Madelung Disease
A 42-year-old Japanese man had a neck mass for 6 months that gradually grew in size. Similar masses appeared in the posterior part of bilateral auricles and upper arms. His medical history was only remarkable for alcoholic liver disease. He had been drinking 2 liters of beer per day for 20 years and smoking 20 cigarettes per day for 20 years. His medication and family history were unremarkable. Physical examination revealed symmetrical, soft, mobile masses on the neck and bilateral upper arms (Figure 1). (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Junsuke Tawara, Kosuke Ishizuka, Kei Enomoto, Masafumi Kamata, Kohta Katayama, Yuki Kaji, Yoshiyuki Ohira Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research

Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Nonagenarians Compared to Younger than 90 Year Old Patients
Given that life expectancy has improved, nonagenarians have become a significant proportion of world population. As aortic stenosis is primarily a disease of the elderly, the need for invasive cardiac approaches is expected to increase in people of extreme age. Herein, we compare the in-hospital adverse clinical outcomes and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures in nonagenarians to younger than 90 year old patients. (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Anthony Matta, Thibault Lhermusier, Fr éderic Bouisset, Francisco-Campelo Parada, Meyer ELBaz, Vanessa Nader, Stephanie Blanco, Jerome Roncalli, Didier Carrié Tags: Clinical Research Study Source Type: research

Statin use in hospitalized patients with COVID-19: A comprehensive analysis of the New York City Public Hospital System
Statins have been commonly used for primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. We hypothesized that statins may improve in-hospital outcomes for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 due to its known anti-inflammatory effects. (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Weijia Li, Saul Rios, Sanjana Nagraj, Adrija Hajra, Tinatin Saralidze, Dimitrios Varrias, Sheetal Vasundara Mathai, Marko Novakovic, Kenneth H. Hupart, Jeremy A. Miles, Adarsh Katamreddy, Leonidas Palaiodimos, Robert T. Faillace Source Type: research

Effect of Alirocumab on Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation After Acute Coronary Syndromes: Insights from the ODYSSEY OUTCOMES Randomized Trial
Proprotein convertase subtilisin –kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors promote substantial and sustained low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering and reduce cardiovascular events in high-risk patients treated with statins.1,2 The ODYSSEY OUTCOMES trial (NCT01663402) compared treatment with the PCSK9 inhibitor, alirocumab, with pla cebo in 18,924 patients with recent acute coronary syndromes and residual dyslipidemia despite high-intensity or maximum-tolerated statin therapy.1 (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Renato D. Lopes, Patr ícia O. Guimarães, Gregory G. Schwartz, Deepak L. Bhatt, Vera A. Bittner, Andrzej Budaj, Anthony J. Dalby, Rafael Diaz, Shaun G. Goodman, Robert A. Harrington, J. Wouter Jukema, Robert Gabor Kiss, Megan Loy, Robert Pordy, Yann Poul Tags: Brief Observation Source Type: research

Understanding Antiarrhythmic Drug Efficacy for the Clinical Practitioner: There is More than Meets the Eye
In theory, determining if a medication is effective should be easy. However, it is often complex. Nowhere is this truer than when using antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) for the therapy of atrial fibrillation, whose incidence and prevalence are increasing progressively.1-3 (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: James A. Reiffel, Gerald V. Naccarelli Source Type: research

Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Nonagenarians Compared to < 90 Years Patients
: Given that life expectancy has been improved, nonagenarians become a significant proportion of world population. As aortic stenosis is primarily a disease of the elderly, the need for invasive cardiac approaches is expected to increase in people of extreme age. Herein, we compare the in-hospital adverse clinical outcomes and mortality after Trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures in nonagenarians to (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Anthony Matta, Thibault Lhermusier, Fr éderic Bouisset, Francisco-Campelo Parada, Meyer ELBaz, Vanessa Nader, Stephanie Blanco, Jerome Roncalli, Didier Carrié Tags: Clinical Research Study Source Type: research

Oral histoplasmosis presenting as a solitary ulcer on tongue in an immunocompetent adult
Histoplasmosis or Darling's disease is caused by the opportunistic dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, ubiquitous in soil contaminated by bird or bat excreta. Humans get infected by inhaling spores of the organism. The organism mainly affects the aerodigestive tracts of susceptible individuals but it can also involve other organs and occur in disseminated and localised forms. Most cases have been associated with immunosuppression particularly in HIV infected individuals in whom disseminated disease is more common, but immunocompetent patients with underlying risk factors may develop histoplasmosis very rarely. (Source:...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Kaushiki Hajra, Uddalak Chakraborty, Kingshuk Chatterjee, Srinjani Mukherjee, Saswati Halder Tags: Clinical communication to the Editor Source Type: research

Madelung's disease
To the Editor: (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Junsuke Tawara, Kosuke Ishizuka, Kei Enomoto, Masafumi Kamata, Kohta Katayama, Yuki Kaji, Yoshiyuki Ohira Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research

Aquagenic wrinkling of the palms
A 47 ‐year‐old Japanese woman presented with blanching and whitening of both palms after bathing and washing dishes for the past 20 years. It is induced by immersion of hands in water for about 5 minutes. She did not report any pain or itching. Her medical history and medications were unremarkable. Physical examination revealed a temperature of 36.5°C, pulse rate of 74 beats/minute, blood pressure of 111/67 mmHg, and respiratory rate of 12 breaths/minute. A five-minute water immersion test induced wrinkling of the palms (Figure 1 and 2), which led to the diagnosis of aquagenic wrinkling of t he palms (AWP). (Source:...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mutsuka Kurihara, Kosuke Ishizuka, Masatomi Ikusaka Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research

Blood Pressure Trajectories and Outcomes for Veterans Presenting at VA Medical Centers with a Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack
Blood pressure control has been shown to reduce risk of vascular events and mortality after an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Yet, questions remain about effectiveness, timing, and targeted blood pressure reduction. (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 12, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Greg Arling, Anthony Perkins, Laura J. Myers, Jason J. Sico, Dawn M. Bravata Tags: Clinical Research Study Source Type: research

Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia due to Isolated Renal Granulomatous Disease
Macrophages in granulomas produce 1- α hydroxylase, which converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25OH-D).1 Hence, in granulomatous diseases, hypercalcemia is a common complication and is generally hypercalciuric.2,3 Here, we present a case of isolated renal granulomatous disease with hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 12, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Masayuki Tanemoto, Takahide Kimura Source Type: research

A Rare Case of Non-Acidotic High Anion Gap Pancreatic Ketonemia
To the Editor: (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 11, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Dana Rubenstein, Gregg A. Robbins-Welty, Margaret Sahu, Andrew Vista, Jenny Van Kirk Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research

Psychological Stress and Heart Disease: Fact or Folklore?
For at least a few centuries, if not millennia, psychological stress has been popularly believed to contribute to heart disease. Does psychological stress really contribute to heart disease? Are anecdotal, patient, and lay press reports that angina, heart attack, and even cardiac death are caused by stress based on fact, or are they just folklore? In this review, the study data supporting associations between stress and cardiovascular risk, as well as potential mechanisms by which psychological stress might contribute to heart disease and precipitate myocardial ischemia and infarction, is critically reviewed and summarized...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 8, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Glenn N. Levine Source Type: research

And to Survive, She Became a Shark
She presented to the hospital for feeling tired and with burning when she urinated, and she was found to have an increase in her creatinine. The patient was found to have a urinary tract infection and was started on IV antibiotics. As part of her initial workup, a resident in the emergency department performed a bedside renal ultrasound that revealed a mass along her left kidney. A formal ultrasound confirmed the findings. It was not clear from the ultrasound whether the mass was a cyst in her kidney or a structure adjacent to the kidney. (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 8, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michelle Izmaylov Tags: Personomics Source Type: research

Is massage a beneficial intervention?
I admit it! I love hands-on massage. I had my first massage when I was a teenager, and my family and I were spending a long weekend in a resort in the New York Catskill Mountains. After exercise that included jogging and swimming, I was taking a shower in the locker room when the masseur approached me and suggested that a massage after vigorous exercise would be a good idea. I had never had a massage before but decided “why not”. After a one-hour hand massage, I went up to our room and slept for an hour awakening with a huge sense of well-being. (Source: The American Journal of Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - March 6, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Joseph Alpert Source Type: research