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When it comes to consumer choice, more is not always better
Mark Letterman’s rheumatoid arthritis had been progressing unrelentingly despite popping dozens of pills each week — eight methotrexate pills on Mondays alone. Letterman felt like he was 63 going on 93. If rheumatoid arthritis progresses unchecked, it is as debilitating of a disease as can be imagined. Don’t think garden variety arthritis that only interferes with activities like, um, gardening. Think: finger and wrist joints so inflamed it feels like your hands have suffered a heat stroke from the inside out. Imagine: the joints of your toes so damaged you have to purchase shoes at a medical supply store...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Public Health & Rheumatology Washington Watch Source Type: blogs

Nitric Oxide Absorbing Hydrogel Releases Drugs to Fight Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other Diseases
At the Institute for Basic Science in Daejeon, South Korea, scientists have developed a hydrogel that responds to the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and releases drugs when so activated. This kind of drug delivery system may be particularly effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis, as immune cells within inflamed joints release toxic NO in large quantities. Injecting a gel that actively responds to inflammation, absorbs NO, and immediately delivers anti-inflammatories or other drugs may allow for automatic long-term control of inflamed joints. The same applies to many other diseases and conditions involving inflamma...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Women and pain: Disparities in experience and treatment
In August, The New York Times published a guest op-ed by a man named David Roberts who suffered from severe chronic pain for many years before finally finding relief. The piece immediately went viral, with distinguished news journalist and personality Dan Rather posting it to his Facebook page with the addendum that it could “offer hope” to some pain patients. However, for many of us in the chronic pain community, particularly women, the piece was regarded with weariness and frustration. The first and most prominent source of annoyance for me regarding this piece was the part when the author finally discloses h...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Behavioral Health Pain Management Women's Health Source Type: blogs

More on US Healthcare Prices
In a recent post,  I showed two drugs that were much more expensive in the United States than elsewhere. One was  for rheumatoid arthritis and the other for hepatitis C. Today we get to look at a cancer drug, Avastin, … Continue reading → The post More on US Healthcare Prices appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 5, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care cancer healthcare costs Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What Confusion about Health Insurance Looks Like in the Doctor ’s Office
Shutterstock Mark Letterman’s rheumatoid arthritis had been progressing unrelentingly despite popping dozens of pills each week – eight methotrexate pills on Mondays alone. Letterman felt like he was 63 going on 93. If rheumatoid arthritis progresses unchecked, it is as … Continue reading → The post What Confusion about Health Insurance Looks Like in the Doctor’s Office appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 29, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care health policy healthcare cost Medicare Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Well, Crapola!
A few weeks ago, I posted about whatmy pain medication may hide, yesterday I found the truth. Call me slow about some things but I had to do some thinking.I have RA, fibromyalgia, bad back, etc - all sorts of nice things that cause pain. So I get the good drugs. I have this awesome pain patch that masks 99% of it. It wasn't until I was an idiot a few weeks ago and forgot to change my pain patch I had no idea how much pain.The thinking process I had to go through was what was all that pain from and why is it important? I know several people that have RA as well, my mother and an old friend. Both of them are on injected biol...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggressive ailments arthritis treatment medical crap rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

What Does That Symptom Mean?
Right now I am contemplating the additional pain I have been having in my fingers/hands and toes/feet recently. I do not expect I have hand/foot cancer but that my rheumatoid is doing funny things. I am not researching online, I am going to send my doctor a message. That is the mature adult thing to do.Normal people think that headache or scratchy throat is nothing. But to cancer people a headache is a brain tumor and a sore throat is esophageal cancer. Along with your cancer diagnosis you learn that Dr Google and Wikipedia are not your friends for medical information.But with cancer, every little symptom gets a new m...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: google rheumatoid arthritis symptoms Source Type: blogs

Learning more about yourself could help you better understand others
The intervention used in this research was based on the Internal Family Systems model that sees an individual’s personality as made up of different sub-personalities By guest blogger Marianne Cezza As social creatures, accurately recognising and understanding the mental states of others (their intentions, knowledge, beliefs, etc.) is crucial to our social bonds and interactions. In fact, in today’s multi-cultural world and strongly divided political climate, this skill – known as Theory of Mind – is perhaps more important than ever. A recent study published in the Journal of Cognitive Enhanceme...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion guest blogger Personality Social Source Type: blogs

How Did I Get So Lucky?
Somehow I got the'lucky'card in the health department. Somewhere in my genes I ended up with the crapshoot of everything. I do know I have my mother's bad back and Rheumatoid Arthritis but I also got my father's hair (which is still not completely gray at 89). But the rest of it, I have no idea.So I always look for hints of how I could have gotten these lovely ailments. Then find an article that asks 'Can Trauma Cause Fibromyalgia?' But I am not so sure I understand how it would help me. They list:" The traumatic experiences that are usually correlated with fibromyalgia are the following:Certain types of viruses ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation ailments frustration Source Type: blogs

Fish consumption and rheumatoid arthritis: Natural remedy or just another fish tale?
In this study, researchers analyzed data from 176 people with rheumatoid arthritis, comparing their reported intake of non-fried fish with the results of their joint examinations and blood tests. Here’s what they found: Those with the highest fish consumption (more than two servings per week) had the best control of their arthritis. There was a “dose effect.” For minimal, low, or high fish consumption, the higher the intake, the better the arthritis. The findings were noted even after accounting for other factors that might affect arthritis control, such as duration of disease and fish oil supplement use...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

How Should I Prepare My Family for Grandpa Moving in?
Decades ago, having Grandma come to live with the younger generations was fairly common, and it often worked well. It did for my family. When my brother and I were teenagers and our little sister a toddler, our grandmother can to live with us. Grandma was crippled by rheumatoid arthritis and could no longer live alone. My parents built a house that would accommodate the different generations, with some privacy for all, and Grandma came to live with us. The home wasn't huge by today's standards, but it was nice and well designed for our needs. The arrangement worked. Read more on Agingcare about preparing your family f...
Source: Minding Our Elders - August 26, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Ailments and Their Add-ons
You get one ailment, and it always seems to bring along its'friends'. A few examples are cancer with chemotherapy causes digestive issuesand temporary baldness. It can sometimes also cause long term cardiac issues - which can eventually kill you. With rheumatoid arthritis you can get things like Sjogren's Syndrome which causes dry eyes and other fun things. Afew examples are:" ... [RA]inflammation can result in conditions affecting skin, heart, lung, eyes, mental health, etc. Conditions likeosteoporosis, cataracts,depression, cancers, etc. are more common. And add to that infection based conditions like influenza, pne...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments being a patient comorbidities Source Type: blogs

Knee pain – and central sensitisation
Conclusion People living with OA in their knees often spend many years having difficulty managing their pain before they are able to have surgery. From recent research in New Zealand, I don’t think many people are offered a pain “education” approach, and indeed, I’d bet there are a lot of people who don’t get referred for movement-based therapy either. Misunderstanding is rife in OA, with some people uncertain of the difference between osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and others very worried that they’re going to “wear the joint out” if they exercise. While OA isn&rsq...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 20, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Assessment Pain Pain conditions Research biopsychosocial Clinical reasoning disability function healthcare rehabilitation science treatment Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 201
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 201, courtesy of Dr Hakan Yaman from RFDS. Question 1 What is the rate of severe permanent TBI in the Asterix comics, 0%, 25%, 50% or 90%? http://www.asterix.com/the-collection/albums/asterix-and-the-picts.html + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer exp...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five asterix CRP Death dying Felty's syndrome fingernail GCS head injury hospital Pain pencil RA rheumatoid arthritis TBI Source Type: blogs

Nima testing for cross-contamination: “ Gluten-free ” is not always gluten-free
When a restaurant labels a dish “gluten-free,” can you count on that being true? Sometimes you can. If they have a segregated area of the kitchen with separate cooking utensils, separate preparation and cooking surfaces, as well as ingredients that are gluten-free, then you can have pretty good confidence that the dish you order is safe. But if there is no such segregation you can never be entirely certain even if the food is not breaded, does not contain breadcrumbs, or is not served on wheat or rye bread. For some people, this can be a real problem. So I brought my Nima device along with me to a local pub/res...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 8, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle celiac Dr. Davis gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation nima Source Type: blogs

Executive Functions in Health and Disease: New book to help integrate Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychology
__________ Neuroscience used to be the monopoly of a few elite universities located in a handful of countries. Neuropsychology used to be a quaint niche discipline relatively unconnected to the larger world of neuroscience and content in its methods with paper-and-pencil tests. Neuroscience itself was relatively unconcerned with higher-order cognition, and the very term “cognitive neuroscience” was often met with rolled eyes by scientists working in more established areas of brain research (a personal observation made in the 1980s and even 1990s on more than one occasion). And the ...
Source: SharpBrains - August 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Professional Development Alexander-Luria clinical psychologists cognition cognitive-psychologists disease Executive-Functions frontal-lobe medical neurologists neuropsychologists Neuropsyc Source Type: blogs

FDA Issues Two Proposed Studies on Disclosures for Advertising
Last month, the FDA issued two proposed studies on disclosures for advertising: one for general advertising and another for oncology advertising. Both studies have comment periods that end on August 18, 2017. For both proposals, FDA invites comments on these topics: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of FDA's functions, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) the accuracy of FDA's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) ways to enhance the quality,...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 8, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 31st 2017
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A View of the Immunology of Age-Related Disease
In this open access paper, the authors present their view of the role of the immune system in age-related disease. Chronic inflammation is the primary focus of many considerations of immune aging, but there are arguably many other areas of disarray and dysfunction in the aging immune system that are just as relevant to the progression of age-related disease. Like other researchers, the authors here divide the complexity of immune aging into two broad categories: inflammaging, changes that increase chronic inflammation and inappropriate immune activation, and immunosenescence, changes that weaken the efforts of immune cells...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Nima for do-it-yourself gluten testing
The people who developed the at-home personal gluten testing device, Nima, recently sent me one of their devices to test. I shall therefore be putting this device to work in coming weeks and posting the results here. Here is the device with one of the single-use capsules for testing: The first meal I tested was a Shrimp, Crab, Avocado & Mango Stack ordered at The Chart House in Boston, where my son and I were visiting my sister. My son’s girlfriend, Liz, is an exquisitely sensitive 23-year old with celiac disease and she needs to be vigilant for any cross-contamination at all. (I once served my son and Liz a mea...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 16, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune celiac disease Dr. Davis gluten grains Inflammation joint pain Source Type: blogs

Undoctored: Health Should Be (Almost) Free
Follow the current debate on “healthcare reform”–which has NOTHING to do with healthcare reform, but healthcare insurance reform, by the way–and you will hear comments about the escalating and uncontrolled cost of healthcare and how people need access to it. What you will NOT hear is that fact that, because the healthcare system fails to deliver genuine health, real health is actually quite easy, straightforward, and inexpensive–nearly free. We achieve a life of being Undoctored, not becoming a profit source for the healthcare industry, not being subjected to the predatory practices of Big P...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 13, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux anti-aging autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Dr. Davis energy Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains health healthcare Inflammation joint pain low-carb Source Type: blogs

FDA Drug Approvals on an Uptick
Already in 2017, the FDA has approved a number of new drugs, which Regulatory Focus points out as a trend away from the low number of new drugs approved in 2016. They caution, however, it is unlikely to match the approval highs from 2014 and 2015. The pace for 2017 may not continue at this level and we could see an average, or perhaps slightly above average year for approvals. 2017 vs. Past It has been reported that coming into 2017, the environment was looking better for approvals. According to the FDA’s Office of New Drugs, 36 new molecular entity NDAs were received by FDA through mid-December 2016, already beati...
Source: Policy and Medicine - July 13, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

A Pill to Replace Needles: Interview with Mir Imran, Chairman and CEO of Rani Therapeutics
Operating within InCube Labs, a multi-disciplinary life sciences R&D lab based in Silicon Valley, Rani Therapeutics is developing a novel approach for the oral delivery of large-molecule drugs such as basal insulin, which is currently delivered via injections. By replacing painful injections with a painless, easy-to-take pill, the technology has the potential to drastically improve the lives of millions of patients suffering from diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and many other chronic conditions. The idea is that the pill allows biological drugs, such as proteins, that would otherwise b...
Source: Medgadget - July 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Oncology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Needle-Free Viscous Drug Injections: Interview with CEO of Portal Instruments
High viscosity biologic drugs generally require syringe injections, but many patients are extremely uncomfortable around long needles and injection times can create a great deal of anxiety. Portal Instruments, a company out of Cambridge, Massachusetts, has developed a nearly automatic needle-free injector that reminds us of something doctors in science fiction movies would use. We spoke with Patrick Anquetil, CEO of Portal Instruments to find out exactly how a viscous liquid can be made to enter the body without a needle, what this means for the treatment of different diseases, and what additional features the company...
Source: Medgadget - June 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

How important is Vitamin D?
FACT: A vitamin D deficiency may result in as much as a 50 percent increased potential for diabetes. FACT: A vitamin D deficiency puts you at a higher risk for cancer, especially breast, prostate, colon, ovarian, and melanoma. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY is a widespread phenomenon with significant implications for health. In modern society vitamin D deficiency is the rule, rather than the exception. While we can blame more severe cases of deficiency on grains, it also commonly occurs independent of grain consumption. The restoration of vitamin D levels is second only to grain elimination when considering the most powerful healthy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 13, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Cancer Depression Diabetes News & Updates Undoctored Vitamin D Weight loss Source Type: blogs

Unprecedented range of therapeutic options for rheumatic diseases is now available — challenge is to make them accessible
From The Lancet:Small molecule inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK)Much of the recent knowledge of the underlying mechanisms that drive rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases has come from preclinical studies of key cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and granulocyte –macrophage colony-stimulating factor. New Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors include tofacitinib and baricitinib which are approved for treatment of arthritis and other rheumatoid diseases.Aggressive treatment, earlyFor a complex, progressive, chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, the timing of intervention is critical...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - June 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Finding Support Resources
In my personal experience the most important thing to do after a'yucky'diagnosis (after going to the doctor and taking your meds) is to find support resources. I keep saying that the emotional part of you is just as important of the physical side of you and this is yet another example.First I would ask your doctor for information and then look at the source of the information they give you. For example, at my breast cancer diagnosis I was given a folder of information with resources - including a flyer from the American Cancer Society, and one from a local support organization. Two good places to start. But I was also told...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer resources cancer support emotional toll emotions support group Source Type: blogs

Exercise versus caffeine: Which is your best ally to fight fatigue?
Chronic lack of sleep makes it hard to focus on a task. As if this didn’t make complete logical sense, multiple research studies have shown that sleep deprivation has about the same effect on our cognition and coordination as a few alcoholic beverages. What do you do when you need to concentrate, but you’re tired? Many of us reach for a cup of coffee, or a soda. Mountains of solid research have shown us that caffeine (in doses ranging between 30 and 300 milligrams) improves attention, alertness, reaction time, and mood, especially when we’re tired. An average cup of brewed coffee contains between 80 and 1...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Exercise and Fitness Source Type: blogs

Diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis with a Blood Test: Interview with IQuity CEO, Dr. Chase Spurlock
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that afflicts an approximate 2.5 million patients world-wide, giving rise to multiple issues regarding quality of life and the potential for disability. Up to 15,000 people are newly diagnosed with MS every year in the US, while another 45,000 experience a clinical precursor with similar symptoms. Distinguishing between MS and other possible neurological conditions typically requires multiple brain MRIs and cerebrospinal fluid testing, which are costly and take a long time. Fortunately, the diagnostic technology company IQuity (pronounced I-Q-witty) has been working to ...
Source: Medgadget - June 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Genetics Neurology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Once Upon A Time, I Was A Healthy Person
I have many friends who, after cancer, get back to their old lives for the most part. I'm not talking about that'new normal'bull, but just doing normal things like going back to work, taking part in all their family activities and all sorts of regular, every day life things.Me, I did not get to go back to my regular life after breast cancer. My body had other plans for me. It decided it was time to fall apart.After breast cancer, I got gall stones and had my gallbladder out six months after radiation ended. That winter I slipped on the ice, landed on my left hand and started all my lymphedema crap.The following fall my bac...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 31, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments being healthy being me Source Type: blogs

MIT Scientists Develop Microfluidic Device to Screen Biologics for Quality During Production
Biologics, which are drugs made of biochemical compounds produced by living organisms, are becoming more common to treat a variety of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, chronic plaque psoriasis, and breast cancer. They’re usually proteins that are immensely easier to produce by plant or animal cells than synthesizing them from scratch in a complex chemical process. Yet, the same difference in manufacturing is a reason for the difficulty of maintaining quality control of such drugs: synthesizing allows for purity of production, but letting nature do it can lead to imperfect results. Researchers at MIT ha...
Source: Medgadget - May 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Source Type: blogs

Over-the-counter pain relievers and your heart
Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like naproxen are and have been the go-to “benign” pain medication for doctors and patients alike. Why? They aren’t addictive, and it’s not easy to overdose. Serious side effects like gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeding seemed to be limited to high doses taken for longer periods or time, or to people with significant medical problems. Even before the era of the opioid epidemic, it was raining NSAIDs, across the country. In 2004, the manufacturer of the NSAID Vioxx pulled it from the market because the drug was associated with serious...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Heart Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Medicare ’s Bundled Payment Programs Suffer From Fatal Flaws, But There Is A Logical Alternative
Several authors from the Brookings Institution recently argued in favor of making Medicare’s Bundled Payment for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative mandatory. While the principles guiding their recommendations are sound, the recommendations themselves fail to acknowledge five fatal methodological flaws within the BPCI program. Their analysis also overlooks the most logical and reasonable alternative: a physician-focused episode-of-care payment model. Five Fatal Flaws Of The BPCI Initiative 1. Hospital-Centricity Each BPCI bundle is triggered by an inpatient stay and in particular by a specific diagnosis-related group...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 9, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: François de Brantes Tags: Costs and Spending Insurance and Coverage Medicare Payment Policy Alternative Payment Models Bundled Payment for Care Improvement initiative Bundled Payments Merit-Based Incentive Payment System Physician-Focused Payment Model Technical Ad Source Type: blogs

Making A Prohibition On Preexisting Condition Exclusions Effective Requires Additional Measures
One of the most popular components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the prohibition on preexisting condition exclusions, eliminating the practice in which insurers exclude coverage for health problems that people had prior to enrolling in an insurance plan. People do not like the idea that an insurer does not have to pay for care that people need due to a previously known health problem. But prohibitions on preexisting condition exclusions alone are insufficient to protect those with health problems and ensure their affordable access to necessary care. Meaningful protections require a package of policies: guaranteed iss...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 2, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Linda Blumberg and John Holahan Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Quality ACA repeal and replace American Health Care Act community rating Essential Health Benefits preexisting conditions Source Type: blogs

Finding Good Medical Resources
This always amazes me. People get diagnosed with a medical ailment and then don't use the good medical resources available. If you need medical information, you need to do a little research to find the resources.A good patient takes time to learn about any significant medical ailment so they better understand their health. If you are educated you will be less stressed and potentially handle your ailment better. You really do not want to just jump on the internet and google your ailment. That is the worst thing to do.A good first step is to ask your doctor who diagnosed you on where you can get good information. Its their f...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments medical research stress Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 1st 2017
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Am I or Will I Get Better?
I get asked often, am I getting better? Have any of my doctors found a miraculous treatment for me?The answers are and always will be a big fat'no'.There are different kinds of ailments out there. They are (in my non medical terminology):Acute - an ailment which happens and gets better. Think a cut, the flu, appendicitis, Lyme disease.Chronic - an ailment which occurs and lasts and lasts and lasts. Think things like arthritis, fibromyalgia, degenerating disks, etc.Terminal - an ailment which will kill you. "Terminal illnesses or infections are consideredincurable when there are no conservative therapies available whic...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - April 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments chronic conditions medical treatment pain management Source Type: blogs

Osteoarthritis as an Inflammatory Condition
This open access paper discusses current views on the degree to which osteoarthritis is driven by inflammation, as is the case for many other age-related diseases. With aging the immune system declines into a malfunctioning state of chronic inflammation, ever more active while also ever less effective at the tasks of destroying pathogens and errant cells. In young people, inflammation in short bursts is a necessary part of the immune response, but in the old it becomes a consistent destructive process, gnawing away at the proper function of organs and systems in the body and brain. Addressing this in some way, perhaps thro...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A New Attempt Emerges To Bridge GOP Divisions On AHCA (Updated)
April 21 Update: New Aid For State Formulary Review At REGTAP On April 17, 2017, CMS announced that it would be turning the job of drug formulary review for qualified health plans over to state regulators in the thirteen HealthCare.gov states that have plan management responsibility.  On April 19, CMS offered at its REGTAP.info website (registration required) a seminar on the qualified health plan (QHP) application review tools for prescription drugs that the states may use for these reviews. The EHB Category and Class Drug Count Tool, which is new for the 2018 QHP review period, reviews drug lists to ensure that QHPs...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 20, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Challenges Of Outcomes-Based Contracting For Pharmaceuticals: Early Lessons From The Genentech – Priority Health Pilot
Conclusion Outcomes-based agreements are a natural extension of a health care delivery-and-reimbursement environment that is moving toward value. With provider organizations taking increasing accountability for both costs and outcomes, it is becoming incumbent upon manufacturers to demonstrate the economic, clinical, and quality-of-life benefits of their medicines. The pilot described here was successful in that Genentech and Priority Health both learned how to overcome clinical, operational, and contractual challenges and demonstrated that this type of agreement is feasible. Genentech and Priority Health believe pilots li...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: John Fox and Marc Watrous Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Payment Policy Outcomes-based agreements Source Type: blogs

ICER Devalues People With Rheumatoid Arthritis
(Source: drugwonks.com Blog)
Source: drugwonks.com Blog - March 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: blogs

I Am Rebelling
Sometimes I need to let my inner rebel out and stop being such a good patient. I usually try to be a good patient (and go to my appointments, take my meds as prescribed, talk to my doctors honestly and generally do what they want me to). But not right now.Last fall I was told I have sleep apnea and my doctors want me to have a CPAP machine for sleeping. I got my CPAP machine and hate it. I can't stand having anything on my face while I sleep. I am on my second mask and still cannot deal with it. I wake up and want to rip it off my face. If I sleep with the mask on, I don't ever feel rested and have the weirdest dreams.I we...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: apnea CPAP lack of sleep rebelling Source Type: blogs

Things Are Not Working As Planned
Sometimes, things just don't go as you wanted or expected. Its a fact of life and we need to learn to cope, change directions, and move on.In the grand scheme of things, my original plans were that would I grow up, go to college, get a job, a career, married, kids, retire to a life of happiness and world travel. Well, we know what happened to that. I got as far as'go to college'when my health started taking over my life. One little cancer diagnosis has a big emotional impact and it took time to get my life back together.So I regrouped and started over at college, etc. The job and career went okay. I did eventually got marr...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being healthy housebound life new house Source Type: blogs

Study Links Multiple Sclerosis to Dementia Risk
It’s MS Awareness Week in the United States — the time of year that the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and people living with MS try to spread awareness of this disease. For the past several years, I’ve determined to spend this week educating people who live with MS about the disease they have. For past MS awareness weeks, I’ve written pieces on MS history and about the first recorded cases of MS. Today I write about research suggesting what might be in some of our futures. It’s not a happy topic, but I believe that forewarned is forearmed. A recent study pub...
Source: Life with MS - March 7, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Trevis Gleason Tags: multiple sclerosis awareness life with MS Living with MS MS and family MS symptoms trevis gleason Source Type: blogs

Invisible High-Risk Pools: How Congress Can Lower Premiums And Deal With Pre-Existing Conditions
As Congress and the Trump administration move forward with plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), they are looking for proven state-led reforms that maintain access for those with pre-existing conditions in the current exchange market while also lowering premiums for everyone buying insurance in the individual market. Maine faced similar challenges in 2011 as it sought to unwind failed experiments that pushed its market into a long-term death spiral. But by creating an invisible high-risk pool and relaxing its premium rating bands, Maine policymakers were able to cut premiums in half while still guarant...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 2, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Joel Allumbaugh, Tarren Bragdon and Josh Archambault Tags: Following the ACA Health Policy Lab Insurance and Coverage ACA repeal and replace high-risk pools pre-existing conditions Source Type: blogs

Could Grains Cause Autoimmunity?
The prolamin proteins of grains— the gliadin of wheat, secalin of rye, hordein of barley, and zein of corn— initiate the small intestinal process that cause a perfect storm in our bodies. And they do so in more than one way. You could even argue that prolamin proteins are perfectly crafted to create autoimmunity. Prolamin proteins of grains are masters at molecular mimicry. The prolamin proteins have been found to trigger immune responses to a number of human proteins, including the synapsin protein of the nervous system; the transglutaminase enzyme found in the liver, muscle, brain, and other organs; the endom...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 1, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Autoimmunity Dr. Davis Grain Free Lifestyle Grains Grains and Grasses Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Success Stories Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat-Free Lifestyle Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Call me Ms. Grumpy
I am very grumpy these days. I think part of it is juggling my medical issues. But its also that I have been dealing with a lot of pain, and in new body parts. I am still on that never ending roller coaster of'wait its another doctor appointment'each week. Also, my stupid CPAP machine doesn't help me. I have given up even using it because the mask doesn't work for me.Last night I almost cancelled all my plans for today to stay home and pout. But I realize pouting never got anyone anything so I ditched that. I did get some good sleep last night which helps. And my reward today is getting my nails done this afternoon after I...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments crabbiness stress Source Type: blogs

I Need to Stop Reading Medical News
I usually like to read the latest medical news. Mostly because I have a lot of medical crap going on. I like to see what is going for advancements and research. I mean maybe some day someone will find the cure for me and all my ailments and I can go back to being a healthy person.But sometimes the news isn't what I want to hear and isn't very good. Liketoday." Fibromyalgia Worsens Function in RA " This is not what I wanted to hear. Also there is a higher prevalence of fibromyalgia in patients with RA. But there are treatment options for patients with both RA and fibromyalgia.But still, I don't like the part about...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fibromyalgia medical crap medical news rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

Breast Cancer Fake News
The'secret'breast cancer cure, that the pharmaceutical industry has known about and hidden from patients in an effort to make money, has been revealed and been approved by the FDA. Now you can just get an (side effect free) injection and are immunized from any potential cancer diagnosis. One lifetimeCures are also in the works for congestive heart failure, emphysema, Alzheimers, AML, MS, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. These should be approved by the FDA by the end of the year.As a result the world's population is now increasing at an exponential rate. NASA is developing new plans for colonies on Mars in the next d...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fake news wishful thinking Source Type: blogs