffer From Fatal Flaws, But There Is A Logical Alternative
Several authors from the Brookings Institution recently argued in favor of making Medicare’s Bundled Payment for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative mandatory. While the principles guiding their recommendations are sound, the recommendations themselves fail to acknowledge five fatal methodological flaws within the BPCI program. Their analysis also overlooks the most logical and reasonable alternative: a physician-focused episode-of-care payment model. Five Fatal Flaws Of The BPCI Initiative 1. Hospital-Centricity Each BPCI bundle is triggered by an inpatient stay and in particular by a specific diagnosis-related group...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 9, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: François de Brantes Tags: Costs and Spending Insurance and Coverage Medicare Payment Policy Alternative Payment Models Bundled Payment for Care Improvement initiative Bundled Payments Merit-Based Incentive Payment System Physician-Focused Payment Model Technical Ad Source Type: blogs

Making A Prohibition On Preexisting Condition Exclusions Effective Requires Additional Measures
One of the most popular components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the prohibition on preexisting condition exclusions, eliminating the practice in which insurers exclude coverage for health problems that people had prior to enrolling in an insurance plan. People do not like the idea that an insurer does not have to pay for care that people need due to a previously known health problem. But prohibitions on preexisting condition exclusions alone are insufficient to protect those with health problems and ensure their affordable access to necessary care. Meaningful protections require a package of policies: guaranteed iss...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 2, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Linda Blumberg and John Holahan Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Quality ACA repeal and replace American Health Care Act community rating Essential Health Benefits preexisting conditions Source Type: blogs

Finding Good Medical Resources
This always amazes me. People get diagnosed with a medical ailment and then don't use the good medical resources available. If you need medical information, you need to do a little research to find the resources.A good patient takes time to learn about any significant medical ailment so they better understand their health. If you are educated you will be less stressed and potentially handle your ailment better. You really do not want to just jump on the internet and google your ailment. That is the worst thing to do.A good first step is to ask your doctor who diagnosed you on where you can get good information. Its their f...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments medical research stress Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 1st 2017
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Am I or Will I Get Better?
I get asked often, am I getting better? Have any of my doctors found a miraculous treatment for me?The answers are and always will be a big fat'no'.There are different kinds of ailments out there. They are (in my non medical terminology):Acute - an ailment which happens and gets better. Think a cut, the flu, appendicitis, Lyme disease.Chronic - an ailment which occurs and lasts and lasts and lasts. Think things like arthritis, fibromyalgia, degenerating disks, etc.Terminal - an ailment which will kill you. "Terminal illnesses or infections are consideredincurable when there are no conservative therapies available whic...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - April 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments chronic conditions medical treatment pain management Source Type: blogs

Osteoarthritis as an Inflammatory Condition
This open access paper discusses current views on the degree to which osteoarthritis is driven by inflammation, as is the case for many other age-related diseases. With aging the immune system declines into a malfunctioning state of chronic inflammation, ever more active while also ever less effective at the tasks of destroying pathogens and errant cells. In young people, inflammation in short bursts is a necessary part of the immune response, but in the old it becomes a consistent destructive process, gnawing away at the proper function of organs and systems in the body and brain. Addressing this in some way, perhaps thro...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A New Attempt Emerges To Bridge GOP Divisions On AHCA (Updated)
April 21 Update: New Aid For State Formulary Review At REGTAP On April 17, 2017, CMS announced that it would be turning the job of drug formulary review for qualified health plans over to state regulators in the thirteen HealthCare.gov states that have plan management responsibility.  On April 19, CMS offered at its REGTAP.info website (registration required) a seminar on the qualified health plan (QHP) application review tools for prescription drugs that the states may use for these reviews. The EHB Category and Class Drug Count Tool, which is new for the 2018 QHP review period, reviews drug lists to ensure that QHPs...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 20, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Challenges Of Outcomes-Based Contracting For Pharmaceuticals: Early Lessons From The Genentech – Priority Health Pilot
Conclusion Outcomes-based agreements are a natural extension of a health care delivery-and-reimbursement environment that is moving toward value. With provider organizations taking increasing accountability for both costs and outcomes, it is becoming incumbent upon manufacturers to demonstrate the economic, clinical, and quality-of-life benefits of their medicines. The pilot described here was successful in that Genentech and Priority Health both learned how to overcome clinical, operational, and contractual challenges and demonstrated that this type of agreement is feasible. Genentech and Priority Health believe pilots li...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: John Fox and Marc Watrous Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Payment Policy Outcomes-based agreements Source Type: blogs

ICER Devalues People With Rheumatoid Arthritis
(Source: drugwonks.com Blog)
Source: drugwonks.com Blog - March 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: blogs

I Am Rebelling
Sometimes I need to let my inner rebel out and stop being such a good patient. I usually try to be a good patient (and go to my appointments, take my meds as prescribed, talk to my doctors honestly and generally do what they want me to). But not right now.Last fall I was told I have sleep apnea and my doctors want me to have a CPAP machine for sleeping. I got my CPAP machine and hate it. I can't stand having anything on my face while I sleep. I am on my second mask and still cannot deal with it. I wake up and want to rip it off my face. If I sleep with the mask on, I don't ever feel rested and have the weirdest dreams.I we...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: apnea CPAP lack of sleep rebelling Source Type: blogs

Things Are Not Working As Planned
Sometimes, things just don't go as you wanted or expected. Its a fact of life and we need to learn to cope, change directions, and move on.In the grand scheme of things, my original plans were that would I grow up, go to college, get a job, a career, married, kids, retire to a life of happiness and world travel. Well, we know what happened to that. I got as far as'go to college'when my health started taking over my life. One little cancer diagnosis has a big emotional impact and it took time to get my life back together.So I regrouped and started over at college, etc. The job and career went okay. I did eventually got marr...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being healthy housebound life new house Source Type: blogs

Study Links Multiple Sclerosis to Dementia Risk
It’s MS Awareness Week in the United States — the time of year that the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and people living with MS try to spread awareness of this disease. For the past several years, I’ve determined to spend this week educating people who live with MS about the disease they have. For past MS awareness weeks, I’ve written pieces on MS history and about the first recorded cases of MS. Today I write about research suggesting what might be in some of our futures. It’s not a happy topic, but I believe that forewarned is forearmed. A recent study pub...
Source: Life with MS - March 7, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Trevis Gleason Tags: multiple sclerosis awareness life with MS Living with MS MS and family MS symptoms trevis gleason Source Type: blogs

Invisible High-Risk Pools: How Congress Can Lower Premiums And Deal With Pre-Existing Conditions
As Congress and the Trump administration move forward with plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), they are looking for proven state-led reforms that maintain access for those with pre-existing conditions in the current exchange market while also lowering premiums for everyone buying insurance in the individual market. Maine faced similar challenges in 2011 as it sought to unwind failed experiments that pushed its market into a long-term death spiral. But by creating an invisible high-risk pool and relaxing its premium rating bands, Maine policymakers were able to cut premiums in half while still guarant...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 2, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Joel Allumbaugh, Tarren Bragdon and Josh Archambault Tags: Following the ACA Health Policy Lab Insurance and Coverage ACA repeal and replace high-risk pools pre-existing conditions Source Type: blogs

Could Grains Cause Autoimmunity?
The prolamin proteins of grains— the gliadin of wheat, secalin of rye, hordein of barley, and zein of corn— initiate the small intestinal process that cause a perfect storm in our bodies. And they do so in more than one way. You could even argue that prolamin proteins are perfectly crafted to create autoimmunity. Prolamin proteins of grains are masters at molecular mimicry. The prolamin proteins have been found to trigger immune responses to a number of human proteins, including the synapsin protein of the nervous system; the transglutaminase enzyme found in the liver, muscle, brain, and other organs; the endom...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 1, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Autoimmunity Dr. Davis Grain Free Lifestyle Grains Grains and Grasses Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Success Stories Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat-Free Lifestyle Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Call me Ms. Grumpy
I am very grumpy these days. I think part of it is juggling my medical issues. But its also that I have been dealing with a lot of pain, and in new body parts. I am still on that never ending roller coaster of'wait its another doctor appointment'each week. Also, my stupid CPAP machine doesn't help me. I have given up even using it because the mask doesn't work for me.Last night I almost cancelled all my plans for today to stay home and pout. But I realize pouting never got anyone anything so I ditched that. I did get some good sleep last night which helps. And my reward today is getting my nails done this afternoon after I...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments crabbiness stress Source Type: blogs

I Need to Stop Reading Medical News
I usually like to read the latest medical news. Mostly because I have a lot of medical crap going on. I like to see what is going for advancements and research. I mean maybe some day someone will find the cure for me and all my ailments and I can go back to being a healthy person.But sometimes the news isn't what I want to hear and isn't very good. Liketoday." Fibromyalgia Worsens Function in RA " This is not what I wanted to hear. Also there is a higher prevalence of fibromyalgia in patients with RA. But there are treatment options for patients with both RA and fibromyalgia.But still, I don't like the part about...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fibromyalgia medical crap medical news rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

Breast Cancer Fake News
The'secret'breast cancer cure, that the pharmaceutical industry has known about and hidden from patients in an effort to make money, has been revealed and been approved by the FDA. Now you can just get an (side effect free) injection and are immunized from any potential cancer diagnosis. One lifetimeCures are also in the works for congestive heart failure, emphysema, Alzheimers, AML, MS, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. These should be approved by the FDA by the end of the year.As a result the world's population is now increasing at an exponential rate. NASA is developing new plans for colonies on Mars in the next d...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fake news wishful thinking Source Type: blogs

The fix for dry eyes
There are two unopened boxes of contact lenses in the cabinet under my sink. I’m not using those tiny disposables anymore; wearing them makes my eyes so dry they feel like they’re being sucked out of their sockets. Actually, it’s not the contacts — those have many benefits, and I’ve worn some version of them since my teens. But as a middle-ager now, the contacts aggravate a condition I have that’s apparently pretty common: dry eye syndrome. “I’d say at least a quarter of my patients have some degree of complaint about dryness,” says Dr. Matthew Gardiner, an ophthalmolog...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Eye Health Worplace health Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Early Stages of Inflammation in Arthritis
Researchers here examine the biochemistry and behavior of immune cells in the early stages of arthritis, a condition that is strongly associated with age-related increases in chronic inflammation. Inflammation in turn is associated with growing dysfunction of the immune system with age, a progressive failure that occurs for a variety of reasons, including the presence of metabolically active excess visceral fat tissue that is so common this age of cheap calories; a reduced supply of new immune cells due to declining stem cell activity and involution of the thymus; and dominance of the immune cell population by cells devote...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173. Question 1 What arm do most people hold their babies? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet2017184592'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink2017184592')) The Left The phenomenon, which is called left-side bias or left-cradling bias, encourages the right side of the brain to process emotions and ability to monitor the baby. It occurs 70-85% of the time in humans. However, huma...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five ADHD anxiety bee stings depression dixon of dock green left cradling bias mees lines narcissistic personality OCD phonism rheumatoid arthritis whinnie-the-pooh Source Type: blogs

Cancer Prevention (Or Why Me?)
I have a feeling I am bit cynical these days. This morning I found a post by Dana Farber's Insight blog on cancer prevention tips, which caught my cynical eye.I was 19 when I was first diagnosed with cancer. Okay, I admit to smoking some by then but I wasn't much of a drinker until I got to college (!!). I was pretty active. I was young. Any bad habits didn't have much time to turn into a cancer, or so I think. Then by my second diagnosis, 26 years later, I might have had a few more bad habits but I was pretty active and got check ups, wore sun screen and in good shape. This is my family history of cancer: one gr...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation cancer diagnosis cancer prevention frustration Source Type: blogs

Doctor Search
Dana Farber Cancer Institute just releasedthis list of what to look for in an oncologist. I just think that they are things we should look for in all doctors.I have ditched doctors who didn't have all these:Communication - why have a doctor who doesn't talk to you.Specific expertise - I wouldn't want a dermatologist to treat my rheumatoid arthritis but I would want them to remove funky looking moles. I would also want my oncologist to specialize in breast cancer.Willingness to collaborate - this is exactly why I am getting a new pain management doctor: he won't let his patients talk to someone else and then go back to him ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient doctors Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly Cruise 2016: A huge success!
Now that the 2016 Wheat Belly Cruise is over, I wanted to recap how it all went for those of you who would like to consider joining us in 2017. First of all, the food: spectacular! The Wheat Belly Cruise organizer, Paul MacInnis, and I met with executive chef, Victor, as well as several others among the nearly 160 or so culinary staff. While they were incredibly well-versed in gluten-free practices, we had to bring them up to speed on our grain-free, no-added-sugar lifestyle. They were interested and energetic, whipping up almond flour-based chocolate cake and other goodies for us, for instance. Beyond this, the food ship...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grains Wheat Belly cruise Source Type: blogs

What If You Had a Priceless Gift?
This holiday season we are all in search of the perfect gift. What is the one thing you truly desire? Don’t you think we all want it? What if you were handed a beautifully wrapped box containing a miraculous tool that caused dramatic weight loss without limiting calories or requiring exercise? What if this gift reduced appetite, shrunk belly fat, dropped your dress size into the single digits, and accomplished all of this while sparing you from a Biggest Loser sob fest? What if that same gift freed you from acid reflux, heartburn, bowel urgency, and diarrhea, but also improved mood, increased energy, deepened sleep, ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Dr. Davis Priceless Gift Weight loss Wheat allergy Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat Watch Wheat-Free Lifestyle Detox diabetes gluten gluten-free grain grains Source Type: blogs

The best gift of all
This holiday season we are all in search of the perfect gift. What is the one thing you truly desire for yourself and your family? Don’t you think we all want it? What if you were handed a beautifully wrapped box containing a miraculous tool that caused dramatic weight loss without limiting calories or requiring exercise? What if this gift reduced appetite, shrunk belly fat, dropped your dress size into the single digits, and accomplished all of this while sparing you from a Biggest Loser sob fest? What if that same gift freed you from acid reflux, heartburn, bowel urgency, and diarrhea, but also improved mood, incre...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Dr. Davis Priceless Gift Weight loss Wheat allergy Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat Watch Wheat-Free Lifestyle Detox diabetes gluten gluten-free grain grains Source Type: blogs

Breaking Down The Final 2018 Letter To Issuers
Editor’s note: The final 2018 Letter To Issuers In The Federally Facilitated Maketplaces, discussed below, was issued in conjunction with the final 2018 Benefit and Payment Parameters rule, discussed here and here. On December 16, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released its final 2018 Letter to Issuers in the Federally Facilitated Marketplaces (FFM). CMS releases a letter each year to insurers that offer coverage through the FFM or through state-based marketplaces that use the Healthcare.gov platform (SBM-FP), laying out the ground ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 19, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Source Type: blogs

Angiotensin Receptor Autoimmunity Correlates with Age-Related Frailty and Hypertension
Autoimmunity is the name given to a very large class of conditions in which the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own cells and machinery. Each different inappropriate target produces a different autoimmune condition, ranging from demyelination diseases like multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks processes and molecules necessary for maintenance of the sheath of myelin that coats nerves, to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, in which the most obvious damage occurs at the joints. In between lie autoimmune conditions for near every important aspect of our biochemistry. While i...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

An Important Step Forward Towards a Vaccine for Periodontal Disease
The various types of gum disease and periodontal conditions create insidious forms of damage, caused by the presence of unwanted but very persistent species of bacteria found in the mouth. Most people suffer inflammation of the gums to some degree, and this is due to the activities of bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. While it is true that there are a large number of ways to remove the bacterial species found in the mouth, the challenge is that they always return, and do so very quickly, often within days. This is obviously important from the point of view of the quality of your teeth over the long term, but argua...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 6, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Common Sense on Aging and the Role of Medicine
Ronald Bailey, who has written on and off on the topic of longevity science for about as long as I've been paying attention to the subject myself, here outlines a common sense view of aging and its treatment as a medical condition. That more people are stepping up to make reasoned arguments along these lines is a sign of progress. At the large scale and over the long term, the research that is carried out is that which is supported and understood, at least in outline, by the public at large. Lines of research that aim to control the causes of aging and thereby prevent and cure all age-related disease is not yet widely supp...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 5, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Keep Holiday Expectations Realistic and Make Adjustments Where You Can
Dear Carol: Last year Christmas was a mess and I’m determined to make this year better. Dad had a stroke two years ago and uses a wheelchair and mom has rheumatoid arthritis and uses a walker, so they both need a place with easy access. That would be my house. Both of my brothers, their wives, and their children join us. Along with our kids, the total of children is five. They are good kids but noisy which bothers my dad. Also, my brothers have opposing political views so I’m praying they don’t get into politics. To make things even more complicated, Mom is super judgmental and finds something to com...
Source: Minding Our Elders - December 3, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Pre and Post Cancer
There is a picture of me around here from back when we were dating. My then boyfriend-now-husband asked me for a framed photo for an occasion birthday/Christmas done by a professional photographer. So I went to a local studio and had a picture done where I look young and healthy. The picture has been some place packed away for a while but now is featured prominently in his office, also know as our second bedroom.As I walk by that picture these days, more frequently now considering where it is now positioned, I contemplate, me post cancer. In the picture I have long hair with natural blonde highlights. I was a goodthirty fo...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 27, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aging coping happiness marriage medical crap pictures Source Type: blogs

Anti-inflammatory medications and the risk for cardiovascular disease: A new study, a new perspective
This study only included people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. The results might be different if people with other conditions had been included. Other medical problems. The risks and benefits of celecoxib in people with other medical problems (such as significant kidney disease) are uncertain because this study excluded them. Other medical treatments. All patients in this study took a medication to protect the stomach; outside of studies, that’s not always the case. While these issues are valid, I think this study does provide a significant measure of reassurance regarding the cardiovascular risks of c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

The BIDMC CareKit app
The following is a guest blog post from Seth Berkowitz, MD, who authors many of the innovative apps in the BIDMC Crowdsourcing program:Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, has developed BIDMC@home, a new app for engaging patients using Apple ’s CareKit and ResearchKit frameworks and the HealthKit API. The app provides a flexible framework to help patients manage their health from home, as directed by their physicians. The app will be piloted in several specific patient populations and will eventually be offered to BIDMC’s entire net work of over 250,000 patients.B...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - November 23, 2016 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Why We NEVER “ Cheat ” On the Wheat Belly Lifestyle?
I’ve heard this many times over the years: “I allow myself one cheat day a week.” Or “I allow myself a cheat every Friday night.” Or “I have a couple of slices of pizza every Saturday.” Or the comments from naysayers such as “A little bit can’t hurt” or “Everything in moderation.” I urge everyone to never cheat. On the Wheat Belly Lifestyle. – Tweet this! It’s not because I’m a control freak or because I like to make arbitrary rules. There are many reasons to never allow yourself such a cheat. This has nothing to do with the few calor...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Why We NEVER “ Cheat ” On the Wheat Belly Lifestyle
I’ve heard this many times over the years: “I allow myself one cheat day a week.” Or “I allow myself a cheat every Friday night.” Or “I have a couple of slices of pizza every Saturday.” Or the comments from naysayers such as “A little bit can’t hurt” or “Everything in moderation.” I urge everyone to never cheat on the Wheat Belly Lifestyle. – Tweet this! It’s not because I’m a control freak or because I like to make arbitrary rules. There are many reasons to never allow yourself such a cheat. This has nothing to do with the few calori...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Diabetes Dr. Davis Grain Free Lifestyle Grains Inflammation News & Updates Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat-Free Lifestyle Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The Role of the Clinical Lab in Immunogenicity Testing for anti-TNF
The use ofanti-TNF biologicals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been a major therapeutic advance. A recent article about testing for drug immunogenicity in these patients by a national reference lab,ARUP, was intriguing (see:Dancing Through the Pain: Advancements in Immunogenicity Testing Deliver Relief to Patients with Autoimmune Diseases). Below is an excerpt from it:To manage the overproduction of TNF seen in rheumatoid arthritis, patients are prescribed TNF blockers, medications that suppress the response to TNF and decrease inflammation. What happens is the body starts seeing the medication ...
Source: Lab Soft News - November 16, 2016 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Lab Processes and Procedures Laboratory Industry Trends Medical Consumerism Medical Research Pharmaceutical Industry Source Type: blogs

Pain Management
There is a lot of information on pain management. I even have a pain management doctor. But what constitutes pain management? I have several prescriptions for pain management - patches, pills, etc. I go to the gym and exercise to help control my pain. I do regular stretching and exercises for pain management.As you can see, pain management is not just about medication and injections. I want more than that. But I am not sure my doctor understands that. If I go to my pain management doctor and tell him my pain is acting up, he always tells me the same things:Don't sit around, get up and move.Here's more medication.He never s...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: medical tests MRI over treatment uncertainty with doctors Source Type: blogs

Are You Consuming Enough Omega-3 Fatty Acids?
Infrequent consumption of seafood, aversion to organ meats, and over-reliance on processed omega-6 oils in foods have led to deficient levels of omega-3 fatty acids in most people today. The seeds of grasses, with all their absorption-blocking and inflammatory effects just add to the problem. Once grains are removed, omega-3 fatty acid absorption may improve. – Tweet this! Intake typically remains low for most people and supplementation is necessary to achieve healthy blood levels. The omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil accelerate the clearance of fatty acids from the bloodstream and keep levels lower. Cholester...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 8, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Dr. Davis News & Updates Nutritional deficiencies Nutritional supplements Omega-3 Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Success Stories gluten Weight Loss Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

FDA Open to Biomarker Comments
FDA has announced the opening of a docket for interested parties to submit suggestions, recommendations, and comments on a proposed list of biomarkers that were used as outcomes to develop FDA-approved new molecular entities and new biological therapeutics from October 2007 to December 2015. The submissions from interested parties will help FDA determine the utility of the list and may assist FDA in developing databases on biomarkers for drug development. The 60-day window for submitting comments will close on November 18, 2016. The submissions can be either public or confidential. Specifically, FDA welcomes comments rega...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 3, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

That Breast Cancer Bond Thingy
While I was at the gym yesterday, I was on the bike getting my cardio in when I two women who I know started talking next to me. Then one of them came over to said hi. I knew she had a lot of cardiac issues last spring and I asked her how she was doing. She said she is better now but still had some soreness on the side of her rib cage. That didn't seem like a cardio issue so I asked her what it was.She had a mastectomy because she had her third occurrence of breast cancer. Twice on the left and this third time on the right. And all three were different cancers. I thought wow three different breast cancers and now two separ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 13, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer bonds pinkification Source Type: blogs

So What Does RA Feel Like?
There is a big difference between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the kind from overuse that causes your knee/elbow/hand to hurt when you over use it, or maybe even when you aren't using it. Rheumatoid arthritis is systemic and starts with your little joints - like your feet and hands. The joints become achy and bulge and more.Thisarticle explains better than anything else I have seen on what RA really feels like:Like the fatigue and exhaustion after climbing a mountain or running a marathon.Like the aches and pains after a significant fall or being in a car accident.Like the full body aches and ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: pain rheumatoid arthritis stress Source Type: blogs